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Harley-Davidson Archives — Page 2 of 56 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride for 2021 this Weekend

By General Posts

by Nate Bird from https://newsradio1310.com

I can’t be the only one who does this, but every time a group of motorcycles drives by me when I’m driving I will roll down the window so I can hear each of them zip past me. I don’t ride motorcycles but I love the sound they make. This weekend there will be a whole bunch of opportunities to hear bikes as they fly by when the Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride happens this Sunday in I-84 between Meridian and Mountain Home.

What Is The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride is an annual motorcycle ride organized by the High Desert Harley-Davidson. The motorcycle ride raises money for the Idaho Guard and Reserve, Family Support Fund, and the Operation Warmheart. This year will be the 11th annual event after taking a break last year due to the pandemic.

When Is The 2021 Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride for 2021 will happen on Sunday July 25th. The event starts at 8 AM and is expected to last until 5 PM. Participants in the Ride will meet at High Desert Harley-Davidson for sign in and breakfast. The group will then be led on a police escorted ride from the Harley dealership to Carl Miller Park in Mountain Home. The ride is about 55 miles each way and runs down I-84.

For those not participating, you can expect there to be delays as the bikes travel down the highway. If you’re going to be in that area it will be a nice opportunity to roll down your windows and listen to the thunder of the bikes as they drive by.

How Do You Sign Up For The 11th Annual Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

Registration Website https://www.eventbrite.com/e/11th-annual-idaho-patriot-thunder-ride-tickets-111370235372

Registration can be done in advance online for $25 per rider or at the event for $35. A select number of VIP tickets are being sold as well for $100 and those get you placed at the front of the pack during the ride. The event is only open to 1,200 motorcycles.

Get all the details on the event on the ticket purchase website. We may not see, or hear, much from the event in Twin Falls but if Boise travel is in your plans on Sunday morning or afternoon you can expect to see lots of motorcycles and probably some driving delays.

 

Pre-Owned Harley-Davidsons Get New Home on Company’s Website

By General Posts

The H-D website has the new brand announcement at https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/marketplace.html

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you’re in the market for a pre-owned Harley-Davidson, then you have a major problem: there are to many places to look for one, and that can make the search a bit disconcerting. Now, in a bid to make things easier, Harley-Davidson itself may end up complicating things some more with the launch of its own dedicated marketplace.

Called H-D1, the virtual showroom will host both certified pre-owned (Harley got into this game this April) and other used bikes wearing the Milwaukee company’s logos.

The company promises “the most comprehensive opportunity to search, experience, sell and purchase pre-owned Harley-Davidson motorcycles across North America. “

The service will first be available to buyers and sellers in the United States and will include the “entire selection of pre-owned Harley-Davidson motorcycles from our participating dealer network, that will be available for our customers to browse and customize online.”

As announced back in April, to be eligible for the certified pre-owned motorcycle program a bike has to be no more than five model years old, read less than 25,000 miles (40,200 km) on the odometer, and come with no aftermarket modifications to the engine, transmission, chassis, or electrical system.

All bikes sold through this program are subjected to a “110-point quality-assurance inspection,” and recalls or a blocked VIN status verification.

When sold, bikes will go with a one-year warranty (with a $50 deductible charge per claim) for the engine and transmission, and a free one-year membership in the Harley Owners Group (HOG).

Remember though, if certified is not your thing, the new marketplace is where you’ll find all sorts of crazy Harley’s available in your area.

Harley hints it plans on expanding the H-D1 Marketplace to more markets soon, looking to transform its website into the main hub for all things Milwaukee. We’re not being told, for now, what’s next on this front.

Custom Harley-Davidson a Mesh of Parts with Old School Look

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Fancy a modern Harley-Davidson with old-school looks? Look no further than this customized two-wheeler, coming to our screens all the way from Japan.

What you’re looking at was initially a 2017 Softail. It somehow got into the hands and workshop of Japanese custom specialist Bad Land, and got turned into this amazing, old school look and feel motorcycle, christened by its maker Shishigaya Style No. 1.

2017 TwinCam Softail Slim BL Shishigaya Style Custom Specs

  • Front & Rear Wheel : OEM
  • 74″ Old Springer Fork STD. Length : W&W Cycles
  • 74″ Old Springer Fork : Rocker arm / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Front Fender : W&W Cycles / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Headlight : OEM
  • Headlight Grill : Rough Crafts
  • Handlebar : W&W Cycles / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Gasolie Tank : OEM / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Front Fender : W&W Cycles / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Rocker Cover : Ken’s Factory
  • Cam Cover : Ken’s Factory
  • T/M Side Cover : Ken’s Factory
  • Exhaust : PAUGHCO / BAD LAND in One-Off
  • Air Cleaner Cover : OEM / Modify by BAD LAND
  • Paint : Naturally Paint
  • And More…

Like with pretty much all other builds signed by Bad Land, this one too is a remarkable collection of custom parts coming from a variety of shops, and made to fit together in an amazing and elegant way.

Sitting inside the frame to power the beast is a Screamin’ Eagle 110 monster of an engine that breaths through a Paughco exhaust system. The engine spins OEM front and rear wheels, and gets its fuel from an equally OEM tank, massaged into a different form by Bad Land.

Also original equipments are the headlight and air cleaner (it too modified), but that’s about it, the rest is aftermarket. The fork comes from W&W Cycles, which also supplies the large front fender and handlebar, both tinkered with by the builder. The various covers that went into the project have been sourced from Ken’s Factory, and the grill behind which the headlight sits is signed by Rough Crafts.

The bike was completed last year, but we are not being told how much it took the Japanese to put this thing together, or how much it cost to make. You can however get a taste of how work on it looked like in the attached gallery, which shows both the finished product, and some work-in-progress shots.

You can find the full details on the build, one of the coolest from the Japanese shop we’ve featured so far, by Clicking Here.

Harley-Davidson Reports Global Bike Sales Up 24 Percent In 2021 Q2

By General Posts

You can read the Company Announcement at their Official Website by Clicking Here.

Second Quarter 2021 Highlights and Results, and Recent Announcements

  • Delivered Q2 GAAP diluted EPS of $1.33, up $1.93 over Q2 2020
  • Q2 H-D, Inc. total revenue up 77 percent over Q2 2020
  • North America Q2 retail sales up 43% over Q2 2020 and up 5% over Q2 2019
  • Delivered strong Motorcycles and Related Products (Motorcycles) segment gross margin and operating margin driven by the Rewire product portfolio adjustments
  • Delivered Financial Services segment Q2 2021 operating income growth of $90 million over Q2 2020 driven by a lower provision for credit losses
  • Launched LiveWire as a standalone brand and introduced LiveWire ONE™ – the electric motorcycle built for the urban experience, with the power and range to take you beyond
  • Revealed Sportster® S, the all-new Sportster motorcycle built on the Revolution Max platform
  • Launched H-D1™ Marketplace today, the ultimate online destination for pre-owned Harley-Davidson motorcycles in North America

Rolling in the right direction.
by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

On July 21, 2021, Harley-Davidson reported its 2021 Q2 results. The numbers are definitely moving in the right direction, especially when compared to the same time period in 2020. Worldwide Harley motorcycle sales are up 24 percent, due entirely to an impressive sales rebound in North America.

North American sales are up 43 percent year-on-year in Q2, which is the only positive number when broken down by sales region. Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (commonly referred to among some OEMs as “EMEA”) are down by 7 percent for the same time period. Asia Pacific sales are down 13 percent, and Latin America sales are down 31 percent.

Taking the entirety of the first six months of 2021 into consideration, worldwide Harley-Davidson bike sales are up 18 percent—which is still good news for the embattled OEM. North American sales are up 38 percent, EMEA sales are down 19 percent, Asia Pacific sales are down 7 percent, and Latin America sales are down 47 percent.

Harley had some explanations for some of the negative numbers, stressing that they’re all part of its overall strategy. EMEA Q2 retail sales, the Motor Company said, went down because Harley stopped sales of the Street and legacy Sportster models in the region. Meanwhile, Latin America sales were negatively impacted by a dealer reduction across the region, as well as “pricing actions across the portfolio, which were executed as part of the Rewire strategy.”

Revenues for Q2 of 2021 are up 99 percent over the same period in 2020. That likely comes as particularly good news, since that contributes to a revenue increase of 45 percent over 2020 for the first six months of the year. While most of these numbers are still below those achieved in 2019, this is clearly the strongest showing since the pandemic became a factor. North American Q2 retail sales stand out as an exception, as those are actually up 5 percent over Q2 2019.

Parts and Accessories sales are likewise up 32 percent for Q2 of 2021, and General Merchandise sales are up 47 percent. Overall, Harley says, it forecasts full-year 2021 motorcycle segment revenue growth to end up between 30 and 35 percent, year-on-year. Since that is just a forecast, we’ll have to see how that prediction pans out over the coming months.

The Stolen Motorcycles File

By General Posts

The Investigation is Ongoing

Hey,

I wrote my first book around a stolen motorcycle called Prize Possession. It was about my bike being stolen from the Easyriders magazine offices in Agoura Hills.

Recently, we thought about writing a series about stolen motorcycles. Readers started to send me news clippings about motorcycle thieves.

The stories keep coming. So, we decided to create an archive of Stolen motorcycle stories.

Ride Fast and Free Forever,
— Bandit

Click Here to check out this new series of articles on Bikernet.com

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Motorcycle dealers in Canada blame rising insurance for drop in sales

By General Posts

Robb Hertzog, owner of Prairie Harley Davidson in Regina, inside their showroom.

by Gillian Francis from https://leaderpost.com

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is.”

In just over three years, Robb Hertzog, owner of the Regina motorcycle dealership Prairie Harley Davidson (click here), estimates he’s lost well over $1 million worth of sales.

“I’m not going to say it’s all because of SGI, but I’d say three-quarters of it is,” he said in an interview Thursday, adding that skyrocketing insurance rates for motorcycles are leading to a decline in the amount of customers he receives.

Hertzog is one of many business owners in the motorcycle industry who have voiced concerns about the increasing expenses for bike owners. SGI is considering upping insurance rates again, by 15 per cent for insurance premiums greater than $1,000 and by $25 to $150, for those that total $1,000 or less, leaving businesses with increasingly dire prospects.

“They just can’t afford to ride anymore,” Hertzog said. “My younger clients are just not getting into it because when your monthly rate is as much or more than your loan payments, it makes it very, very difficult.”

Earlier this week, an SGI spokesperson told the Leader-Post that increasing fees are part of a plan to rebalance insurance rates. This would lead to an annual rate decrease for some types of vehicles and in an increase for vehicles like motorcycles that are perceived to have higher accident risk. A latest proposed rate increase is being reviewed by The Saskatchewan Rate Review Panel.

Insurance rates for new models with large engines, like Harley cruisers, can range from $2,000 to $3,000 per year. While this is enough to dissuade individual motorists from buying, there is also a chain reaction that extends to other parts of the industry as well.

Hertzog explained the number of motorcyclists attending their community events and fundraisers is down by half, leading to a decrease in charity funding of a few thousand dollars, and his bike repair team is getting fewer clients now that people are riding less frequently.

Collin Cossette, owner of Action Cycle in Moose Jaw, switched from selling street models to off-road bikes, a decision motivated by a variety of factors unrelated to insurance, including losing a franchise. He said the demand for street models is not strong enough for him to want to go back.

The few street bikes he continues to carry, have remained untouched for years, brands that would have sold in the hundreds a decade ago. Most dealerships in his area, he said, have lost around 80 per cent of their sales now that more expensive models come with high insurance.

Rick Bradshaw, owner of Schrader’s Motors in Yorkton, estimated insurance rates have increased around 67 per cent in the past decade, causing their street bike sales to decrease from 50 per year to 20.

Most of the clients who visit Schrader’s are older adults who have more disposable income, while younger cohorts are dissuaded by the expense. Prior to the insurance hike, he said more young women were taking an interest in the sport than ever before, but he believes expense has since reduced this trend.

“You can be a high performance car enthusiast and buy a $100,000, loaded-up, 600 horsepower BMW car and you don’t pay any more for that car based on value … But for motorcyclists with the same zero clean record and no accidents, if that bike happens to have a bigger engine or more horsepower all of a sudden you’re penalized dramatically,” he said.

As for Hertzog, he thinks raising awareness of the issue is key to creating change.

“We’ve got to find a way to get people out riding and enjoy life, but it will be a bit of a cost on SGI,” he said. “But the cost of that is worth a lot because I think the industry and the sales and the amount of jobs that were lost are way more money than SGI will ever have lost.”

Zero FXE launched: Review and Details

By General Posts

by Andrew Cherney from https://www.cycleworld.com

The brand’s sleekest and most fun ebike yet. The lightweight, agile FXE is a new addition to Zero’s 2022 lineup.

  • In a segment full of either high-priced, tech-heavy options or cheap flimsy junk, the FXE is a step in the right direction, especially for commuters not too concerned with range. It’s also a ton of fun.
  • The design adds a minimal, supermoto style onto the existing FX platform for a more modern, updated feel.
  • Steel frame holds the tried-and-true ZF 75-5 air-cooled motor in the FXE, rated at 46 hp. The 7.2kWh battery is not removable.
  • Certain design elements like the front headlight design (an LED) and “beak” got carried over directly from the Huge Design concept bike.
  • The bike’s light weight and short wheelbase make it easy to work turns, with good lean angle and sticky Pirelli tires aiding in your attack. You can drag the kickstand if you’re super aggressive though.
  • The relaxed, commuter-friendly riding position is even more upright than the SR/F’s but it makes for a comfy perch (except at higher speeds).
  • You’ll find the Cypher II operating system on the FXE displayed on a new 5-inch TFT screen, giving various ride modes and bike data. Pair your phone with the app to tailor them and get more detailed info.
  • Stylish cast wheels hold grippy Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, which upped our confidence in deeper high-speed turns.
  • The rear Showa monoshock delivers nearly 8 inches of travel for an impressively stable ride.
  • Inverted Showa fork is adjustable. J.Juan brakes offer excellent feel and good stopping power, and ABS can be turned off.

2022 Zero FXE Specifications
MSRP: $11,795
Motor: ZF 75-5 air-cooled IPM motor
Battery: 7.2kWh (max capacity) lithium-ion integrated battery
Charger type: 650W integrated
Charge time: 9.7 hours to 100% w/ standard 110V or 220V input
Claimed Range: 60 miles highway, 100 miles city, 75 miles combined
Claimed Peak power: 46 hp @ 3,500 rpm
Claimed Peak torque: 78 lb.-ft.
Top speed: 85 mph
Transmission: Clutchless direct drive
Final Drive: Carbon belt
Frame: Steel trellis
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa fork, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 7.0 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa 40mm piston monoshock, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 8.9 in. travel
Front Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 320mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 240mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast alloy; 17 x 3 in. / 17 x 3.5 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II; 110/70-17 / 140/70-17
Rake/Trail: 24.4°/2.8 in.
Wheelbase: 56.0 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Claimed Curb Weight: 299 lb.
Standard warranty: 2 years
Contact: zeromotorcycles.com

Conventional wisdom says there will be more EVs on the street within the next five to 10 years, and our urban roadscape will look a lot different than it does now. But conventional wisdom usually skips over the equally important notion that attracting riders means you have to innovate while also being sensitive to price, particularly in the electric space. Zero seems to be tackling those talking points, at least partially, with the reveal of the new 2022 FXE, a compact and affordable supermoto-styled commuter machine it’s billing as “the motorcycle of tomorrow, available today.”

Building the bike of tomorrow is a tall order, even for an electric motorcycle manufacturer, but when Zero took the wraps off its new machine last month near the firm’s HQ in Santa Cruz, California, our group of assorted moto scribes nodded. Here indeed was a very different looking electric bike—especially for the sometimes dowdy two-wheel electric space. And yet a mind-blowing revelation it was not, especially if you’re looking at the spec sheet alone. From a design standpoint, the slim, starkly modern supermoto-styled machine felt instantly appealing—even if it looked an awful lot like a deconstructed riff on the WR450, or more accurately, a close cousin of the brand’s already supermoto-y FXS model. But how would it hold up on the street?

n the FXE’s case, form did not have to follow function—or not as rigorously as previous models, which adopted more familiar shapes to make them appealing to the general public, according to Zero. But now, says VP of Product Development Brian Wismann, the consumer is ready for updated designs, which explains why the FXE, a model based on a concept collaboration with Huge Design back in 2019, is here. Although it’s built on the brand’s existing FX platform, the partnership with Huge introduced a completely new design language, informed mainly by stripped-down panels of bodywork. (The concept bike was in fact built on an FXS model, and you can see the similarities.) On the FXE, the so-called essential surfaces—seats, body panels, touch points—are intended to look like they’re floating over the chassis. The distinctive styling radiates modern industrial design aesthetics, while “celebrating the electric drivetrain” says Wismann.

When we sidled up to the FXE at a secret staging location outside of town—Zero shrewdly had us ride older SR/Fs and SR/Ss to where the new bikes were stashed—we were struck by just how approachable the profile was. A sane seat height welcomed even the shorties in the bunch, with the 32.9-inch perch making for easy access and a riding position similar to that of a dirt bike, not super aggressive but sitting atop the slightly dished, mostly flat seat, with a fairly short reach to the tallish bars. Mid-mounted pegs were ideally located, not too far forward or rearward, providing an upright stance in the saddle—even more than the SR/F I had just gotten off of. The compact body panels make for a clean look, though they did splay outward from below the faux fuel tank, pushing my knees out into the wind. They basically made it impossible to grip the tank as you normally might, but it was more minor inconvenience than any real annoyance.

With the ergonomics checking out, I put the FXE into Sport mode and let ‘er rip. Even though I sort of knew what to expect, the instant torque pop of an electric motor never fails to put a big grin on your face. Yes, 46 horses might not sound like much, but the eerily silent power pulse from the air-cooled ZF 75-5 motor is more than enough to turn your head, especially in its immediacy; the throttle felt far more responsive than the SR/F we had just ridden, possibly because the FXE’s substantially smaller mass and less unsprung weight made for quicker power transfer. With its narrow waist and short wheelbase, I found I could easily push the FXE into and through even the harshest decreasing-radius turns we tackled among the Santa Cruz redwoods. The bike did not fight me on quick transitions as much as expected, with the sticky Pirellis giving me all kinds of confidence throughout a half-day stint in mountain twisties. And with no need to worry about shifting, you’re free to focus on the next apex. Or to just blast to the 85-mph top speed, which I did whenever we hit a straight stretch of road. Why not, right?

Zero also outfitted the FXE with its now-familiar J.Juan brakes and bolstered by a Bosch ABS system, so stops were also a stress-free affair, with easy lever pull giving a strong bite and solid stopping power and almost no fade. (ABS can be turned off as well.) With 7 inches of travel, the inverted, adjustable Showa fork soaked up almost every road deformity we came across (except for one unexpected curb hop) staying composed even in truly harsh divots. Holding the line out back is an equally resilient—and adjustable—Showa monoshock that tracked solidly throughout our short ride.

As with the FX, the FXE also leverages Zero’s Cypher II operating system, which here is married to a new 5-inch optically bonded TFT display that proved bright and easy to read. You can access ride modes—it comes preprogrammed with Eco and Sport—and tailor torque, speed, and brake regeneration from the free Zero app, which also gives you insight to battery status. We can’t speak to range, given our short ride day—Zero claims 100 miles of city riding from the 7.2kWh (peak) battery, with 60 miles of range claimed on the highway, at 55 mph. The display screen showed less than 20 percent of charge remaining after our 50-mile stint, which was a mix of high- and low-speed scenarios, and that feels fairly close to the claim. According to Zero, the onboard 650W charger will top off the battery in 9.7 hours off a standard household socket; a rapid charger available for additional cost will do the job in a little more than 3 hours.

In sum, we’re not entirely buying the “bike of tomorrow” tagline, but the FXE does manage to serve up a grin-inducing blend of instant acceleration, flickability, and easy steering. Perhaps even more tantalizing is the sub-$10K price tag; yes, you’re getting a somewhat short range bike, but at least that obstacle is being somewhat addressed. Of course that sub-10K number rings true only once you tally in the federal and California EV tax credits, but hey, $10K is $10K.

Considering H-D’s lowest priced electric offering, the just-released LiveWire One, runs upward of $20K, and any bike called Lightning, Energica, Tarform, or Damon is well north of there, you’ve gotta hand it to Zero for compiling a portfolio of four models priced under $12K, all coming with a warranty and dealer support.

The dual sport FX sits at $11,595, the entry-level FXS is at $11,295, the naked S is priced at $10,995, and now the FXE at $11,795. All four either are or can be configured with the ZF 7.2 powertrain, which, granted, is not the fastest or most top-of-the-line offering, but it does help make the FXE one of the most affordable models in the Zero line.

You can check it out yourself at some of the upcoming stops of the IMS tour (starting with Sonoma Raceway on July 16) and bikes should be in dealers later this month as well.

Amazing hoard of vintage Harley-Davidson & Indian motorcycles and parts will be auctioned

By General Posts

AUCTION ON Aug. 14th at Vermont State Fairgrounds, 175 S. Main St., Rutland, VT, 05701

It’s the single-owner lifetime collection of the late Robert “Bob” Bearor, a dedicated motorcycle enthusiast, and his wife Christine, who went by “Teenie”.

Bob and Christine “Teenie” Bearor would ride to shows or just for fun on one of Bob’s Harley-Davidsons, often in matching outfits. The couple got married in a 1958 Corvette.

Bob and Teenie always surrounded themselves with vintage cars and motorcycles, especially Harley-Davidsons, which the couple would ride to shows or just for fun, often in matching outfits.” — Yvette VanDerBrink (VanDerBrink Auctions)

“Many of the motorcycle parts will be just for onsite bidders, so it’s best to attend the auction in person,” said Yvette VanDerBrink of VanDerBrink Auctions.

RUTLAND, VT, UNITED STATES — The single-owner lifetime collection of Robert “Bob” Bearor – an incredible assemblage of Harley-Davidson and Indian motorcycles, parts and memorabilia dating as far back as 1908, to include rare and important barn find motorcycles that are finally seeing the light of day, plus vintage cars, midget race cars, antique tractors, chainsaws, vintage fishing lures and more – will all come up for bid on Saturday, August 14th at the Vermont State Fairgrounds in Rutland, from 10 am-6 pm Eastern time, by VanDerBrink Auctions, based in Hardwick, Minn.

Mr. Bearor, who passed away in 2019, was a dedicated car and motorcycle enthusiast and a self-described wild-man who, along with his wife Christine, who went by “Teenie” because of her diminutive stature of just 4 feet 9 inches, always surrounded themselves with vintage cars and motorcycles, especially Harley-Davidsons, which the couple would ride to shows or just for fun, often in matching outfits. The two got married in a 1958 Corvette. Teenie survives her husband.

Along the way, Bob befriended Ed Flynn, a kindred spirit wild-man and the owner of an Indian Motorcycles dealership in Bennington, Vt. Ed’s collection was just as impressive as Bob’s and, upon Ed’s death and with the blessing of Ed’s widow, Mr. Flynn’s massive inventory of Indian motorcycles (two of which were unearthed from under his house), as well as hundreds of parts (including NOS) and memorabilia from the Indian dealership, became part of Bob’s collection.

In May of this year, a team from VanDerBrink Auctions, plus some motorcycle enthusiasts from New York, went to the Bearor property to inventory Mr. Flynn’s collection. In a chicken coop they found 14 frames and vintage Indian and Harley-Davidson motorcycles. The museum was full of Indian and Harley memorabilia and parts. For three days, the crew diligently dug through the buildings on the property and uncovered 53 motorcycles, hundreds of parts and memorabilia.

Now, the two combined collections in their entirety will be sold to the highest bidder, live at the fairgrounds and online, via Proxibid.com. A preview will be held on Friday, August 13th, from 10-6. The catalog, plus a video, can be viewed now, on the VanDerBrink Auctions website: www.VanDerBrinkAuctions.com.

Several motorcycles are certain to attract attention. One is the 1947 Indian Chief motorcycle, an older restore that’s green and gold and with all the stainless-steel parts supposedly dipped in gold (although it has not been tested). The bike had been touring in a display from Mr. Bearor and it ran when parked. It features a V2 4-stroke, V-Twin motor with suicide chain drive transmission, white wall tires with fringe and a big white leather seat with fringe – a truly unique motorcycle.

Then there’s the 1976 Harley-Davidson FLH motorcycle with a sidecar that Mr. Bearor dubbed “The Joker”. Known as a Coney Island custom, the bike is powered by a Harley V Twin motor, shows just 9,567 miles on the odometer and boasts lots of metal green flake. Many hours and thousands of dollars went into this custom, one-of-a-kind motorcycle. It comes with a10-page appraisal, listing all the things done to it. Bearor toured it in a semi on a walk-through display.

Two Indians that are rare but in need of a restoration are the 1932 Indian Chief 4-cylinder bike and the 1937 Indian Sport Scout with V Twin motor, both of them barn finds that appear mostly complete. Memorabilia includes vintage advertising posters for Indian Power Plus motors (25 inches by 38 inches) and an Indian and Goodyear advertising poster (13 ½ inches by 40 inches).

Other Indian motorcycles and parts in the auction include a rare 1917-1918 Indian Model O Light Twin, a 1920 Indian Power Plus, a 1924 Indian Chief, an early 1928 Indian frame, a 1932 Indian Scout, a 1932 Indian Chief 4-cylinder, a 1937 Indian Sport Scout, two 1937-1939 Indian Chief rigid frames, a 1938 Indian Junior Scout, a 1938 Indian Chief frame, a 1949 Indian Arrow and a 1951 Indian Warrior TT. See the VanDerBrink Auctions website for a full list of offerings.

The Harley-Davidson category will feature an early 1916 Harley Davidson frame and motor, a 1919-1922 Harley-Davidson Sport project, a 1991 Harley Davidson, a 1997 Harley-Davidson Electro-Glide Sport, a 1930’s Harley-Davidson frame, a Harley-Davidson VL Series project and more. Lot 170B should spark a bidding war; it’s for a very rare pair of 1916 Harley wheel discs.

Motorcycles by other makers include a 1972 Honda CB100, a 1974 CB125S and a 1982 Yamaha GT80. Motorcycle memorabilia will feature 50 vintage Indian dealer motorcycle posters, Indian pins, Indian postcards, Indian tools, Indian bicycles, Indian oil cans, vintage motorcycle leathers, kidney belts, racing suits, vintage race posters, vintage motorcycle hill climb posters and more.

The few vintage cars in the auction (none of which run and are in need of TLC) include a 1964 Ford Thunderbird coupe, white/cream with a black vinyl top, a V8 with automatic transmission and mostly rust-free body; a 1958 Chevrolet Biscayne four-door sedan old restore, black with a white top, a V8 with automatic transmission and 103,132 miles; and a 1982 DeLorean DMC12 coupe barn find with stainless-steel exterior, 33,886 miles and complete engine and transmission.

Antique tractors will include a Farmall A, a Farmall Cub with blade, a Case MC tractor, The Beaver tractor and a Massey Harris Pony. Stationery gas engines will feature a Majestic 2hp engine, a Majestic 3hp engine, an International Type M engine, an International Tom Thumb engine, a Fairbanks Morse Type Z engine, Maytag stationary gas engines and other examples.

Vintage midget race cars will include an example with a pretty cream-colored metallic paint scheme, juice brakes, a 4-cylinder engine with velocity stacks and racing seat belts; a midget with a GM 4 cylinder engine, two Rochester carbs and headers and racing seat belts; and a beautiful purple and white car with a 49 Flathead V8 with Stromberg #97 carbs, Edelbrock AL2 heads and AL2 intake, velocity stacks, Ford clutch, a three-speed transmission and electric fan.

Gas and oil memorabilia will feature a Mobil Oil gargoyle cabinet, a G&B gas pump, oil cans, signs and more. The auction will have two rings of action, with one ring dedicated to antique tractors, chainsaws and boat motors. See the VanDerBrink website for terms and conditions.

VanDerBrink Auctions specializes in collector car parts auctions, older salvage yard liquidations, auto related items, antique tractors, estates and private collections. The firm has a proven track record of selling farmland and other real estate at auction. Yvette VanDerBrink, the ownere and an auctioneer, formed the company in 2001, after a prophetic message from Minister Tom Stammon. VanDerBrink Auctions is a faith-based company, making every auction a mission.

VanDerBrink Auctions has been regionally and nationally recognized for its auctions and has conducted collector car auctions in eight states. Yvette VanDerBrink’s goal is to get cars and parts to the collectors, hobbyists and rodders, to preserve automotive history and further the car hobby. She has this same philosophy and ambition when selling real estate and land at auction.

For more information, please visit www.VanderBrinkAuctions.com. Updates are posted often.

CycleSource Magazine Golden Panhead raffle

By General Posts

Charlie’s Golden Pan To Benefit The Sturgis Motorcycle Museum

Howdy Folks,

We are less than thirty days out from one lucky person winning the Golden Panhead that is being raffled to benefit the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Tickets are being sold, but it is somewhat slow going. It would be wonderful if each you would help promote this. I know Charlie would be honored to see his legacy go towards the motorcycle community.

The direct link to the raffle is here : https://rafflecreator.com/pages/49273/charlies-golden-pan-to-benefit-the-sturgis-motorcycle-museum

Thank you in advance!
From Cycle Source Magazine
http://www.cyclesource.com

In Charlie’s memory, and in the spirit of the great thing he liked to call Motorsickilism, this incredible handcrafted 1961 Panhead Chopper is being raffled for $20 per chance or 6 opportunities for $100.

On Friday, August 13, 2021, one lucky winner will be selected randomly through a third-party source to be the caretaker of Charlie’s legacy. 100% of the proceeds will go directly to the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum in Charlie’s honor.

It is the perfect way to end this story, maybe the only one that makes sense in the wake of such a tragic loss. Help put Charlie into the history books for one last great accomplishment.

PLEASE VISIT: https://rafflecreator.com/pages/49273/charlies-golden-pan-to-benefit-the-sturgis-motorcycle-museum

Women-only motorcycle club rides across 48 states in 8 days

By General Posts

by Madeleine Hagen from https://www.yaktrinews.com

Forty-eight states in 10 days, from Kittery, Maine to Kennewick, Washington was the adventure 28 women took to honor a motorcycle legend.

“I didn’t know anyway to come out to Washington to put an event on so we came up with the 48 in 10,” Tameka Singleton of Bessie’s Belles said.

The group of ladies is from all over the United States.

They met up in Maine in early July to start their ride in honor of Bessie Stringfield.

“She kind of gives us an inspiration and we use that everyday you know just ride motorcycles,” Singleton said.

In the mid-1900’s, Bessie was a female motorcycle pioneer. She was the first African-American woman to ride the continuous United States all by herself.

She eventually founded a motorcycle club, became president and was inducted into the American Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

Tameka Singleton said Bessie is the reason they completed the cross country journey.

“The logistics are crazy, being resourceful. These ladies have made this ride what it is,” she said.

The ride started on July 5th, Tameka said they covered 15 states and hundreds of miles in the first day.

On their journey, they had to get proof that they stopped in all 48 states. So, they would stop quickly, get gas and carry on.

“Texarkana is in Texas and Arkansas – so it counts,” Tameka laughed.

The women rode with minimal sleep.

“Two to four hours of rest a night,” she said.

As they reached the west, the ladies dealt with extreme conditions.

“Now we have to go through that desert, and we have to go across New Mexico and it was hot, and that’s when somebody turned hell on,” Tameka said by the time they reached Idaho, the historic heatwave had started.

Eventually they ended their journey in Kennewick, beating their goal of 10 days.

“48 in eight, all women, what more can you say? Just watching my sisters like, they were having hard times but they never stopped and that is really the biggest reward to see people standing in this state that probably never would have been here otherwise, and for that Bessie Stringfield has really inspired all of us,” Tameka said.

The ladies spent their Tuesday at the Harley Davidson in Kennewick, to get their bikes serviced and tuned up before hitting the road again. Tameka said next up is a ride to Miami, Florida.