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2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS Coming on January 26

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Despite all the troubles of 2020, or thanks to them, the motorcycle world enjoyed a hell of a ride last year. Harley-Davidson had it particularly hard, Ducati rolled like a champ with several high-profile releases, and Triumph, well, the Brits contended to planting the seeds that would make 2021 a year to remember.

And for them, it will all start on January 26, when the bike maker will be presenting the new iteration of the Speed Triple 1200 RS, the bad boy of the motorcycle family born all the way back in 1994. The news broke earlier this week thanks to a very short video posted on Youtube to tease the unveiling.

“All-new in every dimension the Speed Triple 1200 RS will deliver an absolute revolution in terms of Speed Triple power, performance, handling and technology, for the ultimate performance naked sports ride,” Triumph says about the newcomer. “Join us for the live reveal of the new Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS and be part of the revolution.”

The video (attached below) is literally unrevealing from a visual standpoint, showing nothing but a sketchy outline of the bike and a front end shot. What we do get to experience is the sound the bike will make while revved, something we’ll probably hear when customers will finally get to experience it.

What to expect, then? Well, if we are to trust both what Triumph is saying but also the way it did things these past few years, you should look forward to the Speed Triple 1200 RS having perhaps the most powerful engine offered for the range since forever, as well as some styling changes meant to differentiate from what came before in the range. At the same time, it should build on the design of the new, lighter Street Triple sibling.

As we approach the reveal date, keep an eye out for possible leaks about the 2021 Triumph Speed Triple 1200 RS.

Honda Gives the Gold Wing Bigger Trunk and Android Auto

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Not a week has passed in the new year and Japanese bike maker Honda already announced the first changes to the lineup for the 2021 model year. As you might have guessed, these changes first and foremost target the iconic Gold Wing family.

The touring bike line, in production in the Japanese stables since 1974, bets even more on its ability to handle whatever needs the rider has for long stretches of road. With that in mind, the biggest change pertains to the trunk capacity of the Gold Wing Tour.

According to the Japanese, the trunk can now hold two full-face helmets, thanks to an increase in capacity by 11 liters, to a total of 61 liters. Additionally, the passenger seat has been improved by giving it a “more relaxed angle” and taller profile, but also by making it of thicker foam.

Last but not least, the 45-watt speakers have been bettered as well, there is now a standard XM radio antenna, and optimized automatic volume-adjustment. The bike family now also supports Android Auto alongside the existing Apple CarPlay integration.

“Honda listens to its customers, a fact that is highlighted in our latest new-model announcement,” said in a statement Lee Edmunds, Senior Manager of Powersports Marketing for American Honda.

“In the case of the Gold Wing and our smallest street-legal CRF models, the 2021 iterations reflect improvements that were highly requested by people who ride them every day, and the motorcycles are better as a result. We look forward to customers getting the chance to experience the updates themselves.”

Sporting all red turn signals as the single most important visual upgrade, the new Gold Wing family goes on sale in February in five variants, with prices starting at $23,900 for the standard version and going to as high as $32,600 for the Gold Wing Tour Air Bag DCT.

Aprilia debuts its long-awaited Tuono 660 naked bike for 2021

By | General Posts

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

This promises to be a much more approachable and affordable naked bike from the Italian brand. Enough power, very light weight and top-tier safety tech make the Tuono 660 pretty appealing.

The Aprilia Tuono V4 is one of the most over-the-top, terrifying, wonderful and life-affirming machines I’ve ever had the pleasure of riding. It’s massively powerful, thanks to its 1,077-cc V4 engine, it sounds like half of the world’s angriest Ferrari, and it’s packed to the gunwales with brilliant electronics designed to keep your tires on the pavement. It’s also not a bike I’d recommend to most people as a first, second or even third motorcycle. It’s just overwhelming.

Aprilia seems to understand that issue with its Tuono V4, so it’s done the only sensible thing and lopped two cylinders off it, calling it the Tuono 660 and making it a much more accessible motorcycle. It teased the Tuono 660 alongside the RS 660 sportbike at EICMA in 2019, and now it’s getting its official debut, according to an announcement on Wednesday.

The Tuono 660 makes a reasonable 95 horsepower (the V4, for comparison, produces over 170 hp) and has a curb weight of just 403 pounds. This means that things with the baby Tuono should be plenty rowdy but not quite so hectic as on the V4.

Like its bigger brother, the Tuono 660 sports a more upright riding position than the similarly powered RS 660, which means it should be more comfortable for longer rides. It comes with a KYB suspension with limited adjustment, paired with decently sized, radially mounted Brembo brakes. While miles away from the high-zoot stuff on the more expensive V4, this combination should be more than adequate for some hardcore canyon carving for most riders.

To help make the 660 more friendly for newer riders, it comes standard with Aprilia’s excellent APRC rider-aid suite, which includes multilevel traction control, antiwheelie control, cruise control and user-selectable engine maps. Corner-sensitive, multistage antilock brakes are standard as well.

The 2021 Aprilia Tuono 660 will be available in the US towards the end of Q1 for a starting price of $10,499 before dealer fees. It will be interesting to see how it compares to Ducati’s all-new Monster and KTM’s 790 Duke.

Choices for Motorcycle Insurance for the Teen Driver

By | General Posts

from https://www.sfgate.com

Not every teen wants to drive a car; some would rather ride motorcycles, dirt bikes, or even scooters and mopeds. Parents can, understandably, be hesitant to allow their teen to ride and Cary Runnells, State Farm Insurance Agent in Thousand Oaks, CA has prepared a report to help parents understand the licensing, safety and insurance options available for teen riders.

Not every teen wants to drive a car; some would rather ride motorcycles, dirt bikes, or even scooters and mopeds. Parents can, understandably, be hesitant to allow their teen to ride and Cary Runnells, State Farm Insurance Agent in Thousand Oaks, CA has prepared a report to help parents understand the licensing, safety and insurance options available for teen riders.

First on the list is to prepare the teen rider. The State of California requires a Class M1 or Class M2 driver license to operate a motorcycle or a “Motor Driven Cycle.” The California Department of Motor Vehicles motorcycle handbook describes these vehicles as:

  • Motorcycle having only two wheels and an engine that is over 150cc
  • Motor Driven Cycles have engines that are 149cc or less
  • Vehicles must be registered
  • Driver must be licensed

Before getting his or her license, your teen needs a motorcycle permit. Teen drivers need to be at least 15 ½ years old to get a permit and must complete a motorcycle rider training course that is given by the California Highway Patrol. Other requirements include passing knowledge and skill tests and obtain the Certificate of Completion for the motorcycle training course.

“Shortly before your teen is ready to apply for the permit is the time to meet with your insurance agent about insurance,” said Runnells of the Thousand Oaks State Farm Insurance Agency. State Farm offers motorcycle insurance for multiple bike types:

  • Factory-built motorcycles
  • Motor scooters, minibikes and trail bikes (OHV)
  • Classic motorcycles
  • Custom motorcycles in some cases

Your insurance agent will help you determine the best levels of coverage you need to cover:

  • Bodily injury to someone else or to the insured driver in the event of an accident, including uninsured motorist coverage
  • Damage caused to someone else’s property while your teen is riding
  • Damage to the motorcycle caused by an accident and theft, fire, vandalism, and other losses — even while your motorcycle is in storage for the winter
  • Attached side cars
  • Emergency roadside expenses
  • Damage to protective gear

“Another excellent benefit that we offer,” said Runnells, “is discounts on insurance when policies are bundled and when the teen driver takes advantage of State Farm’s many teen driving programs. We help you choose the best programs for your teen. Safe driving programs cover all aspects of driving any kind of vehicle safely and help instill safe driving habits.”

2021 Yamaha R3 Makes Global Debut

By | General Posts

by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com

Ahead of its launch next year, 2021 Yamaha R3 has been unveiled for Japanese market

The company has put a price tag of JPY 687,500 on the updated motorcycle. Yamaha aims to sell at least 3700 units of updated R3 in Japan on an annual basis.

What’s new in updated Yamaha R3?

Changes are fairly limited on 2021 Yamaha R3. It appears that one of the company’s key objectives is to provide more personalization options to customers. Towards that end, updated Yamaha R3 gets a new Cyan colour option.

This looks quite exciting and goes well with other colour shades used on the motorcycle. This new colour option also seems a bit radical, as it’s not something that one would usually see on a motorcycle. For folks who want to flaunt their rides, this peppy new colour can be a lot of fun on the streets.

Shades of cyan can be seen on the headlight cowl, front fender, fairing and fuel tank. It creates an interesting contrast with the blacked-out parts of the motorcycle. The bike’s trendy profile is further enhanced with the multi-coloured graphics and red alloy wheels. Overall, the motorcycle looks striking in its new colour and is an absolute head turner.

The earlier Matte Black shade has also been updated slightly on 2021 Yamaha R3. The third colour option of Deep Purple Blue Metallic has been retained, just as it was earlier.

2021 Yamaha R3 engine

Updated Yamaha R3 will be using the same engine as earlier. It is powered by a 320 cc, liquid cooled, parallel-twin DOHC motor that is capable of delivering max power of 42 ps at 10,750 rpm and max torque of 29 Nm at 9,000 rpm. This is mated to a 6-speed gearbox. Most other cycle parts will also be the same as the current model.

Earlier, Yamaha had unveiled 2021 R3 in US market. There too, the changes were minor and included a new Electric Teal colour option. In US, the updated bike will go on sale for USD 5,299 (Rs 3.89 lakhs). Yamaha R3 has top speed of around 110 mph (~ 180 km/h) and it can reach 0-62 mph (0-100 kmph) in 5.5 seconds. Fuel efficiency is estimated to be around 56 miles per gallon (~ 24 kmpl).

Triumph Trident 660 and Tiger 850 Sport Reach U.S. Shores

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

British bike maker Triumph had a host of high-profile premieres this year. The most recent are the Trident 660, the entry bike in the world of Triple roadsters, and the Tiger 850 Sport, it too an entry-level. Neither is presently available at U.S. dealerships, but since that will change in early 2021, the company thought a promotional tour is in order.

Triumph initially planned to show the two models as part of the New Product Tour events it had planned, but the health crisis forced a change – instead of a tour, a so-called sneak peek is offered on the grounds of dealerships across the U.S.

“With the cancellation of the motorcycles shows, it was an obvious choice for us to get these in the hands of as many dealerships as possible,” said in a statement Adam VanderVeen, Marketing Director, Triumph Motorcycles America.

“I was blown away to learn the strong support of the dealerships, including a handful opting to open on Sundays or Mondays they’d usually be closed just to have an extra day to preview these hot new models.”

Two pairs of each bike will be trekking the country, hopping from dealership to dealership for what the company calls “a first-hand look.” The four motorcycles are, according to Triumph, the only units of their respective ranges currently on display anywhere outside of Europe. And no, they’re not available for test rides.

The Trident 660 is powered by a whole new breed of the Triple engine that develops 81 PS (80 hp) at 10,250 rpm and 64 Nm (47 lb-ft) peak torque at 6,250 rpm. It is priced at $7,995 and should be available in January.

The Tiger 850 Sport packs an 888cc engine rated at 85 PS (84 hp) at 8,500 rpm and 82 Nm (60 lb-ft) of torque at 6,500 rpm. The asking price for this one is $11,995, and it too should be available starting next month.

The full schedule of dealership stops is available on the bike maker’s website.

Harley-Davidson 2021 Global Digital Event

By | General Posts

HARLEY-DAVIDSON BRINGS THE WORLD TOGETHER TO DEBUT ALL NEW 2021 PRODUCTS IN THE H-D 2021 GLOBAL DIGITAL EVENT ON JANUARY 19

MILWAUKEE, WI (December 09, 2020) – Throughout Harley-Davidson’s 118-year history, the brand has never before brought the entire world together to experience the debut of all-new Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. On Jan.19th, 2021, that all changes with a single virtual event. During H-D 21, the company’s first virtual launch experience, Harley-Davidson will announce new 2021 motorcycles, parts and accessories, riding gear and apparel.

Those who participate will hear from Harley-Davidson leadership, product experts, and passionate enthusiasts who are leading and shaping the industry on all that’s coming to Harley-Davidson® dealerships in 2021.

To take part in the H-D 21 virtual launch experience, register now at www.H-D.com/21.

New Approach to Product Launches

The global virtual launch is part of the company’s streamlined and overhauled approach to bringing products to market for customers. Earlier this year, Harley-Davidson announced significant shifts including streamlining its planned product portfolio by 30 percent, shifting it’s new model year debut to align with the start of the riding season and amped-up marketing efforts to drive desirability and maximize impact in the market

“We’re thrilled to bring the world together virtually to showcase the inspiration and passion behind our 2021 motorcycles, including a glimpse of our first adventure touring motorcycle, Pan America™,” said VP Marketing Theo Keetell. “We look forward to sharing this moment with our customers and dealers from around the world.

Adventurer Jason Momoa Shares his Passion

American actor, producer and motorcycle enthusiast Jason Momoa will play a key role in the Jan. 19th event. Forever seeking new adventures, Momoa will share his thoughts on how Harley-Davidson’s upcoming Pan America motorcycle has expanded his passion for Harley-Davidson and created new opportunities to explore endless horizons beyond paved roads.

“Harley-Davidson has unlocked opportunities for me to find adventure with amazing people, awe-inspiring places, and expand my inspiration seen in the United We Will Ride content series,” said Momoa. “I was excited to collaborate with Harley-Davidson for a first look and chance to ride the Pan America 1250 motorcycle. It’s the perfect vehicle that combines my love of the outdoors, the unknown, and Harley-Davidson. People are going to be completely stoked about this bike that Harley-Davidson has created.”

Harley-Davidson Pan America Global Reveal Feb. 22nd, 2021

Harley-Davidson’s all-new Pan America™ 1250 adventure touring motorcycle will be previewed in the Jan. 19th H-D 21 virtual launch experience. Harley-Davidson will be bringing the world back together on Feb. 22, 2021, to reveal the motorcycle’s full details in a separate digital event with the spotlight on the new Pan America motorcycle.

Stay informed at www.H-D.com/PanAmerica.

2021 Honda CRF300L

By | General Posts

by Vlad Radu from https://www.autoevolution.com

One of the most popular dual-purpose bikes out there returns for the 2021 model year with a series of serious upgrades that range from an increase in engine displacement to improved suspension. Let’s take a closer look at what it has to offer, shall we?

The origins of the CRF300L can be traced back to the 1970s when the XL250S was launched. It was one of the first bikes to successfully combine on-road usability with excellent off-road performance.

The XL range that followed reached legendary status over the years, proving that an easy-to-use, single-cylinder four-stroke engine combined with a capable chassis can create a useful and versatile motorcycle to ride all around the world in various environments. The new CRF300L takes those qualities to another level, offering one of the most capable all-arounder on the market.

It features a larger capacity 286-cc single-cylinder, liquid-cooled DOHC engine. The 14% cubic capacity increase over the previous model is achieved by increasing the bore stroke from 55 to 63 mm (2.2 to 2.5 in.).

The bore size remains the same, at 76 mm (3 in), as does the compression ratio of 10.7:1. The engine’s peak power of 27 hp (20.1 kW) arrives at 8,500 rpm, while the peak torque of 26.6 Nm (19.6 lb-ft) can be reached at 6,500 rpm, making the unit considerably more powerful than its predecessor.

To cope with the increase in power, the gearbox has been heavily revised. Gear ratios 1-5 are shorter, while the 6th gear is taller for better long-distance rides like highway cruises where the new bike can reach a top speed of 132 kph (82 mph).

The addition of an assist/slipper clutch lowers lever load by 20% and manages rear wheel ‘hop’ on quick downshifts, thus providing greater control on- and off-road.

To improve low- to mid-range response, the rpm range most used in day-to-day or off-road riding, the timing of the intake cam, muffler, and ignition have been reworked. Additionally, the air filter has been redesigned, and the exhaust downpipe is 660 grams lighter.

The cooling system has also been revised. It uses a 12.7kW heat-release radiator mounted on the left side of the bike protected by a polypropylene grill. To maintain optimal temperatures, it comes with a thin guide-ring cooling fan.

The new CRF300L is 4 kg (8.8 lbs) lighter than the previous model, with a wet weight of 142 kg (313 lbs). This was achieved by developing a completely new semi-double steel cradle frame.

It features decreased width for the main down tube and across the central bracing tube, along with smaller diameter lower down tubes. Honda claims that these changes result in a 25% reduction of lateral rigidity.

The one-piece cast aluminum swingarm has also been redesigned. It’s narrower behind the pivot point and uses a smooth, cross-sectional shape to create uniform deflection. This makes it 55 grams lighter and improves lateral rigidity by 23%.

The 43-mm (1.7 in) Showa inverted fork gains 10-mm (0.4 in) of stroke to a total of 260-mm (10.3 in). For precise control over any terrain, the spring weight and damping settings have been revised, while the Pro-Link rear suspension now features a 260-mm (10.3 in) axle stroke.

Ground clearance has also been increased to 285-mm (11.2 in) while revisions to the lower frame, engine crankcases, and oil drain plug means the frame and engine sit 20-mm (0.8 in) higher.

The modifications to the engine, chassis, and suspension improve the power to weight ratio by 13%, making for a better ride through various terrain and speeds.

The 2021 Honda CRF300L will be available in Europe next year, but the Japanese manufacturer is yet to release details about prices or its availability in North American markets.

Honda CMX500 Rebel reviewed

By | General Posts

Rebels Without a Pause: Since Hondas rarely break down

by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

The original looked a bit wimpish, but a macho makeover has made this cruiser version of the hugely popular CBR500 a nice alternative for bikers clutching their brand new A2 licences in their gloves

A Honda Rebel is a bit of an oxymoron, like Boris Johnson’s hair stylist or Vladimir Putin’s sense of humour.

You see, Hondas aren’t really bikes for rebels. They’re bikes for chaps and chapesses who want to get from A to B efficiently and safely on machines which never break down and have fewer vices than Audrey Hepburn in A Nun’s Story.

Even their Fireblade superbike has always been a pussycat to ride, although in the hands of 23-times TT winner John McGuinness, a pussycat with very sharp claws.

Their cars are the same, as I found doing a lap of Silverstone in a Civic R with British Touring Car champion Gordon Shedden.

I thought it was going to be terrifying, but he and the car were so fast and flawless that it was a hoot going around corners sideways at 100mph while he chatted about the weather.

The one time Honda took a walk on the wild side was with the 1300cc Fury chopper in 2010.

It looked fabulous, but when MCN compared it to the Harley Rocker C, they said the Harley shook and rattled, and engaging first gear was like dropping a hammer in a bucket, but the Fury was too perfect, so they preferred the character of the Rocker.

You could just see the row of heartbroken designers at Honda HQ trudging out to the car park to commit seppuku.

So I rolled up at Belfast Honda on the Africa Twin with some doubts; particularly since when the Rebel came out in 2017 as a bobber cruiser version of the CBR500 which is hugely popular with bikers who’ve just got their lovely new A2 licence and are limited to 47bhp for a bit, it looked, well, a bit wimpish.

Bobbers, as those of you who have studied Dr Furtwangler’s A-Z of Motorcycles will know, were originally 1930s bikes with everything superfluous removed and the mudguards cut back or bobbed for a lean, mean, moody masculine look.

The original Rebel, though, looked about as masculine as Julian Clary in a frock.

All hail, then, to the chaps at Honda who’ve turned Julian into John Wayne, with a much more rugged appearance, not to mention new LED headlight and indicators and a slipper clutch to stop the back wheel locking during aggressive downshifting.

Climb aboard, and it’s still fairly compact for anyone over 6ft, although I was getting vertigo compared to the Monkey Bike I’d been on the week before, joining some lunatics riding them from Land’s End to John O’Groats for charity.

The mirrors are as useful as before, and the minimalist circular speedo now has, as well as the previous time, fuel gauge and mileage on the 2017 version, a gear indicator, a handy addition for newbies.

Start up, the air filled with a civilised purr, and I set off feeling suitably rebellious and looking for some grannies on scooters to beat up.

Progress is surprisingly perky, helped by the fact that the CBR500 engine has been tweaked to deliver maximum torque 500rpm lower. Peak power comes in 100rpm lower as well, not that you’d notice.

Like all Hondas, you can thrash the bulletproof engine to death without fear of disintegration, but the bike’s perky enough without needing to, and that civilised purr never becomes more than a civilised growl anyway.

Handling, with the bike weighing only 190kg fully fuelled and 16in wheels, is a hoot, allowing even new bikers to fling it around corners as if they’ve been riding all their lives, and the suspension damping is better than on the original model as well, leading to a surprisingly plush ride on a smallish budget bike.

There’s only one brake disc up front, but on a bike this light, that’s all you need, with nicely progressive bit and feel from the rear on the rare occasions you might need to go near it.

For an even meaner look, you can detach the pillion seat, which looks about as big and comfortable as a carefully folded napkin, and for another 400 quid, the Special Edition version has a quilted seat, flyscreen for a bit more wind protection at motorway speeds and black fork gaiters for extra moodiness.

The Facts: Honda CMX500 Rebel

Engine: 471cc liquid-cooled parallel twin

Power: 46bhp @ 8,500rpm

Torque: 32 lb ft @ 6,000rpm

Colours: Grey; blue; black

Price: From £5,799

All-New Rebel 1100 Cruiser from Honda

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Not all new motorcycle rumors are true, especially when you’re Honda and you run your own rumor mill. Sometimes, however, despite all the noise, some of those rumors turn out to be real and we get nice surprises like this shiny new 2021 Honda Rebel 1100.

We’ve been talking about a possible Rebel 1100 since March, 2020, when the folks at Young Machine published a render of an upscaled Rebel 500 armed with the Africa Twin’s new 1100 engine. The bike ultimately showed up in a patent in October which seemed to confirm the rumor. It became more a matter of “when” rather than “if”.

Well, folks, the “when” is November 24. Honda pulled the cover off its all-new buffed up Rebel, equipped, as expected with a retuned version of the CRF1100L’s 1,084cc, 270-degree, Unicam, parallel-twin. Also, like the Africa, the Rebel 1100 is equipped with a ride-by-wire throttle that allows the cruiser to feature three riding modes (Standard, Sport, and Rain) and is offered with a choice of a six-speed gearbox or a DCT.

At the front, the cruiser chassis is mounted to a 43mm telescopic fork while the back is support by a pair of Showa shocks with piggyback reservoirs. The 18-inch front wheel is equipped with a 330mm disc with a four-piston caliper while the 16-inch rear wheel gets its stopping power from a single 256mm disc. The bike also features ABS at both wheels and Honda Selectable Torque Control with wheelie control.

A 3.6-gallon fuel tank sits on top of the chassis (versus 2.96 gallons for the Rebel 500 for comparison) and the bike weighs in at a total of 487 pounds for the manual trim level and at 509 pounds with the DCT.

Pricing for the new 2021 Honda Rebel 1100 starts at $9,299 which is $700 cheaper than, say, the Harley-Davidson Iron 1200 ($9,999) and $2,000 less than the Forty-Eight (for a comparable bobber-ish silhouette). Honda also offers a collection of factory accessories that includes soft saddlebags with rack, a batwing fairing, quilted saddles in black and tan