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A New Definition For Motorcycle

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New vehicles entering the roadways with little resemblance or operational characteristics to that of a motorcycle, have been arbitrarily classified as motorcycles. The Motorcycle Riders Foundation has drafted language to put an end to the confusion. When identifying bill numbers are attached to this position, you will be notified. See the attachment for more details. In the meantime…

  • Have you registered for Bikers Inside the Beltway? It’s free but time is running out! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
  • Have you made your appointments to visit your members of Congress? Make your appointments now in your district or in Washington, D.C.
  • Have you made your hotel reservations? Final date for hotel registration, May 13, 2021: 703-684-5900 Embassy Suites by Hilton Alexandria, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation is moving forward to make the 2021 Bikers Inside the Beltway our most effective event ever. Thank you for your commitment to the MRF’s mission. Thank you for making appointments with your members of Congress. Click here to see the position paper for Definition of a Motorcycle.

Thank you for your membership and support of the Motorcycle Riders Foundation.

Yamaha XSR125 makes global debut

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from https://www.financialexpress.com

Smallest neo-retro XSR to launch in Europe in June.

A new-retro-styled Yamaha has just been revealed which would make fun daily commuter, enter XSR125 – the smallest XSR to date. The Japanese manufacturer is expanding its 125cc portfolio with the XSR125 which is based on the same platform as the MT-125 and R125 but with classic clothing. Although it packs a range of modern features which are quite a necessity now.

Yamaha XSR125 is powered by a 124cc liquid-cooled SOHC engine that puts out 14.7 bhp at 10,000 rpm and 11.5 Nm of torque at 8,000 rpm and is paired with a six-speed transmission. The engine boasts advanced Variable Valve Actuation and is Euro V compliant.

Being a neo-retro, the XSR125 gets a round headlamp casing but with an LED lamp and an LED tail lamp as well, a rounded fuel tank design, and a long flat seat. Bodywork has been kept at its minimal with the underbelly revealing the engine and radiator, but it does get an engine guard.

The instrument cluster is a retro-themed LCD display with a chrome outer finish. Colour options include Redline, Impact Yellow and Tech Black, along with contrasting decals for each.

Suspension setup includes 37 mm upside-down forks and swingarm for the rear and brakes are covered by a 267 mm disc up front and a 220 mm at the rear. Tyre sizes are 110 and 140, front and rear. It weighs in at 140 kg with a seat height of 815 mm, 160 mm ground clearance and a fuel tank capacity of 11 litres.

Veterans plan Memorial Day motorcycle ride despite roadblock

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by Angie Angers from https://www.baynews9.com

It’s a Memorial Day tradition for tens of thousands of veterans to ride their motorcycles to the nation’s capital.

Pentagon had blocked their permit request, but vets say they are going regardless

This time, the event was nearly in jeopardy.

Every May for more than 30 years, veterans from all over the country have made the trip to honor those gone and those still missing in action.

“Not only continue the tradition of holding Congress and the government accountable for trying to find these over 82,000 missing veterans, but also for veteran suicide,” said organizer Tom McNamara with AMVETS.

McNamara says they’re expecting roughly 100,000 veterans and they’d received nine out of the 10 permits needed to make the trip happen.

But just recently, defense officials denied their application to use the Pentagon’s parking lot like they have for the last three decades.

“Using our satellite views on how we’re going to stage motorcycles, and a month ago they came back and said, ‘No, we’re not gonna do it, and didn’t give us an answer as to why,’” McNamara said.

Officials of the Pentagon later cited COVID safety concerns and left AMVETS scrambling for another plan.

Now Rep. Brian Mast is involved and is accusing leaders of blocking the tradition.

He sent a strongly-worded letter to Congress pushing them to reconsider.

McNamara says — either way — the veterans are using their constitutional right to protest and will be coming to D.C. no matter what.

“As our First Amendment right, these people are coming anyway, we’re going to be there anyway. So now, we’re just lining up on the streets,” he said.

They just want to keep the tradition alive.

“Let’s just say Congress will know about it,” McNamara said with a laugh.

The ride is set to take place on May 30. Organizers say they will release a final schedule and route for the event within the week.

View AMVETS website for the event at https://amvets.org/rolling-to-remember-demonstration-ride/

Official Website for the event is https://www.rollingtoremember.com/

Report on Fandango in Texas 2021

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A couple of years ago the growing membership of the Cherokee Chapter of the AMCA (Antique Motorcycle Club of America) in central Texas made a monumental decision. The antique motorcycle group wanted to establish a major antique motorcycle event closer to the center of the country.

Greg McFarland, the current president of the chapter came up with the name Fandango and it stuck. Fandango (noun) means, “a foolish or useless act or thing” Tomfoolery. Greg and Steve developed a successful formula for the event, much like the infamous Smoke-Out: Action all the time and something for everyone.

Click Here to see the Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.

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Tom Cruise rides a Motorcycle Off a Cliff for Mission: Impossible 7

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by Zack Sharf from https://www.indiewire.com

Tom Cruise Rode a Motorcycle Off a Cliff for ‘Mission: Impossible 7,’ His Most Dangerous Stunt Ever
A motorcycle. A cliff. A daredevil actor. What’s the worst that could happen?

Tom Cruise found himself jumping out of airplanes and hanging off the side of cliffs during the making of “Mission: Impossible — Fallout,” but apparently all of that is child’s play compared to what’s in store for “Mission: Impossible 7.” During an interview with Empire magazine, Cruise confirmed that one sequence in the next “M:I” installment features him riding a motorcycle off a cliff and is the most dangerous stunt of his career so far.

“If the wind was too strong, it would blow me off the ramp,” Cruise said about the stunt. “The helicopter [filming the stunt] was a problem, because I didn’t want to be hammering down that ramp at top speed and get hit by a stone. Or if I departed in a weird way, we didn’t know what was going to happen with the bike. I had about six seconds once I departed the ramp to pull the chute and I don’t want to get tangled in the bike. If I do, that’s not going to end well.”

While free-falling off a cliff on a motorcycle sounds insane, Cruise maintained that relief was one of the biggest sensations he was feeling during the stunt because there was a time during the pandemic where the production’s future was in question. “All those emotions were going through my mind,” the actor said. “I was thinking about the people I work with, and my industry. And for the whole crew to know that we’d started rolling on a movie was just a huge relief. It was very emotional, I gotta tell you.”

“Mission: Impossible 7” reunites Cruise with his “Rogue Nation” and “Fallout” director Christopher McQuarrie. Franchise veterans Ving Rhames, Simon Pegg, Rebecca Ferguson, and Vanessa Kirby are back for another go-around opposite Cruise, while new cast members include Hayley Atwell and Pom Klementieff. Cruise told Empire it became his mission last summer to get the “Mission: Impossible 7” production up and running in the safest way possible.

“I’ve produced 30 to 40 movies. I am responsible for thousands, if not tens of thousands, of jobs,” Cruise said. “All my friends in the industry, people that are in distribution, and my crew were like, ‘What are we going to do? I could lose my house!’ So I told the studio and I told the industry, ‘We’re going back. We’re going to get everyone back to work. We’re going to start shooting in the summer. And we’re going to figure out how to do it safely.’”

“Mission: Impossible 7” will open in theaters May 27, 2022 from Paramount Pictures.

Tom Cruise pulls off epic mountain motorbike stunt for ‘Mission: Impossible 7’
by Ben Arnold from https://uk.movies.yahoo.com

Cameras are now rolling again on Mission: Impossible 7, and to celebrate, Tom Cruise has driven a motorbike off the edge of a cliff.

We all recall Cruise hanging from a mountain by his fingernails and clinging on to the side of a plane in past movies.

Norwegian news site NRK has nabbed actual video footage of Cruise performing the stunt, speeding off the ramp, while a plane and helicopter fly overhead.

As the motorbike hurtles towards the ground, Cruise deploys a parachute to bring him safely to the ground.

Locals watched the stunt take place from the valley floor, with Cruise waving to the spectators as he landed safely.

According to reports, the production had to wait for several days for the weather conditions to be just right for the stunt.

Earlier this year, McQuarrie revealed that there are three ‘obscene’ stunts being planned for the movie, with this surely being one of them.

He told the Empire podcast: “We’ve figured out three obscene things that he’s doing that I’m terrified of, that make the (Mission: Impossible – Fallout) helicopter chase look like tinker toys.”

The movie had to close down production in Venice in late February, one of the first major movies to do so, following the outbreak of coronavirus.

The movie was slated for release on 19 November, 2021, having been shunted back from 23 July. Further delay is expected.

Ducati Monster 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Take the edge off.
In 1992, Ducati designer Miguel Galluzzi shoehorned a 900SS engine into an 888 superbike frame. He then bolted on a 750 Supersport fork and the Ducati Monster was born. Galluzzi’s Frankenstein experiment was well-loved though, driving sales at the Bologna brand for years. The parts bin special saved Ducati, in fact, and the Monster has remained in Ducati’s stable ever since.

That hasn’t stopped the Monster from evolving through the years, though. Ducati frequently tweaked the ingredients, but the recipe remained the same: one part air-cooled L-twin, one part trellis frame. However, technology and design move on, and the model has changed with the times. By 2015, all Monster engines switched to liquid-cooling, and the latest iteration finally sheds its trellis frame—and the weight that comes with it.

That prompted traditionalists and ardent Ducatisi to click their tongues, lamenting over Ducati’s heresy. To many fans, the trellis frame was the Monster’s pièce de résistance. The quality that separated the muscular streetfighter from its “soulless” competitors. The trellis frame was the Monster’s greatest strength, but it was also its greatest weakness, imprisoning the naked bike to a bygone era as its counterparts forged ahead.

That’s no longer the case in 2021. Sure, the Monster is still “borrowing” from its counterparts by plucking the 937cc L-twin from the Supersport 950 and wedging it into a Panigale V4-inspried monocoque aluminum frame. Even the model’s 4.3-inch TFT dash sports a Panigale V4-derived interface. Despite those old habits, the question remains: is it still a Monster without the trellis frame? Did it trade in its panache for pastiche? Did it lose its character, its “soul”?

These questions loomed large when Ducati invited us to San Francisco, California, to ride the 2021 Monster. After spending a full day in the saddle of the new bike, it was clear that this is a very different beast.

Engine:
To meet Euro5 emissions standards, Ducati ditched the Monster’s 821cc Testastretta engine in favor of the proven mill found in Ducati’s Hypermotard 950 and Supersport 950. The 11-degree Testastretta configuration carries over, but Ducati bumps the capacity to 937cc for good reasons. That’s 111 good reasons, in the form of horsepower. Ducati couples that with a generous 69 lb-ft helping of torque. More than enough bark and bite for the naysayers.

The powerplant may tout a higher volume than the outgoing unit, but it also shaved off 5.7 pounds in the process. The new clutch drops three pounds alone while the cylinder heads and clutch cover account for two additional pounds of weight loss. The updated gear drum, alternator cover, and pistons and rods pitch in too, saving precious grams.

Ducati’s versatile Testastretta platform isn’t just performance-oriented, however, it’s surprisingly practical as well. New Monster owners can enjoy a whole lot of riding between the 9,000-mile oil services and 18,000-mile valve services. The revised hydraulic clutch also reduces resistance at the lever by 20 percent and the up/down quickshifter nearly eliminates clutch use altogether.

That’s the same Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Evo 2 found on the $24,095 Multistrada V4 S, and the IMU-dependent system works just as well on this $11,895 naked bike. In fact, the DQS equipped on the Monster produces an even more satisfying exhaust note upon downshifting. Modern emissions regulations have taken the voice box of many a motorcycle, but Ducati’s auto-blipper gives the Monster a formidable growl.

Upshifts were just as visceral, but for an entirely different reason. Though the bike’s fueling was pretty fluttery below 3,500 rpm, the Monster really bared its teeth between 4,000-7,000 rpm. A series of clutchless upshifts only amplified the effect. The power delivery never bordered on frightening, though. Of course, if 111 ponies are too much pep for your step, Ducati’s three ride modes help tame the Monster’s inner animal.

Those looking for an easy-breezy experience can switch to Urban mode, which restricts output to 75 horsepower. For highway blasts, Touring mode maintains peak horsepower but prioritizes smooth acceleration. Predictively, Sport mode is the least restrictive, but that doesn’t make it less manageable than its counterparts. After a short squirt through the hilly San Francisco streets, I kept the engine in Sport mode for the rest of the day. Even in the tight and twisty confines of Route 35, the lively engine response never felt overwhelming. Thanks, primarily, to the new superbike-derived frame.

Chassis:
While the engine’s before/after results were truly impressive, Ducati engineers went to greater lengths to reduce the chassis’ mass. Compared to the 821’s trellis front frame, the new monocoque saves 9.9 pounds. The fiberglass-reinforced polymer subframe comes in 4.2 pounds underweight while the swingarm and wheels reduce unsprung weight by 7.2 pounds. Ducati’s diet plan worked wonders for the Monster, converting the heavy brute to a lithe apex predator.

That new, low 414-pound wet weight is noticeable right off the kickstand. Fleet-footed yet planted, the Monster takes advantage of that newfound agility in the turns. Initial tip-in is effortless and side-to-side transitions are predictable and smooth. That sharp-handling quality should redeem the Monster in the eyes of Ducati fans, but focused track riders may discount the sporty naked bike for lacking fully adjustable suspension.

Speaking of, in stock form, the 43mm USD front end and preload-adjustable lean on the stiffer side. At least they did under my 160-pound frame. Heavier riders may benefit more from the spring rate, but the suspension only borders on harsh at the least favorable time—at lean. Northern California’s Skyline Boulevard is a relatively well-maintained mountain road, but a few inconveniently placed potholes unsettled the Monster’s sure-footed stance.

Of course, no suspension operates optimally when leaned over, but the sharp hit doesn’t just stop at the springs. That new, responsive aluminum chassis also relayed those shockwaves up through to the rider. Luckily, the Monster was quick to regain its composure and continued attacking corners. Aside from those rare moments of instability, though, the Monster handled everything the city and the canyons could throw at it.

Unlike the suspension, the braking system’s pedigree was never in question. Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers bite down on twin 320mm discs up front and a dual-piston binder mates to a 245mm disc out back. A radial master cylinder is the last piece of the puzzle, and it delivers incredible feedback at the lever. Whether navigating downtown traffic or approaching a decreasing radius hairpin, the braking performance was confidence-inspiring.

Of course, losing 40 pounds would help any motorcycle shed speed quickly, but that weight loss also informed the motorcycle’s design and user experience.

Ergonomics:
Ducati went to great lengths to reduce the new Monster’s proportions. Along with losing weight, the bike also lost the visual heaviness of its trellis frame and oversized gas tank. The new dimensions deliver a compact yet comfortable riding position that’s neither too aggressive nor lax.

A 58-inch wheelbase certainly helps with handling but it also relaxes the rider triangle. Ducati pairs that compact cockpit with a handlebar that’s 2.6 inches closer to the rider and footpegs positioned .5 inches lower and 1.5 inches rearward. At 32.3 inches, the standard seat height is easy to flat foot, but those with shorter inseams can also purchase a low seat and a lowering kit that drops the perch to 30.5 inches high.

Before jumping for the accessories catalog, I recommend throwing a leg over the new Monster. Ducati narrowed the seat-to-tank area to maximize stand over comfort, and the strategy worked. However, the narrow stand-over position also introduced my knees to a few Testastretta engine cases. On the left side of the bike, the radiator and water pump plumbing can get in the way and the clutch cover is just as obtrusive on the right. It wasn’t too bothersome throughout the day, but it’s definitely worth mentioning.

Aside from those slight discomforts, the new seating position encourages day-long riding. Stretch to the bars is minimal and the narrow cutouts promote clenching the tank with one’s knees. In turn, the ergonomic position alleviated pressure on my wrists and results in a very pleasant riding experience. In the city, however, the stop-and-go traffic definitely introduced wrist fatigue.

Urban riding also revealed that the Monster had the same heat management issues as its predecessors. At speed, the Monster didn’t throw off an irksome amount of warmth, but from light to light, the new naked bike simply radiated heat. Even in Urban mode, the engine reached high temps. If you’re considering a 2021 Monster, you should also consider living near a highway. The Monster is more play than business and excessive urban environs will get it hot under the collar.

The only other tick against the new-fangled Ducati is that L-Twin’s vibration. Of course, that rumble sets the Monster apart from its parallel-twin rivals, but by 7,000 rpm, the high-frequency buzz prompted early upshifts. The vibration is nearly imperceptible at the pegs, marginally more noticeable at the bars, but it’s most present at the seat cowl. With my tailbone pressed against the seat stop, I could tell when the tachometer was approaching that 7,000-rpm threshold just by the vibration.

Electronics:
I can’t wrap up this review without calling attention to the Monster’s impressive electronic suite. With three levels of ABS cornering, eight levels of cornering traction control, four-leveled wheelie control, and launch control, Ducati’s system presents an absurd degree of customization. With that said, I’m the type of person that likes to set it and forget it. Many customers will love the number of doodads on the middleweight roadster, but others will find what they like and stick to it.

Regardless of which camp you’re in, the rider aids and engine performance options make the Monster a more malleable platform. On the other hand, flipping through the numerous menus would be easier if Ducati consolidated the split function navigation and enter buttons on the left switchgear. Also, many electronic interfaces automatically navigate back to the previous menu when the rider confirms a selection. With the Monster’s system, the user has to manually backtrack.

Even with those minor gripes, the electronics suite is clear and easy to use. That should broaden the model’s appeal as it approaches three decades on the market. It’s clear that Ducati wants to angle the new Monster toward a younger demographic, and it believes robust safety aids and rider modes help those efforts.

While all the ride modes are tractable for seasoned vets, I’d hesitate to put the Monster in a brand-new rider’s hands. The entry-level naked bike may be the perfect first Ducati, but that doesn’t make it the perfect first bike. This new Monster is well-mannered, but it hasn’t lost its claws. Rider aids should be there as a safety net, not training wheels, but the Monster would be great bike for intermediate riders to grow into over the years.

Conclusion:
So, did the Monster lose its “soul” when it lost its trellis frame? No, it didn’t. At the same time, it isn’t the same Monster. It’s more youthful. Yes, the trellis frame’s absence is felt. Without its signature visual cue, the Monster doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much, but it does stand toe-to-toe with the KTM 890 Duke, Triumph Street Triple, and Yamaha MT-09. No, the Monster didn’t lose its “soul” it just developed a playful spirit.

If you’re someone that likes the “oohs and aahs” that come with a Ducati, the new Monster may not be for you. If you want a motorcycle that’s light on its feet, attacks the corners, and just happens to be red, the new Duc should be your cup of tea. The 2021 Monster will suit a wide swath of riders just like it did 28 years ago. Those customers may be different today than they were in 1993 and the Monster will only continue to evolve (without the trellis frame) for the next three decades.

Fritchie Classic motorcycle race to return to fairgrounds July 4

By General Posts

by Mary Grace Keller from https://www.fredericknewspost.com

The 100th Anniversary of Barbara Fritchie Classic

There’s a short list of factors that can prevent the country’s oldest continuous dirt track motorcycle race — the Great Depression, World War II, rain and most recently, COVID-19.

But not this year.

The Barbara Fritchie Classic will return to the Frederick Fairgrounds July 4 after the pandemic led to its cancellation in 2020. This year will mark 100 years of tradition at the location since the series started in 1922, according to race organizer Richard Riley.

“The race is on,” he said.

The event will look a little different from years past. The plan is to limit the grandstands to 1,500 spectators (half capacity), COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place, visitors will notice extra cleaning throughout the event, and hand sanitizer will abound.

Riley isn’t worried about reducing the capacity in the grandstands, since they usually see 1,500 to 1,800 spectators, and many of them stand around the racetrack’s fence.

“It’s just good dusty fun,” Riley said.

New this year, the event will offer a STACYC exhibition for youngsters competing on electric bikes. More details are to come, but Riley said the event will probably be geared toward kids ages 4 to 6.

“The kids got to get out,” he said. “They can’t stay in the house all day.”

He also hopes to display restored vintage racing bikes from the era of the first race.

Riley’s been involved in the race in some way since 1977 and first attended in 1968. For decades of his life, the Fritchie Classic has been synonymous with celebrating Independence Day.

Last Fourth of July, Riley found himself staring at the empty fairgrounds. He nearly cried when he had to cancel the event.

“I just looked in there. Everything was locked down,” he recalled. “It would have been strange for me not to go to the Frederick Fairgrounds on the Fourth of July.”

The decision did not come easily.

“I was forced to make a decision that I don’t regret,” Riley told the News-Post in June 2020. “But it’s not something I wanted to make. It was nothing that I would have told you I would have done six months or longer ago.”

One of the competitors looking forward to kicking the dust up at the fairgrounds is 2018 winner Cory Texter of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

“[I’m] looking forward to going back,” Texter said.

He won the main event Expert/Pro Twins race at the 97th running of the Barbara Fritchie Classic. His sister, Shayna, is also a past winner but in the 450cc Pro Sport race in 2008.

“Because it’s so technical, I seem to do really well there,” Cory Texter said. “It’s one of the biggest non-national races we do.”

The history of the half-mile track itself is a draw to competitors. Riley said they’ve had racers from all over the U.S. as well as other countries.

“There’s a tremendous amount of tradition,” Riley said. “I promised I’d get it to 100.”

Richard Riley invites those interested in attending the Fritchie Classic to visit barbarafritchieclassic.com for more information and to buy tickets in the future.

Tickets will also be available at Fredericktown Yamaha, which can be reached at 301-663-8333.

 

A 17-year-old is taking the motorcycle racing world by storm

By General Posts

by James Warren from https://www.theolivepress.es

SPAIN has often been called the mecca for motorcycle racing, with world champions being cultivated from the moment they can sit on a bike.

Household names like Marc Marquez, Aleix Espargaro and current champ Joan Mir all started riding and racing while they were at school, making use of Spain’s love of two wheels to develop their talents unhindered.

As these riders fight to earn their latest victories in 2021, they all have one eye on one name that is causing waves in the Moto3 World Championship.

And that name is Pedro Acosta, a young 17-year-old from Mazarron, Murcia.

So far in 2021, the young man has taken three victories and one podium in the first four races, shattering records for the 250cc class and leaving experts to hail him as a ‘future legend’.

But how has this teenager become one of the most exciting prospects since Marc Marquez arrived on the scene back in 2008.

The answer can be found at the Circuito de Cartagena, a race track six kilometres northwest of the popular resort.

The circuit is popular with trackday riders, people who own motorcycles who rent sessions on the track to hone their skills.

Acosta’s father, also Pedro, was one such rider, with a love for American legend Kevin Schwanz, and eager for his son to inherit his love for two wheels.

“Dad had a Suzuki like Schwantz’s and I grew up looking at the photos and videos of him.” said Acosta in an interview with Spanish publication Marca.

Acosta’s father, keen to see his son carry on the mantle, give him a €150 Chinese Motina bike at the age of five, and brought him to track days at the Cartagena circuit to watch his father ride.

“At first he was not interested, spending more time playing rather than watching, but he soon began to become intrigued to what I was doing.” said his father.

Acosta enrolled into a youth development program at the track ran by early mentor Francisco Marmol, a name that would become an integral part in Acosta’s rise to stardom.

“He would always be at the track with his father, and after a few years we enrolled him in our program, like an after-school club for riders.” said Marmol.

“He developed a taste for it very quickly, and grew a strong bond with me, he listened very intently and it became apparent that he had no fear.”

“He was open to experiment and try new things that I suggested. Some people say they can see a natural talent in children this age but it is not true, it is too early. But Acosta was always ready to learn, and enjoyed every moment, and that was the key.”

The son of a modest fisherman and a mother Mercedes, who didn’t care for racing, Acosta, with the help of Marmol and the KSB Federation, entered numerous national championships as soon as he was old enough, and won the Pre Moto3 championship in 2017.

As a result, Acosta entered the Spanish Junior Moto3 category (CEV), finishing 33rd after racing in just five races, but more importantly giving him his first proper taste of 250cc machinery.

His stint in the CEV gave him the confidence to apply for the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, the official starter class for the MotoGP championship and a place where teams scalp for potential talents.

Acosta made the cut, and in 2019 he began his first foray into international racing.

He impressed, taking three victories and five podiums on the way to a second place finish after 12 races.

In 2020, Acosta remained in the Rookie’s Cup and claimed an unprecedented six straight victories and a further three podiums to take the championship n his second attempt.

His performance got teams talking, and for 2021 Acosta joined the Austrian Red Bull Ajo KTM team on the factory KTM RC250, colours that would propel him into the eyes of the world.

The current crop of riders are already heaping praise on the Spanish youngster, but are concerned that his rapid rise to stardom could be his downfall.

“It is clear that he can become a champion, he has the talent, but he has to surround himself with the right people.” said 2020 champion Joan Mir.

This is a sentiment that is echoed amongst the other riders, with Franco Morbidelli and Marquez all offering words of wisdom to the 17-year-old.

“He must be left alone to enjoy his time on the bike, to concentrate on his development and not be forced to advance to quickly.” said Marquez.

Marquez is referring to rumors that Acosta is already being touted for MotoGP ride, skipping the intermediate Moto2 category altogether, a move that has concerned many.

“Moto2 is a valuable stepping stone, you learn a lot from 675cc racing machinery that you can’t pick up from Moto3, or even training on larger bikes.” said Mir.

“As Pecco (Bagnaia, current Ducati rider) said, two years in each category is sensible, it is important not to rush. It is clear he is something special but he must do what is best for him not what is best for the teams or promotions.”

What Acosta does next year is uncertain, but from humble beginnings he has gained admiration from not only his childhood heroes, but also racing fans across the globe.

Update from Progressive Laconia Motorcycle Week

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Come Ride in NH – Laconia Motorcycle Week, June 12th-20th, 2021 – New Hampshire – home to America’s Original Riding Rally®

https://laconiamcweek.com/

Progressive Laconia Motorcycle Week® returns to the Lakes Region this June 12-20 for its 98th year. Over a quarter of a million riders are expected to attend this year after a pandemic-induced postponement to last year’s rally. The event is host to a full week of music, vendor exhibits, racing and, of course, riding.

Although Motorcycle Week centers around Weirs Beach, you’ll find riders in every corner of the state, from the seacoast to the White Mountains. That’s because New Hampshire’s scenery, fresh air and accessibility are unmatched. Riders can cruise through the mountains, the state’s famed covered bridges, iconic lakes and along the seacoast, all within a matter of hours. Try that anywhere else!

And unlike other events that draw such large crowds, and with that- traffic, residents and businesses embrace this uniquely New Hampshire tradition. By conservative estimates, the week-long event brings over 100 million dollars to the state’s economy each year. Restaurants, hotels, fuel & liquor sales across the state see a huge boost. It is a catalyst for countless tourism dollars, especially helpful because it occurs during the spring season, before the bustle of summer kicks in.

Whether you’re a Motorcycle Week veteran or a first-time attendee, Laconia Motorcycle Week® invites you to experience the thrill of the world’s oldest motorcycle rally®. Come see history in the making as we count down to 100. Come ride in New Hampshire!

Laconia Motorcycle Week® gives great appreciation to all of our sponsors, especially our Presenting Sponsors: Progressive, AMSOIL and Team Motorcycle, as well as the State of New Hampshire for their large financial support of our rally each year.

For more information about visiting the state of NH, check out visitnh.gov.

Laconia – where rallies were invented! https://laconiamcweek.com/