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Custom BMW R nineT Is a Two-Wheeled Lost in Space Robot

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW’s latest motorcycle wonder, the R 18, is the freshest Bavarian creation, and the world keeps talking about it even days after it was launched by the Germans. But there are other BMW motorcycles worth talking about, both factory-made and custome, like the R nineT we have here.

When BMW announced it is building a cruiser motorcycle based on the new Big Boxer engine it developed, it did so by tasking custom builders with advertising the powerplant. This is how with about a year left until the actual unveiling of the R 18, we got the Custom Works Zon R18, and later the Revival Birdcage. But the R nineT is even more tunable as the R 18, it seems.

The bike pictured here is the result of work conducted in Moscow by a builder called Zillers Garage, allegedly with the support of BMW Motorrad Russia. It is, in essence, a tuned-up, futuristic version of a stock R nineT.

Officially scheduled to have been shown at the now canceled Moscow motorcycle show, the bike made its online premiere this week. It presents itself as a stock two-wheeled Bimmer that sheds its skin and wrapps itself in a shell of aluminum, one that ends at the front with a large HID lamp that brings back memories of Lost in Space’s Robot.

According to the information available, the modifications made to the standard motorcycle include altering the suspension to bring the body closer to the ground, some changes to the brake and clutch levers, and the additions of buttons required to control the air suspension.

The engine of the R nineT remains the original one, and no modifications have been made to it. That translates into a 1,170cc powerplant, developing 110 hp and controlled by means of a six-speed transmission.

There is no word yet from Russia whether this concept is just a show motorcycle, or some production run is planned for those able and willing to pay.

Honda e and CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE win Design Awards in the “Red Dot Award: Product Design 2020”

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Source: Honda and http://www.jcnnewswire.com

TOKYO, Mar 30, 2020 – – Honda announced that the all-new Honda e electric vehicle and the CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE supersport bike won product design awards in one of the most respected awards in the world, the Red Dot Award(1).

Honda e

Honda e won “Red Dot: Best of the Best 2020” in the automobile category, and also received “Red Dot 2020” in the meta category of “Smart Products”.

Honda e is a new-generation electric vehicle focused on a simple design and ease of use built upon Honda’s philosophy of human-centric design, while bringing new values to customers that meet the needs of modern urban life through seamlessly connected technology and outstanding driving dynamics. Honda e’s dashboard features two large touchscreens which display a wide range of applications and connected infotainment services in a lounge-like atmosphere, seamlessly integrating with the occupants’ urban lifestyle. By accessing various connected services displayed on these large touchscreens, the driver and occupants can enjoy the same connectivity and comfort while driving, stationary or charging. The battery is situated under the floor, realizing a low center of gravity and a firm footing despite its small size, and contributes to an optimum balance between stability and handling.

CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE

CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE received “Red Dot 2020” in the motorcycle category.

The CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE was announced at EICMA 2019 in Milan, Italy in November 2019, with sales soon beginning in Europe.

Positioned as the top flagship of CBR series, the CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE was developed with the concept, “TOTAL CONTROL for the Track”, pursuing high performance on the track and in races. Its engine was designed with technologies from the RC213V MotoGP machine which continues to win world titles, resulting in the most powerful engine for a CBR yet. The frame has enhanced stability under acceleration and braking, and with the help of advanced electronic control system supporting sport riding, its potential has been further enhanced. Honda believes CBR1000RR-R FIREBLADE won the award in part due to its functional beauty honed through pursuing the limits of high-performance and radical new form to achieve uncompromising function not only in the public roads, but also in the circuit.

(1) The Red Dot Award was founded in 1955, and has since become one of the most respected design awards worldwide. 49 categories of industrial products are judged on nine criteria including degree of innovation, functionality, durability and ergonomics. Outstanding designs are awarded by three awards, “Red Dot: Best of the Best”, “Red Dot” and “Honourable Mention”. “Red Dot: Best of the Best” is the most prestigious award among them.

Honda CB-F Concept revealed: Announces virtual motorcycle show

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by Rahul Kapoor from https://www.financialexpress.com/

Due to the Coronavirus forcing the cancellation of the Osaka and Tokyo Motorcycle Shows, Honda has taken digital measures to showcase its new concept. Say hello to the Honda CB-F Concept retro-sports-naked motorcycle.

Honda was scheduled to premiere its all-new concepts and motorcycles at the 36th Osaka Motorcycle Show 2020 and the 47th Tokyo Motorcycle Show. However, as both events have now been cancelled due to the global epidemic of the coronavirus, Honda decided that they were having none of it and went on with the premiere of their biggest showcase of the event, digitally.

Honda has revealed its new concept motorcycle, the Honda CB-F Concept, a retro-styled sports naked motorcycle, a category that Honda likes to call “Neo-Retro Sports”. Honda has styled the concept to pay homage to the highly popular CB900F/CB750F models as a way to revisit the CB series’ six-decade-long history.

The concept is said to be powered by a 998cc, water-cooled, 4-valve, inline 4-cylinder DOHC engine is said to provide easy power through the rev range and ample torque. How much power and torque is something that Honda has decided to keep to themselves for the moment, although it is paired with a 6-speed transmission. But essentially, the underpinnings of the concept are similar to the CB1000R as the motor is the same 145hp unit that churns out 104Nm for the CB1000R. For suspension duties, Honda has employed inverted forks at the front and a mono-shock rear suspension with a single-sided swingarm which Honda is made from lightweight aluminium. The bike measures 2,120mm in length, 790mm in width, and 1,070mm in height.

Honda’s current global line-up consists of two high-capacity bikes in this segment. They include the CB1100 and the CB1300. The CB-F concept could spawn a replacement for the CB1000R making way for a new “Neo-Retro Sports” bike.

Honda had plans to showcase some more bikes at the now cancelled events. So it has now decided to host a “Honda Virtual Motorcycle Show” on its website where it is showcasing 29 motorcycles covering various categories including the CB-F Concept, all which were supposed to make their debut at the Osaka and Tokyo motorcycle shows.

2020 Honda CBR250RR Details Revealed

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by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com

The high-performance, fully faired quarter-litre bike was launched last year and it is on sale in many international markets including Japan and Indonesia. In its 2020 avatar, the bike gets a new colour option and some mechanical upgrades. Updated Honda CBR250RR borrows some of its styling from its bigger siblings, the CBR650R and CBR1000RR. There’s a new colour option – Grand Prix Red with Pearl Glare White. This variant comes with gold-plated rims and forks, which create an exciting contrast with the red and white colour scheme.

Apart from these, there aren’t any major cosmetic changes in the updated bike. It continues with its aggressive profile, as accentuated by dual LED headlamp, LED position lights, sculpted side cowl, sleek side panels, low-set handlebars, and muscular fuel tank.

2020 Honda CBR250RR was scheduled to be unveiled at Osaka Motorcycle show and Tokyo Motorcycle Show, but these have been cancelled due to coronavirus. Subsequently, Honda decided to unveil 2020 CBR250RR at Honda Virtual Motorcycle Show. Along with CBR250RR, other Honda bikes such as CT125 Hunter Cub and CBR1000RR-R Fireblade will also be unveiled at the virtual event.

Features that have been continued from the earlier model include fully-digital instrument cluster, double-barrel exhaust and petal disc brakes. Updated CBR250RR is powered by a new 250cc twin-cylinder, liquid cooled engine that generates max power of 41 ps. This is around three units more than the earlier model. Torque output is also expected to go up, even though exact numbers have not been revealed yet. For records, torque produced by earlier model was 23.3 Nm at 11,000 rpm. Engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission.

Coming to mechanicals, one key upgrade is the addition of slipper clutch. This was not available in the earlier variant. However, based on customer feedback, Honda has introduced the slipper clutch as a standard feature in new CBR250RR. Honda will continue to offer bi-directional quickshifter system as an option. CBR250RR is already equipped with ride-by-wire throttle system. Users will be able to choose from three riding modes of Comfort, Sport, and Sport+.

New CBR250RR will sport a price tag of 847,000 yen, which is around Rs 5.78 lakh. It will rival the likes of Kawasaki Ninja ZX-25R. In the Indian market, Honda sells CBR250R, which will be discontinued after BS6 emission norms come into effect from March 31. CBR250RR is unlikely to be launched in India, owing to its high pricing. In case it is launched in India, CBR250RR will emerge a formidable competitor to the likes of Kawasaki Ninja 400.

Copyright (C) https://www.rushlane.com.

The Harley-Davidson Anaconda Limo Is One of the Longest Motorcycles in the World

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

The Anaconda is named just that because it was – or aimed to be – the world’s longest motorcycle on the road. Unveiled on February 13, 2004 at the Annual CARQUEST Auto Parts World of Wheels, it is the brainchild of one Steve McGill from Kansas City. Smokey, as he likes to go by.

We’ve discussed in a previous story another strange, Harley-Davidson-based limousine hybrid, the LimoBike, which is part Harley, part limousine and a complete, steaming pile of “no.” The Anaconda is different, in that it resembles more a motorcycle and remains essentially a Harley, because it uses a Harley engine. It is still a trike, though, just to clear any possible confusion from the get-go.

In a 2005 Cycle Connections interview, McGill offered a surprisingly simple explanation for creating this monster of a bike. No, he didn’t do it because he wanted to become famous, though that would happen later. He did it because he’d realized no one else had made a Harley limo.

Whether that’s entirely accurate is debatable, but the bottom line is that he did it. After spotting a Harley Trike displayed at a local Wright Brothers Bikes store, he called to inquire about purchasing one. He started thinking that Harleys are the Cadillacs of the bike world, so it only made sense to turn one of them into a limousine.

Using one Harley and one DFT trike kit, he created the Anaconda, which gunned for the title of the world’s longest motorcycle on the road that same year it was unveiled. In a December 2004 interview retrieved by Cyle Connections, McGill claimed he had been in contact with the Guinness Book of World Records and had obtained confirmation that the Anaconda was a right fit for the record.

He also said he was yet to file all proper documentation, but strongly indicated that he would do so soon. It could very well be that he never did: there is no record of him ever holding a Guinness record. This leaves the Anaconda with the unofficial title of one of the longest bikes in the world.

Measuring 19 feet in length and weighing 1,420 pounds, the Anaconda can carry up to nine passengers, with the one in the back riding most comfortably. McGill needed 6 months and about 640 hours of work to put it together, and said that he was actually surprised how well the project came along.

“Some things went surprisingly well,” he said. “The shift rod is almost 12 feet long, and it had to have proper clearance as it routed through frame components and still align properly at both ends. With amazing luck, it lined up perfectly. I was lucky on a lot of stuff.”

The Anaconda looks like it’s powered by two engines, but the front one is a dummy. McGill says this was done on purpose, since he couldn’t even wrap his head around the idea of not having a motor under the tank. He would get a major rise out of people looking at the Anaconda and not figuring out how it worked.

“The back one is a stock Harley Evo motor and provides the power. The front one is a dummy, for looks only. I found out about a company in Leavenworth that produces over 300 different fiberglass engine replicas,” McGill explained.

“They’re normally used by custom builders to align motor mounts and such. Everything is in the right place, but it’s much lighter. I got a fiberglass Harley block from them and added real heads, primary cover, and other chrome stuff. It’s fun to watch people stare at that front engine and try to figure out how it works. It sometimes takes them a while to figure out that it doesn’t,” he added.

After the Anaconda was completed and made its grand debut, it continued traveling the country throughout 2004, attending various shows and winning countless awards. With an increase in the level of fame came another idea to McGill: that of using all this new-found popularity for a good cause.

It was never his plan to use the Anaconda for an actual limo service. So he started attending events to raise money and awareness for various causes, in between bike shows. And, of course, shooting cheesy videos with nine pink-clad ladies riding in the back to show it off.

Is It Safe To Ride My Motorcycle During The Outbreak?

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

The fun type of social distancing.

UPDATE: Note that there could be lockdowns and “stay at home” orders in your city or your state as the situation evolves and we don’t recommend you overlook them because “riding is seemingly safe”. We’re not your mom, but we recommend you follow your local authorities’ recommendations.

Some readers also pointed out that I didn’t discuss about the possibility of crashes since the question was focused on the virus but I thought it was a good point to touch on. Going for a ride has its risks, whether it’s coming in contact with the virus or getting into a crash. The streets are quieter but it doesn’t mean there’s no risk of making a mistake or of being hit by someone.

Remember that medical facilities and staff are strained at the moment. While riding is relatively safe from a contagion perspective, there’s still the usual risk of an incident that could require you go to the hospital—and this is not a good time to go to the hospital. Keep that in mind.

As we wrote already, the better we cooperate, the smarter we go about this,the sooner we’ll get to go back out there without restrictions. Stay safe everyone!

Is it safe to ride during this outbreak? Are my full-face helmet, gloves, and other apparel able to protect me? Are motorcycle riders risk-free? Just question to exercise our riding knowledge. – Ancarlos

Hi Ancarlos! Thank you for asking your question, I’m pretty sure you’re not the only one wondering about that. Please note, however, that though we like to think we know a lot of things at RideApart, we’re also not doctors. If you have any real concerns or are considered a potentially vulnerable patient, asking someone who is an actual doctor is the one way you’ll get reliable answers. This goes for anyone reading this.

I can, however, give you a few pointers. As “social distancing” is on target to become Merriam-Webster’s 2020 term of the year, riding a motorcycle checks a lot of those “distancing” boxes. See, the great thing about riding a motorcycle is that you get to do it alone and it isolates you in a certain way—provided you don’t head out in a group. After all, everyone else around you is over six feet away, right?

The riding itself doesn’t technically pose a problem but the small things we do when we get on and off the saddle might. Where riding a bike might present a risk of exposure is when you stop in crowded places like at a gas station or in coffee shops, for example. Fuel nozzles are pretty nasty, to begin with, and considering the current situation, they could be carriers for the bug.

Consider bringing a few cleaning wipes or a pair of disposable gloves, just in case you need to fuel up. Even a plastic bag to handle the nozzle is a good alternative to putting your hand directly on it. Once you’re done, be extra safe and wash your hands.

If you do end up using your riding gloves to pick up the nozzle, keep in mind that certain sources suggest that the virus can stay on soft surfaces like clothes (and gear) and its lifespan on different surfaces and materials has yet to be confirmed. If your riding gloves have been in contact with a potentially infected surface, avoid touching your face with them—including that pesky itchy nose!—and throw your gloves in the washer once you’re home. If the gloves are made of leather, you can find a few easy tips to disinfect your leather safely online.

Medical Grade Gear?

To answer your question about gear, keep in mind that motorcycle gear isn’t made from medical grade materials. It’s designed to protect us from bad falls and impacts, not from microscopic bugs. So no, I won’t say that your gear will protect you from the novel coronavirus. It creates a barrier against the elements, that’s true, but it’s permeable, so don’t think that you become invincible by wearing a motorcycle helmet and a jacket.

If you avoid crowds and enjoy the ride by staying on your bike, then you are following the social distancing recommendations. So in summary, yes, riding a motorcycle should be safe—just remember that, as with any form of outing at the moment, there’s never a 100-percent guarantee that you won’t get in contact with the bug. The smarter you go about this, the lower the risks.

You can check out the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendations and updates on the situation here. If you present any symptoms or have been in contact with someone who presents them or who has recently traveled, then postpone your ride for a while (14-day self-isolation recommended) for your own benefit and everyone else’s. It’s a small price to pay to make sure a normal riding season (and life) resumes sooner rather than later.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire Breaks 24-Hour Distance Record

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

One of the main complaints lodged against the Harley-Davidson LiveWire is the short range offered on a single charge, of just 140 miles. That doesn’t mean it’s not made for touring, though.

Swiss rider Michel von Tell has just set a new world record for the longest tour in under 24 hours for an electric motorcycle, covering over 1,000 miles on a LiveWire. The bad news is that the record won’t be recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records, as von Tell did not have Guinness officials present.

Electroauto-news reports (via Electrek) that von Tell started in Zurich, Switzerland and covered four countries and a total of 1,723 km (1,070 miles) on the LiveWire, in 23 hours and 48 minutes. He reached Stuttgart, Germany and then traveled to Singen, before heading to Ruggell, Lichtenstein, the final stop on his journey.

He used Level 3 DC Fast Charge for charging stops, which considerably cut down stop times. Level 1 on the LiveWire uses a regular wall outlet and takes an entire night for a full charge. Level 3 guarantees a faster charge: a nearly full battery in 40 minutes or so. According to the media outlet, von Tell would stop for charging on Level 3 for an average of 25 minutes whenever he needed to.

The previous 24-hour record for an electric motorcycle was set in 2018 on a Zero S fitted with optional Charge Tank and using a team of riders, on a test track. Von Tell traveled in traffic, on the highway and was all alone.

While he couldn’t afford the Guinness fee, which would have ensured officials were on hand to confirm the record, and didn’t have a method to do the electronic self-recording required for Guinness confirmation, von Tell did provide signed witness accounts as confirmation. This makes his LiveWire 24-hour tour the unofficial record holder for the longest on an electric motorcycle to date.

From eardrum bursting motorcycle roar to soft music

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by Fadhli Ishak from https://www.nst.com.my/

KUALA LUMPUR: MotoGP rider Franco Morbidelli, who is used to scorching speeds around the world’s racing tracks, including Sepang, has slowed down to a stop — following the Covid-19 pandemic.

Morbidelli, a member of the Petronas Yamaha Sepang Racing Team (SRT), has yet to twist a throttle this season.

The 2018 MotoGP rookie of the Year is now spending his time at home, under lockdown in Italy.

Instead of listening to the eardrum bursting roar of motorcycles’ engines, Morbidelli now tunes into soft music.

He is keeping himself occupied with a new hobby, playing musical instruments, while doing his best to remain physically fit.

“I am trying to stay in shape but without leaving my house. I can go running if I stay within the land boundaries of my household. I am doing that but not much more,” said Morbidelli.

“I have some musical instruments and I am trying to learn to play them. It’s not easy, I need to practise a lot. Maybe by the end of this thing (lockdown) I will be able to play the harmonica and cajon.”

Cajon is a box-shaped, percussive instrument which originated in Peru.

“We should try to enjoy the time that we now have at home and get the maximum from it. We can do things at home that we usually don’t have time to do.”

The MotoGP second, third and fourth rounds in Thailand, Argentina and the United States have been postponed to later this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus Delays Voxan Motors’ Electric Motorcycle Speed Record Attempt

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by Sebastian Blanco from https://www.forbes.com/

It’s a specific category, but the Venturi Group’s Voxan Motors is working to create the fastest electric motorcycle in the world. Well, the fastest electric motorcycle “propelled by the action of one wheel in contact with the ground, partially streamlined, under 300 kg,” according to the team website.

That specific record is currently held by Jim Hoogerhyde, who rode a Lightning SB220 electric bike to 203.566 mph in 2013, according to Jalopnik. Voxan has set a target of 205 mph for its attempt but the date of the record attempt has been pushed back.

The new world speed record attempt was supposed to happen in July 2020 at the Salar de Uyuni salt flats in Bolivia, but that has been indefinitely postponed due to the cornoavirus. The Venturi Group, which is based in Monaco, issued a statement today saying that it is following the health directives issued by the Monegasque Government and that: “The development teams responsible for the Voxan Wattman motorcycle, which has just completed its initial on-track testing, are now confined to their homes.” Without being able to get together to work on the bike, the team can’t fine-tune the machine on-track, leading to the postponement.

“The health and safety of my teams is paramount. In view of the current health crisis, I have put in place the necessary measures. All of my staff, whether they are attached to Venturi North America (Columbus, Ohio) or to the headquarters in Monaco, are now working from home,” said Gildo Pastor, president of Venturi Group, in a statement. “We will establish a new calendar of operations as soon as the health situation allows it, and announce the new operational arrangements for this project, which is very important to me personally.”

The bike Voxan was (is) going to use to try and set the new speed record is a tweaked version of its Wattman, originally introduced in 2013. The normal Wattman bike is capable of accelerating from zero to 62 miles per hour in 3.4 seconds thanks to its 203-horsepower all-electric powertrain that produces 147.5 pound-feet of torque. Voxan’s high-performance version of the Wattman has been upgraded to produce 367 horsepower in order to hit that 205 mile-per-hour target.

The Venturi Group acquired Voxan in 2010 and shifted the brand’s focus to use electric motors. Both versions of the Wattman (on-road and high-performance) were designed by Venturi’s long-serving lead designer, Sacha Lakic.

The speed record attempt, whenever it happens, is likely to still be driven by Max Biaggi, a two-time World Superbike champion (2010 and 2012). He officially retired from racing in 2012, but has raced a few times since then.

Weston man builds epic motorcycle to promote saving lives through Be The Match donations

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WESTON – It’s a gleaming, curvy, sport-style motorcycle with a distinct Art Deco look, and there’s no other bike like it on Earth.

Mark Ecklund of Weston took two years of painstaking, detail-oriented work to build it, hand-fabricating most of its body work from thin aluminum. For just the tail section, the 53-year-old machinist took two weeks to patiently and gently tap — using a hand-held, hammer-like metal molding tool — a piece of aluminum into the shape he wanted.

The project represents the ability to save lives. Mark created the motorcycle to honor and promote Be The Match, a worldwide organization that works to match donors of life-saving bone marrow and stem cells to people suffering from blood cancers such a leukemia and lymphoma. In 2012, Mark donated stem cells that were used to save the life of a 53-year-old Pennsylvania man, who is a husband, father and grandfather.

Mark is a serial inventor who has built and designed things such as a one-person hovercraft, a safety faucet that prevents scalding and an improved version of a compound bow, and it’s his habit to enthusiastically and compulsively throw himself into projects. But even for his standards, this motorcycle, once a brand-new Indian cruiser, is special.

A year after the transplant, Ecklund and the stem cell recipient, Todd Euen of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, met and became instant friends. The experience was so gratifying that Ecklund can’t even begin to explain it. All he can say is that the motorcycle is a physical manifestation of those feelings, and a vehicle to promote Be The Match. He and his wife, Chris Ecklund, are doing anything they can to encourage people to register for Be The Match donations.

“We want to bring that awareness to people, to have more people register,” Chris said.

The motorcycle is a work of art, Mark said, “that is more of a campaign.”

‘Forever grateful’

Todd, a controller at a Ford dealership, was diagnosed with leukemia in July 2012. In order to save his life, doctors rushed him to Pittsburgh, located about 66 miles west of Johnstown. If Todd hadn’t gotten treatment, he likely would have died within two weeks, doctors told him.

“I was in shock,” Todd said.

He received Mark’s donation in a procedure done on Christmas Eve of 2012.

Be The Match requires that donors and recipients wait a year after procedures before connecting with each other. After that year passed, Todd contacted Mark to get to know him and thank him.

“I didn’t know what to expect when I met him. He basically saved my life,” Todd said. “It was real emotional when we met. … Our family is forever grateful to him.”

‘I knew exactly what I was going to do’

Chris and Mark decided to become donors when Mark turned 35. They both regularly give blood, and it was Mark’s idea to do more.

“We just wanted to help people,” Mark said.

They found Be The Match, did a little research, and then, almost on a whim, drove to the Appleton office of Be The Match to register. Chris still hasn’t been matched with a recipient.

“I’m really jealous of Mark,” she said.

After meeting Todd , Mark came up with the idea to design and build the Be The Match motorcycle. He talked about his plans with Chris, and she agreed that they should purchase the 2015 Indian Scout to convert. Chris didn’t quite grasp what her husband had in mind; she thought it would be a light modification of the new Indian model.

As Mark started to the project, “I thought, ‘We spent all this money to tear it apart,'” Chris said.

Mark visualized his motorcycle from the start. “I knew exactly what I wanted. I knew exactly what I was going to do,” he said.

He wanted something that would be magnetic to other motorcycle enthusiasts. And even though Chris didn’t know the details, she’s been married to Mark for 29 years. So she wasn’t surprised when he spend nearly all his free time working on the bike. Nor was she surprised at the result.

They take the motorcycle to races and shows. First riders come see the bike, then Chris and Mark go into their Be The Match spiel, and often Chris will get people to register for donations on the spot. (It requires filling out a form and doing some cheek swabs to get DNA samples.)

Jess Klingberg, the Be The Match community engagement specialist based in Appleton, said the motorcycle is magnet for potential donors, helping sign up potential donors by the dozen. She attended a motorcycle rally with the Ecklunds. “That motorcycle turns a lot of heads,” she said.

Todd accompanied Mark and Chris to one show near Pittsburgh, and even though he’s gotten to know Mark and his all-in attitude, he was still surprised at how much gusto both Mark and Chris display when promoting Be The Match.

“They have jumped all in,” Todd said with a laugh.

Be the Match Radiothon

A live, over-the-air Radiothon for Be the Match will be held from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. March 19 on the Wausau rock radio station WIFC-FM 95.5 Jess Klingberg, the Be The Match community engagement specialist who works in the organization’s Appleton office, will be on air to explain details about the program and tell stories about what Be The Match can mean for individuals dealing with cancer.