Tag

models Archives — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Ducati Streetfighter V4 Declared Most Beautiful Bike At EICMA 2019

By | General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

Ducati does it again!

Which of the many bikes unveiled at EICMA 2019 has haunted your dreams?? If you said “Ducati Streetfighter V4, obviously,” you’re not alone. Venerable Italian motorcycle publication Motociclismo conducted its fifteenth annual poll, both of EICMA attendees and its readers at home. Guess which bike won?

According to both EICMA attendees and readers who sadly couldn’t attend the show in person, the Ducati Streetfighter V4 was voted the most beautiful motorcycle of EICMA 2019. Motociclismo took to the MotoLive stage at EICMA to present the awards. Ducati design director Andrea Ferraresi and Streetfighter V4 designer Jeremy Faraud were both on hand to accept the official award.

When all the numbers were tallied, the winner stood out by a mile. Not only did the Ducati Streetfighter V4 top the charts; it commanded a solid 36.7 percent of the vote. Second place went to the Aprilia RS 660 which received less than half the votes of the Streetfighter V4— just 14.9 percent.

Third place was the MV Agusta Superveloce 800, with 11.23 percent of the vote. Fourth was the Honda CBR1000RR-R SP, with 9.43 percent, and fifth was the Moto Guzzi V85 TT Travel, with just 4.76 percent of the vote. That makes Honda the only non-Italian manufacturer to crack the top five.

Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, Motociclismo also reported that there was a difference in rankings for some bikes between voters who saw them in person, and voters who participated from home.

The top four bikes among both groups of voters were the same, but from number five down, results are markedly different between those who saw these models only on screens, vs. those who saw them live. For example, a lot more people who saw the BMW F 900 R in person seemed to appreciate it than those who simply saw it at home.

You can check out the full results of the poll—including the EICMA/home voter breakdown—over at Motociclismo.

Harley-Davidson has three models of electric bike going on sale next year

By | General Posts

by Robin-Leigh Chetty from https://www.htxt.co.za/

While Harley-Davidson is not the first name that springs to mind when it comes to electric vehicles, every time we’ve written about the company, it’s had to do with one of its EVs.

This time around is no different, as the company offered up the first looks at its new trio of pedal-assisted electric bikes at 2019 EICMA Motorcycle Show in Milan earlier this week.

Electrek was on hand to take a closer look at the bikes, and you can check out a full gallery of images on its site.

https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/motorcycles/future-vehicles/e-bicycles.html

With the trio of electric bikes yet to have official names, we’re more interested in what Harley-Davidson’s plans are moving forward, and luckily the firm has offered up some insight in that regard.

An unnamed spokesperson has noted that Harley-Davidson will be gauging the interest and demand for pedal-assisted electric bikes in coming months, with a view to launch them some time in 2020.

Based on the concept models shown in Milan, it looks the company is targeting a more premium customer, with The Verge believing that a price tag around the $1000 mark is not out of the question. This makes sense considering the electric LiveWire motorbike goes for a cool $30 000 on pre-order.

These bikes are not the only EVs that Harley-Davidson is working on, with the company also revealing an interesting looking e-bike concept last year, but sadly no word on whether that will go into production.

It’s also unclear which regions outside of the US the firm plans to launch these upcoming electric bikes, or indeed its LiveWire. With a number of dealerships locally, there is certainly a demand for the brand, and perhaps some of its future EVs too.

2020 Triumph Bobber TFC unveiled at EICMA 2019

By | General Posts

Limited Edition with more power, less weight

Triumph Bobber TFC is powered by an updated version of the liquid-cooled 1200cc parallel twin which now makes 87 hp at 6,250 rpm and 110 Nm of torque, which is a 13 percent increase in power compared to the standard Bobber.

by Express Drives Desk from https://www.financialexpress.com

Triumph Motorcycles custom bike wing called Triumph Factory Customs has rolled out yet another gorgeous-looking TFC edition after the Thruxton TFC and Rocket 3 TFC earlier this year. Unveiled at the ongoing 2019 EICMA motorcycle show in Milan, Italy, Triumph Bobber TFC boasts of more power, is lighter than the standard bike and will be limited to 750 units across the world.

Triumph Bobber TFC is powered by an updated version of the liquid-cooled 1200cc parallel twin which now makes 87 hp at 6,250 rpm and 110 Nm of torque. The TFC has received a 13 percent increase in power compared to the standard Bobber and Bobber Black which produce about 77 hp. The exhaust system has also been updated with Arrow titanium pipes and carbon fibre end caps.

The second most notable change is the styling of the Triumph Bobber TFC. While the design is largely the same, it gets a new paint scheme, carbon fibre bodywork, and a short mudguard. Frame and swingarm have been black powder-coated, it gets black anodised wheels, knurled handlebar grips and billet-machined aluminium oil filler cap. The black theme continues to the Öhlins RSU spring, Öhlins forks and engine covers.

The use of lighter components has led to a weight saving of about 5 kg on the 2020 Bobber TFC. It features fully adjustable Ohlins upside-down forks and rear suspension. Braking components include twin floating discs up front with Brembo four-piston M50 radial monobloc callipers. The Bobber TFC features three ride modes – Raid, Road and Sport.

The Bobber TFC is Euro V compliant and is priced at GBP 15,500 in the UK.

Harley-Davidson’s 2020 Bronx and Pan America EICMA debuts are big flags planted in a brave new world

By | General Posts

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com/

The Pan America ADV and Bronx middleweight naked bikes are unlike anything Harley has done before, but they might just be what The Motor Company needs to stay relevant.

Harley’s first ADV bike, the Pan America, is set to bring that classic H-D burble to the wilder places of the world.

One of the main criticisms that we (and seemingly the rest of the motorcycle press) likes to level at Harley-Davidson is that it’s been slow to respond to the changing desires — and budgets — of a younger motorcycle-riding demographic. That criticism is still valid today, but Harley announced its response during the 2019 EICMA show, and what a response it is.

PAN AMERICA
The Motor Company debuted two bikes in Milan on Wednesday, and they’re both aimed at segments in which Harley has never really participated. The first is a large-displacement adventure touring bike called the Pan America, and it’s pretty damned similar to the Pan America concept we saw back in 2018.

The Pan America is packing a new liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine called the Revolution Max that displaces 1,250 cubic centimeters and is said to make 145 horsepower and more than 90 pound-feet of torque. Those are big numbers, especially for Harley, which is more accustomed to building bigger, lazier engines with less power and more torque.

The Pan America differs from traditional Harley models in several other ways, too. It ditches the brand’s almost ubiquitous belt-style final drive for a chain that allows much simpler gearing changes and ease of repair should something go awry out on the trail. It also uses a rear trellis-style subframe for strength and reduced weight, meaning it should be a snap to mount all kinds of cool adventure-y hard luggage to it.

Other changes include the use of Brembo brakes rather than H-D’s typical in-house branded stoppers, and a swap to an inverted fork setup, which is much more common on more sporting bikes and ADV bikes. (Interestingly, Indian also went the Brembos-and-inverted-fork route on its new Challenger bagger.) The Pan America also looks pretty unique from a styling standpoint, thanks to its beakless nose and squinty cyclops-like headlight. We love it.

BRONX
Perhaps an even more significant departure for the brand is the introduction of its middleweight naked bike that it’s calling the Bronx. This wee beastie is packing a smaller 975-cc version of the Pan America’s Revolution Max that’s good for 115-horsepower and 70 lb.-ft. of torque. That puts it within spitting distance of Indian’s sporting FTR 1200.

Where the Bronx trails the FTR is in the looks department. While the FTR proudly wears its flat-track racer heritage, the Bronx looks a bit more like a cookie-cutter naked bike, though that doesn’t mean it’s unattractive. Far from it. Harley’s playing its cards close to its chest when it comes to details on the Bronx, but we can deduce a few things from the press photos.

First, while drive-side photos of the bike are thin on the ground, in the one we can see, the bike appears to be belt-driven, as evidenced by the great big, gigantic cog on the rear wheel. This feels like a mistake to us, since getting locked into a single, final gear ratio is a bummer for sporty bikes, and changing out a belt-drive cog is rumored to be a real chore. If there’s an upside to belt drive in this application, it’s a lack of need for regular maintenance.

Next, we can see that the bike also has a small, round instrument display that we’re betting is a TFT thanks to all the menu navigation controls on the left handlebar pod. That would lead us to believe that this thing will pack rider-selectable throttle maps and more.

One thing we’d love to see from the Bronx is an inertial measurement unit (IMU) that would facilitate lean-sensitive antilock brakes and traction control. This is a feature that we know and love on our long-term Indian FTR and plenty of other bikes in the Bronx’s crowded market segment, and it’s already available as part of RDRS for Harley’s touring line.

Harley-Davidson says that it’s aiming to have both the Pan America and the Bronx in showrooms by the end of 2020. It’s not given any indication of where we might expect to see these models priced, but we sincerely hope that it doesn’t go the same way as the Livewire and expect its name to demand a super-premium price in a brand new segment for the brand.

Honda unveils big bike line-up for 2020 at EICMA

By | General Posts

by Parvatha Vardhini C from https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/

Honda unveiled its motorcycle line-up for 2020 at the EICMA Motorcycle Show here on Tuesday. The launches span across all biking segments — commuter, roadster, adventure and racing.

The refreshed models showcased include SH125i and SH150i in the commuter segment; CMX500 Rebel and CBR1000R roadsters; the Africa Twin and the Africa Twin Adventure Sports in the adventure biking space and racing bikes — CBR1000RR-R Fireblade and Fireblade SP. Of these, the CB1000R, the Africa Twin Adventure Sports and the Fireblade racing bikes will be available in India, although the exact time of launch and the prices are yet to be revealed.

Powered by a lighter and more powerful 1100 cc parallel twin engine, both versions of the 2020 Africa Twin use a lighter, narrower frame, improving both agility and comfort. The all-new racing bikes — CBR1000RR-R Fireblade and Fireblade SP — come with a new frame and engine and draw strongly on Honda’s RC213V MotoGP technology. Both bikes will be available in two colour schemes: a Grand Prix Red and a Matte Pearl Black.

Make in India focus

These launches come at a time Honda Motorcycles and Scooters India is making big plans for its exclusive premium motorcycle business under the ‘Honda BigWing’ vertical. With new focus on ‘Make in India for the World’, Honda plans to foray into mass production of select big bikes from India, from the existing CKD/CBU operations. While the existing model of the Africa Twin is assembled in India, the CB1000R is being imported as a fully built unit. The modalities for these 2020 models are still being worked out and whether they will be manufactured, assembled or imported cannot be ascertained immediately, said Prabhu Nagaraj, Vice-President, Brand and Communications, Honda Motorcycles and Scooters India.

The company plans to nearly double its BigWing portfolio from the current seven to 13 models by next fiscal. Nagaraj hopes that the focus on ‘Make in India’ will improve the export potential for the company, especially after the implementation of BS-VI emission norms (Euro V equivalent) from April 1, 2020.

Honda CB4X adventure concept – Debuts at 2019 EICMA
The concept was designed by Honda’s Italian R&D team.

by Nithyanandh Karupp from https://www.rushlane.com

Honda’s R&D team from Rome has been quite active for the last five years, fielding interesting design concepts at every edition of EICMA. At this year’s edition, the Italian wing has come up with a snazzy Honda CB4X adventure tourer concept.

Honda describes the project as experimental machine which is developed under theme “fun seven days a week”. The motorcycle is claimed to be a crossover with healthy blend of Sport and Touring. The motorcycle was designed by Valerio Aiello and his young team of designers.

Without revealing much, Honda says that the concept is powered by an inline four cylinder engine that would offer more than adequate power for a long trip on the weekends and yet be flexible enough for everyday urban grind.

The company describes the unique fuel-tank silhoutte to be inspired by a cobra ready to attack its prey. Complementing the front heavy stance is the sharp semi-fairing with diamond shaped LED headlamp cluster.

The design concept features aluminium sub-frame, a steeply raked tailpiece a pointy tailight and a set of sport exhaust pipes. 17-inch alloy wheels, Brembo braking system, inverted telescopic front fork and rear monoshock round off the hardware configuration.

On board the new CBR1000RR-R Fireblade, the Japanese motorcycle maker’s popular liter-class four-cylinder powertrain develops a heady 212 hp. If at all the CB4X concept makes it to production, we expect this engine to be adoring its bay albeit in a much saner state of tune.

Honda has not discussed the possibility of a production model anytime soon but we hope to see a derivative achieve fruition. It is to be noted that the company showcased CB4 Interceptor concept a couple of years ago which is yet to see the light of day. That said, if the concept garners good positive response, Honda could explore the possibility of a commercial launch.

A production version of the Honda CB4X would competition with the likes of Yamaha Tracer 900, Kawasaki Versys 1000, Ducati Multistrada and so on. Honda has also unveiled the updated Rebel 500 and 300 cruisers at the ongoing motorcycle expo.

Harley-Davidson’s® First Adventure Touring and Streetfighter Models Debut with All-New Revolution® Max Engines

By | General Posts

Models Beckon a New Era of Middleweight Capability, Performance, and Attitude from Harley-Davidson

Displayed for the first time publicly at EICMA in Milan, Harley-Davidson® is showcasing two all-new middleweight motorcycles, including the release of information surrounding the latest signature Harley-Davidson® V-Twin engine – the Revolution® Max. The powerful all-new 60-degree V-Twin has been designed for a new range of Harley-Davidson motorcycles in two different guises – 1250cc in the new Harley-Davidson Pan America™ and 975cc in the Harley-Davidson® Bronx™. Harley-Davidson® first announced expansion into new segments including new middleweight offerings in its More Roads to Harley-Davidson® accelerated plan for growth in July 2018.  These exhilarating new models will both launch in late 2020 extending the iconic brand into new market segment.

Pan America™

The Harley-Davidson Pan America™ is an all-new advanced adventure touring multi-purpose motorcycle equal parts campfire, wanderlust, and grit. The Pan America™ is a two-wheel multi-tool built to endure, designed to explore, and engineered for the unknown.

Bronx™

The new Harley-Davidson® Revolution® Max powertrain is also at the heart of an all new Bronx™. This middleweight streetfighter model rolls with an unapologetic attitude and performance to match.

Powering both the new Pan America™ and Bronx models is the new liquid-cooled 975cc and 1,250cc Revolution® Max engine. Created to power a range of new Harley-Davidson® models, the Revolution® Max is designed to offer flexible performance with a broad powerband that builds to a surge of high-RPM power. Minimizing weight and maximizing performance, the Revolution® Max provides a narrow powertrain profile that is integrated into the motorcycle as a stressed member of the frame to enhance center of gravity and handling. The fully balanced powertrain has an internal counter balancer that mitigates primary engine vibration to enhance rider comfort and improve vehicle durability. Its design is bold and contoured, classic and contemporary, strong and svelte – a representation of Harley-Davidson® performance and style.

Revolution® Max 1250 Engine Performance Targets

  • Displacement 1250cc
  • More than 145 horsepower
  • More than 90 ft. lbs. peak torque

Revolution® Max 975 Engine Performance Targets

  • Displacement 975cc
  • More than 115 horsepower
  • More than 70 ft. lbs. peak torque

Revolution® Max Engine Technical Features

  • Liquid-Cooled V-Twin Architecture
  • Since 1909 the V-Twin engine has been the centerpiece for legendary Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. This lineage continues into the middleweight performance space with the Revolution® Max engine.
  • A 60-degree vee angle of the cylinders provides space for dual down draft throttle bodies that maximize air flow and increase performance.
  • Liquid cooling maintains a controlled engine temperature for consistent performance in changing environmental and riding situations.

High Performance Development Collaboration– Braking and Tire

To optimize performance of the new Pan America™ and Bronx™ models, Harley-Davidson® tapped into the expertise of world class component manufacturers to deliver bespoke solutions for braking and tire performance. For braking, Harley-Davidson® collaborated with Brembo® to create a new radial monoblock four-piston caliper that combines sharp edges with softer curves designed to create a style that complements the personality of the bike and delivers outstanding braking feel and capability. For tires, Michelin® and Harley-Davidson® have worked closely to develop co-branded tires for each motorcycle model that optimize performance, feel and grip in all conditions.

Ducati partners with Lenovo for designing superbikes

By | General Posts

The bike manufacturer will use a Lenovo high-performance computing cluster that will help the company to drive rapid innovation.

Ducati Motor Holding has joined hands with Lenovo for the design of its superbikes.

The bike manufacturer will use a Lenovo high-performance computing cluster that will help the company to drive rapid innovation.

As the brand says, it is continually looking for innovative ways to make its vehicles faster, safer and even more attractive.

Konstantin Kostenarov, Chief Technology Officer at Ducati, said, “Our HPC environment is the engine that drives the development and design of our road and racing bikes.”

He also added, “We use advanced aerodynamic and fluid dynamic modelling tools to calculate how a particular design or bike feature will react in different riding conditions. We don’t just do this for the superbikes that we sponsor on the racecourse, but for our road models too, so all bikers that choose Ducati enjoy an exceptional riding experience.”

Previously, Ducati used its own HPC infrastructure for the design process, but recently, it found that is no longer delivering the performance, reliability or flexibility which is needed in order to test new designs within tight deadlines. Hence, Ducati decided to use Lenovo’s HPC infrastructure.

Stefano Rendina, IT Manager at Ducati, said, “Previously, we had to transfer the results of our models and stress tests from the HPC environment and then use an entirely different workstation to transform this data into easy-to-understand visualizations. The process of transferring data in this way was both time-intensive and expensive—slowing down research and development.”

News Source https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Harley Davidson: The Road Only Goes Downhill

By | General Posts

Harley-Davidson delays its first $30,000 electric motorcycle after unexpected findings during final quality checks

  • The company delayed the motorcycle after ‘non-standard conditions’ were discvoered during final quality checks
  • Dealers had begun selling pre-orders of the bike in January
  • Harley-Davidson had forecast shipping 1,600 bikes

Harley-Davidson has delayed production on its first electric motorcycle, called LiveWire.

In an email sent to dealers last week, the company announced it had found a ‘non-standard condition’ in its final quality checks but didn’t elaborate further.

The LiveWire was officially announced for commercial release last fall with a planned price of $29,799.

‘We recently discovered a non-standard condition during a final quality check; stopped production and deliveries; and began additional testing and analysis, which is progressing well,’ the company said in a statement.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the decision came after a problem with the vehicle’s battery charging was discovered. The manufacturer did not say when they planned to resume production.

The company had already begun delivering models of LiveWire to dealers in September.

The company had expected to ship around 1,600 bikes, or an estimated 1 percent of the company’s total big shipments.

The LiveWire is said to go from 0-60 mph in three seconds and reach top speeds of 110 mph.

Harley-Davidson recommends users go to dealers to charge the vehicle rather than trying to use standard electrical outlets in their homes.

It is powered by a 15.5 kWh battery and has a 105 horsepower magnetic engine and a range of 146 miles city driving on a single charge.

Harley-Davidson had told potential customers to charge the bike only at registered dealers and not in their homes.

The bike was first shown in The Avengers: Age of Ultron as a sleek prototype ridden by Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow character.

The LiveWire promised a slew of advanced technical features, including what PR Manager Paul James descried as ‘twist-and-go.’

‘Because it’s all-electric, it’s twist-and-go,’ Paul James, PR Manager at Harley-Davidson, told Dailymail.com at the Las Vegas Convention Center earlier this year.

The LiveWire’s battery is said to have a range of 146 miles of city driving.

‘There’s no transmission, there are no shifters, no clutch – it’s very easy to ride.’

LiveWire is equipped with a full suite of electronic lateral aids, with a slew of sensors and programmable touch controls.

It also has cellular connectivity, making it the first mass market motorcycle in North America with the capability.

This means it can alert the owner if the bike has been tampered with or moved. It also has built-in GPS for location tracking.

As for the sound, Harley says its electric powertrain will produce a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

The ‘twist-and-go’ bike ditches the traditional shifters and chirps out a turbine-like whir in lieu of the characteristic rumble. The company is hoping this will usher in a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

LiveWire will also launch in Canada and most of Europe later this year, Harley-Davidson says.

  • Harley Davidson sales have been on a decline the past five years hurting the company’s bottom line. The company has introduced new initiatives to buck this trend.
  • Despite the new strategy Harley Davidson will have a hard time attracting millennial customers and will face stiff competition in Asia.
  • Harley Davidson is highly levered and not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

Harley Davidson (HOG) has been having a rough last couple of years, with its current stock price nearly half of where it was in 2018 as it fell from around $50 per share to its current price of about $35 per share. The company is an American icon, with the Milwaukee-based motorcycle maker being founded more than 100 years ago, and conjures up a certain type of imagery – that of big bikes, loud engines and groups of somewhat older riders riding together in large groups.

This level of brand loyalty and, dare I say, cult following has been a cornerstone of Harley Davidson’s strategy for years. However, Harley Davidson’s sales have begun to slump in recent years after reaching a high in 2014 with this trend set to continue in 2019. In Q2 2019, the company delivered nearly 69,000 bikes for the quarter, down 5% compared to the same period a year earlier and overall sales fell 6% to $1.4 billion.

The brand loyalty that Harley Davidson has cultivated has become its weakness as its core demographic of rider’s ages the company struggles to attract the new millennial rider and re-align its brand messaging to match what that segment is looking for.

UBS conducted a survey of more than 2,000 people between the age of 21 and 34 in an attempt to figure out why Harley-Davidson stock has fallen 32% in the past 12 months. While their findings are bad news for big expensive cruisers and touring bikes, they are actually good for other parts of the industry. Unlike older buyers who considered a bike “as a hobby” or because “motorcycles are cool” Millennial responders want them for “ease of transportation.” Young buyers are interested in practical and affordable bikes, for now, partially because many of them don’t have a lot of money. There is no telling if hooking Millennial customers now with affordable and practical might lead to selling them a big touring bike when they are older and have more time and money. Among the young target demographic, the second most common reason listed for buying a bike was “it goes with their self image” so the important thing might be to not try to sell them their dad’s motorcycle.

Harley will have difficulty attracting the millennial audience

I struggle to see how 10 years from now a millennial who would have values such as being more frugal, more minimalistic and more environmentally conscious would not opt for a sleek, sporty high-tech Ducati and go for a big, loud, chrome-plated Harley Davidson. Therefore, it makes sense that Harley Davidson would try to shift its brand away from this older image and embrace something more modern. And the fact is, the company is well aware of that. On July 30, 2018, the Company disclosed its “More Roads to Harley-Davidson” plan to accelerate the Company’s strategy to build the next generation of riders globally. Under the plan, the Company intends to introduce new products including electric motorcycles, a new middle-weight platform of motorcycles that includes adventure touring, custom and streetfighter models with engine displacements ranging from 500cc’s to 1250cc’s; and smaller displacement motorcycles for emerging markets. The Company plans to introduce these new motorcycles between 2019 and 2022, starting with a new electric motorcycle, LiveWire, in the second half of 2019.

These plans are hitting a bit of a snag, as the company is seeing soft demand for its Livewire electric vehicles. These electric motorcycles, which are aimed at millennial customers and billed as a way to attract a new generation of riders, come with a sticker price of $30,000 nearly as much as a Tesla model 3. It’s as if the company ignored the main necessary selling points (i.e. “practical” and “affordable”) for this demographic. Harley Davidson does make some decent, affordable bikes in their Street lineup. But they still have that stigma, of being expensive toys. In the sub-$10,000 motorcycle market, Harley can’t compete in terms of bang-for-the-buck with the likes of Triumph, Ducati, and the Japanese big four that’s been cashing in on cheap Harley alternatives since the 1980s.

Harley to face stiff competition in the emerging markets

Harley Davidson’s other area for potential growth is through expanding in emerging markets, particularly China and India. The company announced a collaboration with Qianjiang Motorcycle Company Limited (“Qianjiang”) to launch a smaller, more accessible Harley-Davidson motorcycle for sale in Harley-Davidson dealerships in China by the end of 2020. Motorcycles have been a presence in Asia for years with brands like Honda and Yamaha, along with local country-specific brands, dominating the sale of smaller vehicles.

There is a difference in motorcycle riding philosophy between the US and Asia. In many Asian countries, a motorcycle is considered a legitimate transportation option. A motorcycle is easier to park in the densely packed cities, can squeeze right through traffic, and is far more affordable than a car. Fuel in many Asian countries is also more expensive, and the taxes and permit fees for motorcycles are much lower too.

Given these considerations, in my view for Asian customers the main selling point of these motorcycles would be affordability and reliability as the next “tier” in terms of status symbols would be purchasing a car. The way I see it, Harley Davidson’s Asian motorcycles will slot in a premium category as is typical with other Harley products. The question then becomes for the Asian customer who may not be as familiar with the Harley brand and who do not view motorcycle riding as a “hobby” is that will they be willing to pay for that premium.

Harley Davidson is highly leveraged

Looking over at the financials, the company is trading at a low forward GAAP P/E of about 13. This is justified though as the company’s revenue has declined by 8.21% from 2014 to 2018 and its Net income has declined at an even faster rate of 37% in the same timeframe. The company is not trading at a cheap valuation.

Even more worryingly, the company is highly leveraged at 82 percent of total liabilities to total assets and with a debt to equity ratio of 4.62. Furthermore, a large portion of the company’s assets (nearly 70%) are finance receivables i.e. amounts owed by customers who have bought Harley Davidson motorcycles on finance. As we have seen in the experience of Kraft Heinz (KHC), a large amount of leverage would limit the flexibility of the company to make the necessary changes to its strategy. Given the headwinds the company faces due to declining sales and the need to change its strategy, I am quite bearish on Harley Davidson. The company is not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

NEWS SOURCE:
https://seekingalpha.com
https://www.dailymail.co.uk
https://www.wheels24.co.za

BMW Considers Bringing M Badging To Motorcycles As Well

By | General Posts

From http://www.autospies.com

More separates the worlds of Bimmers and Beamers than just the number of wheels.

The two Bavarian houses of BMW, which encompass Bimmers (cars) and Beamers (motorcycles), have had a long-standing wall dividing each other. Cracks, though, have been recently forming and it seems BMW’s ready to tear down that wall with three trademark applications that would unite the two via the brand’s M Division.

According to BMWBlog, which unearthed a score of recent trademark filings with the European Union Intellectual Property Office, BMW looks set to bring the “M” moniker to the company’s motorcycle division using three of its motorcycles.

BMW Could Be About To Bring Its M Division To Motorcycles

By | General Posts

By: Sabrina Giacomini at https://www.rideapart.com

In the automotive industry, BMW’s M division has become a synonym for performance. Pretty much anyone you ask whose favorite car is a Beemer is likely to add an “M” before the model number. For motorcycles, the “S” lineup has become the de facto sport standard, but according to recent trademarks, that could be about to change.

If you hear about the S 1000 RR or the S 1000 XR, whether you’re familiar or not with the model, chances are the S makes you think of “sport”. If we’re going to get technical, the letter-based nomenclature BMW uses refers to its engines rather than to the segment its motorcycles slot in—S implying the motorcycle uses an inline four engine.

A few years back, BMW tried to make HP4 Race happen—a race-ready version of the S 1000 RR. The model was anything but a commercial success and BMW had to rethink its strategy to make its high-performance bike sound inspiring.

It looks like the answer to that problem might come from the brand’s automotive lineup. Three trademarks filed by BMW with the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) in 2019 suggest that the M division will crossover to the motorcycle side. In fact, the company has secured the names M 1000 RR, M 1300 GS, and M 1000 XR.

Now, what should be interesting to see is whether BMW will replace the S 1000 RR and XR with the M 1000 RR and XR or if the Ms will become high-performance versions of the models. That is at least how the brand has proceeded with its cars (M3 for the 3 Series, M4 for the 4 Series, etc.)

Also interesting is the 1300 and GS combination—there currently isn’t any 1300 GS in the BMW Motorrad lineup (there isn’t even a 1300 displacement offered at the moment). Some sources who discussed the trademarks suggest this could be an amped up version of the current R 1250 GS with a new, bigger engine.

I believe the latter would be the more sensible move if the Germans’ sense of precision and order has any part to play in it.

At this early stage, it’s hard to tell whether BMW will execute the plan or not. It could possibly lead to a dead-end and be dropped altogether before it even makes it at the stage of concept. Wouldn’t be curious to know what an M 1300 GS would end up looking like?