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Harley-Davidson Archives — Page 3 of 18 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

New from Harley-Davidson in 2020: the Bronx

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Because we chose to dedicate this month to Harley-Davidson, we’ve been keeping you up to date with all things Harley ever since the beginning of March. Most of our coverage focused though on what was and what is, and less on what’s coming from probably the world’s most famous motorcycle maker.

There are three major projects in the works in Milwaukee, and two of them will be released by the end of this year. The three are the Bronx (2020), the Pan America (2020), and the uber-exciting and yet unnamed custom model that will see daylight in 2021.

This piece here is about the Bronx, a bike built on a new middleweight platform that was shown for the first time at the EICMA show in Milan last year.

The Bronx will be Harley’s first product to be fitted with the 975cc version of the new Revolution Max family of engines. Although the official specs have not been announced, the 60-degree V-twin should develop 115 hp and around 95 Nm of torque.

The bike will most likely use a new braking solution from Brembo – one that should make its way on all Revolution Max-engined bikes, as well as dedicated Michelin tires.

There’s no official date for the release of the Bronx yet, but we should have it detailed sometime in the near future. The bike is part of an expansion plan cooked up by Harley that would see over 15 models being developed on the new middleweight platform.

This is one of the ways Harley is using as a means to meet the target it set for itself: 1 million new riders by 2027, bringing the total to 4 million in the U.S. alone.

“We’ll continue to fuel all aspects of the riding experience and add new solutions to fully develop, engage and retain riders through their journey, starting with the very first spark of interest,” said in a statement when the plan was announced in September 2019.

The Harley-Davidson Ride Home Is How You Properly Celebrate Freedom

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com/

Ask anyone about Harley-Davidson and probably the first word you’ll hear out of their mouth is “freedom.” This is what the Ride Home is all about.

Even for those who don’t ride or have little knowledge of the Harley-Davidson brand (or bikes in general), the image of the Harley-Davidson rider is that of a man’s man (or woman’s woman, in the case of female riders). Throughout the years, the brand has cultivated this image of the rugged outlaw, of the rebel who forsakes the urban environment for the open road and the sense of ultimate freedom.

While the “outlaw” image has been turned into a cliché by the Hollywood machine, the rebel label still holds water. And it’s for and by these rebels that the big Ride Home was born into reality. The most recent edition, the 2018 one, solidified the event as the biggest of the kind in the world – and Harley-Davidson’s status as a leader in the biker community.

All motorcycle groups and gangs have that brotherhood / sisterhood approach, but it is only Harley that can boast such a loyal following as to go on a cross-country pilgrimage every 5 years, just to honor the Harley-Davidson spirit.

The Ride Home is a tradition that started in 1988, when the company celebrated its 85th anniversary. To mark the occasion, management rented out the front half of the Milwaukee SummerFest grounds, and the city of Milwaukee welcomed bikers from all over the world. They had no idea what to expect or how this event would snowball into something this impressive.

As you probably know, Harley-Davidson was founded in 1903 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by the Davidson brothers and their friend William Harley (with some help from another friend, Henry Melk). It is one of the two American motorcycle companies to survive the Great Depression (the other being Indian), and a legendary brand that, though it’s taken several financial hits in recent years, remains a leader in the industry.

That first year, bikers from across the U.S. rode to Milwaukee to celebrate the milestone together, and they have been doing so every 5 years since then. As noted above, the 2018 edition was the biggest ever, with Harley-Davidson really pulling out all the stops to turn it into a memorable experience. Not that it wasn’t memorable before then.

However, for 2018, Harley-Davidson got more involved and organized 4 separate rides (from Seattle, San Diego, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and Portland, Maine), virtually helping bikers from all 4 corners of the country to get to the Mecca of biking. For those still feeling rebellious but on a smaller scale, organized tours by Harley-Davidson authorized dealers were put together, offering anything from overnight accommodation to guide tours and special events. Imagine going on a cruise, but way more awesome because it’s on a Hog.

Also in 2019, the oldest existing Harley-Davidson club held a separate celebration in their hometown of Prague, the Czech Republic, drawing over 60,000 bikes. It paled in comparison to the 500,000 bikers that descended onto Milwaukee and partied over Labor Day weekend.

Every edition, the Ride Home culminates with special Harley-Davidson events (a visit to the official, local Harley-Davidson museum, rides through biking county, meetings with dealers and custom bikes shows), parties, gatherings, cookouts, vendor demos and other outdoor fun activities, which is why it’s also called Harleyfest. Some also refer to it as HarleyMania because of the Harley chaos it brings into town for the duration of a weekend.

However, the Ride Home is really about the ride. Sure, riders love bonding with like-minded individuals and sharing their passion for Hogs with people who can relate to what they’re saying one hundred percent, but the highlight is the thousand-miles ride.

As one rider explains in the video below, you ride in a group but are alone with your thoughts. You move fast but get to take in everything around you through all senses, with nothing in the way. Whatever hardships may (still) come Harley-Davidson’s way and whatever faults it can be found guilty of, this is one thing it has managed to deliver, short-lived as it might be: that near-impossible feel that you can have it all.

Harley-Davidson’s 2020 Mid-Year Model Lineup

By | General Posts

by Jason Marker from https://www.rideapart.com

I hate Florida. Hate it. I hate it with the furious passion of a million burning suns. Years ago I swore that I would never step foot in the Sunshine State again, a promise that I’ve kept religiously. Florida: Not Even Once. That said, when Harley-Davidson calls you up and personally invites you to Daytona Beach to ride brand new bikes and you haven’t touched a bike in three months because Michigan winters suck, well, if you’re me you find that even your most rigidly held beliefs are negotiable.

The Friday before Daytona Bike Week dawned cool and cloudy. I’d rolled in from Orlando International the previous evening around 20:00. After a lovely dinner with the Harley team and my colleagues—among whom was legendary MoJo and RA alum Peter Jones—and a good night’s sleep, I was ready to ride some bikes. We convened for breakfast and the tech briefing, and after a fair amount of drinking coffee and dicking around, we piled into the hotel shuttle and off we went to pick up our bikes.

Now, this wasn’t going to be a typical press ride. We weren’t all going to be riding the same bike all day. Not today. No, we were riding three different bikes—the new Softail Standard (which I can’t stop calling the FX Softail), the 30th Anniversary Fat Boy, and the hi-po CVO Road Glide. The plan was for the four of us to trade bikes on and off all day so that we got seat time on each model. Kind of unorthodox, but I was into it. I mean, I hadn’t touched a bike in three months due to winter and moving to a new house, so I was down for anything.

After an impromptu tour of the greater Daytona Beach metropolitan area thanks to our timid, easily confused driver, we arrived at Daytona International Speedway. The bikes were lined up all gassed up and ready inside Harley’s demo fleet paddock. We got a quick overview of the bikes, took a few minutes for the requisite social media stuff, and finally hit the road.

We spent the next few hours really putting the bikes through their paces. Now, Florida isn’t known for its stunning, technically challenging riding roads, but he Harley team did its best to find a route that wasn’t all straight lines and swamplands. They were the kinds of roads Harleys thrive on—primarily straights with a few sweeping turns and the occasional corner just to keep us on our toes. Overall a really nice ride in pretty weather and not once were we menaced by an alligator or accosted by Florida Man.

Since this was a ride in which I rode three different bikes, I’m going to break up the reviews into three sections—one for each bike. At the end, I’ll sum up my thoughts on all three as a group and give you all my final impressions which, I’m sure, is what you’re all here for anyway. So, without further ado, let’s talk about these sweet new Harleys.

2020 CVO Road Glide

The Road Glide is, hands down, my favorite Harley. It’s my fave despite my general dislike for touring bikes and other big, bulky things that can’t get out of their own way. I love its weird fairing, its close-set dual headlights, and its lines that, while clearly still based on an FL touring frame, seem longer and sleeker to me than their Electraglide siblings.

The monster, hi-po CVO is the Road Glide’s apotheosis. It isn’t just sleek and stylish, it’s also big. From its over-large front wheel to its massive Milwaukee 8 lump to the big sound of the BOOM! sound system, it has all the presence and charisma of Shaquille O’Neil in a $10,000 suit—i.e. a lot.

At the CVO Road Glide’s heart is a 117 cubic inch version of Harley’s stout Milwaukee 8 mill mated to a six-speed transmission. This big stonking engine is the largest installed by Harley in a production bike and comes equipped with an upgraded performance cam and a big old Screamin’ Eagle Heavy Breather (god I love that name) high-performance intake to let this monster breathe. The exhaust is a handsome two-into-two setup with a satin finish and black tips. We’re talking some big iron here.

Out front is a huge 21-inch cast wheel with a skinny tire, a nod to the current, totally bonkers big wheel custom style (which I absolutely love). The wheel is finished in gloss black with smoked satin accents and looks pretty great in that classic FL front end. Aft is a matching, more traditional 18-inch wheels wrapped, like the front, in classic Harley Dunlop rubber. Braking is provided by four-piston calipers fore and aft, backed up by a slew of electronic rider aids like Harley’s Reflex Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS), ABS, traction control, etc.

The CVO’s infotainment package is the top of the line BOOM! Box GTS system. Controlled by a bright, easy to read, 6.5-inch touchscreen, it comes with everything Harley has to offer. There’s the four-speaker—two in the fairing and two in the leading edges of the saddlebag lids—600 watt stereo, integrated navigation, and Apple CarPlay (with Android Auto coming down the pipe soon). It also features the new Harley-Davidson app, its very own cellular relay, and a slew of customization options. To top it all off, Harley throws in a BOOM! Audio 30K Bluetooth helmet comms system—a reskinned Sena 30K—with every purchase.

Looks-wise, the bike comes in a fantastic color that Harley calls Premium Sand Dune. It’s a kind of bone-white color with a satin pearl finish on it. Depending on the light it looks white, beige, or haze gray and it looks deep and rich in the sun. The color is offset by satin black and red accents, including very nice CVO logos on the saddlebags. The classic Road Glide shark-nose fairing is enhanced by “Fang” lowers which look rad and keep more wind off the rider. It’s an extremely good looking bike.

On the road, the CVO Road Glide is stately, king-like. It has gravitas. It also has an acceleration best described as glacial and a hilariously low, 5,500 rpm redline. I was constantly bouncing off the rev limited in first gear under heavy acceleration, which honestly is mostly my fault since I’m used to high-strung, 40-year-old, Japanese triples and inline-fours. That said, once you lug the CVO up to speed it moves. The big M8 117 pushes the bike along at a very respectable clip and provides the rider with short bursts of blinding straight-line speed which belie the bike’s bulk. Much like a gator or, since we’re talking about him, like Shaq.

The engine does its best work in 4th gear, loping along at around 2,200 RPM at 60 miles per hour. there’s a seemingly bottomless well of torque to draw from, too. The engine is rated at 125 foot-pounds and it pulls like a tractor in every gear. It’s honestly kind of impressive.

My biggest complaint about the CVO Road Glide is its size. It’s a handful, especially at low speeds. Despite the bike’s front suspension being specially set up for it, that big 21-inch wheel I like so much does the handling no favors. I found it kind of numb in traffic, and thanks to its sheer bulk, maneuvering the bike through tight spaces was hair-raising, to say the least. The CVO Road Glide is a lot. Almost too much, if you ask me.

To be fair, high-po, limited edition, $40K touring bikes aren’t exactly my cup of tea. If such a machine is your cup of tea, though, I think you’ll dig the CVO Road Glide. The combination of power, comfort, and looks is a potent one. It’s an excellent addition to Harley’s CVO collection. If you have the means, I highly recommend you pick one up.

2020 Softail Standard

Slid into the Softail lineup as a basic, blank-slate model perfect for customization, the Softail Standard is an extremely good looking bike. Offered only in black with a subtle throwback logo on the tank in dark gray, it’s a stripped-down, no-nonsense, short-ranged cruiser.

As befits a base model bike, all the fat has been trimmed off the Softail Standard. Harley pared away the bits, bobs, and superfluous systems. What’s left behind is simply a motorcycle—nothing more, nothing less—and probably the purest Harley experience currently available in the MoCo’s lineup. From its laced wheels and mini-apes to the basic 107ci Milwaukee 8 and mid-controls to the solo saddle, short rear fender, and simple two-into-two shotgun exhaust, the Softail Standard is just a good, solid bike.

The Softail Standard’s biggest selling point, according to Harley, is that the bike is a blank canvas for customization. To that end, Harley launched four complete custom bolt-on packages that new Softail Standard owners can have bolted on at their dealership. First, there’s the “Day Tripper” package that adds passenger accommodations, forward controls, and a small swingarm bag. Second, a “Coastal Custom” package that adds a quarter fairing, two-up seat, and new bars, risers, and footpegs. There’s a “Touring Custom” package that adds small saddlebags, a more comfortable two-up seat, a windshield, and assorted accouterment to improve comfort and turn the bike into a respectable touring machine. Finally, there’s the “Performance Custom” package that upgrades the engine with a Screamin’ Eagle Stage II kit and a host of intake, exhaust, and tuning upgrades.

I gotta admit, I really like this modular custom package idea. Harley touts them as a starting point, a way for new owners to see various ways in which their new bikes can be customized. They’re a pretty good deal, too, and run between around $1,100 (Day Tripper) to $1,700 (Touring Custom) Yankee Dollars. It’s a nice way to bundle popular accessories for riders who want a touch of customization but don’t want to go hog wild with it, as it were.

Now the bad(ish) news. Out of the three bikes we rode during the press ride, the Softail Standard was my least favorite. Sure, it looks phenomenal as you walk up to it and I really like its clean lines, but as soon as you throw a leg over it you discover something disconcerting in a Harley—it’s small.

Thanks to the weird ergos—mid controls, low-slung solo saddle, mini-ape handlebars—the Softail Standard feels cramped and tiny, especially if you’re a, uh, rider of size like I am. At 6’1 and 240 pounds with a 34-inch inseam, I was incredibly uncomfortable while riding this thing. The whole time I was aboard I was sitting right on my tailbone and had to keep shifting my weight around to relieve the pain in my lower back. I also could never find a good place for my feet on those pegs, especially since there’s no heel rest anywhere to be found.

Combine that with a vague-feeling shifter, weird spacing between the rear brake pedal and the footpeg (it’s both too close and too far away, if you get my drift), and a wicked crosswind during our ride and I never felt like I was in complete control of the bike. I mean, I was, but every time I was in the saddle I kept worrying that I might not be able to handle a road emergency if one came up. That kind of thing doesn’t really inspire rider confidence.

To be absolutely clear, I’m not saying that the Softail Standard is a bad bike. Far from it, in fact. Like I said earlier, I really dig its lines, its attitude, and those modular customization packages. Thing is, at its heart the Softail Standard is a short-range bike, built to bounce between stops close to home, not eat up the miles on the superslab. I’m sure it’s great at that, but I was on this thing for an hour at a time and, no sir, I didn’t like it.

My problems with the bike aren’t primarily due to how it’s built, they’re due to how I’m built. Someone smaller and/or lighter probably won’t have the same I did while in the saddle. If you are built like I am, well, caveat emptor big man. You might want to spring for some forward controls and more sensible handlebars (and a more comfortable saddle) if you’re looking to pick one of these up.

2020 Fat Boy 30th Anniversary Edition

Thirty years ago, Willie G. Davidson stood in front of a jet black tractor-trailer with a new bike and changed motorcycling. That bike, the questionably named Fat Boy, was a burly, low-slung brute with a huge FL front end, fat tires, solid disc wheels, and about fifteen miles of Harley-Davidson attitude. Since then, the Fat Boy has been the go-to ride for legions of Harlista bar pirates, killer cyborgs from the future, and my dad. Now, after three decades at the top of the heap, Harley has released a limited edition 30th Anniversary Fat Boy.

I’ve had a soft spot for the Fat Boy ever since it came out, mostly due to Terminator 2 and the fact that my dad rolls a ’96 model that’s seen so many paint jobs, engine upgrades, and mods that it’s essentially the Bike of Theseus at this point. There’s just something about it, an undeniable presence that is, much like the Softail Standard, quintessentially Harley.

Look, I’m not going to lie to you all here. There’s not a lot of blue sky between the 30th Anniversary Edition and a run of the mill 2020 Fat Boy 114. There’s the paint job, which is, admittedly, phenomenal. It’s Harley’s vivid black color offset with copper-colored accents and a slightly redesigned OG Fat Boy logo on the tank. The paint, combined with the blacked-out M8, handlebars, and other brightwork, lend an air of menace to the already looming Fat Boy. It’s just a paint job, though. Aside from the limited run, though—just 2,500 units—that’s it. That’s everything special about the 30th Anniversary edition.

Honestly, I was hoping for something more. Performance upgrades, maybe, or some one-off grips and floorboards to really set the 30th apart from its mass-market stablemates. That said, just because I felt that the 30th Anniversary Edition wasn’t quite special enough doesn’t mean that I didn’t like it. On the contrary, I loved it. It was my favorite of the three bikes I rode during the press ride. It’s comfortable, confident, surprisingly nimble, and respectably fast thanks to the big boy 114 engine. All that is, of course, chalked up to the huge overhaul the Softail line got in 2018, but still. The Fat Boy rules, and the 30th Anniversary Edition is like the cherry on top of an already delicious, and powerful, sundae.

Sorry about the length of this one, friends. After riding three different bikes over the course of just a few hours, I had a jumble of thoughts and impressions to work out, so thanks for sticking around this long. So, my final thoughts? At the end of the day, after thrashing each bike up and down Florida’s Atlantic coast, I felt a little like Goldilocks in the Three Bears’ house. Despite my love for it, the CVO Road Glide was too much—much too much—for me. The Softail Standard was too little, and its fantastic lines didn’t make up for the cramped confines and sore lower back. The 30th Anniversary Fat Boy, though, was just right. It had everything I could have wanted in a single, good looking package.

All three bikes are fantastic Harleys, though. They do exactly what they’re meant to and I reckon the MoCo’s marketing team will land solid hits with each bike’s target demo. I’m clearly not in any of those three target markets, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t. If you’re a CVO buyer, a new rider looking to get into Harleys, or a long-term Fat Boy stan, these bikes are just what you’re looking for.

Here Are the Three Stunning Harley-Davidson Pickup Trucks Available Right Now

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

At the turn of the millennium, Ford introduced a special version of the F-150 dedicated to another American icon, Harley-Davidson. Called Harley-Davidson Edition, the run of special pickup trucks lasted from 2000 to 2011, and most of them are still around today, selling for big bucks at auctions across the U.S.

But there’s another breed of Harley-Davidson flavored trucks presently on the market, much newer and even more hardcore than what Ford itself made before. And they all come from a company called Tuscany Motor.

The American customizer has been around since the end of the 1980s, and has grown since in a behemoth specialty vehicle manufacturer with a soft spot for making GM and Ford trucks really stand out from the crowd.

Tuscany’s Harley-Davidson line now includes three trucks, two from the Blue Oval and one from rival GMC. And all three of them are like nothing you can see on the road today.

Tuscany says all “were created to give motorcycle enthusiasts the opportunity to once again enjoy classic Harley-Davidson design cues in the top-selling vehicles in America.” To meet that goal, a lot of modifications had to be made, mostly visual, for both the exterior and the interior.

Usually, the exterior elements on the trucks that are inspired by the American bike builder are the special front grille, the wheels (that come on all models as Fat Boy-style milled aluminum pieces), the exhaust, the fender vents, and the tailgate applique. In all cases, orange is used throughout the builds, but the most impressive piece of visual tuning is the huge Harley-Davidson logo and shield imprinted on the tonneau cover.

On the interior, the presence of the bike maker can be seen on the leather seat covers, the gauges, the pedals, the floor mats, and the door entry sills.

As said, there are presently three pickup trucks with H-D DNA: the Ford F-150, Ford F-250, and the GMC Sierra 1500. All will be build in limited numbers, and can be ordered from this link.

This 1937 Harley-Davidson UH Is the Best You’ll Find Anywhere

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com/

Decades-old motorcycles are not as widespread as cars. Whereas in the world today there are countless four-wheeled machines, in better or worse condition, going back perhaps a century or so, not the same can be said about two-wheelers.

That essentially means that when we come across a bike as old as the one we’re going to write about here, there’s reason to gloat. Especially because we’re talking about one that was built, in very limited numbers, in the years before the start of the second world war, but runs just as good as it did back then.

What’s being displayed in the gallery above is a 1937 Harley-Davidson UH. It is one of just 185 made in 1937, just a few short years before all civilian bike production would be halted to make room for the WLAs requested by the U.S. Army in the years that followed. Of the 185, this one here is probably the only one that (still) looks this good.

And it owes its looks to a restoration process that tried to stay as close to the original as possible.

Part of the U model family, the UH is powered by the same 80ci engine that was fitted on it back in the day. It runs, as it was rebuilt while keeping all the innovations brought by Harley to the U that year, including the recirculating oil system instead of a total-loss one, and dry-sump lubrication.

The engine sits inside the original frame of the bike, and so is that era’s dash, Parts of the bike hiding beneath the blue and white bodywork may seem a bit different, but that’s because many of the original parts have been chromed during the restoration process.

When the bike was made, it sold for a little over $400. Now, someone is selling it during the Mecum Glendale auction that starts on Wednesday, March 11, and they’ll probably get a lot more for it.

Harley-Davidson Finally Adds Android Auto As Standard On 2021 Motorcycles

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by Mircea Panait from https://www.autoevolution.com/

It’s been long in the making, but what did you expect from a motorcycle manufacturer as traditional as Harley-Davidson? Android Auto will finally roll out to Touring motorcycles as a software update for the Boom! Box GTS infotainment system, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

For the 2021 model year, the Trike, CVO, and Touring families with the Boom! Box GTS will feature Android Auto as standard. Google Maps, the Google Assistant, voice commands, and many more apps should make life behind the bars a little more comfortable and pleasant as well.

Owners of the Boom! Box GTS can update the infotainment system with Android Auto by USB. If you were wondering, the system is available as an accessory for 2014-and-later motorcycles from the Trike, CVO, and Touring families with previous the Boom! Box 6.5GT infotainment.

Designed to look similar to a tablet, the GTS features a 6.5-inch touchscreen with Corning Gorilla Glass for scratch resistance. Apple CarPlay is also supported, but iOS devices need to be complemented by a Harley-Davidson Genuine Motor Accessories headset. The GTS projects a number of phone functions onto the screen, including music streams from Spotify.

Currently available in 36 countries, Android Auto’s assistant is limited to Australia, Canada, France, Germany, India, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The Google Assistant has one purpose, and that is to keep your hands on the bars and eyes on the road while using voice commands to check the weather, make a call, or change the radio station.

Celebrating five years in March 2020, Android Auto rolled out in May 2015 with the Hyundai Sonata. The South Korean manufacturer offered the system free of charge as opposed to the BMW-Apple CarPlay subscription service that was eventually dropped over far-reaching criticism.

On a related note, Harley-Davidson has lost 5.2 percent of sales in the United States in 2019 as opposed to 2018. Despite a boom in the ASEAN region, worldwide sales declined 4.6 percent and Harley-Davidson still hasn’t announced any sort of plan to turn things around for the better.

2007 Harley-Davidson Custom Bike Is a Throwback to the Bobbers of Old

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There are few things the name Harley-Davidson cannot be associated with in the world of motorcycles. From road-going bikes to custom builds, the name is present all across the board in the industry, and it has been so for a great number of years now.

There’s good reason for that, as there are few types of motorcycles today that don’t have a trace of Harley in them. Back in the 1920s, for instance, J-series Harleys gave birth to what today are known as bobbers. Seen by most as the less bling cousins of the choppers that have flooded the streets in times closer to our own, bobbers have been seen across the ages as signature builds of shops around the world.

Because there are so many Harley-based bobbers out there, it’s nearly impossible to say which is the best. Yet from time to time one really stands out, and it is worth a closer look.

Waiting on the list of vehicles that will sell at the end of the month at an auction in Salt Lake City is exactly such a build, simply titled 2007 Harley-Davidson bobber.

Built in the same city where the auction is set to take place, the motorcycle was designed in such a way as to bring back memories of the bobbers build back in the 1960s and 1970s: there is no front fender, the rear one is significantly shorter, and there are literally no other body part elements standing in the way of the exposed V-twin or the black frame.

Offsetting the metal look of the engine and exhaust and the blue tone of the limited bodywork is hand-crafted, brown leatherwork spread throughout.

The ones selling the bike say the entire build cost over $20,000 back when it was made, but there’s no estimate as to how much it is expected to fetch during the auction.

Riding a Harley-Davidson Can Help Fight PTSD, Veteran Group Ride Planned

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com/

In the first month of of 2019, Harley-Davidson released the results of a research that showed just how beneficial riding a motorcycle can be for the mental well-being of humans. As it seems, motorcycling is even good to treat more serious conditions.

Back in 2015, Harley started supporting the efforts of an organization called Wounded Warrior Project. The group provides services and programs for war veterans post-9/11, and among these programs there is an idea called Rolling Project Odyssey.

This Odyssey is centered around bringing together soldiers and help them heal their mental scars through adventure-based learning. And that includes riding Harleys in groups, just as a Harley should be ridden. This type activity has been found to be beneficial in cases of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), among other things.

The Harley research we mentioned earlier, conducted by scientists at UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, showed that riding a motorcycle for 20 minutes can increase the heart rate by 11 percent, reaching a level similar to that achieved while performing a light exercise.

That in turn increases alertness, and helps decrease hormonal stress biomarkers by 28 percent. The study’s findings were based on data taken from 50 experienced motorcyclists that were made to ride their own bikes on a 22-minute route.

“Rolling Project Odyssey was a life-changing experience for me,” said in a statement Jonathan Goolsby, an Army and Rolling Project Odyssey veteran.

“The experience has taught me many things that I have been able to implement into my daily life, like finding my center and keeping my cool when things start to get tough.”

This year’s Rolling Project Odyssey kicks off at the beginning of next week starting in Jacksonville, Florida, and going through Daytona, where the Bike Week marks the start of the riding season on the American continent.

My Harley Sounds Like a Sewing Machine, So Many Google Users Say

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by Bogdan Popa from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you use Google’s search engine or Microsoft’s Bing to look for information online, you probably know that both services provide you with suggestions (or predictions, as Google calls them) as you type, all in an attempt to make the whole process faster.

So technically, if you go to Google and type “Harley-Davidson,” you should then be provided with a series of suggestions that are based on data like popular keywords that other people used when searching the web and trending topics.

One of the top searches related to Harley-Davidson shows that way too many owners believe their motorcycles “sound like a sewing machine.”

The suggestions for “Harley sounds like a” are “my harley sounds like a sewing machine,” “harley 103 sounds like a sewing machine,” and “honda that sounds like a harley.” Also, Google users also tried to figure out “what motorcycle sounds like a harley.”

On the other hand, if you turn to Microsoft’s Bing for searching the web, the suggestions are a lot different.

If you use the same “my harley sounds like a” keyword, you’re not getting a sewing machine suggestion, but something totally different. “My truck sounds like a harley davidson,” is the suggestion this time, which is a little bit unexpected since Harley-Davidson motorcycles sound pretty cool in the first place anyway.

Bing also has a few other suggestions for the sounds generated by a Harley-Davidson engine. “Harley livewire sounds like jet coming,” one suggestion reads, while another one potentially indicates a problem with the motorcycle because “harley sounds like it grinds on a cold start.”

Google calls these suggestions “predictions” because the whole system tries to guess what you’re more likely to type in the search box.

“We look at the real searches that happen on Google and show common and trending ones relevant to the characters that are entered and also related to your location and previous searches,” Google says.

These predictions could thus be a little different depending on your location and should be provided regardless of the device you use to search the web.

Harley-Davidson T-Shirt Quilt Sells for $11,500, Money Goes to Charity

By | General Posts

For more than a century, the Harley-Davidson name has grown so large that now it far exceeds the confines of just motorcycle manufacturer moniker. For some people – and they are not few – Harley has become a way of life.

For true fans of the brand there are few things that cannot be associated with this famous American name. From motorcycle-related hardware to less-so items, there are countless ways in which the brand is honored.

One strange, yet apparently very satisfying way the Harley name is used around the world is quilts. There is an entire industry dedicated to them, and the Internet is flooded with people bragging or trying to sell their quilts.

You can generally buy a Harley-Davidson quilt for sums that start from around $100 for a twin-sized U.S. bed. But this one here, pictured above, was sold at the end of February for $11,500.

It went for so much because there’s a story behind it. It was made by a British Columbia quilter named Bobbi Pardy to help Adaura Cayford, a 9-year-old currently undergoing treatment for an inoperable brain cancer.

Pardy spent around 60 hours assembling the quilt from donated T-shirt wearing the Harley-Davidson name and logos, sent to her from places as far as Saudi Arabia and Ecuador.

Once ready, the quilt was sold at the end of a 10-day auction event for $11,500. And even if that seems a lot, just think Adaura’s medication costs $5,000 per month, according to Alaska Highway News.

“I had to do something,” the creator of the quilt said according to the source. “I thought this was something I could do. It’s my time and that’s it. It’s a really cool T-shirt quilt.”

Despite the effort made by these people from British Columbia, Adaura’s fight continues. For those willing to help, a Go Fund Me page has been created where more money can be donated.