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Ride Vision raises $7 million for AI that alerts motorcycle riders to collision threats

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by Kyle Wiggers from https://venturebeat.com

Ride Vision, a startup developing “collision aversion” technology for motorcycles, today emerged from stealth with a $7 million round led by investment platform OurCrowd. Ride Vision also unveiled an AI-driven safety alert system called Ride Vision 1 that will go on sale in several European countries in early 2021. A spokesperson said the fresh capital will be used for marketing, distribution, and R&D as the company looks to expand its 20-person team.

There are more than 700 million motorcycles on the road globally, according to estimates. And motorcycles currently account for 28% of all fatal road accidents, resulting in the death of roughly 378,000 people a year. That number could tick upward soon, as motorcycle sales have skyrocketed during the pandemic.

The company’s Ride Vision 1 package will feature cameras and LEDs designed to alert riders to dangerous situations. Two small wide-angle cameras mounted on the rear and front of motorcycles or scooters transmit footage to an onboard processing unit running an algorithm that detects and notifies riders of collision threats in real time via mirror-mounted LEDs. A mobile app delivers customizable alerts (including at night); records up to two-hour continuous-loop videos; and keeps note of stats like speed, lean angle, distance, location, and time.

Ride Vision says it can detect forward collision, blind spot, and distance keeping threats from cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, and scooters. New alerts for rear collision, forward-left, and forward-right collision threats are scheduled to arrive post-launch.

“Ride Vision has built a unique dataset particular to two-wheelers that’s used to train models taking into account different bikes, level of biking experience, locality, different environmental conditions, and synthetic use cases,” a spokesperson told VentureBeat via email. “Ride Vision has the ability to improve upon the skill set of riders should the riders elect to share their ride data [and] an option of impacting insurance due to ongoing risk estimations. This data can be used to lower riders’ insurance rates and open up new business models, such as ‘usage-based insurance’ to train various models.”

Ride Vision 1 hardwires directly into a vehicle’s battery and claims to draw less charge than a standard cellphone. The system’s two water-resistant video cameras begin recording the moment the motorcycle is turned on and transmit footage to the app over Wi-Fi. Ride summary cumulative reports are broken down by weeks, months, and years and include total distance, total alerts, and max speed data. They can be exported for personal use or things like insurance reduction.

Ride Vision walls new software, alerts, and other updates behind a subscription fee, but it offers a free plan with periodic security updates, bug fixes, and other small enhancements. Features on the premium roadmap include emergency contacts, enhanced video with automatic ride state overlays, and “more extensive” metrics.

Ride Vision says it’s working with motorcycle manufacturers as well as with resellers and insurers. Currently, the company has resellers across the EU but is looking to expand further into the EU and North America.

This latest funding round brings the Herzliya, Israel-based company’s total raised to $10 million. YL Ventures, Mobilion, and Metagal also participated in the round.

Porsche vs Harley-Davidson Drag Race Video

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by Vlad Mitrache from https://www.autoevolution.com

Up until very recently, the thought of a drag race between a Porsche (any model) and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle (any hog) was one of the most preposterous ones that anyone could come up with.

On the one hand, you have a German automotive brand with a strong history and deep roots in motorsport. Sure, it’s guilty of also building SUVs – with some even powered by diesel – but you’d be pushing it to call any of its models “slow”.

On the other hand, you have an American motorcycle specialist with an equally strong history and plenty of racing connections throughout its history, though less so in the more recent years. Indeed, these days Harley-Davidson is better known for its range of cruisers and choppers, the type of machines that don’t necessarily value speed.

However, when things go electric, speed always has a knack for making its way into the center of it. That’s probably because making electric vehicles go quick is surprisingly easy – there is no complicated transmission, no engine with a million moving parts – just an electric motor and tons of instant torque.

There’s also the fact that you can’t get too much range out of a 15.5 kWh battery pack – and you can’t fit a larger one on a bike – so if reaching faraway places is out of the picture, you still have to offer the buyer something. And that something is speed.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire can reach 60 mph (97 km/h) from a standstill in roughly three seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 114 mph (183 km/h). Its motor produces 105 hp and 86 lb-ft (117 Nm) of torque to battle the 549 lbs (250 kg) that the rig weighs.

The Porsche Taycan Turbo, its competitor for the day, has obviously got very different figures, but the one that matters the most in this case is actually identical. Like the LiveWire, the Turbo will reach 60 mph from a complete stop in three seconds. Does that mean we have an even race on our hands?

Well, motorcycles very rarely manage to keep up with their four-wheeled counterparts during these drag races, and it’s usually in the second part of the competition where they make up ground as finding traction stops being a problem. With the Taycan Turbo being the grippy monster that it is, it’s hard to imagine the LiveWire stands any chance.

As the driver of the Taycan says (opinions about how likable or not he is in the comments below, please. I want to know if it’s just me), the most important thing to take away from this race isn’t so much the winner, but the performance potential of electric drivetrains for both cars and motorcycles.

 

BMW and Bosch will debut a massive 10.25-inch motorcycle dashboard in 2021

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

The screen will also be the first to offer split-screen functionality for your phone.

BMW’s big screen will split your bike’s dash between phone and bike info.

We recently covered BMW Motorrad’s totally cyberpunk and totally excellent CE04 scooter concept, and one of that vehicle’s coolest features was a 10.25-inch information screen for the rider. A screen that size is pretty big in a car, and on a motorcycle or scooter, it’d be gargantuan, but that’s not going to stop the Germans.

See, BMW is planning on adding that 10.25-inch screen to some of its motorcycles in 2021, according to an announcement made Thursday by Tier 1 supplier Bosch. And it gets more interesting than that because this screen is the first motorcycle TFT that can do split-screen. By that I mean you can have your motorcycle’s dash information on one side and your phone’s info on the other.

The screen can do this magic trick thanks to a piece of software for your phone called from Bosch called MySpin, and while the big screen is going to hit BMW first, Bosch also confirms that both Ducati and Kawasaki have MySpin-based apps of their own in the works, though those are meant to work with existing 6.5-inch screens.

The big problem with that much smartphone integration is the possibility of distraction for the rider, which is dangerous in a car, borderline suicidal on a motorcycle. Bosch believes it’s nailed down a way to bring smartphone integration to a motorcycle dash without that risk. Based on what we can tell, it involves limiting access to only motorcycle-specific apps like Rever (which is excellent and something I use personally).

The push toward TFT LCD dashes on motorcycles has been going on for a few years now, and it’s exciting to see screens get bigger, better and more functional. We’d like to see more of these screens become touchscreens too — like on our long-term Indian FTR1200 — but it remains to be seen if that will be the case with the big Bosch unit.

Five tips that you must know to prepare for an amazing motorcycle road trip

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from https://www.traveldailynews.com

Be it your first or hundredth road trip; preparation is a must thing. It is essential to consider all the aspects before you hit the road. The right preparation leads to a comfortable and worry-free ride.

Being on a motorcycle road trip is one of the best experiences. Nothing is as impressive as being on a long motorcycle ride all alone; there’s just your thoughts and solitude to accompany you. If you are looking for a bit of fun this summer with some added adrenaline rush, rent a motorcycle in San Francisco or get your own one and hit the road for some of the best rides of the country.

With that being said, before you set out for your long-distance motorbike ride, our frequent bikers bring you some useful tips that sure can make your two-wheel voyage much better.

Be it your first or hundredth road trip; preparation is a must thing. It is essential to consider all the aspects before you hit the road. The right preparation leads to a comfortable and worry-free ride.

So without a further ado, let’s dive right into the 5 most important tips you should never miss.

Choose the best bike for you and reduce your baggage
A road trip on an uncomfortable bike can get you in the worst place, and that’s not the experience one would want to go through. If you are on the move for a lively and adventurous motorcycle ride, choose your ride wisely. Ensure it suits your body and will function the same in the long run. If you have your own bike, you can modify it to improve the comfort level. However, if you are renting one, do your research and consult with the party you are dealing with to get the best.

Choose a bike that you can easily take care of. As long as off-road trips are concerned, bikes that have softer seats, great headlights, agreeable handlebars and safety guards will be the best options. Do not fall for just the appearance of the motorcycle as that should be the last thing on the list. A comfortable ride is your first step towards the smooth and enjoyable road trip.

Moving to the packing tips for beginners, you can find plenty of options for luggage carries in the market. Our experts suggest saddlebags as they are easy to transport. You can fix them on the sides of the back seat of your bike and ride without any burden. If you are looking for options, tail bags, and tank bags can be a great deal.

Once you decide what type of bag you are going to take with you, choosing the amount of luggage is your next crucial step. No matter how much distance you are planning to cover, remember to keep your luggage as light as possible. Carry fewer clothes, sachets, and disposable stuff to maintain the ideal weight. It is recommended to make a list before you start packing your bag.

Drink plenty of water and take breaks along the way
Sadly, many riders do not really give importance to the concept of ‘hydration’. The reality is, it should be in the top 3 critical things throughout your ride. Therefore, keep a proper back up of water while you are in action. Keeping the body hydrated should be the priority, and if you do not like stopping again and again to drink water, get a hydration pack. Such packs keep the water cold and come with a long tube that helps you drink water on the go without stopping.

About breaks, they are necessary to be on the top of your game. When you do not rest while travelling, a continuous sitting on a bike causes saddle sores. If your body is asking to stop, be wise enough to understand the signal and act accordingly. If you do not take required rest, it will unnecessarily lengthen your journey and turn it into a frustrating one. While on a break, check if your bike is in the right conditions or if it needs refueling. Being careful and attentive can save you from unwanted glitches that can ruin your trip.

Prefer off hours eating
It is always ideal to hit the restaurants or cafes at the off hours while on a road trip. Why? Well, most of the people usually stop at restaurants on the regular dinner and lunchtime. If you enter the place at the same time, the chances of spending hours in a waiting queue are more. This can delay your journey and eventually ruin your plans. If you can adjust, off-hours eating can save you from long lines and unexpected delays.

Map is your best friend, don’t lose it
We cannot remember all the roads, and thus, it is better to rely on the helping hand; in this scenario — GPS, maps, etc. If you are ready to invest a bit more, you can purchase a helmet with Bluetooth connection. It guides you throughout the trip without having to stop.

In the case of remote locations with no network availability, going old school can help. Keeping the hand copy of maps is your way to be on the right track. If not that accurate, it can at least tell you what area you are currently in.

Don’t forget your earphones
Well, not all highways are quiet and peaceful. Sometimes, they can be extremely loud and annoying. Earplugs can come to the rescue in such time and save you from immense pressure on your ears. If you are a music lover, headphones can be a great alternative. After all, what can be better than a solo bike trip with the music you love?

Final words
To ensure the best bike ride:

  1. Get your bike thoroughly checked before you begin your journey.
  2. Get done with a little bit of tweaking your bike if needed.
  3. Always carry spares to stay away from difficult times on the highway.

By spares, we mean things like accelerator cables, brake cables, tubes, etc.

Finally, we know it is very tempting to go for a cooler and more powerful bike. Throw that temptation away! Just because you have handled the bike nicely on a test ride, it does not mean that you are the master. Instead, move up to a more smart, sensible and comfortable option.

Evel Knievel Museum adds long lost motorcycle to their collection

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by Keith Horinek from https://www.ksnt.com

The Evel Knievel Museum located in the Historic Harley Davidson Motorcycle shop held an unveiling of a long lost motorcycle used by Knievel in his daredevil jumps.

Knievel’s second surviving original American Eagle jump bike was presented to the Evel Knievel Museum by Louis “Rocket” Re and the Stroop and McCormack families. The ceremony took place in the Evel Knievel Museum.

The motorcycle was used by Knievel during his tenure as a motorcycle stunt performer in the 60’s and 70’s.

The motorcycle was purchased by Dave Stroop of Belt Montana in 1972. Stroop then rode the bike for several years and eventually stored the bike in his barn. Years later the bike was found and restored by Knievel’s longtime friend and riding partner Re. Stroop then donated the motorcycle to the museum.

Here’s What It’s Like Driving The Largest Motorcycle In The World

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by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

Meet the diesel-powered Tower Trike.

What is a motorcycle? It sounds like a question that’s disingenuous at best, but after watching this video, you may find yourself asking it anyway. It turns out that legal definitions and official standards and classifications vary by state—and outside the U.S., also by country.

According to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA), “Motorcycle is defined as a motor vehicle with motive power having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground.” That’s why the Tower Trike you’re seeing in this video does, in fact, qualify as a motorcycle.

At one point, the Tower Trike’s builder mentions an 11,000-pound vehicle weight limit for motorcycles that he found somewhere, and it’s unclear where this figure originated. However, that’s not a huge surprise, as vehicle classification standards vary so much from state to state—and who knows, maybe the guy just wanted a handy story to tell.

In any case, when SRK Cycles describes this bike as what happens when a semi-tractor-trailer and a motorcycle have a baby, he’s not wrong. The resulting behemoth weighs just under 11,000 pounds and is powered by an enormous two-stroke Detroit diesel engine. It’s road-legal, with mirrors, headlights, indicators—and also seat belts, because you sit in the kind of seat you’d find in a big rig. Gas and brake are pedal-operated on the right side of the floorboard, and if you have a big enough foot, you can even heel-toe shift to your heart’s content.

There’s also a 200-plus pound metal cross on the back, which the Tower’s builder says isn’t only a design choice; it also functions as a roll bar of sorts for the trike’s rider and passenger. Since rolling this thing would have to be absolutely terrifying, let’s hope no one tests that functionality any time soon.

The “Cobra” Could be the Next Autonomous Motorcycle

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

You know, sometimes dream really do come true. Most of the vehicles around today came to life on some drawing board in a room hidden away from the world. But before that they were all concepts, ideas so to speak.

It’s been dubbed the Cobra by its creator Christian Grajewski of Hannover, Germany, and is to be a fully autonomous motorcycle. This too is one of those ideas, and even though it hasn’t quite made it into real life manufacturing, one day, it very well could make it into production. But then again, I’m a dreamer, and for now this motorcycle remains only a concept rendering.

But being a concept, there’s definitely some worth to its mention, and mention it we shall. Before you go on reading, have a look in the gallery to really get a feel for the idea.

If you’ve had the look, then by now you’ve figured out why it’s called the Cobra, basically because it looks like a downright cobra snake, only in mechanical form. Also, if you paid attention to the gallery, you witnessed two different designs. Both are from the same creator, just during different years. The one in focus today will be the newer design, which is also characterized by the white and orange color scheme.

This concept is similar to the idea of Roborace, you know, the ones that race autonomous and electric sports cars. The designer wanted to push the limits of motorcycle design by simply eliminating one crucial component, the rider. Anytime you choose to design something that is no longer based around the human form, you can really go outside the box. And that seems to have happened here as well.

But you still need a pilot in some way or another, so an AI system is definitely present in the design. Where exactly on the vehicle it’s hidden, we can’t say. But we do know that a number of sensors and cameras are placed around the bike to help direct its autonomous movement.

For example, at the very front of the bike, where that chopped fender-like thing is found, we are told it houses a camera, Lidar and aadar sensors. Another pair of these sensors is found one each side of the bike behind the front wheel, and another set near the rear tire. As with anything autonomous, these sensors are the eyes and ears of the vehicle.

Another idea that the concept explores is something called sphere-based magnetic steering. I honestly don’t know what that’s all about, and it seems that neither does Google. Not as a steering based function anyway. But hey, we are all allowed to dream a little.

As for the body design of the vehicle, I personally feel it looks hella sleek. By eliminating the need for a rider, the body design was able to follow one major line. As this vehicle is most likely electric, the space where an engine would normally be has also been removed by the low dropping body line of the top.

Speaking of top, the chassis coverings are held in place by magnets and not screws or bolts. Not so sure how that will hold up at high speeds, but then again, what do I know, I’m not the designer.

Don’t bother looking for the handlebars of pedals on this one folks, it’s not meant for you to ride. But don’t be discouraged, we can still enjoy this vehicle’s hypothetical abilities as it offers a function where an actual driver can be in control via a VR system.

Sure, this design may be far off from anything that is around, but frankly, not for long. Autonomous vehicles are making a very quick progression toward reality.

Voxan Wattman the fastest electric motorcycle in the world

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Max Biaggi and Monegasque electric motorcycle constructor Voxan marked the Venturi Group’s 20th anniversary in style, setting a total of eleven new world speed records at Ch�teauroux airfield in France, on 30 and 31 October and 1 November. The outright top speed achieved over the three days was 408 km/h (254 mph).

On the morning of Saturday 31 October, Max Biaggi and the Voxan Wattman achieved their primary objective, beating the most sought-after of the twelve world records they had been targeting this weekend. With a speed of 366.94 km/h (228.05 mph), the team set a new record in the prestigious “partially streamlined electric motorcycle over 300 kilos” class. In doing so, they dethroned previous holders Ryuji Tsuruta and Mobitec EV-02A with their speed of 329 km/h (204 mph).

In line with FIM (F�d�ration Internationale de Motocyclisme) regulations, the Voxan Wattman’s speed was measured from a flying start over 1 mile in opposite directions, within a period of two hours. Under Federation regulations, the final speed is the average of the two speeds recorded over these two runs. The Voxan, with its grey Sacha Lakic-designed fairing, sent records tumbling as the GPS speedometer peaked at an instantaneous speed of… 408 km/h (254 mph).

Given the relatively short track (3.5 km / 2.17 mi), reaching such an impressive top speed has encouraged Voxan to set its sights even higher. When they make their next attempts on a longer course, the team now has serious designs on an average speed in the region of 400 km/h (249 mph).

349.38 km/h (217.14 mph) for the non-streamlined Wattman

On Friday 30 October, a non-streamlined version of the Voxan Wattman without its fairing also took on the challenge over a distance of 1 mile, from a flying start. The principle was identical: 1 mile in opposite directions, within a period of two hours. Once again, the final speed was the average of the two speeds recorded over these two runs: 349.38 km/h (217.14 mph).

Yet the on-board systems showed that the Wattman, propelled by its powerful 270 kW (367 CH) engine, peaked at a top speed of 372 km/h (231 mph). This measurement augurs well for the next attempts planned, with Voxan set to take on more records until the end of 2022.

Nine other records

Gildo Pastor’s team had a number of other world records in their sights. After these three days of attempts, the final record tally is as follows:

– � mile, flying start, partially streamlined: 394.45 km/h (245.10 mph) – no previous record

– � mile, flying start, non-streamlined: 357.19 km/h (221.95 mph) – no previous record

– 1 km, flying start, partially streamlined: 386.35 km/h (240.07 mph – previous

record: 329.31 km/h (204.62 mph)

– � mile, standing start, non-streamlined: 126.20 km/h (78.42 mph) – no previous record

– � mile, standing start, partially streamlined: 127.30 km/h (79.10 mph) – previous

record: 87.16 km/h (54.16 mph)

– 1 km, standing start, non-streamlined: 185.56 km/h (115.30 mph) – no previous record

– 1 km, standing start, partially streamlined: 191.84 km/h (119.20 mph) – previous

record: 122.48 km/h (76.11 mph)

– 1 mile, standing start, non-streamlined: 222.82 km/h (138.45 mph) – no previous record

– 1 mile, standing start, partially streamlined: 225.01 km/h (139.81 mph) – no previous record

Quotes

“It was important to me to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Venturi Group’s electric adventure. Given the health situation, it hasn’t been easy, but thanks to the hard work and mentality shown by Max and my teams, we proved ourselves up to the challenge. Twenty years after buying Venturi, I am delighted that the Group can now claim to have created the fastest ever electric vehicles on two and four wheels (Venturi VBB-3, FIA record: 549 km/h – 341 mph), but also in the four-wheel fuel cell category (Venturi VBB-2, FIA record: 487 km/h – 303 mph). On each project, we have worked openly with major companies to share with them our expertise in the field of ground-breaking technologies, and in doing so contributed to improving ecomobility. That modest contribution reflects my commitment to ensuring we are fully line with the values of the Principality in terms of sustainable development. So I am sharing these records with my country, Monaco.” – Gildo Pastor, President of Venturi

“When Gildo Pastor, the President of the Venturi Group, approached me about this project, I was curious, very motivated, and at the same time a little uncertain. Having said that, right after our first meeting, I quickly realised that, like Gildo, his teams were driven by an incredible belief and determination. They told me “we came close to 600 km/h (373 mph) on four wheels, and now we want to flirt with 400 km/h (249 mph) on two wheels, nothing’s going to stop us!” These records make me a happy man! I’m proud of the team and delighted to bring these titles back to Monaco!” – Max Biaggi, rider of the Voxan Wattman

“At ROKiT we believe electric vehicles are the future and we are proud to partner with the fastest electric motorcycles in the world. Venturi and Voxan are true innovators and it’s exciting for ROKiT to be part of history in the making.” – Jonathan Kendrick, Co-Founder and Chairman ROKiT.

About Voxan

In 2010, the iconic motorcycle manufacturer Voxan Motors was bought by Venturi. Its President, Gildo Pastor, immediately refocused the constructor on a new core business: electric engines.

In 2013, Venturi unveiled the Voxan Wattman, a symbol of the brand’s rebirth and its radically new technical direction and styling.

In 2019, the teams began work on a new, high-performance version of the Wattman, specially designed to set new world speed records.

Man’s motorcycle, stolen 4 years ago, anonymously returned

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by Cameron Evans from https://www.washingtontimes.com

MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) – Miles McCarvel didn’t think he was ever going to get his 1972 Harley-Davidson motorcycle back after it was stolen four years ago.

On. Oct 13, though, he came home to find the bike leaning up against his garage.

The bike looked exactly the same as the last time McCarvel saw it: it was still missing a battery, the tires were flat and it didn’t have any new miles on it.

“I was like ‘what the hell,’ you know? I couldn’t believe it,” he told the Missoulian.

McCarvel hopped out of his car, took a picture of the red Aermacchi Harley-Davidson 350 Sprint and made a post on Facebook that read: “I built this bike when I was 20 years old! Glad to have it back. I guess there’s good things happening in the world too.”

The post received over 350 reactions and over a hundred comments, including one comment from a person who said their cousin also had a stolen truck returned a couple weeks later with a $20 bill on the console.

Missoula Police Department public information officer Travis Welsh said it isn’t very often that people return items they’ve stolen without police intervention, and said that once a theft has already occurred, any weight given to the gesture of returning the item at a later time would be determined by a prosecutor.