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By | General Posts

NEW BIKERNET AND BANDIT’S CANTINA PROGRAMS FOR 2020

To keep Bikernet moving forward in the New Year, we’ve shuffled things around a bit. We have decided to shut down all major advertising sales and will move all of Bikernet’s impressive library and 24 years of archived editorial content into Bandit’s Cantina, Bikernet’s subscription-supported section.

We will however keep the Bikernet Blog active daily and accessible for free.

All major content will be expanded into the Cantina.

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Our readers can stay abreast of all the action on Bikernet by joining the Cantina for as little as $24 yearly or $39 for two years. They will also receive a special package containing an assortment of Bikernet goodies and bling.

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Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

By | General Posts

by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”

Our magic number – 200

By | General Posts

They say that every company has a magic number.

“Seven friends in ten days.” – It was Facebook’s sole focus in its growth from zero to one billion users.

With Twitter, their explosive growth happened when users followed thirty people.

Even though we are making motorcycles, we have identified our own magic number. And we think this number will turn the incumbent motorcycle industry on its head.

Our magic number is 200.

Can you guess what this means?

CLICK HERE to join the conversation

WAIT, what about specs and price?
And when can I get one?

We know you’re all very excited and can’t wait to get specs and pricing. We’ll be live-streaming our first ever public unveil live from the show floor in Las Vegas at CES 2020. So get in on the action via our social media channels and stay tuned for more information via email.

Pre-ordering begins January 7th

About Damon Motors Inc.
Damon is unleashing the full potential of personal mobility for the world’s commuters. With its proprietary electric drivetrain, the company has developed the world’s safest, smartest, fully connected electric motorcycle employing sensor fusion, robotics and AI. Designed as a platform for worldwide line extension, Damon motorcycles will ship direct to consumer on subscription plans to drive scale.

Based in Vancouver, Canada, Damon is a Techstars Mobility company founded by serial entrepreneurs Jay Giraud and Dom Kwong. Damon’s investors include Round 13 Capital, Techstars, Fontinalis, Extreme Venture Partners and Pallasite Ventures.

Return of the Titan

By | General Posts

A Brother Brings the Giant Back to Life and Youth to His…

I had the wants for another custom bike but have turned into a cheap old fucker since getting SS at 62.

I’m still a chopper guy and decided a Big Dog or Texas Chopper was it. Limited funds had me loosing auctions on EBay. Up pops a ‘98 Titan with no reserve only 300 miles away.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FEATURE ARTICLE

Funky Panhead Part 4, New Frontend Installed

By | General Posts

Brand New from Paughco, Early-Style Springer and Black Bike Wheel

I spent a lot of money and time rebuilding an old 41mm wide glide for my 1969 Panhead build. It was one of those crazy builds, fulla twists and turns, but the glide haunted me.

Then I got a call from the masterminds at Paughco. They recently developed a new springer configuration, because so many overseas manufactures stole their classic, flat side design.

CLICK HERE TO READ THIS TECH ARTICLE ON BIKERNET

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Rik Albert blends love of motorcycles, cars with art

By | General Posts

by Thia James from https://thestarphoenix.com

Saskatoon’s Rik Albert speaks about his unique art and his 10-year quest to bring an ergonomic bike handle bar to market.

“You build that?” asks a man walking along the residential street where Rik Albert rides his bike, equipped with a Toon bar, a raised handle bar of his invention.

Albert explains that the handle bar is for people with carpal tunnel syndrome — since it’s intended to relieve some of the pressure put on the rider’s wrists — and people with spinal injuries, since the rider remains in an upright position.

“Holy smokes,” the man replies. Both continue on their way.

The Toon bar has been a 10-year passion for Albert. It’s still at the prototype stage, but he’s been an unfailing advocate for his invention. He created a video, wrote a letter to talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, and has appeared on local television to spread the word about his creation. He reached out to DeGeneres, who is originally from Louisiana, because they share Acadian roots, he says. He’s originally from New Brunswick.

Albert’s father was from New Brunswick and his mom was from Western Canada; they met in Ontario and moved to New Brunswick, then to Montreal, where he became bilingual by learning English. When his parents divorced, he moved to Esterhazy, Sask. when he was about 10 years old.

“(When I) got off the train, I could see the Atlantic and I could see the Pacific, and went ‘Wow, this is flat,’ ” he jokes.

Albert went on to work for General Motors and Harley-Davidson, which speaks to both of his passions, cars and motorcycles.

The idea for the raised handle bar came almost out of necessity. As he puts it, he’s already used seven of his nine lives.

When he was 27 in 1989, while riding his Harley-Davidson motorcycle from Davidson to the Alberta border, he attempted to pass a truck near Gull Lake and ended up underneath it. The truck sucked him under its front wheel and dragged him for a distance, crushing his right ankle and breaking his right hand and collarbone.

He spent time in three different hospitals, he says.

While rehabilitating over the course of three to four years, he found the best thing for him was to be on a bicycle to move his right leg and hand.

One day, while at work unloading Harleys, he came close to suffering another injury when a three-ton truck backed up, nearly missing him. After that, he designed the raised handlebars.

Albert can’t bend over traditional handlebars, putting his weight on his right wrist, so he made a version of what would come to be known as the Toon Bar for himself. Almost 10 years ago, he had a friend weld a piece of pipe to his bike’s existing handlebars, then added a crossbar. He wants to make telescopic handles and functional hand brakes for it, he says.

He’s been approached by many people while out riding his bike with the raised handles who have asked him to bring it to market, he adds.

“I wish I had a log and a camera on the bars to show their expressions, because you’d think I was riding a bike on Jupiter or on Mars.”

While he works to move his invention past the prototype stage, sales of his art are what “buys the mac and cheese,” as he puts it. Albert repurposes unused motorcycle parts, such as exhaust pipes stripped off at the retail level for new owners who want custom pipes. He’s used them to create and sell custom-built lamps.

He’s had vehicle parts in his hands since he was a General Motors parts manager in his 20s, he says, and became familiar with cars at a young age when his dad raced cars in Montreal.

He fondly remembers his time working for Harley-Davidson.

“It’s a shame when a customer buys a brand new Harley that the pipes are $500 each and they take them off brand-new and throw them in a corner and nobody uses them again. So I figure, why not repurpose them and make all kinds of stuff with them?”

After his accident and rehabilitation, he learned how to work with glass. Over the last 10 years, he’s created commissioned glass works, including tables and mirrors, for customers in Vancouver, Calgary, New Brunswick and Montreal. To generate sales, he relies on word of mouth, online classified ads and appearances at craft, art and car shows — anywhere he can exhibit his work for free.

One piece he keeps for himself is dedicated to his Acadian roots. It took 20 hours of airbrushing and etching behind the glass, he says.

Louis Paquette, the owner of Saskatoon Truck Centre, met Albert at a Cruise Night event earlier this year and bought a lamp, which led Albert to show him photos of his other custom furniture pieces. Paquette saw a coffee table he liked and asked Albert to build him one. The lamp and table are now at Paquette’s business. When clients ask where he got it from, he says “It’s an old family secret.”

Paquette, a past director of the Saskatchewan Craft Council, said he isn’t a motorcycle enthusiast, but he does collect cars. Albert’s work is unique, he says.

“He uses his imagination when it comes to motorbike parts. Who the hell would think that you’d take some mufflers and make a coffee table out of it?”

What drew him to Albert’s display at Cruise Night was his custom-built Corvette — the combination of the back end of a 1976 model and the front end of a 1981 model.

One child dubbed the vehicle The Batmobile, Albert says. He attributes his interest in rebuilding cars to his father’s own interest in hot rods, and going to car shows.

“Everything I have, I pretty much make it to my own liking and make it custom made so it’s not a cookie-cutter item,” he says.

Design : A Deeper Dive on Proportion

By | General Posts

Proportion _ Take a moment to study the size and proportion of our Hades 1 Pure. Compare it to the others. We’ve created a First Principle design by starting from the ground up with the technology required to create the best battery-electric vehicle. We’ve optimized the packaging. The proportion that exists on the others is a carry-over from bloated internal combustion packaging. There is no need for it in a world of electric. We have the opportunity to create a new Golden Age proportion, and we are determined to lead the way.

Us vs. Them _ Our 19″ wheels, 8″ ground clearance, low 28″ seat height, and compact 25″ of core girth, compared to their 17″ wheels, 5″-6″ ground clearance, 30″+ seat height, and 36″+ core girth highlights the proportional differences between their machines and ours.

Hades 1 Pure _ Represents the fresh start in motorcycle design opportunities that we have all been waiting for, and it begins with proportion!

Order Hades 1 Pure for 1,500.00 USD down. Production will begin in late-Spring 2020. Delivery will be first-come, first-serve based on order date, so be quick in order to secure your position!

ORDER NOW https://www.curtissmotorcycles.com/ownership

Dull Yamaha XSR900 Turns Into Convoluted Naked Racer

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

On the market as a naked motorcycle paying tribute to the classic bikes of old, the Yamaha XSR900 somehow manages not to be a real head-turner. At least not in factory specification, because when custom builders get down to business, it turns into something else entirely.

The factory-made motorcycle is as basic as it gets from a design standpoint, lacking all the unnecessary elements that on other two-wheelers cover the front and side. But given enough imagination and just a few extra elements, the XSR900 can look quite appealing.

The motorcycle depicted in the gallery above is called Type 11 and started life as a Yamaha XSR900. It was born after hours and hours of work on three different prototypes, at the hands of a London-based custom builder by the name of Auto Fabrica.

The bike no longer looks bare and simple, but features flowing lines – obvious especially when it comes to the long, curved exhaust – that make you think the bike is no longer slamming against the incoming air, but rather flowing through it.

That’s mostly because of the way in which the fuel tank has been shaped and extended to embrace the handlebars, and then end with the large, round headlight.

The changes made to the Yamaha are not only visual. The Type 11 uses Ohlins forks and socks, the steel exhaust we mentioned earlier, painted black, and carbon-nylon parts in the radiator. Also, there’s Alcantara on the seat and aluminum on the grips.

Auto Fabrica says it will build this bike in limited numbers, and only to order. That means the personalization options go even further, and each client will have the right to ask for the desired specifications.

No pricing for the custom build has been announced. More details on the Auto Fabrica Type 11 can be found at this link.

Samurai-Inspired Kenzo Motorcycle by Death Machines Is a True Work of Art

By | General Posts

by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com/

Not many would describe a motorcycle as “stunning” or “beautiful,” but then again, maybe they haven’t seen yet the latest from Death Machines of London (DMOL). The Kenzo is a tribute to the early Samurai, and Kenzo Tada, the first Asian rider to compete at the Isle of Man TT, built on a 1977 Honda Gold Wing GL1000.

It’s DMOL’s most radical machine to date, as per their own words. It’s also a true work of art of tremendous beauty, combining an aggressive look (smooth curves and razor-sharp folds) with the exquisite handiwork and high-performance technology.

Putting The Kenzo together took longer than DMOL ever imagined. They say they ripped apart one machine (the original Gold Wing) and built another, only to rip that one apart too. The Kenzo is the result of a combination of techniques, from 3D printing to CNC machining, precision etching and holographic lighting, and actual handwork for the leather parts. And lots of frustration.

It is meant as a tribute to 2 great men whose deeds have made history: Honda Tadakatsu, who, in 1570, became one of the most revered samurai in Japan, and Kenzo Tada, who traveled by train for 4 straight days in 1930 just so he can ride in the Isle of Man TT, becoming the first Japanese rider to do so. It is actually named after the latter because there is only one The Kenzo.

The Kenzo was penned using CAD software and the team behind DMOL assumed that putting every piece together would be relatively easy. They were wrong, but the extra long hours and the many moments of “f**k it” eventually paid off. The result is an aggressive-looking machine that stands out for the seamless way in which it incorporates parts that seem ripped from an early samurai armor, like the scale-like panels that hide the tank, the leather stitched to mimic the under-armor clothing on the seat, or the grips that are wrapped in the traditional Tsukamaki sword wrapping technique.

Even the speedometer is customized in typical DMOL fashion. Using an 18th century Japanese jewel box, they hand-crafted a beautiful, holographic speedo that features a dragon that is illuminated with diffusion film technology. The dragon ghost, says DMOL, is “the spirit of the machine.”

The stacked projector headlight arrangement, as well as the indicators and tail light are a collaboration with Luminit of California and represent a custom DMOL design. The wheels are 18-inch rims clad in Avon rubber. Additional features include a black-anodized USD Ohlins fork, a “detailed ‘Kenzo’ grill work, an in-house petrol cap, [and] precision-machined aluminum badges.” The body is painted in the company’s proprietary Titanium Samurai paintwork, with matte black detailing.

While The Kenzo proved a bigger headache than anticipated, DMOL is all for giving credit where credit is due: it’s “a testament to Honda’s engineering prowess that very little work needed to be carried out on the 40-year-old engine,” they say. The original Gold Wing arrived and stayed in mint condition for less than 5 minutes, before they set out to work on it, but the soul of the machine is still inside The Kenzo.

“The horizontally opposed 1000cc flat four was dismantled, inspected and refreshed. The carburetors were tuned to compliment the DMOL Slash Cut mufflers,” DMOL says. “Painted in satin black, cosmetic detailing features head case plates with ‘Kenzo’ written [in Japanese characters].”

On the electrics, our in-house designed loom was installed, greatly simplifying the original installation,” DMOL adds.

Bringing the engine to life can be done by tapping the proximity fob on the leather “V” intersection on the custom seat, while ignition is possible with the starter button hidden under the right handle bar.

If you have about $72,350 to spare, this one-off masterpiece can be yours.

Harley-Davidson Hits the Slopes with Street Rod Snow Bikes

By | General Posts

by Jason Marker from https://www.rideapart.com

Harley-Davidson and Suicide Machine Company built a pair of extremely rad Street Rod-based snow bikes for the X Games.

What do you get when you cross a Street Rod 750, a snow track kit, and the know-how of a couple of ace fabricators? Well, you get a pair of killer Street Rod-based snow bikes like these two beauties right here. Now, I hear you. I hear you asking, “But Jason, why?” The short answer is, “Why not?” The long answer is that the X-Games are coming up and Harley wants to go play in the snow with the cool kids.

A week or so ago, we told you about Harley’s new Snow Hill Climb event at the 2018 X Games out in Aspen, CO. Apparently that wasn’t the only thing The Motor Company had up its sleeve for the event, as I found out earlier this week when I got to talk with Scott Beck, Harley-Davidson’s director of marketing. Along with the customized Sportsters taking part in the hill climb, Harley hired known hooligans and all-around cool guys Aaron and Shaun Guardado from Suicide Machine Company to build the Street Rod Snow Bikes to haul athletes around between events. That’s… that’s pretty rad, Harley.

One of the first things I asked Beck was, “Why the X Games?” I’ll be honest, when I think Harleys I think more about lonesome highways and open roads rather than, say, snowboarding and energy drinks. Beck told me that the hill climb event and the snow bikes are all part of Harley’s efforts to attract more people to motorcycling via the power of awesomeness.

“For 115 years H-D riders from all walks of life have expressed their freedom from the seat of America’s favorite motorcycle, so it’s natural for us to continue to blaze trails – this time off the road and in the snow,” Beck told me. “We’ve raced the ice and climbed virtually every kind of hill, and the Harley-Davidson Snow Hill Climb is another way for us to grow the sport of motorcycling. We know our riders, and X Games fans and athletes alike share a passion for adrenaline and speed.”

That’s great and all, but what you guys really want to know about is the bikes themselves, right? Lucky for you I also talked to Aaron Guardado of Suicide Machine about the build to find out how these things were built and what makes them tick.

The bikes started off as bone stock XG750 Street Rods, which the brothers received from Harley just before Christmas. That kicked off a frantic search for track conversion kits, a search complicated by the fact that these things are so popular that they’re sold out just about everywhere and Christmas was in a few days. After a flurry of phone calls, they finally tracked down two Camso DTS-129 kits at a dealership in Salt Lake City, Utah, on December 23. The track conversion kits arrived at Suicide Machine’s Long Beach shop on Christmas Eve, delivered by the SLC dealer himself in his wife’s Jeep, but that was just the beginning.

If you don’t know – and I didn’t know until Aaron told me – track conversion kits like the Camso units are built specifically for dirt bikes, not street bikes. This meant that both the bike and the track unit itself would have to be modified to make the project work. The guys started by removing the Street Rods’ swingarm, rear tire, and shocks. They then fabricated a pair of struts with quick-release hardware to connect the track unit to the bikes themselves. This was complicated by the fact that the track unit was just a hair narrower than the bike, which threw off the chain allignment. With the help of a machinist friend, the Guardados built a handful of spacers and other adapters to get the drive chain aligned with the bike’s primary drive. Thankfully, since the track has its own integral suspension, they didn’t have to deal with finding a way to spring it as well as mount it.

Up front, they removed the front wheel and fender to mount the conversion kit’s ski. Using the stock Street Rod axle, forks, and triple trees and some custom machined spacers, they were able to mount the ski with much less drama than the track. It still wasn’t quite right though. See, the skis only come in white, which just wasn’t going to cut it. Since, as we all know, black is the coolest color, the guys had the skis ceracoated black. This improved not only their aesthetics, but added an additional layer of protection to keep the skis safe from any debris or obstacles lurking in the snow.

On the performance side, the Guardados chose to give the bikes a light tune and fancy-pants new clutches. Each one got a Screamin’ Eagle pro street tuner, Screamin’ Eagle intake, and Screamin’ Eagle exhaust. The latter needed a bit of fiddling to get it to fit since the stock mounts were removed when the track was installed. To improve power delivery and make these frankenbikes easier to manage, the brothers switched out the stock clutches for Radius X auto-clutches from Rekluse. These things consist of an auto-clutch assembly and a custom clutch pack and allow a rider to start, stop, and shift without ever touching the clutch lever. Aaron told me that the Rekluse clutches make the Street Rods respond to throttle input more like something with a CV transmission than a standard gearbox, therefore making them easier to control in the snow.

Once all the machining and fiddling and finessing was done, it was time for the Guardados to test their new creations. Sadly, there was no snow because, you know, California, so the bikes were just fired up on the bench and tested in the shop. Everything looked okay, so the bikes were loaded up and shipped out to Aspen for their shakedowns. Once the bikes were in the snow, they really showed off their potential. The Street Rods proved surprisingly well suited for the snow bike conversion, and with the engine tune and Rekluse clutch they powered through the drifts like they were built for it. At one point during all the screwing around in the snow serious testing, Olympic snowboarder Ben Ferguson showed up with fellow snowboarder Jack Mitrani. After oohing and aahing over the bikes for a bit, they snagged one and started towing each other through the snow while kicking up serious rooster tails. This was, without a doubt, the perfect way to test them.

During our conversation, Aaron told me that despite the stresses of building these bikes over the holidays with such a tight deadline, that he was really proud of how they came out. He felt that the project stretched the boundaries of not just the brothers’ skills as builders and fabricators, but the capabilities of the Street Rod as well.

I gotta say, these snow bikes are extremely rad. They’re such a departure from the usual Harley-based customs, and they really show off the versatility of the Street Rod platform. I mean, who ever would have thought making a Street Rod into a snow bike? If you’re going to be in Aspen this weekend, or are just enjoying the X Games from the comfort of your warm living room, keep an eye out for them zipping around the event grounds.