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Annual Raffle – Only 3 days left

By | General Posts

August is Almost Over

Only 3 more days and August will be over, which means this month’s EXCLUSIVE package will be gone! The August Special includes the limited ’36 Knucklehead Print and our WTT Duffel Bag along with your raffle shirt for “The ’36 Exclusive” raffle package or higher. The limited ’36 Knucklehead print comes with the “Great Deal” package or higher.

Raffle Day is just around the corner, and you don’t want to miss out!

GET TICKETShttps://wheelsthroughtime.com/win-this-bike/

Our Annual Raffle

Every year we hold an Annual Raffle to help sustain the cost of operating the museum, and help us further American history! Our mission is to preserve and share the culture, history, and artifacts of early American motorcycle history. Currently, the museum houses over 300 machines, a handful of cars, countless pieces of memorabilia, and over 15 timeless exhibits.

Young, Hot Motorcycle App – Now With Video

By | General Posts

Tonit Announces Slick New Video Feature
Video Feature Enhances User Experience & Makes Tonit a True Social Media Platform

Kelowna, BC – August 9, 2019 – Tonit, the motorcycle community app built by riders for riders, today announced the release of their new Video Feature, which makes sharing motorcycle content more versatile and engaging. Members will now be able to snap and feature up to 60 seconds worth of video on their profiles, and view the latest clips posted on their feeds.

The Tonit app was developed to be a social hub for motorcycle riders to connect with one another and foster a strong community. On the app, riders can meet, post photos and videos, share tips and tricks, track and share riding experiences, and stay safer on the road.

“Our members asked for it, and we listened,” said Jason Lotoski, Founder and CEO, Tonit. “Tonit is 100% developed from the community’s voice. The new video feature is cementing Tonit’s place as a must have social-media platform for riders across North America. We will continue to roll out new app features and improvements quickly to keep meeting member requests that help build a better experience for the community.”

Tonit can be downloaded for free on Google Play or the App Store

Motorcycle social media app Tonit has devoted itself to uniting and growing a global network of motorcycle riders. With over 200k users in less than 8 months, the app allows people to create profiles, connect with other motorcyclists, join group rides, and attend motorbike-centric events.

A near fatal accident didn’t stop Natalie from getting back on the open road.

When she was young, Natalie yearned to one day have her own motorcycle. She made her dream a reality when she purchased her own Yamaha, and could finally experience the thrill of riding solo and getting involved in the local motorcycle community.

Things took a turn for the worse and she was involved in a near fatal accident that left her dreams – and bones – broken. Natalie was told that she wouldn’t be able to walk for up to a year. Five surgeries, organs removed, and one titanium pelvis later, Natalie’s passion for riding drove her to get back up again. Three months after her accident, she was back on wheels– and not the wheelchair kind.

One of the things that helped Natalie stay positive throughout her traumatic ordeal was the Tonit community that would be there to welcome her return to the road.

For motorcyclists riding in groups or flying solo, no resource offers a more authentic way to connect with other passionate riders than the Tonit app.

About Tonit https://www.tonit.com/

Tonit, the motorcycle app built for riders by riders was developed to bring motorcyclists together both online and on-the-road through an interactive and inclusive social community. Motorcyclists across the globe use Tonit to connect with other riders, share bike-related content, map and track riding experiences, and stay safer on the road. Riders can find new people to hit the road with based on location and riding style, and, once in touch, easily plan group rides. Routes and stats can be shared with the Tonit community so that riders can discover new locations, share intel about best routes, provide maintenance tips and tricks and post photos and experiences. Launched late November 2018, Tonit has over 60,000 downloads and 50,000 active users and four months later was the #1 trending lifestyle app on Google Play. Tonit is a free download on both the Google Play and App Store. Visit tonit.com to learn more.

MRF MOTM 2019 TIME IS RUNNING OUT!!!

By | General Posts

With just over a week to the pre-registration cut-off, time is running short to save money registering for The 35th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference!!! 

As the MRF makes final preparations to Honor the Past with the induction of Legacy Members into the MRF Hall of Fame and gear up to Protect the Future with two days of information filled workshops and presentations, you still have time to register for this premier event and secure your hotel room.

Up to the minute legislative updates, topical workshops to assist you in building your SMRO, plus several hundred new and old friends you’ll be glad to see!  Workshop & presentations including…

  • NHTSA – Protecting our Future from their Past
  • Shared Goals & Working Together – SMROs & Motorcycle Clubs
  • Membership Promotion, Retention, Growth & Volunteers
  • Old Media – New Media … – Dealing with print, electronic & social media successfully

And there’s more… Those listed workshops represent one-third of the time allocated for workshops.  We’ve got eight more and only two days to deliver.  However, those two days will be so jammed packed by the end of the Conference you’ll wonder where the time went and be asking for more.

The 35th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference is coming together as well as any smooth-running machine.  We don’t want you to miss it as we Honor the Past, Protect the Future and live up to meeting and exceeding the expectations of motorcyclists’ rights advocates from across the country.
You have until August 23rd to take advantage of the MOTM pre-registration price of $80.00 for MRF members or $90.00 for non-MRF members.
Use this link to register:  Meeting of the Minds 2019

After August 23rd, the event registration fee goes to $90.00 for members and $100.00 for non-members.  And you’re not just getting a receipt for your efforts… You’ll get a few hundred years of experience from some of the most dedicated and knowledgeable motorcyclists’ rights advocates in the world!

The deadline to get the nightly room rate of $115.00 at the MOTM Conference hotel is September 4th.  After that, rooms may be scarce. So, one more time… beat the deadlines and register for the 35th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference.  While it’s on your mind, call (952) 854-9000 and use this code to get you’re the MRF room rate: Block code MOT    LINK TO HOTEL MOTM2019

Thanks, and we look forward to seeing you in September at the Crowne Plaza Aire Hotel in Bloomington, Minnesota, for the 35th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference!!!

Fredric Harrell
Director, Conferences & Events
Motorcycle Riders Foundation

Newly Published in the Cantina – read now

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How to choose the best Bluetooth Helmet for your Road Bike

With the prolific rise in technology, there has also been an influx of so called, “Smart Helmets”

CLICK HERE TO READ about best Bluetooth Helmets.

Motorcycle Museums Worth Making a Pit Stop For

Can’t Miss these Motorcycle Travel Stops

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REVIEWS OF MOTORCYCLE MUSEUMS.

2019 Kawasaki Z400 Vs. Ninja 400

How do the two 400s compare?

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ROAD TEST REPORT.

Triumph Resurrects Its Torque Monster, The Rocket III

The all-new 2500cc inline three-cylinder engine has more torque

CLICK HERE TO READ ABOUT THE NEW Triumph Rocket III.

GET EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO 20+ YEARS OF BIKER CULTURE CONTENT – Subscribe to the Bandit’s Cantina.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Click Here to Subscribe the the Cantina

Motorcycle Makers Are Getting Hip to Women-Only Rallies

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Anxious to find new audiences after a decade of declining sales, the giants like Harley-Davidson and BMW Motorrad are finally taking notice of a self-made community.

On Valentine’s Day, Sharry Billings posted a photograph on Instagram. Below the image of herself, her hair a red caramel and her smile open, she wrote: “I love you so much I wanna squeeze you!”

The object of her affection? “All the motorcycles I have owned and will own in the future,” she explained. Alongside the photo of her astride a Harley-Davidson, she wrote that bikes “have changed my life, healed my soul, and brought me more love and friendships than I could have ever imagined.”

Billings goes by @sistermother13 on Instagram, but the main account she oversees is @thelitaslosangeles. The Litas is a group she joined three years ago as a way to connect with other women riders in her city. She’s co-led the L.A. branch for two years. When she joined, it provided her with much-needed healing and camaraderie after her kids grew up and she got divorced. Billings had ridden as a teenager and into her 20s but took a hiatus later. “It was always in my heart,” she says. But when she was married with young children, “I thought it was a little too dangerous.”

After the breakup in 2015, she found herself longing for escape. And adventure. “My prayer at the time was, ‘God, I don’t want to date.’ These men are not happening,” Billings says, laughing. “The first thing that came to my heart was the motorcycle I wanted. It was a Harley.”

She bought the bike, took the ride. Then she joined the Litas. “I’m very grateful to have found my heart again,” Billings says.

Founded in Utah by Jessica Haggett half a decade ago, the Litas have expanded to include hundreds of branches around the world (Litas Denver, Litas Lisbon, Litas Rome), with members ranging from twentysomething singles to 60- and 70-year-old retirees with grandkids. They take regular rides, often along wild back roads, including the Pine Mountain Ridge route near Ojai, Calif., that Billings took with 32 other riders one Saturday in July. It’s about riding with your own style and pace but surrounded by like-minded friends.

“If you’re learning to ride, you’re going to kill yourself riding with men—they ride like bats out of hell!” Billings says. “And women—I’m generalizing here—tend to be more careful. We are mothers, we are sisters, we feel obligated to stay alive.”

The Litas are singular but not uncommon. All across California, Oregon, and Utah, from Texas to New York, women-only motorcycle groups and riding events are springing up like wildflowers. They go by names such as the Miss-Fires (Brooklyn, N.Y.), the Chrome Divas (Austin), and Leather and Lace (Daytona Beach, Fla.). They do regular rides: Tuesday night pizza runs, say, or weekend coffee meetups—and they take periodic excursions to women-only destination events such as the Wild Gypsy Tour, which is organizing a festival in Sturgis, S.D., in August, and the Dream Roll in Ashland, Ore.; it’s early June event near Denver was photographed for this article.

The biggest crowd follows Babes Ride Out, a series of events founded by Anya Violet and Ashmore Ellis in 2013. It started with 50 women riders who gathered to camp out in Borrego Springs, Calif. They built fires, pitched tents, drank beer, and played games on Harleys, Husqvarnas, and Hondas while soaking in nature and one another’s company.

These groups are tapping into an undercurrent of the motorcycle industry. As sales have faltered, dropping more than 40% from 2008 to 2010, then recovering somewhat by 2014 but never to previous levels, manufacturers including Harley-Davidson Inc. and BMW Motorrad have struggled to create appeal beyond their core demographic of older white men. Their efforts include offering electric and less-expensive motorbikes and introducing exciting conceptual prototypes. Female riders offer enthusiasm and youth, and, yes, they’re spending money that brands crave.

The number of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled since 2010, according to a 2018 study by the Motorcycle Industry Council. Today, 19% of owners are women, up from 10% in 2009 and 8% in the late 1990s. And the number of female riders gets higher as you go younger: 22% of Generation X riders are women, and 26% of millennial riders are women. What’s more, the average woman who owns a motorcycle spends $574 annually on maintenance, parts, service, and accessories, while the average man who rides spends $497.

While the industry on the whole dropped 40% from 2008 to 2010, the amount of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled

“We are riding a ton,” says Joy Lewis, who started when she was 12. “I have a friend who put 20,000 miles on her bike in one year.” Lewis’s father, an Alaskan crab fisherman who owned a Harley, got her hooked. “We spend a lot of money on our gear and our bikes, and a lot of things to go with them. I think that’s starting to be appreciated.”

Andy Jefferson, a spokesman for Husqvarna, says one of the brand’s priorities must be to provide support for women’s motorcycling. “We were like everyone else—going after a piece of the pie,” he says. “But everyone was looking at men, and there are all these other people—women—that nobody even really talks about in conversations about how to sell more bikes.” The brand lacks figures for how many of its owners are women but is “working to change that,” Jefferson says. “That’s part of the problem.”

Husqvarna honed in on women riders five years ago when it started sponsoring Babes in the Dirt, an offshoot of Babes Ride Out that’s more focused on off-road and dirt-bike riding. Last year the company spent $50,000 to $60,000 in support of the three-day rally, lending 27 motorcycles and nine staffers to service the bikes and teach.

“We counted between 80 and 100 girls out there [trying out] Husqvarnas,” he says. “The number is not huge by any means, but those are 100 people we didn’t have before. It also jumps down to their brothers and sisters and kids. We never would have got these people without doing this.”

But more important, “we want to get you to ride a motorcycle,” Jefferson adds. “If you ride with Babes and have fun and go buy another brand, great. We just want people riding.”

At BMW Motorrad, which on July 1 named Trudy Hardy vice president for the Americas, the company is sponsoring women-only events including the Sisters’ Centennial Motorcycle Ride. It’s also covering travel expenses and appearance fees for brand reps such as Elspeth Beard, an architect who was the first British woman to ride her motorcycle around the world. The brand also sends pro racer Jocelin Snow and Erin Sills, who holds a 242 mph land speed record, to attend events at local dealerships.

Harley-Davidson has expanded its retail line in recent years to include a host of riding jackets, helmets, boots, and gloves sized and styled for women. It’s perhaps the most critical field of growth for the 116-year-old Wisconsin brand, which has seen sales steadily decline since 2014. The average age of a Harley owner is 50. The average price of one is $15,800—more than many millennials will spend on a car, let alone a motorcycle.

“Even just in the last five years the conversation has shifted,” says motorcycle aficionado Lewis. “I’m sitting here in leather Kevlar pants as we speak, about to go into a meeting. Not only are companies making cute technical stuff that you could wear to work—rather than some weird leather pants with pink embroidery all over the butt that you’d never wear—they’re making things we can actually use.”

Attendees at events for Babes Ride Out (or BRO, the ironic abbreviation they’ve adopted) come to America from as far away as Sweden and South America. Some have ridden since they could walk; some can’t operate a bike at all, preferring always to be a passenger and imbibe the inspirational atmosphere. There’s always plenty of denim and leather on-site—but the hipster kind, not the leather-daddy look. Local shops give classes on basic bike maintenance. Some women get tattoos to commemorate the experience.

“People camp, and there are trailers, too,” Lewis says. “The idea is that you grab coffee and breakfast, and then during the day everyone is out riding. And then all the stuff happens in the evenings with bands or karaoke and slow races”—feats of throttle control.

Earlier this year, a 96-year-old woman joined them at camp; she’d first ridden cross-country on her motorcycle 75 years ago. Last summer the annual California desert meetup saw 1,700 women ride in Yucca Valley; 500 attended an East Coast campout in the Catskill Mountains in New York; 700 attended the most recent Babes in the Dirt in Lebec, Calif.

“Maybe people think that women who ride are pretty tough and badass, which is probably true, but all in all, women riders come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and lifestyles, so any label that you want to give them does not really work,” co-founder Violet says. “I can honestly say that there is no ‘type’ … and we like it that way!”

Be Here Next for Motor-Loving Ladies

The Dream Roll
Set at New Frontier Ranch in the southern wilds of Oregon, the Dream Roll offers camping, tattoos, dirt trails, an on-site bar, and water activities near stunningly picturesque Crater Lake. Aug. 23–25; Ashland, Ore.

Wild Gypsy Tour – Sturgis Buffalo Chip
The biggest and baddest Gypsy festival of the year, the five-day South Dakota event will appeal to the truly unbridled spirit with Super Hooligan races, minibike showdowns, the Wall of Death—and multiple concerts including Keith Urban, Toby Keith, Snoop Dogg, and Styx. Aug. 3–7; Sturgis, S.D.

Babes in the Dirt East
A mix of flat-track and motocross riding gives dirt-loving ladies a place to experience and perfect their off-roading skills. Where Babes Ride Out focuses on asphalt routes, here you’ll be on trails. Sept. 20–22; Greenville, Tenn.

Babes Ride Out 7 – Central Coast
BRO 7 will include the jewels of years past: karaoke, free beer, performances from local bands, route maps for area rides, and hands-on classes for working on your bike. B.Y.O. tent. Oct. 11–13; Santa Margarita, Calif.

Benelli teases Harley-Davidson Street 750 rival Leoncino 500

By | General Posts

Internationally, Benelli retails the Leoncino 500 in two variants – a road version and a more off-road friendly one – but the manufacturer is likely to launch only the road-going version in India.

Benelli Leoncino 500 has been on the upcoming motorcycles list for the Indian market for a long time but now the launch may have just been drawn closer. Benelli India recently teased the launching of a new motorcycle in India and reports suggest the new Leoncino 500 is set to launch in the country in the coming months. Internationally, Benelli retails the Leoncino 500 in two variants – a road version and a more off-road friendly one – but the manufacturer is likely to launch only the road-going version in India.

Benelli Leoncino 500 is a mid-capacity neo-retro motorcycle powered by a 499.6cc liquid-cooled fuel-injected parallel-twin engine that develops 47.6 hp at 8,500 rpm and 45 Nm of torque at 5,000 rpm. Expect the Leoncino 500 to launch at about Rs 4.5-5 lakh (ex-showroom). It doesn’t have a direct rival in India but in terms of price, it will rival Harley-Davidson Street 750 which retails at Rs 5.33 lakh (ex-showroom) and Kawasaki Ninja 400 which is priced at Rs 4.99 lakh (ex-showroom).

Benelli Leoncino 500 is a naked street motorcycle with a projector headlamp and a distinctive design feature involving metal ornament in the shape of a lion on the front fender (Leoncino’s literal translation from Italian is lion cub). It’ll come with an all-digital instrument cluster and the tail section has a very minimalistic design.

Other cycle parts include 320 mm twin discs up front and a 260mm single disc at the rear with ABS (Anti-lock Braking system). For suspension, the bike gets 50 mm USD (upside down forks) upfront and an adjustable monoshock at the rear.

The motorcycle manufacturer from Italy went through some financial hiccups after it parted ways with its erstwhile partner DSK Motowheels. Now the company has collaborated with Adishwar Auto Ride India for its future expansion projects in the country.

Benelli hopes to come up with a number of new dealerships across India and grow its current market share which is not in its finest state as of now. But to turn the tables in its favour, Benelli is adopting an aggressive approach which is not just limited to the new bike or showroom launches, but also improving the ownership experience.

American Flat Track Ready to Rock at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip

By | General Posts

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (July 31, 2019) – Following a short layoff to rest and reload, American Flat Track is set to kick off an intense six-week, eight-event run starting with this weekend’sBuffalo Chip TT presented by Indian Motorcycle in Sturgis, S.D., on Sunday, August 4. 

A relatively recent addition to the legendary Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, the Buffalo Chip TT has already established itself as a highlight of the massively popular 10-day event. Originally conceived as ‘a race that broke out at a rock concert,’ the TT has proven to be exactly that, as the heroes of AFT will set the stage for Godsmack this year in its third annual running.

Some 10,000 raucous fans are again expected to line the fences of the purpose-built TT circuit that winds its way around the legendary Sturgis Buffalo Chip Campgrounds. Those fans will be expecting plenty of drama and excitement and the race has historically delivered and then some.

The Buffalo Chip TT has a tendency to spice things up with a bit of podium variety, including last year’s AFT Twins presented by Vance & Hines victory on the part of Jake Johnson (No. 5 Estenson Racing Yamaha MT-07 DT), and the ‘17 triumph of Briar Bauman (No. 14 Indian Motorcycle/Progressive Insurance FTR750) — coming at a time when that sort of success was a bit less the norm for the AFT Twins championship leader.

Henry Wiles (No. 17 Bandit Industries/DPC Racing/Wilco Racing Indian FTR750) has also demonstrated race-winning speed at the venue, as has two-time race runner-up Jared Mees (No. 1 Indian Motorcycle/Progressive Insurance FTR750).

Two riders who may be poised to deliver an upset are Sammy Halbert (No. 69 Harley-Davidson Factory Flat Track Team XG750R Rev X) and Bronson Bauman (No. 37 Indian Motorcycle/Progressive Insurance FTR750); both men have shown to be strong at the Buffalo Chip event in years past.

Meanwhile, the Roof Systems AFT Singles presented by Russ Brown Motorcycle Attorneys class has been even more unpredictable, with both previous Main Event victories going to riders who ultimately finished the season outside the championship top 15. The race’s maiden win was taken by full-time roadracer Hayden Gillim, while last season’s went to all-around two-wheeled ace Ryan Sipes (No. 264 Red Bull/Leatt/KTM 450 SX-F).

Last year’s podium also featured Jacob Lehmann (No. 14 Vince & Denise Holt Honda CRF450R) and his teammate Cole Frederickson. While Frederickson is on the long road to recovery following a serious training accident, both Sipes and Lehmann will be back to give the Roof Systems AFT Singles’ regular fits again in 2019.

That said, the likes of Dalton Gauthier (No. 122 D&D Cycles/Gobert Smash Husqvarna FC450), Mikey Rush (No. 15 RMR Honda/Red Riders Rewards Honda CRF450R), Dan Bromley (No. 1 Red Bull KTM Factory Racing 450 SX-F), and Jesse Janisch (No. 132 Roof Systems Dallas TX/Öhlins Yamaha YZ450F) all expect to be up front and contending for the race win come Sunday evening.

Directly following the AFT Twins podium ceremony, Godsmack  the iconic metal band with multiple Grammy nominations and a Billboard Rock Artist of the Year Award to its name — will unleash its particular brand of musical aggression to cap off the evening.

The Buffalo Chip TT and Godsmack performance are just two of a huge number of attractions at the Buffalo Chip during this year’s Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The venue will also host the likes of Skid Row, Keith Urban, STYX, Snoop Dogg, Toby Keith, Zakk Sabbath and legions of other diverse and popular musical acts, along with nine bike shows, ongoing stunt performances, BMW demo rides and much more.

Buffalo Chip TT tickets are on sale now at www.rallytickets.com. Race-day campground admission tickets are $72 and include free access to Buffalo Chip entertainment and activities unless otherwise noted as a separately ticketed event.

For fans watching remotely, FansChoice.tv will offer live coverage of the Buffalo Chip TT presented by Indian Motorcycle when the gates open at 2:30 p.m. ET/11:30 a.m. PT. Opening Ceremonies are scheduled for 8:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m PT. The Open Paddock/Rider Autograph Session will take place at 9:05 p.m. ET/6:05 p.m. PT, followed by the Main Event program, which is slated to begin at 10:00 p.m. ET/7:00 p.m. PT

Be sure to catch the feature broadcast of the Buffalo Chip TT presented by Indian Motorcycleas part of a two-hour block on NBCSN that will also include flag-to-flag coverage of the Black Hills Half-Mile presented by Law Tigers. The back-to-back broadcasts will debut on Saturday, August 10, at 1:00 p.m. ET/10:00 a.m. PT and re-air on Wednesday, August 14, starting at 3:00 p.m. ET/12:00 p.m. PT.

For more information on American Flat Track visit www.americanflattrack.com.

To get the latest American Flat Track clothing and merchandise visit www.americanflattracker.com.

How to Watch:

NBCSN and FansChoice.tv are the official homes for coverage of American Flat Track. For the 2019 season, NBCSN’s coverage of AFT moves to highly-coveted, weekend afternoon programming slots within two weeks of each event. The complete schedule for AFT on NBCSN can be viewed at http://www.americanflattrack.com/events-nbcsn/. FansChoice.tv remains a cornerstone of AFT’s digital strategy, providing live streaming coverage of every event on AFT’s live page while previous events and exclusive features are available on AFT’s VOD page.

Perfect Bikernet Weekly News for July 18th, 2019

By | General Posts

What an interesting week. We are scrambling with the Salt Torpedo. I trying to outfit the new Bikernet Salt Flats Van for the trip to Bonneville. I’ve been in touch with various Easyriders contributors and now ex-staff members regarding the future.

A few of us have been super-lucky to make a living in the motorcycle industry. Even tougher, I’ve been having a blast in the Chopper industry most of my life. It’s not about the money, obviously, it’s about sex.

What could be sexier than to bang around choppers, metalflake paint, sultry art and girls all your life. What could be better.

Otherwise, this week has been amazingly positive with cool resources surfacing for the Torpedo. We’ve about got the body handled. Jane came by and took shots of my ’72 Ford F250 and the Shovelhead in the back. She thinks she can move it and the Shovelhead. Not sure I can sell the 1928 Shovelhead.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE NEWS IN THE CANTINA – SUBSCRIBE TODAY for $24

Polaris Slingshot Invites You to Win a Trip to Hawaii During The “Summer of Fun”

By | General Posts

Win a trip to Maui for you and a +1 and experience the Road to Hana by test driving a Slingshot!

Costa Mesa (June 21, 2019)- Polaris Slinghsot, the three wheeled autocycle that is a hit to look at and a dream to drive is the key to your trip to Hawaii this summer. Slingshot is offering a trip to Maui, Hawaii during their “Summer of Fun” sweepstakes. The Sweepstakes start June 21st and end September 22nd. To enter, all prospective Slingshot owners must test drive a Slingshot at a participating dealership to get their name in the drawing.

Slingshot owners can also enter the sweepstakes by posting on their social media and tagging Slingshot. Each post will enter your name into the sweepstakes, there is a limit of one entry per month. Slingshot owners and Slingshot prospects will be entered in separate categories of the sweepstakes to avoid conflict.

With four distinct models, the 2019 Slingshot lineup takes style, technology, and comfort to a whole new level. Select 2019 models feature the seven-inch touchscreen RideCommand® infotainment system with turn-by-turn navigation, while all Slingshot models are powered by a 2.4L GM engine that creates 173 horsepower and 166 ft-lbs of torque. Slingshot’s 2019 lineup includes four models: the S, SL, SLR, and Grand Touring. Pricing ranges from $20,999 (S) to $30,999 (Grand Touring).

Owners can personalize their Slingshot with a variety of Slingshot Engineered Accessories, including the revolutionary Slingshade®, a color-matched top offering superb rider comfort and sun protection.  Also available are interior upgrades and technology enhancements, such as Rockford Fosgate® audio, Ride Command® infotainment system, wind deflectors, and storage bags. For the ultimate customization, most accessories are available in a variety of factory color-matched options.

For more information about Slingshot, or to find a dealer, visit PolarisSlingshot.com. Follow Slingshot on social media: Facebook.com/PolarisSlingshot, @Slingshot on Twitter and @PolarisSlingshot on Instagram. For information on Polaris Adventures and Slingshot rental locations, visit Adventures.Polaris.com.

About Polaris Slingshot

Polaris Slingshot®, a product of Polaris Industries Inc. (NYSE: PII), is a three-wheeled motorcycle that delivers a ride like nothing else you’ve ever experienced.  The Slingshot is powered by a 2.4-liter engine with a five-speed manual transmission and comes in a variety of models that will leave you grinning from ear-to-ear.  To learn more, visit www.PolarisSlingshot.com.

Slingshot® is a three-wheeled motorcycle. It is not an automobile and does not meet automotive safety standards. Drivers should always wear helmets and seat belts. Three wheeled vehicles may handle differently than other vehicles, especially in wet conditions. Always wear a DOT approved full face helmet and fasten seat belts. Driver may need a valid motorcycle endorsement. Rider licensing requirements vary by state. Check your state’s requirements before driving. Don’t drink and drive. Unless noted, trademarks are the property of Polaris Industries Inc. © Polaris Industries Inc.

Motorcycle Clubs and the One Percenter

By | General Posts

It’s no secret that Americans love outlaws, from the legends and lore of rebellious (and illegal) acts by the Founding Fathers, to the bushwhacking and bank-robbing capers of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the “bad boy” music of Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Dr. Dre.

American culture and mass media have led inexorably to characters that embody this bad-boy attitude – a recent example being Jax, the heartthrob outlaw biker star of the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”. Western society has a long established canon from which we “learn” about society from fictional dramas. And the more we watch shows like “Sons of Anarchy,” the more a news story will seem to fit our mental construct of “how those people are.” The same is true of popular TV crime dramas’ portrayal of American minorities’ involvement in violent crime. And it seems that every time outlaw motorcycle clubs are portrayed in the news, it’s because of something terrible, such as the deadly events in Waco, Texas. Add to this the fact that the outlaw biker narrative has been largely controlled over time, not by members of the culture, but by outsiders and the misconceptions grow.

The term 1%er was first used in print in the pages of Life Magazine during the 1960’s. The article was a contrived response to an AMA rally in Hollister CA, after encouraging certain individuals to get drunk and ride through town the media then reported on ‘drunken’ motorcycle clubs giving rise to the popular misconception of bikers and also the movie The Wild One. The American Motorcycle Association stated that 99% of the people at their events were God fearing and family oriented. The other 1% were hard riding, hard partying, non mainstream type people. Thus the term 1%er found its place in popular vernacular.

Motorcycle clubs were historically born of a love of the machine, racing, riding and from military service. Gangs began for various reasons as well, but largely as a form of protection for outsiders or ethnic immigrants residing in inner cities. Their social structure is overwhelmingly democratic from the local to the international levels. Officers are democratically elected and hold office so long as they meet the memberships’ needs.

In contrast, Motorcycle Gangs can be seen as more autocratic than democratic, where leaders emerge more for their charismatic leadership and illicit earning abilities than for their abilities to run organisations. Motorcycle clubs are organised hierarchically, with strictly defined chains of command and lines of communication. MCs elect secretaries whose jobs are to maintain meeting minutes, keep track of committees and chairs, and see that old business is complete and new business is on the agenda. Treasurers also are elected officials and they attend to fiduciary responsibilities such as collecting membership dues, paying clubhouse expenses and financial planning for the future. Both secretaries and treasurers are required to produce written documents for the membership to review and approve during each meeting.

It’s not easy becoming a patch-holder. Many have compared “prospecting” – the process of earning full membership – to that of military basic training, where the individual is broken down in order to be reformed into a part of a collective: To think not of one’s self but of others, and to understand that one’s actions or inactions impact the team and the organisation. But prospecting takes months and sometime a year or more (5 years for one MC). Prospecting is physically, emotionally, and intellectually demanding and not everyone can do it. A significant amount of social status is conferred upon those with the steel to make it. Perhaps this is the only obvious similarity between MCs and gangs.

MC is generally reserved for those clubs that are mutually recognised by other MC or outlaw motorcycle clubs. This is indicated by a motorcyclist wearing an MC patch, or a three piece patch called colours, on the back of their jacket or riding vest. Outlaw or 1%er can mean merely that the club is not chartered under the auspices of the AMA, implying a radical rejection of authority and embracing of the “biker” lifestyle as defined and popularised since the 1950s and represented by such media as Easyriders magazine, the work of painter David Mann and others. In many contexts the terms overlap with the usual meaning of “outlaw” because some of these clubs, or some of their members, are recognised rightly or wrongly by law enforcement agencies as taking part in organised crime.

That sense of brotherhood was on display at a funeral for a patch-holder slain at Waco. Members of the Hells Angels, Bandidos, Mongols, Vagos and more than 50 other motorcycle clubs come together in peace to mourn the passing of a man who touched the lives of so many in his community. To them, he was much more than a biker or a patch-holder — he was their Brother, with all the familial love, respect, and honour that that word conveys. Possibly such a gathering has never happened before. This convergence of contrasting MCs was no media stunt. There were no media in the funeral that day (although there was one white, unmarked van, out of which came uniformed men clad in body armour and armed with assault rifles).

Perhaps the singularly most important distinction between outlaw motorcycle clubs and gangs is evidenced through philanthropy. Many motorcycle clubs are closely intertwined with charity work: MC family members are or have been affected by the maladies the charities seek to eradicate, and members of the local community are in legitimate and immediate need. MCs support a wide variety of local, national, and international charities that seek to end disease, poverty and hunger, but especially supported are disabled veterans organisations. Charity is to members of motorcycle clubs as petrol and oil are to their machines. For some, it’s a major reason why they join and stay in MCs.

Clubs have been observed providing 24/7 security at battered women’s shelters, holding motorcycling events such as Poker Runs to raise money for local families whose homes were destroyed by fire or natural disasters, or to help families stricken by some other tragic event get on their feet. If a member of the community is in legitimate need, and the MCs are able to help, they almost always do. Even if it’s just “Passing the Hat,” where patch-holders literally pass around a baseball cap into which members place what cash they can spare. This might not seem like much, but to a family in desperate need of short-term assistance, this can mean the difference between having electricity and water and going without.

The above puts perspective on the recent statement that certain US law enforcement officials and organisations have labeled outlaw motorcycle clubs as a domestic terrorist threat, something is that is obviously more concerning since many of these clubs are made up of veterans who have fought bravely in recent wars for their country.