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Seattle’s motorcycle clubs ride free (but socially distanced)

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Nick “Double Tap” Ziehe of Cretin Motorcycle Club stands for a portrait at the crew’s clubhouse in Seattle’s Interbay neighborhood, April 20, 2020.

by Agueda Pacheco Flores from https://crosscut.com

Coronavirus has scooter, moped and motorcycle enthusiasts rolling with caution.

Long before he was president of the Cretins Motorcycle Club, Nick Ziehe was just a kid growing up in Renton, fascinated by his dad doing a complete overhaul of a Honda CB350.

The bike was a vintage racer, but one his father heavily modified. Ziehe recalls his dad plopping him on the seat of this “odd” looking bike for short rides on backroads around Lake Washington. In high school, when his friends were getting their first cars, Ziehe got his first bike, which he rebuilt with his dad.

Today, Ziehe, 48, works at Boeing as a manufacturing engineer, and for the past five years has led the Ballard-based Cretins Motorcycle Club (aka Cretins MC Seattle), which he joined 10 years ago. Among members, Ziehe is known as “Double Tap.” The club’s preferred bikes are vintage cafe racers, with an aesthetic hearkening to 1960s London.

The glue that holds the Cretins together is the love of riding. Spring usually marks the beginning of the riding season, when members take group rides and share the feeling of the road rolling out under their feet. But this spring is different.

The global coronavirus pandemic put the group’s planned March 28 spring opener ride on hold. The annual Taco Dash (a fundraiser involving minibikes, silly games and homemade tacos) scheduled for May 2, is up in the air. And the customary, rain or shine, Thursday night dive bar meet-ups (Cretin Nights) have gone virtual, from vroom-vroom to Zoom.

Washington is home to an abundance of motorcycle, moped and scooter clubs. In addition to the Cretins there are dozens of groups, including Jewish riding club The Tribe, the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, Los Gatos Gordos and women-only riding groups. According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commision, as of last year there were 237,976 registered motorcycles (this includes mopeds and scooters) in Washington, accounting for 3% of all vehicles registered in the state. Additionally, there are 429,238 people licensed to drive motorcycles.

For many, the longer, warmer days of spring signal a return to the road. Bikers start rolling motorcycles out of garages, and groups convene for scenic rides along highways lined with pines and miles of ocean coast. But Gov. Jay Inslee did not include motorcycle rides on the list of acceptable public activities during the coronavirus stay-at-home order.

“It’s not legally prohibited, but it’s a terrible idea at the moment,” Mike Faulk, Inslee’s press secretary, says by email. “People should limit travel to limit exposure and transmission. This is a legitimate crisis. Adventure can wait.”

Despite the rebellious reputation of motorcycle riders, the Cretins aren’t rule breakers.

“The motorcycle thing is obviously kind of a sticking point for us because we can’t go and ride together,” Ziehe says. “At the same time it’s the human aspect…. I want to make sure that my buddy is good and everything is copacetic. But I can do that online.”

While group rides are off the table, for now, Ziehe and other members still go out for solo rides along desolate stretches of roads to avoid people and practice social distancing as much as they can. A bonus: With traffic significantly down, the roads are more wide open than ever.

“It’s easy for me to hit a backroad and just get lost,” says Ziehe, who now lives in Maple Valley. “Riding a motorcycle is so therapeutic — it’s not like driving a car.”

For bikers, going on rides offers a kind of solitude that people who are socially distancing might not be able to achieve while visiting a park and working hard to stay 6 feet away from the dozens of other people trying to grab their own bit of sunshine.

“You got the wind blowing across you, and you can relax and take everything in,” Ziehe says. “It’s a good way to de-stress from everything that’s going on around you.”

But some bikers are rebels with a cause.

Last week, Doug Davis, president of local Jewish motorcycle club, The Tribe, rode with a small caravan of eight people from Bellevue to Anacortes.

“The truth of the matter is because everybody is homebound and we have a lot of retired and semiretired people, we are riding much more,” says Davis, 66. “If you ask most of us what the number one thing they want to be doing, it’s usually going to be motorcycle riding. You’re out on the road — just you and nature.”

Not all members of The Tribe have chosen to go on rides. But a subgroup of the Bellevue-based posse of mostly 60-somethings have gone out at least twice a week for the past five weeks. And while the group of riders, who primarily own Harley Davidsons, are in an age group that’s considered more vulnerable to coronavirus, Davis says they’re doing everything they can to stay safe.

By Washington state law, motorcyclists are required to wear helmets, which can range from half helmets to full head coverage. Some helmets have face shields; riders in The Tribe who don’t have a face shield wear cloth face masks. (As is customary in biker culture, they also wear leather gloves.) They stay 6 feet apart while on their feet and when out on the road at upwards of 60 miles per hour, they keep two bike lengths between them.

And The Tribe isn’t the only local group that’s taking their chances on the newly empty roads.

Alex Sokolowski owns Magic Touch Mopeds, a full service garage in Seattle specifically for mopeds. He says his business currently has a steady influx of customers, but it’s not nearly as busy as it usually is around this time of year. And when customers do call in for an appointment, some get cold feet when the time comes to drop off their bike.

“We’ve definitely taken a hit because mopeds are generally a social thing,” Sokolowski explains. “Even if you don’t have any problems, the first thing you would want to do when you get your bike running is go visit the moped shop to show it off.”

Sokolowski is also the president of the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, which has 25 active members. As of now, official club business is indefinitely postponed. But some in the moped community, including Sokolowski, meet up for “social distance rides” on Sundays and “moped Mondays.”

“We’ll ride out and then disband at the end of the ride,” Sokolowski says. “Which is different from the way we usually do moped Monday.”

Because the moped’s engines are smaller than those in motorcycles, riders go for shorter distances. And especially now, they are avoiding winding roads.

“It’s obviously not the time you would want to have any sort of incident and visit the ER,” Sokolowski says. Additionally, he says, no one in the club who’s gone out for a ride has exhibited symptoms of the virus. (The CDC cautions that even asymptomatic people can spread the coronavirus.)

“Everybody that I know has been taking the quarantine pretty seriously, and has put a lot of thought into making the decision to go out and socially distance with our moped rides,” he says.

One event still in question is the annual “Mods and Rockers” ride, a June tradition that nods to the historic rivalry between Mods (scooter riders) and Rockers (motorcyclists). Legend has it the two subcultures battled it out on the beaches of Brighton, U.K., in 1964, in a fight that lasted two days. But these days the event is cause for friendly celebration of the two-wheeled lifestyle.

“The Cretins are great. I’ve partied with them many times,” Sokolowski says of the “rocker” club. “They’ve opened their clubhouse to us before and we’ve hosted parties there in the past.”

More than 80 riders on scooters, motorcycles and mopeds usually gather for Mods and Rockers — the mods starting their engines on one side of town, the rockers on the other. After meeting in the middle, the squads join forces and ride to a bar and afterparty.

Ziehe hopes the stay-at-home order isn’t extended into June, so that the Mods and Rockers can take to the road for the commemorative ride.

“We’re just holding out to make that decision to pull the plug on all of our events,” he says. “We’re not the only ones waiting and getting antsy.”

Regardless of the rules, Ziehe expects there will probably still be some riders who say, “I’m going to put on my leathers,” and do a solo ride on June 1 to honor the clash of cultures. But it isn’t the same.

“It’s such a group dynamic; that’s what makes it — that belonging,” Ziehe adds. “You’re never going to get the feeling [elsewhere] like when you’re actually at an event or riding with your fellow riders. You can’t replace it.”

Bikernet Bike Builder of the Month

By | General Posts

Cole Rogers from Cycle Fabrications in Lebanon, Ohio

By Bandit and Michael Lichter with photos by Michael Lichter

This is a kick-off piece. For years I attended every show in the country and met all the old and new builders. As my travel budget decreased and my desire to work in the shop and go to Bonneville increased, I missed out on some of the shows and the chance to meet new builders.

With the help of Michael Lichter, we are going to introduce Bikernet Readers to new, young, less well-known builders. The first one is Cole Rogers, from Lebanon, Ohio, who is 46 and has been building bikes since he was 15, when his brother scored a 1972 BSA A-70L for $300, 750 Lightening. There were only 201 built.

CLICK HERE TO READ THIS ARTICLE ON BIKERNET

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Classic motorcycle ridden by George Lazenby has emerged for sale for £30,000

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by Faith Ridler from https://www.dailymail.co.uk/

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service: Classic motorcycle ridden by George Lazenby to the set of his only James Bond film goes on sale for £30,000

  • George Lazenby bought BSA Rocket III in 1969 and rode it on 17-mile commute
  • He lived in Bayswater, London while filming On Her Majesty’s Secret Service
  • Mr Lazenby, now 80, sold his motorcycle after the release of the sixth Bond film

A classic motorcycle which George Lazenby used to ride to the set of his only James Bond film has emerged for sale for £30,000.

The actor bought the BSA Rocket III in 1969 and rode it on his 17-mile commute from Bayswater, London to Pinewood Studios near Slough, Berkshire during filming for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.

Mr Lazenby, now 80, went on to sell the motorcycle after the release of the sixth James Bond film later that year.

The Australian actor was the second to play the British secret service agent after Sean Connery in You Only Live Twice, who took on the role again in the 1971 film Diamonds Are Forever.

Little is known about what happened to the bike after it was sold by Mr Lazenby until it was bought by its current owner, a collector based in Kent, in 2007.

The unnamed vendor only discovered the machine was previously owned by the actor when he approached the BSA Owners Club, who revealed Mr Lazenby bought the motorcycle new in the 1960s.

The collector has now fully restored the bike, with an engine and gearbox rebuild, new chrome and a repaint.

During the restoration, a sidecar which had been installed after Mr Lazenby sold the bike was also removed.

It will now be sold by Charterhouse Auctions in Sherborne, Dorset – who say they are expecting a huge amount of interest from James Bond fans.

Richard Bromell, of Charterhouse, said: ‘Today the market for Bond films is bigger than ever, with many fans waiting patiently for the now postponed release of No Time To Die.

‘We all have our favourite Bond actor. Having watched from a young age, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service is one on my favourites.’

A spokesman for the auctioneers added: ‘Living in an apartment in Bayswater, Lazenby bought the bike to commute to Pinewood Studios for filming the new Bond film.

‘He was a keen motorcyclist and this was one of the very first new Rocket IIIs to be sold.

‘Not much is known about its history after Lazenby sold the bike until it was bought by our vendor 13 years ago – although at some point a sidecar was added.

‘The current owner is a collector of British motorcycles and purchased the Rocket with a view to restoring it to its former glory.

‘The BSA underwent a full program of restoration and was subject to an engine and gearbox rebuild, new chrome, and a repaint.

‘During the restoration the sidecar was discarded and it is now in great condition for the new owner.’

Whatever Happened to the Kawasaki J Shape-Shifting Electric Motorcycle?

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In the very near future, electric motorcycles will become just as common as electric cars. There are countless startups working on such projects, and even giant Harley-Davidson has joined the party with the launch of the LiveWire.

But there is one company that saw the potential of electric motorcycles years before all others. Back in 2013, at a time when electric cars were just beginning their ascension, Kawasaki introduced at the Tokyo Motor Show the J concept, a bike the likes of which the world had never seen before.

Half a decade before Yamaha introduced the strangely shaped Niken, Kawasaki envisioned a motorcycle with two front wheels and also the ability to shorten and rise itself to suit a particular riding style. Moreover, the motorcycle was designed to be powered by an electric powertrain, something few thought about back then.

The main trait of the motorcycle was that it could provide either a low riding position for high-speed motoring, or a more upright one just for cruising. It could do that by modifying the length and height of the wheelbase at a moment’s notice.

The bike lacked handlebars in the traditional sense, and they were replaced by two controllers, governing each of the two front wheels.

The concept looked fantastic, as you can see in the gallery above. It was of course too far fetched to actually spawn a production motorcycle anytime soon, but we would have expected at least some of the technologies previewed on it to actually make it into production.

The two front wheel layout did, not at Kawasaki but over at Yamaha. The electric powertrain never made it into production at Kawasaki either – there is an electric version loosely based on the Ninja that was shown at EICMA 2019, but with only 62 miles of range it’s more of a joke than anything else.

In the lack of something better from Kawasaki in this segment, just watch the video of the J presentation from years ago and see how glamorous it all felt back then.

 

Royal Enfield Photon Electric Motorcycle Launch Price £20,000 approx.

By | General Posts

by Abhinand Venugopal from https://www.rushlane.com

This one-off Royal Enfield electric motorcycle was made by Newtown-based Electric Classic Cars

Global automotive industries have termed EVs as the future of mobility and many environmentalists (actual and keyboard warriors) are glad about it. However, an ideal balance between electric vehicles and petrol hybrids would be the best scenario if the world really wishes to cut down emissions drastically. The reason for this is that many countries still depend on coal power plants to generate electricity. Hence, a world of only electric vehicles could only accelerate emissions, indirectly.

On the bright side, the push towards electric mobility has introduced an array of interesting products. This ranges from the cost-effective Tata Nexon EV we have here to high-end performance cars such as Porsche’s Taycan Turbo S. Newtown-based (in Wales) Electric Classic Cars have done something similar at a smaller yet equally interesting scale.

Dubbed as the Royal Enfield Photon, the project is essentially a Royal Enfield Bullet with an electric powertrain. It’s a one-off product like most other commissioned Porsche, Land Rover or Volkswagen projects from Electric Classic Cars. Attention to detail seems to have been one of the top priorities in the EV since it does not look like a half-baked design. The uber-retro electric motorcycle is finished in a beautiful shade of British Racing Green with neat-looking Gold pinstripes against gloss black. The quilted leather seat is done in tan.

Purists may argue that it has ditched the original ‘Royal Enfield charm’, but it’s often forgotten that the current line of Bullet products employs an archaic architecture — especially in terms of output-to-displacement ratio. The story could take a twist when the next-gen ‘350’ models hit the market.

The Royal Enfield Photon is powered by a 12kW (almost 16bhp) hub motor coupled to four 2.5kWh lithium-ion batteries. To integrate the electric powertrain, the engineers at Electric Classic Cars had to make significant changes to the stock downtube chassis frame. The air-cooled battery pack can be filled from empty in about 90 minutes using any mainstream charging facility. It has a real-world riding range of 130km (claimed) as well.

While 16bhp does not impress on paper, EVs are mostly about good torque characteristics right from zero RPM. While the Photon is no rocket from the get-go, it has a much more enjoyable RPM band compared to its original ICE counterpart. The motorcycle tops out at 112km/h.

Hardcore Royal Enfield fans would surely miss the ‘thump’ and NVH associated with a Bullet, alongside its affordable price tag. Yes, a regular Royal Enfield in the UK is significantly cheaper at about £4,699 (roughly Rs 4.45 lakh) compared to the Photon’s estimated asking price of £20,000 (just under Rs 19 lakh).

Benda Asura 400: Purely Chinese motorcycle with Indian name and somewhat inspired design

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com/

The Benda Asura 400 comes with a single-sided swingarm, which is quite rare to see on a 400cc motorcycle.

In the last few years, a lot of Chinese manufacturers have ventured into the motorcycling space. We have been bringing you a lot of stories on Chinese copy bikes that are particularly on sale in Pakistan. Well, today’s story is also about one Chinese motorcycle minus the fact that it is not on sale in our neighbouring country. This one is called the Benda Asura 400. What catches the attention at first is the Indian name used for naming the motorcycle. The Chinese manufacturer Benda had unveiled the quite futuristic-looking Asura 400 concept in February 2019. Now, very recently, the final production model has been revealed along with the technical specifications.

For now, the Benda Asura 400 is on sale in China only with prices starting at 27,800 Chinese Yuan that translates to almost Rs 3 lakh as per the Indian currency. This is indeed a quite competitive price tag, keeping in mind the fact that the bike packs in modern and premium components like a single-sided swingarm, parallel-twin engine and more. Coming to the powertrain, Benda Asura 400 is powered by a 389cc, liquid-cooled, parallel-twin engine that is good for developing respective power and torque outputs of 36.7hp and 32Nm. However, while the concept was showcased, the company had claimed a maximum power torque of 43.5hp that was very much in line with that of the KTM 390 Duke.

Acceleration time from a standstill to 100 kmph is 7 seconds while the top speed of the Asura is pegged at 160kmph. The company has also revealed the mileage which is 32.2kmpl, a figure that is reasonably impressive for a twin-cylinder engine. While you may think that the Benda Asura 400 is somewhat lesser performance-oriented compared to the competition, here is how the company has tried to compensate for it. The bike comes with premium underpinnings and hence, you get inverted forks upfront along with a rear monoshock. Moreover, the bike gets a single-sided swingarm, which is pretty interesting and rare for a bike of this segment.

Stopping power comes from twin disc brakes up front along with a single rear disc and these are coupled to a dual-channel ABS (Anti-Lock Braking System) for better safety. Moreover, in terms of features, the Benda Asura 400 gets an all-LED lighting set up and the instrumentation is also a fully coloured TFT unit. If you are thinking the ‘Asura’ will be launched in India, you need to realign your thought process due to the fact that a 400cc bike at this price won’t be making much sense considering the price-sensitive buyers.

A lot of chinese manufacturers have been copying the design of products and one best example is Sigma Motorsports that sells numerous copy bikes in Pakistan with different names and smaller displacement engines compared to the respective original bikes on which those are based. While the Asura is not an outright copy-paste job, we can still see some heavy resemblance with two premium naked streetfighters on sale in India. Can you name those?

Harley-Davidson to hold virtual annual meeting, acting CEO says More Roads plan is working

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by Margaret Naczek from https://www.bizjournals.com

Amid the instability of the COVID-19 pandemic, Harley-Davidson Inc.’s acting president and CEO Jochen Zeitz reflected back on the advancements made in the More Roads to Harley-Davidson strategy in 2019.

2020 already was a pivotal year in the company’s strategic plan to grow more riders and expand dealership reach, but the year became a lot more crucial as the Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) looks to also overcome the difficulties during a pandemic.

With concerns over public health and travel restrictions, Harley-Davidson organized its 2020 annual shareholders meeting to be conducted virtually via a live audio webcast on May 21, 2020. The annual meeting will elect nine directors to the board, approve the compensation of the company’s executive officers, approve amendments to the company’s restated articles of incorporation, approve the company’s 2020 incentive stock plan and ratify the selection of Ernst & Young LLP as Harley-Davidson’s independent registered public accounting firm.

“As we embark on our next chapter and seek new leadership, we are steadfast in our belief that we have both much to be proud of and much to look forward to,” Zeitz said in his letter to shareholders.

On Feb. 28, Harley-Davidson announced former CEO Matt Levatich had stepped down and Zeitz would assume the role of acting president and CEO. The company is currently engaged in a search for new CEO.

In his letter to shareholders, Zeitz shared some of the company’s accomplishments in 2019. While U.S. motorcycle sales continue to decline over consecutive quarters, Zeitz noted that in 2019 the rate of decline significantly tempered.

“After four years of accelerating declines, such improvement was supported by our More Roads actions, notably in how we’re Amplifying our Brand and delivering on our New Products catalysts for growth,” Zeitz said in the letter.
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Some other company milestones included the launch of the first Harley-Davidson electric motorcycle, the LiveWire, the introduction of Reflex Defensive Rider System, the acquisition of StaCyc and the launch of the company’s IRONe two-wheelers for children.

In its efforts to continue to grow new riders, Zeitz noted that in 2019, 75% of people who purchased Harley-Davidson products on Amazon were new to the company. Harley-Davidson dealerships that participated in company consulting engagements also saw a nearly 6% increase in motorcycle retail sales compared with dealers not in the program, Zeitz said. Internationally, Harley-Davidson also added 27 new dealerships.

“In 2019, we also continued to manage our business to address current market conditions across the globe. We expanded our Thailand plant to serve the ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) markets and increase customer access with more competitive prices, and we continued our work to mitigate the bulk of the impact of recent EU and China tariffs,” Zeitz said.

Zeitz said the company now expects the impact of tariffs to be significantly less in 2020 compared with 2019. According to its annual report filed in February, Harley-Davidson expects the impact of recent EU and China tariffs to be approximately $35 million, which is down significantly from the 2019 impact of $97.9 million.

Zeitz also stated that in 2019, Harley-Davidson finished with 3.1 million riders in the U.S., 55,000 more total riders than 2018. Throughout 2019, the company saw 527,000 new people join the brand.

“The number of people who continue to join Harley-Davidson each year is a testament to the power of our brand and our strengthened capabilities. We are becoming a company that excels at and exists to not only build great bikes, but to build riders,” Zeitz said in the letter.

Zeitz said that in 2020, the company will expand its focus from heavyweight motorcycle shipments to revenue from motorcycles and related products.

“This measure best reflects our comprehensive efforts to expand into new product segments and foster a customer-creation culture,” he said, “one that is laser-focused on our riders and fans who are passionate about our great brand.”

New Kalk INK SL Electric Motorcycle Revealed with $10K Price Tag for the U.S.

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For a while now, a Swedish electric motorcycle manufacturer by the name of Cake has been moving to position itself as a noteworthy adversary in this expanding segment. Its moves have been rather shy so far, but as of this summer the company is going head on into the segment with a brand new entry.

This week, Cake gave us a dose of optimism for an outdoor summer with the introduction of the Kalk INK SL, a vehicle meant to be used for off-roading and the casual trip to and from work in equal measure.

Cake says the new bike can be legally used on the road both in the U.S. and Europe. It is based on the same technology that underpins other Cake Kalk products (OR, &, and INK), but modified in such a way as to provide the performance required from a street-legal electric motorcycle.

Sharing the drivetrain, battery, and aluminum frame with the others from its family, the INK SL separates itself from the pack by making use of a non-linkage suspension at the rear and motocross suspension at the front, black fenders and bodywork made from polycarbonate and ABS, and two 19-inch wheels.

In addition, as a means to make it legal to operate on the road, the motorcycle received turn signals, front headlight, rear brake light, and a license plate holder.

Mechanically, the speed of the motorcycle has been increased to 62 mph (100 kph) to provide it with the required highway speeds. The range is of about three hours, which translates into anywhere between 22 to 53 miles (35 to 86 km), depending on how it is ridden.

“With the launch of the Kalk INK SL, we introduce the fourth model of street-legal CAKE bikes next to the Kalk& and recently released Ösa+ and Ösa Lite. Each of these models combines excitement with responsibility to inspire a turn toward zero emissions, whether that’s in remote or urban environments.” said in a statement Cake CEO Stefan Ytterborn.

The bike goes on sale this summer, and sells for $10,500 in the U.S and €10,500 in Europe.

Custom BMW R nineT Is a Two-Wheeled Lost in Space Robot

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW’s latest motorcycle wonder, the R 18, is the freshest Bavarian creation, and the world keeps talking about it even days after it was launched by the Germans. But there are other BMW motorcycles worth talking about, both factory-made and custome, like the R nineT we have here.

When BMW announced it is building a cruiser motorcycle based on the new Big Boxer engine it developed, it did so by tasking custom builders with advertising the powerplant. This is how with about a year left until the actual unveiling of the R 18, we got the Custom Works Zon R18, and later the Revival Birdcage. But the R nineT is even more tunable as the R 18, it seems.

The bike pictured here is the result of work conducted in Moscow by a builder called Zillers Garage, allegedly with the support of BMW Motorrad Russia. It is, in essence, a tuned-up, futuristic version of a stock R nineT.

Officially scheduled to have been shown at the now canceled Moscow motorcycle show, the bike made its online premiere this week. It presents itself as a stock two-wheeled Bimmer that sheds its skin and wrapps itself in a shell of aluminum, one that ends at the front with a large HID lamp that brings back memories of Lost in Space’s Robot.

According to the information available, the modifications made to the standard motorcycle include altering the suspension to bring the body closer to the ground, some changes to the brake and clutch levers, and the additions of buttons required to control the air suspension.

The engine of the R nineT remains the original one, and no modifications have been made to it. That translates into a 1,170cc powerplant, developing 110 hp and controlled by means of a six-speed transmission.

There is no word yet from Russia whether this concept is just a show motorcycle, or some production run is planned for those able and willing to pay.

Honda e and CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE win Design Awards in the “Red Dot Award: Product Design 2020”

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Source: Honda and http://www.jcnnewswire.com

TOKYO, Mar 30, 2020 – – Honda announced that the all-new Honda e electric vehicle and the CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE supersport bike won product design awards in one of the most respected awards in the world, the Red Dot Award(1).

Honda e

Honda e won “Red Dot: Best of the Best 2020” in the automobile category, and also received “Red Dot 2020” in the meta category of “Smart Products”.

Honda e is a new-generation electric vehicle focused on a simple design and ease of use built upon Honda’s philosophy of human-centric design, while bringing new values to customers that meet the needs of modern urban life through seamlessly connected technology and outstanding driving dynamics. Honda e’s dashboard features two large touchscreens which display a wide range of applications and connected infotainment services in a lounge-like atmosphere, seamlessly integrating with the occupants’ urban lifestyle. By accessing various connected services displayed on these large touchscreens, the driver and occupants can enjoy the same connectivity and comfort while driving, stationary or charging. The battery is situated under the floor, realizing a low center of gravity and a firm footing despite its small size, and contributes to an optimum balance between stability and handling.

CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE

CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE received “Red Dot 2020” in the motorcycle category.

The CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE was announced at EICMA 2019 in Milan, Italy in November 2019, with sales soon beginning in Europe.

Positioned as the top flagship of CBR series, the CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE was developed with the concept, “TOTAL CONTROL for the Track”, pursuing high performance on the track and in races. Its engine was designed with technologies from the RC213V MotoGP machine which continues to win world titles, resulting in the most powerful engine for a CBR yet. The frame has enhanced stability under acceleration and braking, and with the help of advanced electronic control system supporting sport riding, its potential has been further enhanced. Honda believes CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE won the award in part due to its functional beauty honed through pursuing the limits of high-performance and radical new form to achieve uncompromising function not only in the public roads, but also in the circuit.

(1) The Red Dot Award was founded in 1955, and has since become one of the most respected design awards worldwide. 49 categories of industrial products are judged on nine criteria including degree of innovation, functionality, durability and ergonomics. Outstanding designs are awarded by three awards, “Red Dot: Best of the Best”, “Red Dot” and “Honourable Mention”. “Red Dot: Best of the Best” is the most prestigious award among them.