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Creating a 1916 Harley-Davidson from only an original engine

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Recreating a historic Harley-Davidson racing model without the original parts except the original engine.

Believe it or not, it’s been 118 years since the foundations of the company we now know as Harley-Davidson were laid. Somehow, the company managed to get through two hot world wars, a cold, long one, and more near-death experiences that we care count.

Such a long history means there are more models in the company’s past than in its present (and some, might argue, more than in the future). Some are so old it’s literally impossible to come across one, and people have to turn to all sorts of gimmicks to get their hands on a historic model.

Like the guys behind this build did. Trying to bring back one of Harley’s historic racing models, a Swedish museum by the name of MC Collection got their hands on an original motorcycle engine from 1916 and built a bike around it, trying to capture the essence of what was once the Model 11K racer.

The engine belonged to a Model F, and was slapped inside a full loop frame constructed (together with the forks) by former German road racing cyclist Christian Henn. The frame presents itself just like it did on the original Harley of more than a century ago, in the so-called keystone configuration, with stressed members and steel engine plates.

This way of building racers gave them better handling but, perhaps equally as important, allowed for the cylinder to be removed with the powerplant still fitted on the bike, allowing for quick intervention during races, if they were required.

This 1916 Harley was put together in Sweden more than a decade ago, and in the meantime it made it to the U.S. It was listed as for sale during the Mecum motorcycle auction this weekend, and it got sold for $57,750. As a side note though, whoever bought it will only be using it as a museum piece, because it is not street legal.

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Cut-Down 1926 Harley-Davidson JD Is a Throwback to Custom Bikes of a Century Ago

Like with cars, ever since motorcycles were born, their stock appearance and performance were not enough for some owners. Attempts at giving machines, regardless of the number of wheels, new capabilities, have led over the years to the many custom shops we have around today, but also to a wide range of styles and visions.

Back in the 1920s, motorcycles were already evolved enough to be taken racing. The novel sport naturally attracted lots of fans, including some that wanted to feel on the road at least part of the thrills riders felt on the track.

As a result, modifications started being made, and they ultimately began to coalesce into different customization styles. In the U.S., one of the first such styles, considered by some to be the first widely-copied one, was the cut-down. That’s not to be confused with the term that stands for modified Italian scooters from the 1970s and 1980s.

Taking inspiration from racing motorcycles, cut-down two-wheelers were made lighter by removing several elements, and visually unique by the elimination of the front fender and the modification of exhaust pipes and headlamps, for instance.

These changes were largely performed on the Harley bikes of the age, especially those from the J family. And we have a taste of how they looked like in the 1926 JD model we have here.

We found it on the lot of bikes going under the Mecum hammer next week in Las Vegas. It’s described as a “proper period custom with no radical changes to the chassis or engine,” but with all the enhancements one would expect from a cut-down model.

We are not given any details on who is responsible for the changes made to the stock JD but the green and red machine will probably make quite an impression next week in Vegas.

GMA handlebar wiring harness

By General Posts

GMA custom 48″ handlebar wiring harness for 1″ bars

GMA, a member of the Belt Drives Limited family of companies, is now offering a complete handlebar wiring harness designed exclusively for the popular GMA hand controls. Available with or without their custom replacement switch housings, kits include 48” long OEM color coded wires that are pre soldered to the micro barrel switch buttons. Wires are encased in a protective glue impregnated shrink tube at the buttons to ensure secure connections while pulling wires through your bars.

Additional lengths of shrink tube are included along with pin connectors. Deutsch 6 pin connector housings, and a small brain box ensure positive – flawless operation. Each kit comes with an easy to follow simplified wiring schematic. Part numbers are GMA-HBWH, “wire harness, no switch housings”, GMA-HBWH-SW-P, “wire harness with polished switch housings” GMA-HBWH-SW-B, “wire harness with black switch housings” & GMA-HBWH-SW-C, “wire harness with chrome switch housings. Retail prices are from $235.00 for harness only up to $459.00 for harness and chrome housings.

For additional information and to order visit GMA at www.beltdrives.com

Chasing and Cleaning Threads Tech Tip

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Cutting new threads in stock materials is all but necessary for fabricating new parts and pieces for a project, but what about threaded holes that already exist in parts you need to salvage? Then it’s time to talk about chasing threads. While it’s a simple process, there are a few tips that are important to keep in mind.

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Indian Motorcycle Announces Indian Chief Custom Program

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Indian Motorcycle is tapping four renowned builders to customize the new 2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse. To showcase the range of the platform, each builder has a signature style that differs from the next. First, Indian Motorcycle is excited to reunite Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, as the two haven’t teamed up for a project in nearly 15 years. Next, Indian is tapping Go Takamine to see his interpretation of a custom Chief. Lastly, Indian will see how Carey Hart will follow up his first custom Chief with this build.

Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief. In an effort to showcase the vast personalization possibilities inherent to the Indian Chief platform, three renowned V-twin customizers were selected to produce totally unique interpretations of the iconic motorcycle; including former Indian Larry tandem, Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart, and creator of “Bratstyle,” the popular brand and globally recognized “throwback” aesthetic for motorcycle customization and restoration, Go Takamine.

For Cox and Sasaki, this project marks the first time in nearly 15 years the duo has worked together, dating back to the early 2000’s when they disbanded after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

With its classic steel tube frame, exposed rear shocks and Thunderstroke motor, the new Indian Chief was designed with a mindset fixed on reaching back to the past, while pushing into the future. To that point, it was also by design that Indian Motorcycle selected three builders that span the spectrum of classic and modern customization styles.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, various Indian Motorcycle models have served as the canvas for Hart’s design creativity and customization skills. He recently unveiled the first-ever, custom 2022 Indian Chief – a modern club-style take on the new Chief platform – just following the bike’s debut in early February.

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Indian Chiefs and Indian Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian Motorcycle.

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model – allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

The curated accessory collections consist of the following:

Rogue Collection
Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection
With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection
Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Shipping to dealers now, the 2022 Indian Chief lineup offers three distinct models with two trim levels. Powering all premium Chief models, including the Chief Dark Horse, Chief Bobber Dark Horse and Super Chief Limited, is Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 116 engine with 120 ft-lbs of torque. ABS is standard, while premium finishes set these bikes apart and further showcase the craftsmanship and attention to detail. The Chief Dark Horse and Chief Bobber Dark Horse each pack further attitude with premium gloss black finishes, while the Super Chief Limited touts premium chrome finishes. All are equipped with Indian Motorcycle’s industry-first 4 inch touchscreen powered by Ride Command which offers turn-by-turn navigation, Bluetooth® pairing for access to mobile phone information, as well as bike and ride information.

The Indian Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief are each powered by Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 111 powertrain with 108 ft-lbs of torque. Each model features an analog gauge, chrome and matte black finishes, and is available with or without ABS.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Customs Garage webpage. Additionally, riders can learn more about the Indian Chief at their local Indian Motorcycle dealership, by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com, or by following along on Facebook®, Twitter® and Instagram®.

Softail Gone Tough

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Generally described as a type of motorcycle boasting the rear suspension concealed under the frame, the term Softail is literally tied to Harley-Davidson. The American bike maker even has some rights for the name, ever since the FXST hit the market in 1984.

The moniker is deceiving, at least on a superficial level, as there are no soft traits in these bikes. The family, which presently includes the Softail, Fat Boy, and Low Rider, among others, are known to be able to take a beating in stock form, but also survive hard customization work performed in shops around the world.

What you’re looking at now was once a member of the Softail family, and for all intents and purposes it still is. Only it has been modified by a German shop called No Limit Custom to such a degree that it now looks like a hard, cold piece of threatening metal on two custom wheels.

Called Limited in the shop’s books, the motorcycle was gifted with a sharp-looking fuel tank. What you’re looking at is not a custom piece, but something NLC calls a shell, which is glued on top of the original piece of hardware to give it whatever new shape the owner desires.

The two-wheeler also received a new short rear fender, a so-called engine spoiler meant to make the entire build more aggressive, custom CNC-milled hand levers, and various covers. The most expensive hardware that went into this build is the swingarm kit, worth around $4,400 according to NLC.

The changes made to the two-wheeler are successful enough to convey a message of toughness, but only for those who can afford it. Combined, the parts used on this build are worth around 6,000 euros, which is roughly $7,000 at today’s exchange rates. That’s not including the man-hours, paint scheme, and of course the bike itself.

Custom Motorcycle with Three Engines

By General Posts

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Custom Motorcycle With 3 Honda CB750 Engines made with the objective of participating in Land Speed Racing.

Once in a while we come across an engineering marvel that makes us wipe our eyes and maybe even scratch our heads. Now, branding the latest case as a marvel would be an outstretch but it surely does make us carry out the last two acts. If you think you have witnessed insane aftermarket modifications that can’t be matched, this one might force you to rethink.

When you see a single motorcycle is powered by three engines, yes you read that right – three engines in one motorcycle, probably can be called MotorsCycle. You can easily judge for yourself the number and kind of mod jobs that would have been carried out. Named ‘The Galaxy’, this behemoth is powered by three bored-out CB750 motors which essentially makes it a 12-cylinder 2,508cc glory.

Idea of Three Engine Motorcycle
This motorcycle is a creation of California-based custom motorcycle builder Mitsuhiro ‘Kiyo’ Kiyonaga who intends to take this monster to Land Speed Racing. Kiyonaga started his aftermarket workshop in Los Angeles in 2013 and his first project ‘Cherry Blossom’ was a custom-built stretched land speed racer that featured a turbocharged Honda CB750 engine housed in a frame built from scratch.

A few years later he followed it up with another 1970s top fuel-style bike but powered by twin motors this time and named it ‘Gekko’. Even though the Galaxy was Kiyo’s pet project which he has dreamt of since his childhood, it was seriously materialised only when his first two motorcycles were acquired by Haas Moto Museum. Work on the bike only started when owner of the museum, approved and officially commissioned the project.

Galaxy- Powertrain specs
Coming to its specification, Galaxy draws its energy from three four-pot motors sourced from F2 large port heads. Each of these engines has been bored-out to 836cc has been completely rebuilt with balanced and lightened crankshafts, performance cams, oversized stainless steel valves and heavy-duty connecting rods. Special care was taken to ensure that each internal configuration was in line with the original spec.

The motors are held by a three-piece chassis that constitute a tubular upper frame, and two huge engine mounting plates that also act as a rigid swingarm. Front half of Galaxy has been integrated into the frame which hides the pump, fuel tank, battery and all other functional components under its skin.

That tail section is a hand-built aluminium piece that can hold up to 9.5 litres of gasoline for the oil-sucking engines. A tiny port found at back is essentially an outlet for the engine breather hose.

The alloy wheels made out of aluminium are a piece of art with holes cut out on the front wheel in order to limit the effect of crosswinds at high speeds. With stretched-out ergonomics, ‘rider triangle’ was carefully calculated that offers impressive control and grip when racing across salt tracks.

The designer claims that every component on the bike has been modified and built by hand without aid of any designing software which deserves high applause. The Galaxy now finds shelter in the same museum as Kiyo’s previous two projects. However, Kiyo is yet to tick off all boxes and that would happen only when he takes to Land Speed Racing.

Harley-Davidson Fat Boy on 52-Spoke Wheels Is a Sight to Behold

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

You don’t have to be the owner of a motorcycle shop to be able to make your own incredible designs. All you have to do is have some ideas, pitch them to the right crew, and then get ready to pony up the bill. And someone seems to have nailed all these requirements with the 2011 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy we have here.

The bike you’re looking at is a 2011 model year, but it doesn’t look like one thanks to over $9,000 spent on modifying it. In charge of that was a Corinth, Texas-based shop called American Eagle, and it seems like they more than lived up to their end of the deal.

In our view, the change that stands out the most has to do with the wheels. The original ones were replaced by DNA Mammoth pieces with so many spokes it makes one dizzy to look at. There are 52 of them on each of the 18-inch wheels, all of them black and beautifully offset by the white rims.

But these are not the only changes made to the two-wheeler. At the back the bike received a custom lowering kit, and a solo spring-saddle in leather. At the front, we get a slim fender, black upper and lower fork slider covers, and 12-inch, ape-style handlebars with white grips.

As for what powers the bike, the shop did not change that for something else, but improved on it. The stock 96ci powerplant was gifted with Screamin’ Eagle gray exhaust wrap, a Stage 1 air cleaner kit, and a Smokey Chrome air cleaner cover.

The bike is presently for sale on Hemmings with about 6,600 miles (10,600 km) of use on it. Despite the upgrades that went into it, and the way it looks, it doesn’t seem to impress people all that much, as for now just $7,100 have been pledged for it, with eight or so days left in the auction.

Tropical Tattoo Willie’s Chopper Time 2021

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Tropical Tattoo Old School Bike Show at Daytona Bike Week
by Rogue

A classic Chopper show I try not to miss when in Daytona for Bike Week. Willie puts it together at his Tropical Tattoo, and it looks like lots of other people felt the same way about the Bike Week show.

The place was packed with motorcycles and people.

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Sam’s Picks for the Week of March 16th, 2021

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What do Choppers mean to you? I should know. I’ve worked with the greatest builders on the planet. I’ve built a few myself and I started in the industry because of Choppers.

Hell, I worked with the god father of the Chopper, Arlen Ness on several projects. So, what did they mean to me, when I first started to turn a wrench and built my first rat bike chopper? I was maybe 20, recently back from Vietnam, escaped the harsh family and wondered what the hell I was going to do next.

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