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motorcycle Archives — Page 2 of 21 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Lightning Motorcycles Is Working on a Fully-Enclosed Bike, Presumably

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Californian electric motorcycle maker Lightning Motorcycles is presumably (hopefully) working on a new project, one that would considerably improve the range and overall comfort of an electric motorcycle.

The project doesn’t have a name and, for that matter, hasn’t even been confirmed yet. Renderings of it have emerged with a patent filing in China, obtained by Cycle World. It’s not that uncommon for U.S.-based companies to file patents in China even before they do back home, in a bid to prevent cheap imitations.

The renderings show a tear-shaped framing on what could be an electric motorcycle. They are included with the patent filed under the name of Lightning Motorcycle, with CEO Richard Hatfield named as designer. It wouldn’t be uncommon for a company (be it a car or a motorcycle maker) to file a patent for a possible product or tech they’re studying but might never release, but since Lightning has a reputation for thinking outside the box, it is assumed they’re really planning on releasing a fully-enclosed motorcycle.

Cycle World notes that, in addition to the direct link to Lightning in the patent, this… thing comes in the electric blue already seen on the Strike (aka the affordable sport e-bike still pending delivery) and the LS-218 (aka the world’s fastest e-bike, now in very limited production). The slanted headlight design is another common element between the three.

The shape of the enclosed e-bike suggests a driving position similar to cars, while the tear-shaped framing would improve range. As for how this thing would be able to not topple over at low speeds or when stationary, the renderings don’t offer a single clue. Extendable outrigger wheels or self-balancing technology could be used in this instance.

As of the moment of writing, Lightning Motorcycles would not comment on the new product they’re supposedly working on.

Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix cancelled because of coronavirus restrictions

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by Ian Royall from https://www.geelongadvertiser.com.au/

The 2020 Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix, scheduled for October 25 at Phillip Island, has been cancelled because of coronavirus restrictions.

The four-day MotoGP weekend at the island is regional Victoria’s biggest sporting event, attracting more than 85,000 spectators and generating about $50 million for the state economy.

The Australian Grand Prix Corporation and the sport’s commercial rights holder Dorna made the call to cancel the GP, the latest event to get the axe.

The British GP, due to be held on August 30 at Silverstone, has also been cancelled.

No races have been held yet this year with tentative plans to start in Spain in late July.

Aussie Ducati rider Jack Miller said he was disappointed he would not be able to race in front of home fans at the island.

“It’s my favourite weekend of the whole year and it’s the best circuit in the world so it’ll be a shame not to be there,’’ Miller told the Herald Sun.

Miller finished third in the 2019 race at the island last October.

Mick Doohan, five-time 500cc world champion and AGPC board member said it would be the first year since 1997 that Phillip Island had not hosted the Australian GP.

“The race will return in 2021 and provide an opportunity to make it one of the biggest and best-attended MotoGP events we’ve seen, plus watch Miller take the win,” Doohan said.

Full refunds would be given to all ticket holders.

AGPC chairman Paul Little said the race would be back better than ever in 2021.

Dorna chief executive Carmelo Ezpeleta said: “We’re saddened to have to announce the cancellation of this iconic event after finding no way through the logistical and operational issues resulting from the pandemic and rearranged calendar.’’

The race cancellation will also be a major blow to the island’s tourism and hospitality industries which rely heavily on income from the GP weekend.

Jack Miller was just a skinny Townsville kid of 16 with a questionable haircut when he started racing in the 125cc world championship in 2011.

He finished just four races, including a 23rd place at his home circuit of Phillip Island.

But Miller worked hard, learnt his racecraft, graduated to premier class four years later and was this week elevated into the Ducati factory team for 2021.

His race performances last year were improved and consistent, earning him the coveted red leathers.

“It’s something (a factory ride) I’ve always dreamt of,’’ Miller said.

Now 25, Miller has spent the past two months on his parents’ property near Townsville, giving him time to reflect on his career so far.

“I’ve been pulling all my old leathers out of storage and hanging them up on the walls around the shed, so it’s been pretty cool to go through that and think back where it began and what’s to come in the future,” he said.

He’s spent his enforced break keeping fit and ripping around the farm on 450cc and 250cc two-stroke dirt bikes, about 45 hours in total.

“I’ve been keeping myself busy — I have a lot of little projects on the go while we’ve been in lockdown,” he said.

Miller has signed a one-year deal with Ducati with an option for a second.

It’s still not clear who he will replace, but it’s more likely he will partner Andrea Dovizioso with talk linking Danilo Petrucci to the manufacturer’s World Superbike team.

Petrucci won his home GP at Mugello last year but his form fell away in the second half of the year.

It is clear that all manufacturers are trying to find someone to break Marc Marquez’s hold on the championship.

But for now, Miller just wants the 2020 championship to start after COVID-19.

“I can’t wait, especially the bike we had in testing in Qatar and Sepang, we believe we can do some special things,” he said.

“We’ve (Pramac) still got a lot of unfinished business — the way things ended last year and how pre-season testing went, we’re in good shape to repay Pramac.

Miller finished a career-best eighth in last year’s championship, with five podium finishes.

He hopes to head back to Europe by mid-June to start preparations.

Dorna, the sport’s commercial rights holder, has said it hopes to start racing at Jerez in Spain by late July, followed by more races in Europe.

Fox News Autos Virtual Motorcycle Show: YOUR bikes

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by Gary Gastelu from https://www.foxnews.com

While many of us are stuck at home, Fox News is holding a series of virtual car shows where you can share and discuss your cool cars, trucks and motorcycles with the rest of the Fox News Autos audience.

Ride on!

No vehicle can combine freedom and solitude the way a motorcycle can, and plenty of people have been turning to them as the go-to mode of transportation today. But they’re also very much about the brother and sisterhood of the bike, and that’s why we held the Fox News Autos Virtual Motorcycle Show.

You have some fantastic rides of all kinds and we’ve posted a few of our favorites below so you can chat about them in the comments, but don’t forget to check out more of the submissions on Twitter and add your own.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FOX NEWS AUTOS VIRTUAL AUTO SHOWS

The eRockit Hybrid Is an Electric Motorcycle You Have to Pedal for Speed

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Who said you have to choose between an electric bicycle and a motorcycle? A German startup is offering a solid and very fun compromise they like to call “the human hybrid:” eRockit.

The eRockit is part bicycle, part motorcycle and all fun. It’s an electric motorcycle that promises good performance and decent range but also uses the pedals found on the regular bicycle instead of throttle. To put in much simpler terms, this bike requires some leg work in order to move around: the more the faster you want to go.

Falling under the 125cc motorcycles classification, the eRockit has already been tested on the Autobahn by stunt rider Sebastian “Satu” Kopke, and he says the fun of having to do light exercise while overtaking cars is something he’s never experienced before. “I have never experienced such a mixture of physical activity similar to cycling and this incredibly good acceleration. It’s doubling the fun!” he says.

The makers are equally generous in showering this little thing with praise: “the most extraordinary electric motorcycle of today” is able to deliver an “indescribable, magical driving experience” and, at the same time, top German quality in terms of the materials used, performance and safety. It’s almost enough to make you want to go out and buy one right away.

Speaking strictly numbers, though, the eRockit is basically a faster commuter electric bicycle at a much higher price. It has a top speed of 90 kph (56 mph) and a range of 120 kilometers (75 miles), with the latter largely dependent on weight of the rider and weather / road conditions. Peak power is at 22 HP from a permanent magnet synchronous motor, while the 6,6 kWh Lithium-Ion battery achieves a full charge in 5 hours.

The eRockit may be all sorts of fun, but it’s also not cheap. It will retail for 11,850 euro ($13,100), with a 250 euro ($277) deposit needed to place a pre-order.

 

The Pros And Cons Of Motorcycle Commuting

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by Enrico Punsalang from https://www.rideapart.com

The pros definitely outweigh the cons, and the cons can be seen as part of the adventure!

To many motorcycle enthusiasts, motorcycles are merely toys. These toys come in many shapes and sizes—from sportbikes for spirited trackdays, to adventure bikes for weekend getaways with friends. However I’m sure it has crossed your mind, as a motorcycle enthusiast, to consider commuting to and from work, or to anywhere for that matter, on your beloved steed.

Undoubtedly, there are quite a number of cons—reasons for you to save riding your motorcycle for weekend leisurely rides. However, in as much as there are cons, there are twice as many pros—reasons why it is a good idea to commute with your motorcycle. So, I’m going to try to convince you that commuting on your motorcycle has quite a lot of benefits.

First, for a little context. I live in the Philippines, a country with one of the worst traffic conditions in the world. I’ve been commuting to and from work on my motorcycle for a couple of years now. I’ve practically seen it all as far as city commuting is concerned. From 40-degree summer heat, to torrential downpours in the middle of the monsoon season that had me chilled to the bone, I’ve managed to survive and enjoy commuting on my bike regardless of the situation. I’m lucky enough to have the option of driving myself to work in the safety of a four wheeled enclosure, also known as a car, when riding my bike is simply out of the question. However, the joy that motorcycling brings me seems to cut across the drudgery of day-to-day life (that’s one pro right there).

The Cons

I’m one to take my vegetables first, so let’s discuss the cons. Quite honestly, I don’t think the cons need that much enumeration. Of course, you have the exposure to literally all the elements. From sun, rain, snow (if it snows where you live), and not to mention the high levels of pollution in densely populated cities, you get a front row pass to experience all of these up close and personal. There’s also the increased chance of getting into an accident as opposed to driving a car. Us being on two wheels means that we’re more likely not to be seen, and the fact that we don’t have the protection of doors, bumpers, and airbags doesn’t help either.

Lastly, commuting on your motorcycle means you’ll be needing to change into your work or office clothes when you get to work. This can be a slight inconvenience, since you may even need to go as far as taking a shower before proceeding to your desk.

The Pros

You can practically go on and on about all the cons of commuting and actually riding a motorcycle in general. However given the fact that we are into motorcycles means that our wants and needs transcend those of mere utility. Don’t get me wrong, motorcycles offer a hell of a lot of utilities under the right circumstances. To give you a rundown of some of the pros which definitely outweigh the cons, for starters, commuting on a motorcycle means that you get to save money on gas with the added bonus of lower emissions (depending on what motorcycle you ride).

Of course it goes without saying that you would look utterly stylish rev bombing your way into your office parking complex, with envious coworkers giving you nods of approval. Kidding aside, riding your motorcycle will also save you a lot of time, especially if lane splitting is legal where you live. Now in most Asian countries, lane splitting is practiced by all motorcycle riders. However the legality of lane splitting is a lot murkier in America and in parts of Europe, so the time saving aspect comes with an asterisk.

Another pretty cool pro, especially for you folks who are trying to stay in shape, is that riding your motorcycle can be quite a workout. In fact, studies have shown that riding a motorcycle burns significantly more calories per hour, as compared to driving a car. Of course this number varies from person to person, as well as the conditions of the environment you’re riding in. I personally burn an average of 500 calories on a one-way ride to home from work, or vice versa.

Lastly, another pro that motorcycling gives you is something that can be difficult to measure simply because it’s a very personal thing. I’m sure we can all agree that our motorcycles are our pride and joy. We love every moment we spend with our bikes. So it’s definitely extremely beneficial for your mental health to do something you love everyday, right? Personally, riding my motorcycle to work everyday keeps me sane. It’s one of the few things I look forward to starting and ending each day.

So there you have it. I hope I was able to convince you to even consider taking your motorcycle to work tomorrow, or the next day, and the day after that. Motorcycling is truly an awesome thing, and it’s something I wouldn’t give up for the world.

BMW R100 R Green Beret Is the Warrior Bike Special Forces Never Used

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

One of the deadliest military forces on the planet, the so-called Green Berets, have a wealth of gear at their disposal to conduct whatever missions Uncle Sam throws at them. But we’re pretty sure they never used this here bike, though.

What’s featured in the gallery above is a BMW R100 R from 1994. The R is one of the many variations of the R100 line the Bavarian bike builder begun making in 1976 as its last line of motorcycles powered by air-cooled engines. The line was discontinued in 1996, just two years after this model was manufactured.

And by manufactured, we don’t mean as you see it here. What sits before our eyes is the result of customization work conducted by a Paris-based garage that goes by the name Blitz Motorcycles. This group has been responsible for other interesting remakes of older motorcycles, mostly BMWs and Kawasakis.

In the case of German bikes, Blitz seems to have a soft spot for military-oriented names. Another build of theirs, also based on the R100 (in GS configuration this time) was called Black Ops.

This one here is the Green Beret, named so because it kind of looks like something the American Special Forces soldiers would use while roaming some desert in search of the enemy.

Painted in a combination of khaki green and black, the frame hides the original engine, only reconditioned to be better suited for modern-day use. Several bespoke parts were added to the BMW, including mufflers, the black headlight, the rear loop and of course the seat. The most visible change is the fuel tank, of course, which in this case was sourced from a Honda CB 125 S.

We are not being told how much the rebuilding of the BMW R100 R cost, or where the bike eventually ended up. We’re pretty sure you haven’t seen it in a war zone, though.

Yamaha Announces Arrival of 2021 Ténéré 700 in U.S.

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Customers to Begin Receiving Highly-Anticipated Adventure Touring Motorcycle in Early June

MARIETTA, Ga. – May 22, 2020 – Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA (YMUS) today announced the 2021 Ténéré 700 arrival for the U.S. market beginning the first week of June. Earlier this year, Yamaha connected with customers interested in making the first Ténéré 700 purchases through the company’s website and dealer network, and orders started taking place today.

While the first shipment of Ténéré 700 motorcycles are expected to sell out, additional inventory will be arriving at authorized Yamaha dealerships for purchase later this summer and fall.

Customers who ordered their Ténéré 700 motorcycles today were also given the opportunity to purchase one of two accessory packs. The Rally Pack features a skid plate, main stand, engine guard, radiator protector, chain guide, mono-seat rack and tank pad. The Tour Pack features a main stand, engine guard, side case stays and a set of side cases with locks. All accessories for the 2021 Ténéré 700 can be found at www.shopyamaha.com.

The Next Horizon is Yours
With a spirit of adventure embedded in their DNA, Yamaha Adventure bikes are rugged, tough and reliable. Each Ténéré model in the Adventure Touring segment opens up the possibilities of endless travel and enables riders to discover a feeling of utter freedom where the only limits exist within a rider’s imagination.

To find out more about the 2021 Ténéré 700, visit https://www.yamahamotorsports.com/adventure-touring/models/tenere-700.

For more information related to all Yamaha products, visit YamahaMotorsports.com.

Follow Yamaha Motor Corporation, USA, through your favorite social media site:
#Yamaha #YamahaMotor #YamahaMotorUSA

1983 BMW R100 GS Black Ops Comes With Dented Tank Because It’s Cool

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

When someone asks for a custom build to be made based on either a car or a motorcycle, they usually ask for the finished product to be perfect. For someone living in Florida, perfect does not necessarily mean flawless.

The motorcycle in the gallery above was once a stock BMW R100 GS. The R100 line was born in BMW’s stables back in 1976, and was to become the last of the German motorcycles powered by air-cooled engines. In production until 1996, the range grew to include a wide number of models, from the R100 T to the R100 GS, covering an even wider range of customer needs.

Because production of these models ended quite some time ago, and BMW bikes are not usually held in such high regard to be preserved for decades, most of them are now basically useless machines. But there are some garages out there that make a buck by bringing these beatdown bikes back to life.

One such garage is Paris-based Blitz Motorcycles, which focuses on giving a new purpose to old German motorcycles. Like this R100 GS here.

Made at the request of what we understand is an American customer, the bike underwent a major mechanical overhaul that included an engine rebuild, the replacement of the fuel tank, the addition of new parts and, in the end, the renaming into Black Ops.

Named so because the garage “wanted this bike to look stealth and mean” it kind of does not live up to the name. After all, such a dark apparition on a road somewhere is bound not to pass unnoticed, and the distinctive dents on the Honda CB350 fuel tank, kept because “this is what we liked about this tank,” sure makes it easy to pick out from a crowd.

We are not being told how much the rebuilt of the bike is worth.

Apex Predator Is One Sportster Harley-Davidson Should Start Making

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

At the beginning of April, Harley-Davidson announced the winner of this year’s King of Kings competition, a mashup of the best 15 previous winners of the Battle of the Kings. Its name is Apex Predator, and with it we’re kicking off a series that will bring to light over the following days all the participants.

Known in the industry as BOTK, Battle of the Kings kicked off in 2015 as a custom build competition for Harley dealers worldwide. It is, if you like, a competition of ideas Harley itself was incapable of having, but recognized by the bike maker as possibly game changing for the custom industry.

The rules of the competition are simple: the base motorcycle needs to be a Harley-Davidson bike, the customization must not cost over €6,000 ($6,500) and must have at least half of the parts used taken from the Harley inventory, and the final bike must be road legal.

Over the years many competed in the Battle of Kings, but in April 2020 Harley crowned one of them ruler of the pack. And as fate would have it, that King of Kings is the Apex Predator.

Built by a dealer in Mexico called Harley-Davidson Queretaro, the Apex is based on the Sportster XR1200 with the stock engine, and it is supposed to be a “retro-futuristic XR-based track monster meets street fighter.”

Featuring custom parts like front fork covers, dual air intakes, and wave-style brake rotors, the bike does not shy away from making use of materials not often used in the motorcycle industry, like the Alcantara on the seat.

Aside from the visual upgrades made to it, the Sportster also got a full color TFT Bluetooth instrument panel, and a hand built 2-1-2 exhaust system.

As for the Sportster line, it was introduced by Harley back in 1957 and has been produced continuously ever since. The XR1200 has been around globally since 2006. We reckon not many would mind if it were to sell in the Apex Predator configuration.

 

Naked man frightens off woman, steals her motorcycle

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by Nujaree Raekrun from https://www.bangkokpost.com

A naked man seized a motorcycle from a shocked woman at an intersection in Sichon district on Sunday and rode off on it, and police finally found him at a nearby market on Tuesday – still without clothes.

Sunday’s incident occurred in full view of pedestrians and motorists. It was videoed and posted on the Ruamphon Khon Tha Sala Facebook page and, unsurprisingly, went viral.

The clip, lasting 49 seconds, showed a man aged around 30 sitting naked on the road divider at Phuyai Pluem intersection in Tha Sala district.

He walked towards a woman motorcyclist who stopped at the red light. As the man approached she was clearly frightened, then abandoned her motorcycle and ran away.

The naked man then took possession of her bike, sitting on it and preparing to drive off. Then a rescue worker ran into the video and tried to stop him. He was kicked away by the naked thief, who then rode off on the bike.

Earlier on Sunday, rescue workers saw a naked man sleeping alongside another road in Tha Sala district. They bundled him into their vehicle intending to take him to Tha Sala Hospital.

But when they stopped at Phuyai Pluem intersection the man woke up, became very agitated and jumped from the vehicle. He sat down on the road divider – and then the unfortunate woman drew up at the red light on her motorcycle.

Local police assigned to the case said they arrested a naked man at Kimsong market, in the same district, on Tuesday. He was taken to Tha Sala Hospital.