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Harley-Davidson Archives — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

New Harley Boom Audio Helmet

By | General Posts

As I was preparing for my trip to Sturgis, for the rally, I decided I needed a new helmet. Besides the normal reasons I wanted to upgrade to one that handled rain better.

I started researching helmets, and I came across the Harley-Davidson Boom-Audio NO2 Full-Face Helmet.

It is made of a fiberglass composite and weighs about 3 pounds 12 ounces. It has a washable removable liner and standard Double D-ring chin strap and of course meets all the Dot FMVSS 218 safety standards.

CLICK HERE TO READ THIS PRODUCT REVIEW ON BIKERNET

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Zero Miles Harley-Davidson VRXSE Destroyer Is a Speed Junkie’s Dream Ride

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

So, a decade and some change ago, the world’s favorite motorcycle builder, Harley-Davidson, decided to do something crazy: come up with a factory-build dragster that would shred the hell out of the competition on the strip.

This is how the VRXSE Destroyer was born, a CVO-handled monster of a two-wheeler powered by a chunky Screaming Eagle engine. 1,300cc in displacement, the powerplant churns out 165 hp and, aided by things like stroker crankshaft, high compression pistons, a racing transmission with a multi-stage lock-up clutch, and two-stage launch control, it had enough punch to shoot the missile to the end of the quarter-mile distance in under 10 seconds.

Initially, Harley planned to make at most 300 units of the thing, but the impact it had it was (naturally) immense, and before you knew it, the production run doubled in size to 600 units.

The motorcycle had such an appeal that not everybody bought one to race it. In fact, there are quite a few people who paid the little over $30,000 asking price just to have sit around in a garage somewhere, as a museum piece.

This is what happened to this here Destroyer. Now available for sale at the hands of Porsche specialist Canepa, it shows “no miles, no driving, no wear, nothing,” as its description says.

The bike was purchased new and sat for a very long time in a larger collection of dragsters, in the select company of a Kent Fuller nitromethane dragster and the likes. It then ended up over at Canepa, who is selling it for an undisclosed price.

Now, don’t go thinking this is the only Destroyer on the market. There are others, of course, but most of them, if not all, have been put to some use in the past, and are not quite as pristine as this one.

We only hope whoever buys it chooses to enjoy it the way it was meant to, not only visually.

U.S. judge approves revised EPA Harley-Davidson emissions settlement

By | General Posts

by David Shepardson from https://www.reuters.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A U.S. judge late on Monday approved a revised settlement with Harley-Davidson Inc over excess emissions that dropped a requirement that it spend $3 million to reduce air pollution.

In August 2016, the Milwaukee-based motorcycle manufacturer agreed to pay a $12 million civil fine and stop selling illegal after-market devices that caused its vehicles to emit too much pollution.

It also agreed to spend about $3 million to retrofit or replace wood-burning appliances with cleaner stoves to offset excess emissions.

The Justice Department in July 2017 cited a new policy by then-U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and an ongoing review of the penalty by a government auditor in proposing to drop the $3 million mitigation project.

More than four years after the settlement was announced, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan approved the settlement over the objections of environmental groups and a group of 10 states, including New York, Illinois, Maryland, Vermont, Washington and Massachusetts.

While the earlier agreement “containing the mitigation project might have been the ‘best’ resolution of

Harley-Davidson’s alleged violations, the court cannot say that the decree lodged before the Court is not within ‘the reaches of the public interest,’” Sullivan wrote in approving the consent decree.

Harley-Davidson and the EPA did not immediately comment Tuesday.

The settlement resolved allegations that Harley sold about 340,000 “super tuners” enabling motorcycles since 2008 to pollute the air at levels greater than what the company certified.

Harley-Davidson did not admit liability and has said it disagreed with the government, arguing that the tuners were designed and sold to be used in “competition only.”

Even though the settlement had not yet taken effect, Harley-Davidson has said that since August 2016, it sold only tuners certified by the California Air Resources Board and halted sale of the tuners in question and destroyed tuners returned by dealers.

Harley-Davidson Killer S&S Indian Challenger Begins Testing

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In the weekend of October 23, during the MotoAmerica Superbike Speedfest, an incredible battle is about to be fought: 13 Harley-Davidson motorcycles will be on the same field, fighting for the Drag Specialties King of the Baggers title against each other and a single non-Harley bike, this S&S Indian Challenger.

The event, which will be held at Monterey, is the first of its kind since this whole health crisis mess began all those months ago and, at least on paper, it should be something to remember.

The bagger Challenger is an Indian project backed by S&S and it calls for a stock bike to be modified even further that the already incredible specs: 122 horsepower, an inverted front suspension, and a hydraulically-adjustable FOX rear shock.

Since we first learned about this back in July, things seem to have progressed quite nicely. Not long ago, the team behind the build, let by the one who will ride it during the October event, Tyler O’Hara, took the bike out for what was supposed to be the first testing session.

It kind of wasn’t because rain put some dents in the team’s plans, but we are told that even this brief outing was enough to “gather valuable information around rider ergonomics, suspension and more.” And they also took some photos, which you can see in the gallery attached above.

“When the Indian Challenger was released last October, it set a new standard for performance-oriented, stock baggers and offers the ideal platform, from which to base our race modifications,” said Paul Langely of S&S in a statement back when the project was announced.

“That said, we’re leaving no stone unturned when evaluating the modifications needed to be successful at Laguna Seca.”

With about a month left to go until the event, keep an eye out for more info on this project in the coming weeks.

Harley-Davidson Bara Bore Is a Fat Boy on an Indian Diet

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Seeing how many custom garages are out there working their magic on Harley-Davidson motorcycles, one might be tricked into believing this is something anyone can do. After all, Harley itself made it incredibly easy for custom shops to make a living off their products – if anything, the Milwaukee based bike maker is the most tuner-friendly industry giant there is.

Over the past few months we’ve talked aplenty about Harley and the aftermarket world it is so much a part of. We’ve had the King of Kings competition dedicated to international Harley dealers back in May, then the health-crisis inspired The No Show dedicated to minor custom builders in the U.S., and of course our extensive coverage of the custom Harley movement in Europe.

But there are shops living off the American two-wheelers in other parts of the world as well. India, for instance, is one of the bike maker’s major markets, and there’s even a local factory catering to the needs of the Asian Indian customers.

One of the most visible Indian garages in the country is Rajputana. We’ve only recently started talking about their Harleys, and we’ll probably not keep it up for long. These guys seem to like Royal Enfields more, as in there are only a handful of Harleys in their portfolio. All are incredible unique though to deserve a place under the spotlight – we’ve already talked a bit about the modified Street 750 and the Forty-Eight these guys are responsible for.

Now it’s time for a Fat Boy that got a taste of Indian styling. Just like in the case of the other two, we are only being told that modifications to the stock bike can take from six to eight months, but we are not being told what these modifications are.

Some of them are clearly visible though, and we’re talking about a new wheel design, repositioned exhaust, a slimmed-down seat, redesigned fenders, and the usual Rajputana touches on the fuel tank, engine block, and the significantly raised handlebars.

In Indian speak, this conversion is called Bara Bore. We are not being told how much it cost to make, but a simple inquiry on the garage’s website can answer that question for those interested.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire Claims the Crown of a Barren Kingdom

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

At the end of last week, drag racing fans were back in business as the Denso Spark Plugs NHRA U.S. Nationals at the Lucas Oil Raceway in Indianapolis took place. A lot of interesting things happened there, including an appearance by the 1,400 hp electric Mustang Dragster and some demonstration runs with Harley-Davidson LiveWire motorcycles.

A couple of days ago the Milwaukee bike maker released a very short video showing the highlights of the LiveWire runs with riders Andrew Hines, Eddie Krawiec, and Angelle Sampey holding the handlebars. As it was, the video showed nothing impressive, as fast, drag racing motorcycles we’ve seen before.

Socially-distanced people in the stands seemed to confirm nothing spectacular happened, as they seemed unimpressed with what was happening down on the strip. As such, few could have anticipated records being broken.

Only that they were (sort of), and Harley confirmed this with an announcement made on September 10.

As per the bike maker, one of the three riders, Angelle Sampey (who usually rides a FXDR Pro Stock) accelerated the LiveWire to the records of best elapsed time and top speed.

In short, the LiveWire covered the eighth-mile distance (201 meters) in 7.017-seconds and the full quarter-mile (402 meters) in 11.156 seconds, while reaching a top speed 110.35 mph (177.6 kph), which is a bit more than the official top speed of the motorcycle.

“Let me tell you what’s amazing,” said Sampey in a statement. “That was the first time I rode the LiveWire. I could not wait to get it on the track. The LiveWire is so easy to ride. Just twist the throttle and go, and you really go!”

So, great numbers, and that made Harley confident enough to claim it set the all-new records for an “electric-powered production motorcycle on a drag racing course.”

So, this is the baseline for future electric bikes to beat. But given how there is virtually no competition in the electric-powered production motorcycle segment on the drag strip at the moment, it’s like Harley crowned itself the ruler of an empty realm.

Harley Courts Mahindra, Bajaj, and Hero For Indian Partnership

By | General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Harley-Davidson has been trying to find its way in a rapidly modernizing world for years now. In the saga’s latest installment, the Milwaukee-based brand ditched Matt Levatich and installed Jochen Zeits as the new President and CEO, changes have been swift and steady. From potentially nixing the Bronx to creating a Chief Digital Officer role, the new regime is implementing its Rewire plan without batting an eye.

With the company projecting jobs cuts in 2020 and speculation that the Street lineup will bite the dust, many Indian outlet are reporting that Harley’s Bawal factory could soon shut down. As the MoCo shifts its Asia Pacific operations to Thailand, talks with Mahinda & Mahinda, Hero Motocorp, and Bajaj are only fueling more rumors about the American brand’s future in the country.

Similar to KTM’s partnership with Bajaj or BMW’s TVS deal, the Bar and Shield could be seeking an affiliate to manufacture midsize motorcycles for the Indian market. Harley’s courters also include auto industry heavyweight Mahindra & Mahindra. As the owners of Classic Legends, the brand behind the Jawa revival and current BSA name-holders, the subsidiary could match the Motor Company’s retro aesthetic and satisfy its need for a global supply chain.

We should note that spokespeople from all brands involved are refusing to comment on the potential partnerships at this moment, but the talks certainly align with Zeits’ cost-cutting efforts. While the brand plans to focus on high-potential segments and markets, a presence in India is key for global success. Harley seems to be moving forward with its China-exclusive model 338R, and a similar tactic could benefit the MoCo in India.

We may be reading the tea leaves at this moment in time, but with cruiser sales continuing to dwindle in the U.S., Harley’s global presence will be more important than ever. Catering to the two most populous countries and the largest motorcycle markets in the world will be critical for the brand’s future. For now, we’ll have to wait and see if the company’s Indian factory closes by the end of the year and whether that begins a whole new phase of Harley’s ever-evolving modernization plan.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire Drag Races at NHRA U.S. Nationals, Who Was Impressed?

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There’s only one mainstream bike maker with an electric motorcycle on the market: Harley-Davidson. The Americans launched the LiveWire last year, hit a few snags along the way, and now the entire thing looks like a lost bet.

Maybe it’s the fact that the world is not yet ready for electric motorcycles – we lost track of how many startups came and went while promising a revolution in the industry – or it could be that Harley really messed up the LiveWire, but the reality is riders do not really flock to dealers to order one.

Truth be told, the bike maker itself didn’t make a big fuss about the electric two-wheeler, and kind of left it fending for itself because, well, it really has no competition.

That approach is about to change as of this month. Harley is finally putting some big names and some more dollars behind promoting the bike, in the hopes its fortunes would change.

Starting September 18, people with an Apple TV+ subscription will have the chance to see what the LiveWire is really capable of. After all, it did travel over 13,000 miles (21,000 km) from the city of Ushuaia in Tierra del Fuego to America’s West Coast, ridden by Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman as they were shooting their Long Way Up show.

And also from September, expect to see it more on the drag strip, just like it happened this past weekend in Indianapolis, where the NHRA U.S. Nationals took place.

Three Harley riders – Andrew Hines, Eddie Krawiec, and Angelle Sampey – enjoyed themselves between races by taking the LiveWire down the strip in exhibition runs, trying to convince people an investment in the LiveWire would not be a bad idea.

Don’t expect anything spectacular to have happened. There’s a short video below this text with the highlights of the Harley runs, but don’t look forward to records being broken or the crowds going wild with excitement.

 

Harley-Davidson Street 750 Rajputana Is How Low-Price Custom Cool Looks Like

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The Street motorcycle is the cheapest two-wheeler in the Harley portfolio, and it represents for most riders the entry point into the realm of the world’s most famous bike maker. As such, the range has been a sales leader in developing markets such as India ever since its introduction.

The Street 750 came to the world in 2014 as the bike maker’s first new model in more than a decade. It quickly grew to become exactly what was needed to tackle the need to expand in emerging markets. And selling lots of Streets meant that soon there were countless garages taking their own shot at the line.

The one in the gallery above was considered six years ago “the first officially sanctioned Street custom from an independent builder.” It’s a significantly modified 750 handled by an Indian garage called Rajputana Customs.

The shop specializes now in reimagining several bike makes, but have a soft spot for the Royal Enfield brand. Yet they seem quite apt at giving a new direction to Harley bikes as well.

It took the garage four weeks to put this thing together, and quite a lot of work went into it. Rajputana went for a more road-friendly approach by replacing the original forks with Suzuki GSX-R forks that are 25 percent stiffer, the dual shocks have been pulled out and a monoshock was fitted, the subframe replaced with a new one, and finally the belt drive was scrapped in favor of a chain.

Visually, the bike looks much more massive than the stock 750. That is owed to the fat tires and the swept down handlebars. The fuel tank is no longer were it used to be, as it was raised at the rear, and the fuel cap moved from the right to the left side.

We are not being told how much the conversion cost, or what happened to the bike after it was completed. Rajputana’s website no longer lists this Street 750 as one of their products, but does list another version of it called Makku V2.0.

Harley plans to hitch a ride with two-wheeler makers

By | General Posts

from Lijee Philip from https://economictimes.indiatimes.com

Harley plans to hitch a ride with two-wheeler makers, Classic Legends, Hero Motocorp frontrunners

Mahindra’s Classic Legends could be the obvious choice for the iconic leisure bike making company as it aligns very well with M&M’s approach of catering to the premium end of the market with marquee brands , and for Harley, it gets a local company with a large manufacturing facility and an established local supply chain.

After its global restructuring efforts to make Thailand its main hub for Asia Pacific, Harley Davidson is now understood to be exploring potential collaborations with Indian two-wheeler makers. The two possible names doing the rounds are Mahindra NSE -0.82 %’ subsidiary Classic Legends and Hero Motocorp NSE -1.89 %.

The potential Indian alliance partners could do contract manufacturing for Harley Davidson in the mid-size motorcycle space – in line with Bajaj-KTM or TVS-BMW.

Mahindra’s Classic Legends could be the obvious choice for the iconic leisure bike making company as it aligns very well with M&M’s approach of catering to the premium end of the market with marquee brands , and for Harley, it gets a local company with a large manufacturing facility and an established local supply chain.

Classic Legends was established to re-introduce iconic marquee motorcycle brands in the market and currently retails the Jawa motorcycle brand also owns iconic brands like BSA & Yezdi.

While it started of with impressive sales numbers, delays in deliveries and quality issues makes it difficult for the company to meet the growing demand.

Hero Motocorp has stated that it’s open to partnerships to get a stronger foothold in the premium segment. Market leaders in entry level/commuter and the 125cc segments, it lacks premium bike building capability.

After several attempts, Hero has finally managed to break-into 200 cc segment with Xtreme, but bikes beyond 350 cc domain does not exist with the maker of Splendor, with Harley coming on board, the positioning would have been quite complementary in nature.

Harley-Davidson has been scouting for alliance partners in India with a manufacturing and distribution network to make lightweight motorcycles in the sub-500cc category. Under the new CEO, things are being reviewed again, say sources. ..

While the contours of the agreements are still being worked on, sources say it will be a non-equity partnership to make bikes targeting the small displacement category.

To a detailed email query , Harley Davidson, Mahindra ,Hero Motocorp and Royal Enfield said it does not comment on market speculation and rumours.

“On its own and with limited volumes, Harley will struggle to localise. By partnering with a local company, Harley will not only be able to shed fixed cost, but also accelerate sourcing with the help of the local partner. Over the last five years, the company has explored mid-size motorcycles for India and India like emerging markets. Its model developed in China has a potential to cater to the Indian market,” said one of the several people in the know of the company’s plans.

Earlier this year, Harley partnered with Chinese motorcycle maker, Zhejiang Qianjiang, mother company to Benelli, to launch Benelli 350 and the Harley-Davidson 338. Such kind of a smaller capacity motorcycle will be important for the Milwaukee cult brand which has been seeing slower sales in the country.