Skip to main content
Tag

news Archives — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup

By General Posts

From Ducati Racing Museum – Troy Bayliss

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup, Road Machines to Follow.

To date, despite the advances electric mobility is making in the world of motorcycles, there is only one major bike maker that has embraced electric drivetrains: Harley-Davidson, with its LiveWire. But soon, there will be more, and Ducati seems to be keen on becoming the next one.

The Italian company announced this week it is officially entering the electric motorcycle segment, but it will not be doing so with a bike that can be sold to the general public. Instead, the Borgo Panigale manufacturer will become the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship, the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup.

The deal between Ducati and the organizers of the competition, Dorna Sports, will come into effect in 2023 and will run through 2026. That means we’ll probably have to wait some more before we get to see official details and images of the electric bike, but Ducati tried to give us a glimpse of that by releasing a teaser rendering of the two-wheeler (main pic of this piece).

What’s more important is that Ducati promises the MotoE bike will influence “the evolution of the product range,” hinting the electric drive is something now under consideration for the general public.

“The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts,” the Italians promised.

MotoE came into existence in 2019 and is presently using Energica Ego Corsa motorcycles. Sadly, the series became famous not for the achievements of these electric machines, but on account of a fire back in 2019 that destroyed all the motorcycles before racing could get going at Jerez.

Ducati promises to share the story of this new bike’s development throughout 2022, through means that are yet to be announced.

PRESS RELEASE FROM DUCATI

21 OCTOBER 2021
Ducati is thrilled to announce the beginning of its electric era: starting from the 2023 season it will be the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the FIM Enel MotoE™ World Cup, the electric class of the MotoGP™ World Championship.

The agreement signed with Dorna Sports, organizer and promoter of the most important international two-wheel racing championships, lasts until 2026 and will therefore cover four editions of the MotoE World Cup.

This is a historic step for the Borgo Panigale motorcycle manufacturer which, following its custom of using racing competition as a laboratory for technologies and solutions that then become reality for all motorcyclists, enters the world of electric bikes starting from the sportiest sector, that of the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship.

The goal is to develop expertise and technologies in a constantly evolving world such as the electric one, through an experience familiar to the company like that of racing competition. This has been a consolidated tradition for the Borgo Panigale company starting from the Ducati 851, which inaugurated the trend of Ducati road sports bikes by revolutionizing the concept with its innovative two-cylinder water-cooled engine, electronic fuel injection and the new twin-shaft, four-valve heads, deriving from the Ducati 748 IE bike that made its debut in endurance races at Le Castellet in 1986.

Since then, this endless transfer of expertise has always taken place from the Superbike World Championships, in which Ducati has participated since the first edition in 1988, and from MotoGP, in which Ducati is the only non-Japanese motorcycle manufacturer to have won a World Championship.

The crossover is also evident in the most recent and prestigious products of the Borgo Panigale manufacturer: the V4 engine of the Panigale is in fact strictly derived in its entire construction philosophy – from the bore and stroke measurements to the counter-rotating crankshaft – from the engine that debuted on the Desmosedici GP in 2015. The V4 Granturismo that equips the new Multistrada V4 was then derived from the Panigale engine. All the vehicle control software is also directly derived from those developed in the racing world. Not to mention the field of aerodynamics.

The technological solutions developed in the world of racing, transferred to the products that make up the range, allow Ducati to offer its enthusiasts extremely high-performance and fun-to-ride motorcycles. The FIM Enel MotoE Championship will also be no exception in this regard and will allow the Company to develop the best technologies and test methodologies applied to sporty, light and powerful electric motorcycles.

At the same time, the fact that Ducati forms part of the Volkswagen Group, which has made electric mobility an essential element of its 2030 “New Auto” strategy, represents the best prerequisite for an extraordinary exchange of expertise in the field of electric powertrains.

The announcement of the agreement was made during a joint press conference in the press room of the Misano World Circuit ‘Marco Simoncelli’ on the eve of the Made in Italy and Emilia-Romagna Grand Prix, the third to last round of the 2021 MotoGP World Championship. Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports, and Claudio Domenicali, CEO Ducati Motor Holding, were both present.

Claudio Domenicali, CEO of Ducati Motor Holding: “We are proud of this agreement because, like all the first times, it represents a historic moment for our company. Ducati is always projected towards the future and every time it enters a new world, it does so to create the best performing product possible. This agreement comes at the right time for Ducati, which has been studying the situation of electric powertrains for years, because it will allow us to experiment in a well-known and controlled field like that of racing competition. We will work to make available to all participants of the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup electric bikes that are high-performance and characterized by lightness. It is precisely on weight, a fundamental element of sports bikes, that the greatest challenge will be played out. Lightness has always been in Ducati’s DNA and thanks to the technology and chemistry of the batteries that are evolving rapidly we are convinced that we can obtain an excellent result. We test our innovations and our futuristic technological solutions on circuits all over the world and then make exciting and desirable products available to Ducatisti. I am convinced that once again we will build on the experiences we have had in the world of racing competition to transfer them and apply them also on production bikes.”

Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports: “We are very proud to announce Ducati as the new, single manufacturer for the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup. With their incredible racing history, it is an honour to welcome this commitment from one of the best-known manufacturers in the paddock and to take on this new challenge together. We are eager to see what the future has in store and continue to watch this technology develop and grow, with the MotoGP paddock and MotoE continuing to drive innovation and evolution in the motorcycling industry – at the same time as creating an incredible on-track spectacle.”

This first step of Ducati in the world of electric bikes will also have an influence on the evolution of the product range. Now, the most important challenges in this field remain those of the size, weight, autonomy of the batteries and the availability of charging networks. Ducati’s experience in the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup will be a fundamental support for product R&D, together with the physiological evolution of technology and chemistry. The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts.

A new chapter of the FIM Enel MotoE Word Cup is closer than ever. And that of Ducati too.

During 2022, various events and collective moments will allow all fans to discover the development of the project step by step.

The Nuts Bikernet Weekly News for October 21, 2021

By General Posts

Bedroll from 5-Ball Racing Gear

Bandit says, “Let’s ride, no matter what.”

Don’t ever give up on Freedom. It works.

— Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Click Here to Read the Weekly News only on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Every Angle of the New BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW Shows Every Angle of the New R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

Enough time has passed since BMW pulled the wraps off the new members of the R 18 family, the B and Transcontinental, so the enthusiasm about them might have gone down a bit. In an attempt to remind people these new two-wheelers are ready to hit the roads, the Bavarians threw online yet another huge gallery showing the motorized beasts.

You can enjoy most of them on BMW Website, and you can top them off with the already large set of pictures BMW released when the bikes were unveiled. Before you get into that though, a quick reminder about what these ones are all about.

The R18 came into existence more than a year ago, as BMW’s return to the cruiser segment. Being such an important model, it was gifted with the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.” Called Big Boxer, it is a piece of 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Before the two new models were introduced, the family comprised the standard cruiser and the Classic. And now there are four.

The B, which is supposed to stand for bagger, comes with a low windshield, slimmer seat, and a large fairing. The Transcontinental on the other hand is fitted with a larger windshield, additional headlights, and a top case at the rear.

Both hold in their frames the same engine we mentioned earlier, not modified in any way, and are gifted with a larger fuel tank, 10.5-inch TFT screen, and even an area with inductive charging for smartphones. Three riding modes, Rain, Roll, and Rock, are on deck to help riders better navigate their way, and each bike is fitted with automatic stability control and drag torque control.

On the U.S. market, the cheapest R 18 is the standard one, which sells for $15,995. The most expensive is the Transcontinental, priced at $24,995, while the B sits somewhere in between, at $21,945.

New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated Regularly

By General Posts

There are New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated With Every New Event

Check Out the Photos by Jack McIntyre at Cantina Section of Bikernet.com

There’s nothing like the warm Florida sun. Daytona Biketoberfest is a classic example of great riding, weather, and a nonstop 4-day long party. From the super-beautiful beer tub gals to the assortment of motorcycles, events, contests, and bands, it’s simply a stunning Bikefest to attend.

This gallery is only from the first Thursday, 10/14/21. Much more to come as out photographers creep around and shoot everything & everyone, especially the sun-tanned skin of the gals on Main Street.

CLICK HERE To View the Latest Photos from Biketoberfest 2021 on Bikernet.

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Fossil Fuel Bikernet Weekly News for October 14th, 2021

By General Posts

It’s All Good and Packed with Info

We are living in the absolute best of times. Let’s ride free forever.

Never a dull moment, but it’s all a positive adventure. Even fixing stupid shit, is a positive endeavor and keeping me from thinking about building another motorcycle.

There’s always something going on in Deadwood. If it has to do with whiskey, I’m in.

Let’s hit it.

–Bandit

Click Here to Read the Weekly News only on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

By General Posts

Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Getting A Grip Bikernet Weekly News for October 7, 2021

By General Posts

Hey,

We’re headed directly into the magnificent Holidays.

I’m beginning to itch for bike to build, maybe a Knucklehead.

Ya get it. We can do anything we set our minds to, and rapidly.

We have the resources, the knowledge and the materials at our fingertips. So, what the fuck is holding you up?

Ride fast and free forever and never give up!

–Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Click Here to Read the Weekly Motorcycle Industry News on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Peery Win Streak Continues at AHDRA

By General Posts

AHDRA motorcycle drag racing race coverage report by Tim Hailey with photos by Mike Davis.

event: AHDRA Southern Nationals

when: September 17-18, 2021

where: South Carolina Motorplex, Orangeburg, South Carolina, USA

From the U.S. Nationals in Indy to AHDRA’s Southern Nationals in Orangeburg, Ryan Peery is enjoying a streak like few other racers ever. Heat and humidity, cool and dry, quarter mile or South Carolina Motorplex’s eighth—Peery has mastered them all in 2021 as he wins Top Fuel Harley races one after another in multiple sanctions, including AHDRA, NHRA, and just last weekend at AMRA.

Peery could be headed to multiple Top Fuel Harley championships this year, including the AHDRA all-American motorcycle drag racing series. His final round win against Dr. Jimmy “Mack” McMillan at Orangeburg on September 17-18 might have sealed the deal.

Qualifying number one, Peery had the bye while running consistent 4.20’s all weekend, while McMillan had to face Bad Apple Racing’s Tracy Kile—the winner of AHDRA’s Cecil County event.

“Jimmy ran some personal bests and took out Tracy,” said Peery. “He and I paired up for the final, and it looked like he was lined up a little crooked and he crossed center. Jimmy is doing a great job though. He will turn into a tough competitor with a little more seat time.”

Local second generation star Armon Furr won Hawaya Racing Nitro Funnybike, beating points leader Michael Balch in the final. “I appreciate everyone that came out and participated in the event,” Furr said first off. “I hope we can try it again, maybe this time earlier in the year. If we are going to have a race in South Carolina, this is the best track even though it is eighth mile.

“Not really much to tell about my performance because I didn’t really do anything great. Just got lucky.”

Like Furr, South Carolina’s Sam White gave the home crowd what they wanted, taking the Hawaya Racing Pro Fuel final over Rocky Jackson.

Nate Carnahan scored an easy Pingel Modified win when Stoney Westbrook redlit in the final. “Was my first win in Mod, and it was pure luck but I’ll take it!” laughed Carnahan, who was struggling all weekend with tire spin off the line.

John Shotts won Vreeland’s Harley-Davidson Super Gas 6.35 index, beating Robert Willis in the final. Shotts took the tree .039 to .049 and came out on top of the double breakout race.

“We struggled all weekend with the bike,” said Shotts, echoing Carnahan’s path to victory. “Never did figure out the problem but we ran good enough to win! It was our first time at that track and we really had a good time.”

Willis also runner-upped in Top Eliminator, losing the final round to Ken Strauss, but won Mad Monkey Motorsports Eliminator over Jason Leeper.

Jason’s son Jordan Leeper had a Luke Skywalker moment, beating his dad in the Street Eliminator final. “Wasn’t the first time,” laughed Jordan. “He’s good, but my bike was dialed in more than his was. When it came down to it, I got the holeshot and he broke out trying to chase me down.

“I’d just like to thank Universal Fleet & Tire Racing for having me as a team rider, and everyone from the AHDRA for coming out and letting the sport prosper, and a special shout out to Bill Rowe for hosting these amazing races! I’m very pleased with my bike this year, minimal breakdowns while staying consistent. I’m happy with 11.50 wins this year, but we’re on the hunt for the championship.”

Leeper’s teammate “Crazy” won Trophy.

Larry Maynhart hadn’t been to the track in over five years, and came back with a bang—winning Universal Fleet & Tire Pro Eliminator 7.00 index and falling just short in Super Pro 6.60 as the runner-up.

“I did a permanent move to Georgia,” Maynhart says about his absence. “Don’t realize how fast the time goes, but I was determined to get back racing this year.”

Maynhart was sharp on the tree in both finals, putting .040 on Cody Hayward while winning a double breakout Pro Eliminator final. He had .033 on Bob Maier in the Super Pro final, but let Maier win with a sharp 6.609. “Get the light, lose the race. I’m rusty,” concluded Maynhart. “But I had a great weekend.”

John Price won the Zippers Performance Pro Modified final over Shane Pendergrass, and Ryland Mason tamed his wheelies long enough to win Law Tigers Pro Bagger over Justin Demery,

Greg Quinn is another winning wild wheelier, picking up the MTC Bagger trophy. “Been trying to tame my bike,” Quinn said of his Kendall Johnson ProCharged, former Tii Tharpe machine. “Finding the perfect combination is tough for a carbureted bike. Still doing wheelies and climbing the ladders of the field.

“My first time running at this track and the prep was good.

“I’m blessed to be part of a history making time frame. It really started in Nahunta, North Carolina—Wood Cycles put a race on. My racing life has been blessed, and out-of-pocket is hard. Hope to keep doing just as I did in South Carolina, and somebody will surprise me with sponsorship.

“I’m just grateful for my travels, and that AHDRA has Mike Davis and Tim Hailey around for capturing the moments I don’t get to see.”

Kevin Campbell won GMS Racing Pro Open

And now Bill Rowe, his family, and the AHDRA community turn their attention to making the World Finals at Gainesville Raceway the biggest, baddest, and best ever! Be there November 6-7 to cap off a great 2021 and set the stage for a historic 2022.

The AHDRA website is at http://raceahdra.com/