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Best motorcycle cleaner for 2021: Top 10 products

By General Posts

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Cleaning your motorcycle can be a pain, but this stuff makes it a lot easier.

Motorcycle cleaner notes
The visual benefits of keeping a clean bike are pretty obvious, I mean, more shiny is more better, right? But there are some performance and safety benefits, too. For example, if your bike is filthy, it can be hard to see if you’ve suddenly sprung a leak of some vital fluid (usually oil).

Some road crud can be corrosive over time to the exposed steel and aluminum parts of your motorcycle, not to mention the fasteners that hold things onto your bike. You thought changing out that clutch was going to be easy, didn’t you? It would have been if you hadn’t left a bunch of road salt all over the bike for months. Now it’s broken-bolt city, population: you.

The performance benefits are more subtle but no less real. This is especially true when it comes to chain maintenance. Just think, if your motorcycle has to fight the friction of a dry, dirty or corroded chain, then that’s power lost. If you’re on a 200-horsepower sport bike, that’s not a big deal, but if you’re on a 20-horsepower motorcycle like the Royal Enfield Meteor 350 I recently reviewed, you might just notice.

Keep your bike clean with a well-stocked motorcycle care kit, and make your life easy.

Best general motorcycle cleaner overall
S100 Total Cycle Cleaner $15

Best general motorcycle cleaner overall runner-up
Muc-Off Nanotechnology Motorcycle Cleaner $16

Best motorcycle quick detailer
S100 Detail & Wax spray $15

Best waterless motorcycle wash
Muc-Off High-Performance No Rinse Bike Cleaning Spray $18

Best motorcycle chain cleaner and lube
Maxima Clean Up and Chain Wax $28

Best motorcycle chain cleaning brush
Simple Solutions The Grunge Brush $14

Best motorcycle wheel cleaner
S100 Motorcycle Wheel Cleaner $21

Best motorcycle chrome cleaner and polish
Simichrome Polish $14

Best complete motorcycle cleaning kit
S100 Motorcycle Detailing Kit $50

Best motorcycle helmet cleaner
Motul Helmet Clean $8

I love riding motorcycles, but kind of hate the care and maintenance that they require — especially when it’s my own bike. Luckily, I live in a place where things are dry and dusty rather than wet and muddy, so I can get by most of the time. But when it’s time to buckle down and wash the bike, there are a few motorcycle cleaning products I always turn to.

In addition to keeping your bike clean, it’s important to clean and lubricate your chain (if you have one) and make sure your helmet is free of crud and dried bugs. I’ve listed some of the best motorcycle cleaner products here. They’ve been good to me over the years for both purposes and hopefully you’ll appreciate them too.

Best general motorcycle cleaner overall – S100 Total Cycle Cleaner
I’m one of those people who like a clean motorcycle, but hate actually cleaning their motorcycle. That used to mean that I’d just live with a dirty motorcycle most of the time, but not since I found S100 spray cleaner.

This cleaning product is awesome and it’s easy to use. Spray it on, let it sit for a few minutes and hose it off. It does a great job of removing dirt, road grime, grease, dried-on bugs and whatever else I’ve accumulated on my adventures. It’s also safe on plastics like your motorcycle windshield and metals, so no worries about it harming any exposed components on your motorcycle.

Best general motorcycle cleaner overall runner-up – Muc-Off Nanotechnology Motorcycle Cleaner
The Muc-Off Nano Tech bike cleaner spray is awesome. It smells better than the S100 and it’s biodegradable. Muc-Off also sells it in concentrate form, which I love, so you don’t have to constantly buy new plastic bottles.

Like the S100, it’s a spray on and rinse off affair and it does a great job of removing caked on road grime nastiness from all parts of your motorcycle without sending a bunch of harsh chemicals down the drain.

Best motorcycle quick detailer – S100 Detail & Wax spray
Sometimes you just need to touch up your bike before heading out on an all-day ride with your buds. I mean, you don’t want to show up and have the least shiny two-wheeled machine, now do you?

This S100 Detail and Wax spray is great because it’s specifically geared towards motorcycles and does a good job of shining paint and powder-coat. It’s easy to use, too. Just spray on the detailer and wipe it off with a good microfiber towel.

Best waterless motorcycle wash – Muc-Off High-Performance No Rinse Bike Cleaning Spray
What do you do if you have a dirty motorcycle and you don’t have access to a hose? Either take it to a coin-op car wash to use the pressure washer (which kind of sucks) or grab the awesome High-Performance Waterless Wash spray from Muc-Off.

Like basically every Muc-Off product, this bike cleaner is easy on the environment while still being tough on stubborn dirt and grime. All you have to do is spray it on, let it soak for a minute and wipe it off. After you wiped the dirt off, get a new clean microfiber cloth and buff your bike until it shines. It’s super easy and packs into a backpack or side case for easy motorcycle cleaning on the go.

Best motorcycle chain cleaner and lube – Maxima Clean Up and Chain Wax
Keeping your motorcycle’s chain clean and lubed is a miserable task, but it’s critical if you want to keep your chain and sprocket in tip-top condition. There are as many different products and techniques and old-timey sage wisdom for cleaning and lubing motorcycle chains as there are stars in the sky, but I’m going to recommend what works for me.

The Maxima products — Clean Up chain cleaner and Chain Wax — are the perfect one-two punch for chain maintenance. Clean Up does an excellent job of removing dirt, debris and and acting as a degreaser for old gross lube while at the same time being gentle on the delicate O-rings inside your chain. Chain wax is a spray-on chain lube that goes on wet and then dries into a waxy coating that resists coming off and doesn’t encourage dirt to stick to it. The best part is that Maxima offers it in a combo pack with a decent penetrating lubricant as a bonus.

Best motorcycle chain cleaning brush – Simple Solutions The Grunge Brush
As we’ve already established, cleaning motorcycle chains sucks. It’s greasy, grimy work and depending on how nasty you’ve let your chain get, it can be hard work, too. Having a good chain-cleaning brush in your cleaning kit is a huge help and my personal favorite brush is the Grunge Brush.

The Grunge Brush has stiff bristles that clean your chain on three sides at once, plus longer bristles at the other end for getting into your sprocket teeth and so on. It’s cheap and effective and it even has replaceable brushes, so you’re not constantly buying new ones. When paired with a good chain cleaning solvent like Maxima’s Clean Up, this makes the work of chain maintenance a whole lot easier.

Best motorcycle wheel cleaner – S100 Motorcycle Wheel Cleaner
There are a zillion different wheel cleaners on the market and they all do something a little different, but one of the things I like best about the S100 motorcycle wheel cleaner is that it is a thicker, more gel-like formula which sticks to your wheels better. It does a great job of getting brake dust, dirt and other grime off as well.

The other nice thing about the S100 Motorcycle Wheel Cleaner is that it’s gentle, which means it’s safe on all kinds of wheels — be they painted, powder-coated, aluminum, magnesium or stainless steel. If your bike’s wheels are too dirty for normal bike wash to take care of, grab a spray bottle of this.

Best motorcycle chrome cleaner and polish – Simichrome Polish
Unlike most cars these days, it’s easy to buy a brand new motorcycle with a bunch of chrome. And chrome looks great until it starts to dull or pit, but then it looks like crap. Thankfully the solution to that dull chrome problem is easy: Just polish it!

If you’re going to undertake that task, you’re going to need a good chrome polish compound and one of my personal favorites comes straight outta Germany. It’s called Simichrome and it works really, really well. All you need to do is apply the elbow grease with a microfiber towel using this metal polish and get ready to be blinded by the shine.

Best complete motorcycle cleaning kit – S100 Motorcycle Detailing Kit
If you’re detecting a theme with the S100 products here, you’re not mistaken. The fact is that S100 offers some of the best motorcycle-specific cleaning and detailing products around and at reasonable prices. Still, what if you don’t necessarily want to buy each product by itself? Thankfully there’s a motorcycle cleaning kit.

The S100 detailing kit comes with everything you’ll need to detail your motorcycle short of a hose and water — including a drying towel. Even better, it comes in a tidy little carrying case, so you can keep all your motorcycle cleaning supplies together and not let things get lost in the back of some dank, daddy longlegs-infested garage cabinet over the winter.

Best motorcycle helmet cleaner – Motul Helmet Clean
Everybody knows that riding with a motorcycle helmet is a good idea — hell, it’s even the law in most places. What people might not know is that while keeping your helmet clean is a good thing, using chemicals is a huge no-no — even on the outside. Luckily, there are a few great helmet cleaning products on the market and my favorite comes from Motul.

The Motul helmet spray not only does an epic job of loosening dried on bugs and dirt from the shell of your helmet, it also offers up a nice shine that is more resistant to getting bugs stuck on it in the future. Spray it on, let it soak and wipe it off.

For the inside of your helmet, never try and clean the pads and liner when they’re still inside the shell. Always remove them and wash them gently according to your helmet manufacturer’s guidelines.

Hideout Harley-Davidson and Four Kings of Oklahoma hold car and bike show

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by Benjamin Kouchnerkavich from https://www.fourstateshomepage.com

JOPLIN, MO. – Hideout Harley-Davidson and a motorcycle club are celebrating Memorial Weekend with a car and bike show.

The Four Kings of Oklahoma held Saturday’s event to raise money for first responders.

In addition to the cars and bikes, food trucks, local vendors and even artists were on hand.

Artist Len Nordmann say, he has traveled the country making automotive art for over 25 years.

Len Nordmann, Artist, says, “I’ve always had a love for automobiles and I sold my first painting when I was 10 years old. And from then on, I’ve always had an interest in doing special buildings and also doing homes and doing businesses and then also cars.”

Dale Wano, Sales Manager, says, “We just want to have everybody come out, have a great time, look at some awesome cars, look at some awesome motorcycles and enjoy the fellowship of being together.”

They also gave out door prizes from local businesses.

SEE: https://www.hideouthd.com/

Ducati Multistrada V4: Zero to 5,000 in just six months

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Germany Becomes Home of the 5,000th Ducati Multistrada V4

Zero to 5,000 in just six months. It is the achievement of Italian bike maker Ducati’s Multistrada V4, which in just half a year managed to convince 5,000 riders it is the right choice for them.

Ducati announced the milestone this week, with the 5,000th two-wheeler ever made in the family ordered by a German rider from Ingolstadt. The bike is a fully-loaded V4 S Sport and was accompanied in the rider’s garage by a “sculptural reproduction” of the bike and a “personal letter certifying the motorcycle’s serial number.”

The V4 was presented by the Italians in November last year, and it is currently available in three versions, the V4, V4S, and V4 S Sport, all described as the most advanced of their kind ever. The most potent of them all can easily go in the high $20,000s (exact pricing is available upon request at dealers).

At the core of the bikes sits the so-called Granturismo engine, a 1,158cc piece of hardware rated at a massive 170 hp at 10,500 rpm and a maximum torque of 125 Nm (92 lb-ft) at 8,750 rpm. The engine is lighter than the one that preceded it and tips the scale at 66.7 kg (147 pounds).

But it is not only the engine that makes the bike special. The V4 is presently the first production motorcycle equipped with both a front and a rear radar, working together with the Adaptive Cruise Control (AAC) technology.

Only a limited range of colors is available for the bike, going from the Ducati Red of the entry-level to the “particularly aggressive dedicated livery“ of the S Sport. This one also gets an Akrapovic exhaust and carbon front mudguard.

The exhaust system is made of stainless steel and was designed to bring the motorcycle’s weight down by 5 kg (11 pounds) and increase the engine’s power output to 174 hp and 133 Nm (98 lb-ft) of torque.

Largo, Florida police unveil all-electric motorcycles

By General Posts

by 10 Tampa Bay from https://www.wtsp.com

The city says it plans on having a totally-electric fleet by 2030.

Largo police officers are easing up on the gas as the department revealed a pair of all-electric motorcycles.

The two stylish bikes were unveiled Tuesday and will join the city’s growing alternative-fuel fleet, according to City of Largo officials. They say the motorcycles will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality.

Largo officials says the bikes are part of the city’s commitment to have 100 percent renewable energy by 2035.

The city also plans on having an all-electric fleet by 2030.

British bike show is a triumph for organisers

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by Nigel Baudains from https://guernseypress.com

The heyday of the British motorcycle industry was on display at St James yesterday.

People were queuing by the 10am opening to see about 90 machines spanning the period from 1911 to the present day.

Alan Richmond, who organised the show on behalf of the St James Trust, is also chairman of The British Motor Cycle Club Guernsey.

‘I think British motorcycles appeal to the older man who probably had one in his youth,’ he said.

‘Naturally he will say that it was the best and there is a huge brand loyalty.

‘For the practical, you can strip them down to the last nut and bolt, whereas motorcycles today are computer-controlled and you dare not change a spark plug.’

Some of the bikes – nicknamed trailer queens – belonged to people who did not want to get them wet. Half an hour of riding and four hours of cleaning was no fun, he said.

Vaccine centre volunteer Alan Boyd, 66, said visiting the show had reactivated his interest in motorcycles.

‘I had bikes from the age of 15 and I even managed to persuade my wife, Jo, to tour Europe with me on a [Honda] Goldwing,’ he said.

‘I sold it because I thought I was getting too old. I’m a Triumph fan. The early ones leaked oil and the electrics were always packing up. Every time you went out it was an adventure as you never knew whether you’d get back or not.’

Within a few minutes of the show opening, the hall was packed with motorcycle enthusiasts.

Jackson Garage technician Wojtek Krzemien, 39, who came to Guernsey from Poland 13 years ago, was among them.

‘I just love motorbikes and I wanted to bring the boys to show them the story of motorcycling,’ he said.

‘They love motorbikes too and everything here is in such great condition.’

Other makes on show included Norton, BSA, James, Velocette, Sunbeam and Royal Enfield.

Car and Motorcycle Companies Now Making Electric Bikes

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Lee Iacocca with his electric bike in 1998. It had a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour.

by Roy Furchgott from https://www.nytimes.com

They see branding opportunities as the pandemic and a desire by cities to curb traffic propel e-bike sales to new heights.

The transportation industry has seen the future, and the future is 1895.

That was the year Ogden Bolton Jr. of Canton, Ohio, was awarded U.S. Patent 552,271 for an “electrical bicycle.” A century and change later, electric bikes have gained new currency as car and motorcycle companies like Ducati, Harley-Davidson, Jeep, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Yamaha have horned into the market with their own designs.

While the pandemic has accelerated bike sales, the overriding attraction is that cities worldwide are beginning to restrict motor traffic. These companies are betting that e-bikes are the urban vehicles of tomorrow — or at least vehicles for good publicity today.

“In the past 12 to 18 months, you have seen a lot of new brands come into the market,” said Andrew Engelmann, an e-bike sales and marketing manager at Yamaha, which has been in the electric bike business since 1993 and claims sales of two million worldwide. “We in the U.S. have not seen this new energy toward cycling since Lance Armstrong won the Tour de France.”

Credit the coronavirus pandemic, which has ignited bike sales of all stripes, but none so much as e-bikes. While retail unit sales of bicycles from January to October last year were up 46 percent from a year earlier, electric bikes were up 140 percent. Measured in dollars, regular bikes were up 67 percent and e-bikes 158 percent — so don’t expect a discount. Those numbers, from the market researchers at NPD, do not include online-only retailers such as Rad Power Bikes, so sales may actually be higher still.

Ogden Bolton aside, there is a historical connection between bicycles and motorcycles. Many early motorcycles came from bicycle makers that simply clapped a motor on a bike, often retaining the pedals in the style of a moped.

The automotive industry’s bicycle connection is more recent, with the likes of Malcolm Bricklin and Lee Iacocca introducing electric bikes in the ’90s. Both flopped. Mr. Iacocca’s design, typical for the time, was hampered by a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour. Many car companies, including Ford, Audi, Maserati and BMW, have gotten into and out of e-bikes since.

“No car company has had any success selling an electric bicycle,” said Don DiCostanzo, chief executive of Pedego Electric Bikes, who in 2014 licensed a bike design to Ford. “It’s fool’s gold. It can never replace the profit on a car.”

Yet car and motorcycle makers are being drawn in. “I think they are seeing a lot of the same opportunity we see,” said Ian Kenny, who leads the e-bike effort at the bicycle company Specialized. “But I think there is a very big difference between demonstrating you can do something and doing something very well at scale.”

However, changes in the way people get about, especially in Europe and Asia, are enticing motor vehicle companies that operate internationally. Overseas, in cities that manage pollution and overcrowded streets by restricting motor traffic, e-bikes often fill a gap.

“In Europe, the e-bike is more of a fundamental transportation tool,” said Dirk Sorenson, an analyst for NPD. London, Madrid, Oslo and Paris are among the growing number of cities restricting downtown traffic.

The pandemic has American cities testing similar restrictions. Boston, Minneapolis and a number of California cities have instituted Slow Streets programs, restricting motor traffic on side streets in favor of cycling and walking. It even has UPS, Amazon and DHL trying out e-cargo bikes in New York.

“There is a huge opportunity for e-bikes in the U.S., which is a huge untapped market,” said Rasheq Zarif, a mobility technology expert for the consulting firm Deloitte.

Some companies are preparing now for the possibility that “micromobility,” as the buzzword has it, will catch on here.

“Let’s imagine Harley-Davison is not a motorcycle company but a mobility company,” said Aaron Frank, brand director for Serial 1, which builds an e-bike in partnership with Harley. “There is a strong argument we can do for urban commuters what Harley-Davison did for motorcycles.”

Other companies see e-bikes as a gateway to sell their primary products. Though best known for its motorcycles, Ducati North America wants e-bikes to “potentially turn people on to Ducati,” its chief executive, Jason Chinnock, said. “And we’ve seen that with people at some events and with the media reaching out.”

E-bikes may be more expensive than bicycles, but are cheaper than cars or motorcycles. And improved motor and battery technology is bringing prices down. Low-priced e-bikes with a motor in the wheel hub — similar to that 1895 design — can be had for about $1,000. Prices for versions with more complex, geared motors at the pedals can reach more than $10,000.

“Spending $1,000 on a bike seems out there,” Mr. Kenny said, “but when you don’t look at it as a toy — when it becomes transportation — it becomes a very different conversation.”

Price isn’t the only hurdle. E-bikes confront a crippling hodgepodge of laws. Although the Consumer Product Safety Commission deemed “low speed” e-bikes (with a motor equivalent to 1 horsepower or less) a bicycle, states still decide where that bike can be ridden.

“It’s up to 50 states to define the use, and that’s been a big problem in the past,” said Claudia Wasko, general manager of Bosch eBike, a prominent manufacturer of drive systems.

The PeopleForBikes coalition drafted model state legislation to allow most e-bikes in bike lanes and parks. It suggests three classes of e-bike, with a top speed between 20 and 28 m.p.h. Twenty-eight states have adopted some version of the legislation.

Some companies may be less concerned with the future of mobility and more interested in getting some attention now.

“I think it’s a halo thing,” said Mr. DiCostanzo, whose company has produced e-bikes for Tommy Bahama, Ford and others. Halo vehicles represent a brand’s aspirations, like concept cars.

“I think that’s what it is for Ford,” he added. “They wanted it for window dressing, and that’s what they got. I think they sold 500 in the five years it ran.”

Mercedes, which is taking orders for its top-of-the-line Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team V11 e-bike at $12,000, said it was a chance to showcase its ability with high-tech materials from carbon fiber to paint.

“High-performance road bikes and e-bikes provide a great way to showcase such technologies into a range of consumer products,” said Damian Cook, a spokesman.

For some in the bicycle industry this all smacks of déjà vu. In the 1970s, a bike boom was thought to presage a new future for transportation in which cycling was central. But it failed. Though there were many contributing factors, roads weren’t made more bicycle-friendly and people didn’t want to arrive at work sweaty.

With the combination of Slow Streets programs, which address the first problem, electric bikes, which address the second, and a pandemic that has given people a chance to adjust to both, experts like Mr. Zarif find hope.

“When you give people a chance to try something, it reduces resistance to change,” he said. “As a society, the reality is we go forward — we don’t go backward.”

Five Million Tires Sold Plus a New Upcoming Fourth Generation

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Pirelli DIABLO ROSSO™ in Numbers: Five Million Tires Sold Plus a New Upcoming Fourth Generation

Since 2008 the DIABLO ROSSO™ Brand has Been Using the Technology Developed by Pirelli in the FIM Superbike World Championship to Offer Uncompromising Riding Performance

ROME, Ga. (January 7, 2021) – The Pirelli DIABLO ROSSO™ tire family enters the new year with record numbers and celebrates the achievement of an important milestone: over 5,000,000 radial tires sold since its introduction on the market in 2008.

The origins of DIABLO™ and DIABLO ROSSO™ brands

DIABLO™ represents Pirelli’s excellence in the world of high-performance tires designed for two-wheeled vehicles. The DIABLO product family, after its introduction into the market in 2002, has rapidly evolved to include in its broad portfolio tires dedicated to other market segments, from professional racing to the supersports road arena. The DIABLO brand brings with it more than 18 years of experience, technology and victories in the most prestigious national and international two-wheeled competitions.

Within the DIABLO™ range, the DIABLO ROSSO™ products are dedicated to road machines of a sport leaning. The name DIABLO ROSSO™ was born with the intention of honoring the distinctive color of the Italian national motorsport team since 1922, which was the color racing red (PANTONE® 185C).

The most prestigious motorcycle manufacturers in the world choose DIABLO ROSSO™ products as original equipment for their top models, while many respected international magazines and websites consider DIABLO ROSSO™ products a benchmark for this sector. Among the leading products of this family there are currently tires such as DIABLO ROSSO™ Corsa II, DIABLO ROSSO™ III and DIABLO ROSSO™ Scooter, still reference tires in their respective segments.

Thanks to the high performance of each of these products, supported by the ability of Pirelli engineers to anticipate the demands of a constantly evolving market, and to use cutting-edge materials and technologies, the DIABLO ROSSO™ product family has been able to reach the important milestone of 5,000,000 radial tires sold worldwide.

Respectable numbers that allow Pirelli to announce with great satisfaction and pride the fourth generation of this tire family, with the arrival of DIABLO ROSSO™ IV, the new supersports product created to continue the history of this successful brand. As the direct successor of DIABLO ROSSO™ III, DIABLO ROSSO™ IV raises the bar of this product range even higher, pushing the qualities of handling and grip to the highest levels, both in dry and wet conditions.

DIABLO ROSSO™ IV is dedicated to motorcyclists who love a more dynamic riding style, owners of supersports, hypernaked or crossover bikes who demand from a tire a high level of grip, on all types of asphalt and weather conditions, as well as precise feedback and great handling to make the most of the high performance of their bikes.

For more information about the complete line of Pirelli motorcycle tires, please visit Pirelli.com

RFR rides into the New Year

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Got my first 65 miles of 2021 in, I always try to ride on New Years Day start my year off right, while it said 35 degrees at my 6:40 am departure, that was not the temperature on the backroads I took this morning. Not as cold as the 29/30 degrees of 2018, but still got mild frostbite in my fingers & that’s was with the last Christmas HD gloves and Gator Skin inserts. The Roadglide blocked those 2018 temps, time for some heated gloves I guess? And another Roadglide, keeping the Dyna, we bonded laying there in the mud a couple days ago.

Happy New Year!

RFR

Pirelli Releases Recommended Tire Setup for Upcoming Thor Mini O’s Amateur Motocross National

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Trackside Support and Technical Assistance Will be Available to SCORPION™ MX Riders Throughout the Week

ROME, Ga. (November 17, 2020) – Pirelli has announced its plans to return for the 49th annual Thor Mini O’s amateur motocross national at Gatorback Cycle Park on November 22-28, 2020. With the event featuring both motocross and supercross-style tracks as well as the potential for a variety of weather conditions throughout the week, it’s critical to match tire setup with track and soil conditions. Pirelli will be working with its trackside vendor Mid-State Motorsports to have its SCORPION™ MX range readily available and provide technical support and assistance to all racers competing on Pirelli products.

“Mini O’s is a special event that Pirelli looks forward to each year,” said Nick Walton, off-road race manager, Pirelli. “The event produces great camaraderie with families coming together for the Thanksgiving holiday and produces a unique opportunity for amateur riders to showcase their skills on both motocross and supercross tracks. Pirelli places great emphasis on the grassroots level of the sport, and together with our trackside vendor Mid-State Motorsports, we look forward to providing the technical assistance and products needed for SCORPION™ MX riders to get a step ahead of the competition.”

For riders who are set to compete at Gatorback Cycle Park for the upcoming Thor Mini O’s, Pirelli is recommending the SCORPION™ MX32 Mid Soft front and rear tires as a starting point. In the event of rain or softer than normal soil conditions, the SCORPION™ MX Soft rear scoop tire is an alternate option. Recommended air pressure is 14 PSI for all tires.

Pirelli continues to give consumers and riders of all skill levels access to the very same tires used by its factory racing teams and world champions such as Tim Gajser, Antonio Cairoli and Jeffrey Herlings. The SCORPION™ MX range consists of the SCORPRION™ MX32™ Mid Soft, SCORPION™ MX32™ Mid Hard, and SCORPION™ MX Soft, providing a tire suitable for all conditions. Pirelli recently introduced new minibike sizes for its highly sought-after MX Soft in 12-inch and 16-inch sizing.

The event information for the Thor Mini O’s can be found HERE.

Thieves hit the gas as motorcycle thefts accelerate across NYC

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by Melissa Klein from https://nypost.com

The city may have been on lockdown, but motorcycle thefts revved up in New York City.

The number of motorcycles and mopeds stolen this year hit 1,348 through Sept. 20, up from 916 in the same period in 2019, according to statistics from the NYPD.

The 47% surge is part of an overall increase in vehicle thefts in 2020. A total of 6,107 cars, motorcycles and mopeds were swiped citywide through Sept. 20, up a stunning 63% from the same period last year, NYPD data shows.

The NYPD has blamed the increase on the state’s bail reform laws which prohibit pretrial detention for many alleged crimes.

The East New York and Cypress Hills neighborhoods in Brooklyn are the city’s grand theft auto hot spots followed by Queens Village, Cambria Heights, Laurelton, Rosedale and Springfield Gardens.

Motorcycle thefts had previously been on the decline in the Big Apple, dropping 9% from 2018 to 2019, according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

Gavriel Cohen, 27, a bartender who started an Instagram page to help motorcycle owners track down their stolen rides after his own bike was taken in 2018, called the thefts “rampant.”

“It’s all bundled up with the lack of law and order going on in the city right now,” Cohen said.

So far, the Instagram page led to one motorcycle being reunited with its owner.

In June, cops nabbed an ex-con for allegedly taking a stolen Suzuki motorcycle on a 1 train on the Upper West Side. When he was caught on June 16, it was the sixth arrest for Frank Pagan that month alone.

Ramiro Vigil, 34, a biomedical engineer from Park Slope, said thieves swiped his 2019 BMW bike in early August near his home. He said video footage showed three or four men lifting it into a van and taking off. Two friends also had their rides taken around the same time.

Vigil, a native of Mexico who has lived in China, Brazil and Europe, said he did not experience this type of crime in other countries.

“I think it could be related to the COVID and people probably looking for easy money,” he said. “But it’s really sad.”

Jessica Brown, 38, who purchased her $6,000 customized Honda bike just three months ago, had it disappear on Sept. 18 while parked in front of her Richmond Hill home.

Security footage showed two men walking the bike off the street at 1 a.m., Brown said.

Brown immediately put the word out in the motorcycle community, where she is known as Jes Blaze.

“You can’t depend on the cops, unfortunately. They take a report and then they go on with their merry way,” she said. “I’m basically relying on the streets right now.”

Brown said the distinctive bike, which is covered in a red camouflage pattern, has been seen on Long Island, in Ridgewood and on the Bruckner Expressway. But she doesn’t have high hopes of getting it back.

“The chances of a motorcycle being found or returned is literally like finding a needle in the haystack,” she said.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau said its statistics showed that just 255 motorcycles, mopeds, scooters or motorbikes have been recovered in New York City this year out of 1,389 it has recorded stolen.