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Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle Documentary

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“Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” Documentary – Coming Soon

Slinger, Wisconsin – March 8, 2021 – The Edge Ltd., producer of “Hogslayer: The Unapproachable Legend,” announces the release of “Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” documentary.

Walter is a feature-length narrative documentary featuring Walter, a 1913 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck, and his former caretaker Michael W. Schuster. A meticulous restoration by Ally Schuster and his grandson Michael, Walter ultimately became an acknowledged motorcycle artifact recognized as the last-known Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck in existence.

In 1913 an unusual motorcycle negotiates through the mud-rutted streets of old Milwaukee. This is one of the first Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck forecars and represents a unique early venture in commercial service delivery motorcycles for the Motor Company. Fast-forward to the present-day as that very same motorcycle truck negotiates through the world of motorcycle collectible artifacts. This is the last-known Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck in existence, a remarkable motorcycle affectionately known as Walter.

This documentary chronicles the life and times of Walter the forecar from its early days of service, through many decades of desolation stored in a horse barn, and then many years of restoration to eventually become the most valuable service motorcycle in the world. Along the way, the producer explores the history of three-wheeled vehicles; the Harley-Davidson Motor Company’s development of commercial service motorcycles, and most importantly documents one man’s adventure in restoring a motorcycle that has been in his family for a century. Independent producer James Cutting considers the discovery of Walter to be the most extraordinary barn-find of our times. In the end, Walter delivers a lesson to embrace our past and forge relationships for our future.

“Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” documentary will be released in 2021. A late-summer premiere is planned in Milwaukee. For more information please contact executive producer James Cutting.

For more “Walter” documentary content visit www.walterdoc.com

Friend Walter on Facebook @Walterthemissinglinkmotorcycledocumentary

“Walter” documentary trailer –

 

Vintage bike as authentic as possible in a discreet bobber look

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

“A vintage bike as authentic as possible in a discreet bobber look.” These are the words used by German custom motorcycle shop Thunderbike to describe one of its more complex projects. Officially titled Bel-Air, it pairs some original and old Harley-Davidson parts with the benefits of more modern hardware in a unique, pure-European custom package.

Thunderbike has been modifying Harley-Davidsons for close to three decades now, and its work has oftentimes been recognized by the American company itself. Most of the time, the shop goes about transforming production bikes to customer specification, but every now and then it sets out to create something a bit more special.

That is the case with the build we have here, which started life as a Harley from 1954. It went through Thunderbike’s doors in 2016 and came out the other way looking like it does now.

The bike’s frame was molded into supporting an S&S shovelhead engine 92ci (1.5L) in displacement and rocking a Super E carburetor and an air cleaner from the same make. The entire thing was then tied to a Paughco Shotgun exhaust system.

Visually, the motorcycle sets itself apart first and foremost through the choice of colors used on the body parts. We’re dealing with a combination of red and white that was allegedly inspired by the Harley-Davidson Duo Glide and looks perfectly in sync with the Chevrolet Bel Air used as prop during the photoshoot and as inspiration for the name.

A 3.5-gallon (13-liter) fuel tank, a shortened rear fender, a Fat Boy front end, and 16-inch wheels wrapped in Avon Gangster tires complete the look of this two-wheeled machine.

Sadly, we are unable to determine how much the build cost to make. With the exception of the exhaust, endcaps and tires, which are still being sold by Thunderbike, all the other elements are custom made or adapted for this project.

Car and Motorcycle Companies Now Making Electric Bikes

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Lee Iacocca with his electric bike in 1998. It had a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour.

by Roy Furchgott from https://www.nytimes.com

They see branding opportunities as the pandemic and a desire by cities to curb traffic propel e-bike sales to new heights.

The transportation industry has seen the future, and the future is 1895.

That was the year Ogden Bolton Jr. of Canton, Ohio, was awarded U.S. Patent 552,271 for an “electrical bicycle.” A century and change later, electric bikes have gained new currency as car and motorcycle companies like Ducati, Harley-Davidson, Jeep, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Yamaha have horned into the market with their own designs.

While the pandemic has accelerated bike sales, the overriding attraction is that cities worldwide are beginning to restrict motor traffic. These companies are betting that e-bikes are the urban vehicles of tomorrow — or at least vehicles for good publicity today.

“In the past 12 to 18 months, you have seen a lot of new brands come into the market,” said Andrew Engelmann, an e-bike sales and marketing manager at Yamaha, which has been in the electric bike business since 1993 and claims sales of two million worldwide. “We in the U.S. have not seen this new energy toward cycling since Lance Armstrong won the Tour de France.”

Credit the coronavirus pandemic, which has ignited bike sales of all stripes, but none so much as e-bikes. While retail unit sales of bicycles from January to October last year were up 46 percent from a year earlier, electric bikes were up 140 percent. Measured in dollars, regular bikes were up 67 percent and e-bikes 158 percent — so don’t expect a discount. Those numbers, from the market researchers at NPD, do not include online-only retailers such as Rad Power Bikes, so sales may actually be higher still.

Ogden Bolton aside, there is a historical connection between bicycles and motorcycles. Many early motorcycles came from bicycle makers that simply clapped a motor on a bike, often retaining the pedals in the style of a moped.

The automotive industry’s bicycle connection is more recent, with the likes of Malcolm Bricklin and Lee Iacocca introducing electric bikes in the ’90s. Both flopped. Mr. Iacocca’s design, typical for the time, was hampered by a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour. Many car companies, including Ford, Audi, Maserati and BMW, have gotten into and out of e-bikes since.

“No car company has had any success selling an electric bicycle,” said Don DiCostanzo, chief executive of Pedego Electric Bikes, who in 2014 licensed a bike design to Ford. “It’s fool’s gold. It can never replace the profit on a car.”

Yet car and motorcycle makers are being drawn in. “I think they are seeing a lot of the same opportunity we see,” said Ian Kenny, who leads the e-bike effort at the bicycle company Specialized. “But I think there is a very big difference between demonstrating you can do something and doing something very well at scale.”

However, changes in the way people get about, especially in Europe and Asia, are enticing motor vehicle companies that operate internationally. Overseas, in cities that manage pollution and overcrowded streets by restricting motor traffic, e-bikes often fill a gap.

“In Europe, the e-bike is more of a fundamental transportation tool,” said Dirk Sorenson, an analyst for NPD. London, Madrid, Oslo and Paris are among the growing number of cities restricting downtown traffic.

The pandemic has American cities testing similar restrictions. Boston, Minneapolis and a number of California cities have instituted Slow Streets programs, restricting motor traffic on side streets in favor of cycling and walking. It even has UPS, Amazon and DHL trying out e-cargo bikes in New York.

“There is a huge opportunity for e-bikes in the U.S., which is a huge untapped market,” said Rasheq Zarif, a mobility technology expert for the consulting firm Deloitte.

Some companies are preparing now for the possibility that “micromobility,” as the buzzword has it, will catch on here.

“Let’s imagine Harley-Davison is not a motorcycle company but a mobility company,” said Aaron Frank, brand director for Serial 1, which builds an e-bike in partnership with Harley. “There is a strong argument we can do for urban commuters what Harley-Davison did for motorcycles.”

Other companies see e-bikes as a gateway to sell their primary products. Though best known for its motorcycles, Ducati North America wants e-bikes to “potentially turn people on to Ducati,” its chief executive, Jason Chinnock, said. “And we’ve seen that with people at some events and with the media reaching out.”

E-bikes may be more expensive than bicycles, but are cheaper than cars or motorcycles. And improved motor and battery technology is bringing prices down. Low-priced e-bikes with a motor in the wheel hub — similar to that 1895 design — can be had for about $1,000. Prices for versions with more complex, geared motors at the pedals can reach more than $10,000.

“Spending $1,000 on a bike seems out there,” Mr. Kenny said, “but when you don’t look at it as a toy — when it becomes transportation — it becomes a very different conversation.”

Price isn’t the only hurdle. E-bikes confront a crippling hodgepodge of laws. Although the Consumer Product Safety Commission deemed “low speed” e-bikes (with a motor equivalent to 1 horsepower or less) a bicycle, states still decide where that bike can be ridden.

“It’s up to 50 states to define the use, and that’s been a big problem in the past,” said Claudia Wasko, general manager of Bosch eBike, a prominent manufacturer of drive systems.

The PeopleForBikes coalition drafted model state legislation to allow most e-bikes in bike lanes and parks. It suggests three classes of e-bike, with a top speed between 20 and 28 m.p.h. Twenty-eight states have adopted some version of the legislation.

Some companies may be less concerned with the future of mobility and more interested in getting some attention now.

“I think it’s a halo thing,” said Mr. DiCostanzo, whose company has produced e-bikes for Tommy Bahama, Ford and others. Halo vehicles represent a brand’s aspirations, like concept cars.

“I think that’s what it is for Ford,” he added. “They wanted it for window dressing, and that’s what they got. I think they sold 500 in the five years it ran.”

Mercedes, which is taking orders for its top-of-the-line Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team V11 e-bike at $12,000, said it was a chance to showcase its ability with high-tech materials from carbon fiber to paint.

“High-performance road bikes and e-bikes provide a great way to showcase such technologies into a range of consumer products,” said Damian Cook, a spokesman.

For some in the bicycle industry this all smacks of déjà vu. In the 1970s, a bike boom was thought to presage a new future for transportation in which cycling was central. But it failed. Though there were many contributing factors, roads weren’t made more bicycle-friendly and people didn’t want to arrive at work sweaty.

With the combination of Slow Streets programs, which address the first problem, electric bikes, which address the second, and a pandemic that has given people a chance to adjust to both, experts like Mr. Zarif find hope.

“When you give people a chance to try something, it reduces resistance to change,” he said. “As a society, the reality is we go forward — we don’t go backward.”

Harley-Davidson of Valparaiso’s paint shop experts create unique and fan-favorite designs for riders

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by Allison Tunstall from https://valpo.life

From custom jobs to throwback styles, Harley-Davidson of Valparaiso’s Paint Shop is a unique service offered in-store—one of the only Harley-Davidson dealers in the Midwest to house its Paint Shop right in the service center. Dealers from surrounding states from Ohio to Kentucky send their parts to the shop located on US 30, where the “Dynamic Duo,” John Galloway and Randy Melton, have been creating one-of-a-kind motorcycle looks for decades.

It is easy to see why so many riders and dealers trust Galloway and Melton with their bikes. Galloway, who started his painting career in his brother’s motorcycle shop and has continued painting for over 30 years. He and his team use only the most state-of-the-art technology and methods to create custom and industry-standard style. They are commited to creating quality, lasting work their customers love.

“We don’t do any shortcuts,” Galloway said. “We have a reputation of creating lasting work. We don’t want people to come back in a few years saying they’ve had problems, so we use the best product you can get as far as paint, primer, paint guns, air brushes, and more. Our spray booth is top of the line, which helps us get a better product out.”

“Recently, two riders brought their bikes to us and said that we’re the only ones they trust to create the look they want for their bikes,” he continued. “For years, I’ve worked with dealerships in Ohio, Kentucky, and Wisconsin, which continue to send me parts and tell me how satisfied their customers were with the job. It really makes a difference.”

Galloway and Melton specialize in repair and refinishing Harleys. If a bike has a scratch, dent, ding, mark, you name it, the duo gets to work repairing and detailing so it looks as if the damage never happened.

The Paint Shop also offers custom jobs, like the signature Harley-Davidson hot rod flames and custom graphics and airbrushed work. Galloway remembers a bike from a few years back that was Celtic-themed with Celtic symbols around the entire bike. They even recreate beloved styles that Harley-Davidson no longer makes. Currently, Galloway and Melton are recreating a stock paint job, one that is no longer available, on a 1997 bike.

“Tastes change and styles come back now and again,” Galloway said. “Harley-Davidson came out with a CVO with the Harley-Davidson number one on the gas tank, which was a little different than styles before. I’ve recreated that paint job probably 15 times. The hot rod flames come and go. Some people know exactly what they want for their bike, some people may only have a general idea of what they want and will let us run with it. For jobs like those, we spend a more time on doing a good job for them to make sure, in the end, they have the bike of their dreams.”

“I’ve had so many customers who are just overwhelmed and excited about the work we did,” Galloway said. “It’s gratifying to hear customers tell you that your work is even better than they could have imagined. I don’t interact with customers as much as I have in the past, so when I do, I love seeing that twinkle in their eyes when they see their fresh bike for the first time.”

Stop in the Harley-Davidson of Valparaiso Paint Shop today to see what Galloway and Melton are creating. Make sure to say hello to Willow, the dog, who comes to work with Galloway every day.

For more information about Harley-Davidson of Valparaiso’s Paint Shop and how to make an appointment, visit their site at https://www.hdvalpo.com/Services/The-Paint-Shop.

Harley-Davidson and TEEX team up to offer specialized motorcycle officer training nationwide

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by Erin Wencl (KAGS) from https://www.kagstv.com

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — TEEX and Harley-Davidson have teamed up to offer specialized and advanced training to law enforcement officers who patrol on motorcycles, according to information released by the school Tuesday. The training will be available for law enforcement officers in Texas, as well as motorcycle cops across the country.

The program will offer basic, advanced and instructor-level training courses. Basic level includes 80 hours of training for those officers going directly into the police motorcycle unit. Advanced training will be for experienced officer riders who are hoping to increase their skills and the instructor-level course will certify an officer hoping to build their own training program.

“As a former law enforcement administrator, I know training is key to managing risk,” said Dr. John M. Ray, who is director of the TEEX Institute for Law Enforcement and Protective Services Excellence. “You want to attend a manufacturer specific school because there are subtleties about riding these bikes in high-risk situations. This curriculum is tailored specifically for that.”

Dr. Ray said there will be classroom and “on-track” training. The motorcycles will be provided by Harley-Davidson and they will offer servicing on-site. This is something unique to the program, according to Dr. Ray, because many training programs require students to bring their own bike. By teaming up with Harley-Davidson and their mechanical crews, students will be able to finish the course without worrying about if their own bike will make it through.

“We are proud to partner with TEEX to create a comprehensive training program that allows peace officers to focus completely on improving their skills,” said John Dedeo, GM Field Sales for Harley-Davidson.

Kyle McNew, who is the TEEX Training Manager for the Institute for Law Enforcement and Protective Services Excellence, said the training will be offered in Texas, but also other locations across the country. “That gives us an opportunity to save agencies money by sending their officers to train closer to home.” It also offers an option for those law enforcement agencies that are considering starting up motorcycle traffic enforcement.

If you would like to register, click here or call Kyle McNew at 979-458-2762. You can also email him at kyle.mcnew@teex.tamu.edu.

Which Three-Wheeler Fits Your Style?

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We offer a brief history of the Three-wheeled vehicle, and take a guess at the lifestyle each fits best.

In 2007, BRP put its three-wheeled Can-Am Spyder on the market and sold 2500 units in the U.S. By 2015, it had sold 1 million units globally. In 2017, it estimated the U.S. three-wheel industry to be good for approximately 40,000 sales a year, and that industry includes competition from historic names like Harley-Davidson and Morgan. Some bikers scoff at the three-legged mechanical portmanteau called an autocycle, but they’re here to stay; in 2020, BRP more than doubled its 2019 volume in the U.S.

Maybe you’re considering joining the growing crowd but aren’t sure which saddle to throw a leg over, here is a brief history of three-wheelers and the people who love them.

Click Here to Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.

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Custom Harley-Davidson Flying Shovel 1957 FL

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

When talking about the exploits of that European Harley-Davidson custom shop by the name Thunderbike, we’re usually treated with reinterpreted modern motorcycles. Occasionally, we also get full custom builds, based on their own frames, and somewhat rarer, conversions of earlier Harleys.

The Flying Shovel, as the one we have here is called, is part of that last category. Originally a 1957 Harley-Davidson FL, it was transformed into something the shop describes as a “true old-school Bobber with rigid frame, but reliable engine.”

What you see before your eyes is the frame of the FL, wrapped around an S&S shovelhead engine. The powerplant is linked to 4-speed gearbox from RevTech and topped by an S7S Super E carburetor also from S&S. The powertrain spins 18-inch wheels of Thunderbike make.

Other than the engine and frame, many of the other parts on this build have been custom-made for it exclusively. We’re talking about things like the exhaust, handlebars, grips, pegs, fuel tank, oil tank, rear fender, all of which have been designed specifically with the Flying Shovel in mind.

Some of these parts, made in brass, were wrapped in nickel, or given an old-finish look to have the appearance the bike belongs to another age, and for the most part, the shop succeeded.

In all, there were around 30 custom bits and pieces that made it into this two-wheeler, but because most were specifically designed for this project, very few of them are available commercially. That means it is extremely difficult to estimate how much it cost to put this thing together, and as usual Thunderbike makes no mention of the cost.

The Flying Shovel was built for a customer, and sadly the world lost track of it since it was completed about three years ago.

Harley-Davidson Pan America Apparel Coming From Europe

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It may be called Pan America, but Harley-Davidson’s biggest gamble in years requires a global reach to work. And we’re not talking from the sales perspective only, but from the partner companies’ point of view as well.

Harley pulled the wraps off Pan America at the beginning of the week and announced it would be supporting the upcoming launch with a long list of home-brewed parts and accessories. It also secured the involvement of foreign companies, who were quick to jump on this new and shiny two-wheeled train.

European apparel specialist REV’IT is one of them, and it will be making gear for Pan America riders, ranging from jackets and pants all the way to gloves and helmets. For all intents and purposes, they complement the other side of the coin, covered by Harley itself with the launch of luggage sets and accessories.

“REV’IT! shares Harley-Davidson’s values in creating protective motorcycle gear that delivers functionality with refined style. Successful adventure touring gear delivers on providing protection, mobility, visibility, four-season versatility and storage, and this new gear was designed based on extensive REV’IT rider feedback and experience,” the company said in a statement.

The REV’IT offer comprises two types of jackets and pants and two types of helmets. There are also boots and gloves on the table from the European supplier. Sadly, you will find no reference on pricing yet, as this piece of information was not released.

The Harley-Davidson Pan America comes in two variants, 1250 and 1250 Special, both powered by the same 1,250cc engine from the Revolution Max family. The engine is rated at a maximum output of 150 hp, and that’s pretty good for motorcycles that tip the scales at 534 lbs (242 kg) and 559 lbs (254 kg), respectively.

Austin’s Arrows To Fire Release Harley Davidson-Inspired Song

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from https://top40-charts.com

New York, NY (Top40 Charts) Austin-based indie rockers Arrows To Fire have announced their new single ‘I’m Supersonic’, hot on the trail of their pandemic-inspired single ‘A Million Miles Away’, a guitar-driven track that was inspired by struggles experienced during the current pandemic.

Driven by solid guitar power, their sound is in keeping with a tradition of ’90s-rooted alternative rock, only with a current twist.

Just as the previous single ‘I’m Supersonic’ was mixed by legendary producer Tim Palmer (David Bowie’s Tin Machine, The Mission, HIM, U2, Robert Plant, Tears For Fears, Ozzy Osbourne, Goo Goo Dolls, Pearl Jam).

A US-French collaboration, Arrows To Fire is Austin native John Joyo on vocals and French/American guitarist Chris Lavigne (guitarist, composer), who warns listeners about this single “Get ready for a ride and rock on”.

“Chris and I both love Harley Davidson motorcycles and both love anything that goes fast. “I’m Supersonic” is written from the perspective of a vintage 74 cubic inch Harley Davidson Shovelhead motor,” says John Joyo.

“Even though it’s old, it has guts and will kick your ass every time you ride it. This motor is psyched out of its mind to be ridden hard and can’t wait to melt your face off. We basically channeled the energy of one of the baddest motors ever built into this song. Hopefully people will feel that when they hear it!”

Joyo and Lavigne – both biotech entrepreneurs – first met in 2016 during a meeting about medical devices. They soon discovered a shared passion for alternative rock and strong desire to use music as a forum to address varied subjects – both personal and political. It didn’t take long for them to find common ground in sound and grow a path that led to releasing their 2016 debut album.

The band has since blazed its way onto the alternative rock scene with their 2018 album ‘Here We Go’ and a series of YouTube videos that have racked up nearly a million views collectively, most notably for ‘This is Here’, underlining the song’s call to action for planetary preservation. Indie Rock Cafe listed Arrows to Fire a band to watch after their 2018 South By Southwest debut. Amazon’s music curators were equally impressed, including their cover of Golden Earring’s ‘Radar Love’ in their epic Open Road Amazon Original playlist.

Their songmanship influenced by Pearl Jam, Kings of Leon, The Killers, Foo Fighters, The Presidents of the United States of America, Band of Horses, The Hives, Fu Manchu and Weezer, but Chris Lavigne notes, “It’s important to us that we don’t box ourselves in too much or stick to the same sound all of the time because we like to approach music like we approach life – be adventurous, try new things, and be open to inspiration that could come to you from anywhere or from any type of music. We like to think that comes through in the variety of sounds you’ll hear in our new music.”

‘I’m Supersonic’ will be released on February 18 and will be available across online stores such as Apple Music, and streaming platforms such as Spotify.

All songs and lyrics written, performed and recorded by John Joyo & Chris Lavigne
Recorded at the ATF World headquarters in Austin
Mixed by Tim Palmer in Austin, Texas
Mastered by James Bacon in Sheffield, UK

 

All we know so far about Harley-Davidson Pan America

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Harley-Davidson Pan America Goes Live as 1250 and 1250 Special, All Bets Are Off
by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a hell of a ride for Harley-Davidson these past few years. In a very short time, it lost its CEO, had to abandon a major market, and decided to realign its racing priorities. It even had to unofficially cancel the launch of some new bikes, like the Bronx, but at the same time managed to hang on to its biggest bet in ages, the Pan America.

The bike, revealed in full on Monday, February 22, is the iconic bike maker’s first major foray into the world of adventure bikes. Harley is finally making a motorcycle that could be easily be ridden both on the road and off of it, and that’s a big gamble for an entity that in recent times liked to play it safe.

As expected, the Pan America will be made available in two versions, 1250 and 1250 Special. Both get their kicks from the same engine of the liquid-cooled Revolution Max V-Twin family, 1,250cc in displacement and capable of generating 150 hp of power. For weight-saving reasons, the engine is integrated into the bikes as the central member of the chassis, helping the 1250 tips the scale at 534 lb (242 kg), and the Special at 559 lb (254 kg).

The 1250 rides on 19-inch front and 17-inch rear wheels, and adds things like cruise control, a 5.6 gallons (21 liters) fuel tank, and all-LED lighting. The Special builds on that with Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), adaptive headlamp, and heated handgrips, among others.

The bikes ride on electronically adjustable semi-active front and rear suspension systems and are packed with electronic rider aides, including ride modes. Harley went one step further in the technology department and is offering something called Adaptive Ride Height (ARH), which is a system that automatically transitions between a low stopped position and optimal ride height when the motorcycle is in motion.

“From its inception more than a century ago, when many roads were little more than dirt trails, Harley-Davidson has stood for adventure. So I’m very proud to present Pan America as the first adventure touring bike designed and built in America,” said in a statement Jochen Zeitz, CEO Harley-Davidson.

“The Pan America models exude that go-anywhere spirit, shared today by riders in the US and around the globe who want to experience the world on a motorcycle.”

To make sure the Pan America appeals to a great number of riders, Harley and its partners will offer all the needed accessories, from luggage systems to riding gear.

Full details about the two versions of the Pan America can be seen on Harley-Davidson website.

The Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 is an off-road hog
by Gary Gastelu from https://www.foxnews.com

Harley-Davidson is taking the brand into the wilderness.

The Milwaukee-based motorcycle company has unveiled the production version of its first adventure touring style bike, the Pan America 1250.

A far cry from its classic cruisers, the Pan America 1250 was built for on and off-road riding and is powered by the Revolution Max 1250cc engine. The all-new V-twin is rated at 150 hp and 94 lb-ft of torque and serves as a stressed member of the chassis and sends power to the rear wheel through a six-speed transmission and chain.

The 534-pound bike has 8.3 inches of ground clearance and is equipped with a Showa suspension that provides 7.5-inches of wheel travel via inverted front forks and a monoshock rear swingarm. The top Pan America 1250 Special adds a semi-active version that adjusts damping through several ride modes for different surfaces and lowers the bike a couple of inches when its parked to make it easier to mount and dismount the saddle.

Brembo brakes and custom-designed Michelin Scorcher Adventure tires come standard along with a host of electronic traction and stability management systems and a hill-hold feature.

The Pan America’s 6.8-inch touchscreen display is adjustable and provides instrumentation, entertainment and navigation via a connected smartphone app.

Pricing starts at $17,319 for the standard 1250 and and $19,999 for the 1250 Special, which is on par with the big adventure bikes from the likes of Kawasaki, Ducati and KTM, but lower than BMW’s.

The Pan America 1250 is scheduled to go on sale in May.

Harley-Davidson Pan America 1250 ventures well off the beaten path
by Jeremy Korzeniewski from https://autos.yahoo.com

Harley-Davidson is known for lots of things — big V-twin engines dripping in chrome, heavyweight touring motorcycles, leather — but they definitely aren’t known for diving into completely new market segments. The brand-new Pan America 1250 challenges that perception. It’s a clean-sheet adventure touring motorcycle, and even if it’s still sporting a V-twin, this one is liquid cooled and tuned to produce 150 horsepower, 94 pound-feet of torque, a 9,500-rpm redline and “a broad powerband that builds to a rush of high-RPM power.”

That 60-degree, 1,250-cubic-centimeter, double-overhead-cam engine is a stressed member with a front frame, mid frame and tail section bolting directly to it to make up the chassis. A cast-aluminum swingarm stretches the wheelbase to 62.2 inches, which is just a half inch longer than the Ducati Multistrada V4. Cast aluminum wheels measure 19 inches up front and 17 inches at the rear. The seat height adjusts between 34.2 inches in the low position and 35.2 inches in the high position.

An upper-level Pan America 1250 Special model gains electronically adjustable semi-active front and rear suspension, tire pressure monitoring, a steering damper, a center stand, brush guard and skid plate, an adjustable rear brake pedal, an adaptive front headlight and heated handgrips. The electronic suspension automatically drops the bike when at rest and raises back up under motion.

Michelin Scorcher Adventure tires designed specifically for the Pan America come standard, and Michelin Anakee Wild tires with a more aggressive tread pattern will also be offered. Tubeless laced wheels will also be offered.

The radial monoblock four-piston brake calipers were co-developed with Brembo. The 47-mm inverted front fork and rear shock are sourced from Showa and provide 7.48 inches of travel at each end. A tilting 6.8-inch touchscreen display features Bluetooth connectivity and navigation through an app offered for Apple and Android phones.

Road, Sport, Rain, Off-Road and Off-Road Plus ride modes are selectable, each tailoring the bike’s electronics package to suit the needs of the rider and the terrain. The Pan America 1250 features Cornering Rider Safety Enhancements, which relies on an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to offer Cornering Enhanced Electronically Linked Braking, Cornering Enhanced Antilock Braking System, Cornering Enhanced Traction Control System, Cornering Enhanced Drag-Torque Slip Control System, and Hill Hold Control. Cruise control comes standard.

The Pan America 1250 will start at $17,319, which undercuts the Multistrada V4 (which is a clear competitor, though more powerful with 170 ponies from its four-cylinder engine). The Special edition model is $19,999. Both will arrive in dealerships this spring. Naturally, a whole host of accessories will launch alongside the adventure bike, including luggage options, seats and windshields. We expect a few more new motorcycles featuring this Revolution Max engine will be revealed in the coming months.