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Veterans plan Memorial Day motorcycle ride despite roadblock

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by Angie Angers from https://www.baynews9.com

It’s a Memorial Day tradition for tens of thousands of veterans to ride their motorcycles to the nation’s capital.

Pentagon had blocked their permit request, but vets say they are going regardless

This time, the event was nearly in jeopardy.

Every May for more than 30 years, veterans from all over the country have made the trip to honor those gone and those still missing in action.

“Not only continue the tradition of holding Congress and the government accountable for trying to find these over 82,000 missing veterans, but also for veteran suicide,” said organizer Tom McNamara with AMVETS.

McNamara says they’re expecting roughly 100,000 veterans and they’d received nine out of the 10 permits needed to make the trip happen.

But just recently, defense officials denied their application to use the Pentagon’s parking lot like they have for the last three decades.

“Using our satellite views on how we’re going to stage motorcycles, and a month ago they came back and said, ‘No, we’re not gonna do it, and didn’t give us an answer as to why,’” McNamara said.

Officials of the Pentagon later cited COVID safety concerns and left AMVETS scrambling for another plan.

Now Rep. Brian Mast is involved and is accusing leaders of blocking the tradition.

He sent a strongly-worded letter to Congress pushing them to reconsider.

McNamara says — either way — the veterans are using their constitutional right to protest and will be coming to D.C. no matter what.

“As our First Amendment right, these people are coming anyway, we’re going to be there anyway. So now, we’re just lining up on the streets,” he said.

They just want to keep the tradition alive.

“Let’s just say Congress will know about it,” McNamara said with a laugh.

The ride is set to take place on May 30. Organizers say they will release a final schedule and route for the event within the week.

View AMVETS website for the event at https://amvets.org/rolling-to-remember-demonstration-ride/

Official Website for the event is https://www.rollingtoremember.com/

Ducati Monster 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Take the edge off.
In 1992, Ducati designer Miguel Galluzzi shoehorned a 900SS engine into an 888 superbike frame. He then bolted on a 750 Supersport fork and the Ducati Monster was born. Galluzzi’s Frankenstein experiment was well-loved though, driving sales at the Bologna brand for years. The parts bin special saved Ducati, in fact, and the Monster has remained in Ducati’s stable ever since.

That hasn’t stopped the Monster from evolving through the years, though. Ducati frequently tweaked the ingredients, but the recipe remained the same: one part air-cooled L-twin, one part trellis frame. However, technology and design move on, and the model has changed with the times. By 2015, all Monster engines switched to liquid-cooling, and the latest iteration finally sheds its trellis frame—and the weight that comes with it.

That prompted traditionalists and ardent Ducatisi to click their tongues, lamenting over Ducati’s heresy. To many fans, the trellis frame was the Monster’s pièce de résistance. The quality that separated the muscular streetfighter from its “soulless” competitors. The trellis frame was the Monster’s greatest strength, but it was also its greatest weakness, imprisoning the naked bike to a bygone era as its counterparts forged ahead.

That’s no longer the case in 2021. Sure, the Monster is still “borrowing” from its counterparts by plucking the 937cc L-twin from the Supersport 950 and wedging it into a Panigale V4-inspried monocoque aluminum frame. Even the model’s 4.3-inch TFT dash sports a Panigale V4-derived interface. Despite those old habits, the question remains: is it still a Monster without the trellis frame? Did it trade in its panache for pastiche? Did it lose its character, its “soul”?

These questions loomed large when Ducati invited us to San Francisco, California, to ride the 2021 Monster. After spending a full day in the saddle of the new bike, it was clear that this is a very different beast.

Engine:
To meet Euro5 emissions standards, Ducati ditched the Monster’s 821cc Testastretta engine in favor of the proven mill found in Ducati’s Hypermotard 950 and Supersport 950. The 11-degree Testastretta configuration carries over, but Ducati bumps the capacity to 937cc for good reasons. That’s 111 good reasons, in the form of horsepower. Ducati couples that with a generous 69 lb-ft helping of torque. More than enough bark and bite for the naysayers.

The powerplant may tout a higher volume than the outgoing unit, but it also shaved off 5.7 pounds in the process. The new clutch drops three pounds alone while the cylinder heads and clutch cover account for two additional pounds of weight loss. The updated gear drum, alternator cover, and pistons and rods pitch in too, saving precious grams.

Ducati’s versatile Testastretta platform isn’t just performance-oriented, however, it’s surprisingly practical as well. New Monster owners can enjoy a whole lot of riding between the 9,000-mile oil services and 18,000-mile valve services. The revised hydraulic clutch also reduces resistance at the lever by 20 percent and the up/down quickshifter nearly eliminates clutch use altogether.

That’s the same Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Evo 2 found on the $24,095 Multistrada V4 S, and the IMU-dependent system works just as well on this $11,895 naked bike. In fact, the DQS equipped on the Monster produces an even more satisfying exhaust note upon downshifting. Modern emissions regulations have taken the voice box of many a motorcycle, but Ducati’s auto-blipper gives the Monster a formidable growl.

Upshifts were just as visceral, but for an entirely different reason. Though the bike’s fueling was pretty fluttery below 3,500 rpm, the Monster really bared its teeth between 4,000-7,000 rpm. A series of clutchless upshifts only amplified the effect. The power delivery never bordered on frightening, though. Of course, if 111 ponies are too much pep for your step, Ducati’s three ride modes help tame the Monster’s inner animal.

Those looking for an easy-breezy experience can switch to Urban mode, which restricts output to 75 horsepower. For highway blasts, Touring mode maintains peak horsepower but prioritizes smooth acceleration. Predictively, Sport mode is the least restrictive, but that doesn’t make it less manageable than its counterparts. After a short squirt through the hilly San Francisco streets, I kept the engine in Sport mode for the rest of the day. Even in the tight and twisty confines of Route 35, the lively engine response never felt overwhelming. Thanks, primarily, to the new superbike-derived frame.

Chassis:
While the engine’s before/after results were truly impressive, Ducati engineers went to greater lengths to reduce the chassis’ mass. Compared to the 821’s trellis front frame, the new monocoque saves 9.9 pounds. The fiberglass-reinforced polymer subframe comes in 4.2 pounds underweight while the swingarm and wheels reduce unsprung weight by 7.2 pounds. Ducati’s diet plan worked wonders for the Monster, converting the heavy brute to a lithe apex predator.

That new, low 414-pound wet weight is noticeable right off the kickstand. Fleet-footed yet planted, the Monster takes advantage of that newfound agility in the turns. Initial tip-in is effortless and side-to-side transitions are predictable and smooth. That sharp-handling quality should redeem the Monster in the eyes of Ducati fans, but focused track riders may discount the sporty naked bike for lacking fully adjustable suspension.

Speaking of, in stock form, the 43mm USD front end and preload-adjustable lean on the stiffer side. At least they did under my 160-pound frame. Heavier riders may benefit more from the spring rate, but the suspension only borders on harsh at the least favorable time—at lean. Northern California’s Skyline Boulevard is a relatively well-maintained mountain road, but a few inconveniently placed potholes unsettled the Monster’s sure-footed stance.

Of course, no suspension operates optimally when leaned over, but the sharp hit doesn’t just stop at the springs. That new, responsive aluminum chassis also relayed those shockwaves up through to the rider. Luckily, the Monster was quick to regain its composure and continued attacking corners. Aside from those rare moments of instability, though, the Monster handled everything the city and the canyons could throw at it.

Unlike the suspension, the braking system’s pedigree was never in question. Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers bite down on twin 320mm discs up front and a dual-piston binder mates to a 245mm disc out back. A radial master cylinder is the last piece of the puzzle, and it delivers incredible feedback at the lever. Whether navigating downtown traffic or approaching a decreasing radius hairpin, the braking performance was confidence-inspiring.

Of course, losing 40 pounds would help any motorcycle shed speed quickly, but that weight loss also informed the motorcycle’s design and user experience.

Ergonomics:
Ducati went to great lengths to reduce the new Monster’s proportions. Along with losing weight, the bike also lost the visual heaviness of its trellis frame and oversized gas tank. The new dimensions deliver a compact yet comfortable riding position that’s neither too aggressive nor lax.

A 58-inch wheelbase certainly helps with handling but it also relaxes the rider triangle. Ducati pairs that compact cockpit with a handlebar that’s 2.6 inches closer to the rider and footpegs positioned .5 inches lower and 1.5 inches rearward. At 32.3 inches, the standard seat height is easy to flat foot, but those with shorter inseams can also purchase a low seat and a lowering kit that drops the perch to 30.5 inches high.

Before jumping for the accessories catalog, I recommend throwing a leg over the new Monster. Ducati narrowed the seat-to-tank area to maximize stand over comfort, and the strategy worked. However, the narrow stand-over position also introduced my knees to a few Testastretta engine cases. On the left side of the bike, the radiator and water pump plumbing can get in the way and the clutch cover is just as obtrusive on the right. It wasn’t too bothersome throughout the day, but it’s definitely worth mentioning.

Aside from those slight discomforts, the new seating position encourages day-long riding. Stretch to the bars is minimal and the narrow cutouts promote clenching the tank with one’s knees. In turn, the ergonomic position alleviated pressure on my wrists and results in a very pleasant riding experience. In the city, however, the stop-and-go traffic definitely introduced wrist fatigue.

Urban riding also revealed that the Monster had the same heat management issues as its predecessors. At speed, the Monster didn’t throw off an irksome amount of warmth, but from light to light, the new naked bike simply radiated heat. Even in Urban mode, the engine reached high temps. If you’re considering a 2021 Monster, you should also consider living near a highway. The Monster is more play than business and excessive urban environs will get it hot under the collar.

The only other tick against the new-fangled Ducati is that L-Twin’s vibration. Of course, that rumble sets the Monster apart from its parallel-twin rivals, but by 7,000 rpm, the high-frequency buzz prompted early upshifts. The vibration is nearly imperceptible at the pegs, marginally more noticeable at the bars, but it’s most present at the seat cowl. With my tailbone pressed against the seat stop, I could tell when the tachometer was approaching that 7,000-rpm threshold just by the vibration.

Electronics:
I can’t wrap up this review without calling attention to the Monster’s impressive electronic suite. With three levels of ABS cornering, eight levels of cornering traction control, four-leveled wheelie control, and launch control, Ducati’s system presents an absurd degree of customization. With that said, I’m the type of person that likes to set it and forget it. Many customers will love the number of doodads on the middleweight roadster, but others will find what they like and stick to it.

Regardless of which camp you’re in, the rider aids and engine performance options make the Monster a more malleable platform. On the other hand, flipping through the numerous menus would be easier if Ducati consolidated the split function navigation and enter buttons on the left switchgear. Also, many electronic interfaces automatically navigate back to the previous menu when the rider confirms a selection. With the Monster’s system, the user has to manually backtrack.

Even with those minor gripes, the electronics suite is clear and easy to use. That should broaden the model’s appeal as it approaches three decades on the market. It’s clear that Ducati wants to angle the new Monster toward a younger demographic, and it believes robust safety aids and rider modes help those efforts.

While all the ride modes are tractable for seasoned vets, I’d hesitate to put the Monster in a brand-new rider’s hands. The entry-level naked bike may be the perfect first Ducati, but that doesn’t make it the perfect first bike. This new Monster is well-mannered, but it hasn’t lost its claws. Rider aids should be there as a safety net, not training wheels, but the Monster would be great bike for intermediate riders to grow into over the years.

Conclusion:
So, did the Monster lose its “soul” when it lost its trellis frame? No, it didn’t. At the same time, it isn’t the same Monster. It’s more youthful. Yes, the trellis frame’s absence is felt. Without its signature visual cue, the Monster doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much, but it does stand toe-to-toe with the KTM 890 Duke, Triumph Street Triple, and Yamaha MT-09. No, the Monster didn’t lose its “soul” it just developed a playful spirit.

If you’re someone that likes the “oohs and aahs” that come with a Ducati, the new Monster may not be for you. If you want a motorcycle that’s light on its feet, attacks the corners, and just happens to be red, the new Duc should be your cup of tea. The 2021 Monster will suit a wide swath of riders just like it did 28 years ago. Those customers may be different today than they were in 1993 and the Monster will only continue to evolve (without the trellis frame) for the next three decades.

Fritchie Classic motorcycle race to return to fairgrounds July 4

By General Posts

by Mary Grace Keller from https://www.fredericknewspost.com

The 100th Anniversary of Barbara Fritchie Classic

There’s a short list of factors that can prevent the country’s oldest continuous dirt track motorcycle race — the Great Depression, World War II, rain and most recently, COVID-19.

But not this year.

The Barbara Fritchie Classic will return to the Frederick Fairgrounds July 4 after the pandemic led to its cancellation in 2020. This year will mark 100 years of tradition at the location since the series started in 1922, according to race organizer Richard Riley.

“The race is on,” he said.

The event will look a little different from years past. The plan is to limit the grandstands to 1,500 spectators (half capacity), COVID-19 safety protocols will be in place, visitors will notice extra cleaning throughout the event, and hand sanitizer will abound.

Riley isn’t worried about reducing the capacity in the grandstands, since they usually see 1,500 to 1,800 spectators, and many of them stand around the racetrack’s fence.

“It’s just good dusty fun,” Riley said.

New this year, the event will offer a STACYC exhibition for youngsters competing on electric bikes. More details are to come, but Riley said the event will probably be geared toward kids ages 4 to 6.

“The kids got to get out,” he said. “They can’t stay in the house all day.”

He also hopes to display restored vintage racing bikes from the era of the first race.

Riley’s been involved in the race in some way since 1977 and first attended in 1968. For decades of his life, the Fritchie Classic has been synonymous with celebrating Independence Day.

Last Fourth of July, Riley found himself staring at the empty fairgrounds. He nearly cried when he had to cancel the event.

“I just looked in there. Everything was locked down,” he recalled. “It would have been strange for me not to go to the Frederick Fairgrounds on the Fourth of July.”

The decision did not come easily.

“I was forced to make a decision that I don’t regret,” Riley told the News-Post in June 2020. “But it’s not something I wanted to make. It was nothing that I would have told you I would have done six months or longer ago.”

One of the competitors looking forward to kicking the dust up at the fairgrounds is 2018 winner Cory Texter of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

“[I’m] looking forward to going back,” Texter said.

He won the main event Expert/Pro Twins race at the 97th running of the Barbara Fritchie Classic. His sister, Shayna, is also a past winner but in the 450cc Pro Sport race in 2008.

“Because it’s so technical, I seem to do really well there,” Cory Texter said. “It’s one of the biggest non-national races we do.”

The history of the half-mile track itself is a draw to competitors. Riley said they’ve had racers from all over the U.S. as well as other countries.

“There’s a tremendous amount of tradition,” Riley said. “I promised I’d get it to 100.”

Richard Riley invites those interested in attending the Fritchie Classic to visit barbarafritchieclassic.com for more information and to buy tickets in the future.

Tickets will also be available at Fredericktown Yamaha, which can be reached at 301-663-8333.

 

A 17-year-old is taking the motorcycle racing world by storm

By General Posts

by James Warren from https://www.theolivepress.es

SPAIN has often been called the mecca for motorcycle racing, with world champions being cultivated from the moment they can sit on a bike.

Household names like Marc Marquez, Aleix Espargaro and current champ Joan Mir all started riding and racing while they were at school, making use of Spain’s love of two wheels to develop their talents unhindered.

As these riders fight to earn their latest victories in 2021, they all have one eye on one name that is causing waves in the Moto3 World Championship.

And that name is Pedro Acosta, a young 17-year-old from Mazarron, Murcia.

So far in 2021, the young man has taken three victories and one podium in the first four races, shattering records for the 250cc class and leaving experts to hail him as a ‘future legend’.

But how has this teenager become one of the most exciting prospects since Marc Marquez arrived on the scene back in 2008.

The answer can be found at the Circuito de Cartagena, a race track six kilometres northwest of the popular resort.

The circuit is popular with trackday riders, people who own motorcycles who rent sessions on the track to hone their skills.

Acosta’s father, also Pedro, was one such rider, with a love for American legend Kevin Schwanz, and eager for his son to inherit his love for two wheels.

“Dad had a Suzuki like Schwantz’s and I grew up looking at the photos and videos of him.” said Acosta in an interview with Spanish publication Marca.

Acosta’s father, keen to see his son carry on the mantle, give him a €150 Chinese Motina bike at the age of five, and brought him to track days at the Cartagena circuit to watch his father ride.

“At first he was not interested, spending more time playing rather than watching, but he soon began to become intrigued to what I was doing.” said his father.

Acosta enrolled into a youth development program at the track ran by early mentor Francisco Marmol, a name that would become an integral part in Acosta’s rise to stardom.

“He would always be at the track with his father, and after a few years we enrolled him in our program, like an after-school club for riders.” said Marmol.

“He developed a taste for it very quickly, and grew a strong bond with me, he listened very intently and it became apparent that he had no fear.”

“He was open to experiment and try new things that I suggested. Some people say they can see a natural talent in children this age but it is not true, it is too early. But Acosta was always ready to learn, and enjoyed every moment, and that was the key.”

The son of a modest fisherman and a mother Mercedes, who didn’t care for racing, Acosta, with the help of Marmol and the KSB Federation, entered numerous national championships as soon as he was old enough, and won the Pre Moto3 championship in 2017.

As a result, Acosta entered the Spanish Junior Moto3 category (CEV), finishing 33rd after racing in just five races, but more importantly giving him his first proper taste of 250cc machinery.

His stint in the CEV gave him the confidence to apply for the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, the official starter class for the MotoGP championship and a place where teams scalp for potential talents.

Acosta made the cut, and in 2019 he began his first foray into international racing.

He impressed, taking three victories and five podiums on the way to a second place finish after 12 races.

In 2020, Acosta remained in the Rookie’s Cup and claimed an unprecedented six straight victories and a further three podiums to take the championship n his second attempt.

His performance got teams talking, and for 2021 Acosta joined the Austrian Red Bull Ajo KTM team on the factory KTM RC250, colours that would propel him into the eyes of the world.

The current crop of riders are already heaping praise on the Spanish youngster, but are concerned that his rapid rise to stardom could be his downfall.

“It is clear that he can become a champion, he has the talent, but he has to surround himself with the right people.” said 2020 champion Joan Mir.

This is a sentiment that is echoed amongst the other riders, with Franco Morbidelli and Marquez all offering words of wisdom to the 17-year-old.

“He must be left alone to enjoy his time on the bike, to concentrate on his development and not be forced to advance to quickly.” said Marquez.

Marquez is referring to rumors that Acosta is already being touted for MotoGP ride, skipping the intermediate Moto2 category altogether, a move that has concerned many.

“Moto2 is a valuable stepping stone, you learn a lot from 675cc racing machinery that you can’t pick up from Moto3, or even training on larger bikes.” said Mir.

“As Pecco (Bagnaia, current Ducati rider) said, two years in each category is sensible, it is important not to rush. It is clear he is something special but he must do what is best for him not what is best for the teams or promotions.”

What Acosta does next year is uncertain, but from humble beginnings he has gained admiration from not only his childhood heroes, but also racing fans across the globe.

BMW Motorrad campaign for Women’s International Day in Motorcycle

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Bia Dantas celebrates Womens International Day in Motorcycle success campaign

BMW MOTORRAD launched campaign starring Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose was to emphasize the empowerment of women in commemoration of Women’s Day.

My time in the world of motorcycles just started & I couldn’t have a better start… happy to participate in this project, from a brand that I admire and with such outstanding professionals and women” — Bia Dantas

MIAMI, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, May 10, 2021 — Under the motto: Together we are stronger. Make Life a Ride. On March 8, BMW MOTORRAD launched a campaign starring the Influencer, DJ and Top Model Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose of the campaign was to emphasize the empowerment of women in the framework of the commemoration of International Women’s Day.

The campaign was recorded in the vicinity of the Teotihuacan pyramids, which allowed the construction of a perfect and unique setting.

Weeks after the campaign launch, we can assure you that the campaign was very successful and had a relevant scope. Consolidating BMW Mexico as the leading motorcycling company and with great proximity to the female consumer.

It should be noted that the message of the campaign focuses on highlighting the path that each personality has had to travel with its challenges and the power of motorcycling to support the development of women in groups and individually. Emphasizing that together or individually with effort and preparation the woman is stronger. Bia Dantas was the perfect influencer for this campaign. Also, the crew had a Balloon Ride next to the Teotihuacan Pyramids that create a perfect environment for team production.

On the other hand, Bia Dantas highlighted that during the filming of the campaign she had her country very present: “I bring my jacket from my dear old Moto Club with the flags of my country and the Brazil-Alagoas State. Always representing ”.

BMW Motorrad Mexico is part of BMW de México S.A de C.V. with address at Av. Javier Barros Sierra 495, 14th floor Cdmx.

Recently Bia Dantas starred on the cover of Glamour Bulgaria with a production dedicated to commemorating the mergers between the different cultures of Brazil. Also, Bia Dantas was cover in Harpers Bazaar a few weeks ago.

Bianca Dantas is an Influencer, DJ and Top Model. Account @biadantasbr. She has collaborated in various campaigns and editorials, highlighting covers of world-renowned titles such as Harpers Bazaar, Vogue Magazine, and Glamor. She currently stands out in the world of music under the name of DJ BiaD @ Biad.oficial. She was born in Brazil and currently lives in Mexico City.

 

May Motorcycle Bikernet Weekly News for May 6, 2021

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Hey,

What’s the deal today? It’s motorcycle month. The sun is shining in Deadwood. The news is packed, and I’m waiting to close on our Sturgis property so I can unpack.

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Click Here to read the Weekly News on Bikernet.

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MRF: Stop The Profiling of Motorcyclists – Support H. Res 366

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Bikers Inside The Beltway – Stop The Profiling of Motorcyclists – Support H. Res 366

Bikers Inside The Beltway Meeting With Congress To Stop Profiling

H.RES 366 – your MRF is moving forward and making it happen. Profiling is not going to go away without your immediate action. See the attachment for more details. In the meantime…

  • Have you registered for Bikers Inside the Beltway? It’s free but time is running out! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
  • Have you made your appointments to visit your members of Congress? Make your appointments now in your district or in Washington, D.C.
  • Have you made your hotel reservations? Final date for hotel registration, May 13, 2021: 703-684-5900 Embassy Suites by Hilton Alexandria, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation is moving forward to make the 2021 Bikers Inside the Beltway our most effective event ever. Thank you for your commitment to the MRF’s mission. Thank you for making appointments with your members of Congress. Thank you for taking action and asking your members of Congress to support H.RES 366. Click here to see the position paper for H.RES 366.

Thank you for your membership and support of the Motorcycle Riders Foundation.

Fredric Harrell
Director, Conferences & Events
Motorcycle Riders Foundation
P.O. Box 250
Highland, Illinois 62249

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya

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from https://africa.com

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya And For The First Time In Africa.

Uber has announced the launch of electric BodaBodas and bicycles for earners on UberBoda, Uber Connect and Uber Eats in Kenya, allowing riders and eaters the ability to choose a more sustainable option to move around and to have deliveries made. The launch is a first for Uber in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Sustainable rides with UberBoda Green

The launch of electric BodaBodas will not only offer an affordable and reliable manner of transportation within the city, but riders will be able to select a zero-emissions ride to help drive a green recovery. Using electric UberBoda vehicles will cost the same as a regular journey, as going green should never be more expensive. Riders can also expect the same door-to-door safety experience.

The launch of electric boda presents a 45% reduction in overall costs for Uber Boda and Uber Connect drivers, for whom fuel is the most significant operating cost. In Kenya, the boda boda sector employs over 1.6 million youths, the vast majority of which are based in Nairobi.

“We are doing our part to help transform mobility in the country so that Kenyans can play their part in reducing carbon emissions. Uber is continuously looking for ways to improve the customer experience, and we have a responsibility to invest in offering product innovations that make a difference to cities. We believe this collaboration will do just that”, says Brian Njao, Head of East Africa for Uber.

Reducing emissions while making deliveries

With consumers being environmentally and health-conscious, it is important for Uber Eats to be part of the journey. The introduction of electric BodaBodas can allow consumers to order their favourite meals while giving them peace of mind that their food is delivered in transportation with low emissions. In addition, Uber Connect deliveries will also be done using the newly launched electric motorcycles and bicycles.

“Uber Eats has grown exponentially across Kenya, with the app being available in Mombasa, Nakuru and Nairobi, which means more delivery people on the road. Providing electric BodaBodas to delivery people means that transportation emissions can be cut drastically, says Nadeem Anjarwalla, General Manager of Uber Eats in Kenya.

Uber will continue to actively work with cities to introduce eco-friendly products to decrease air pollution, reduce urban congestion, and increase access to clean transportation modes.

More Motorcycle Safety Awareness campaigns by authorities

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California Highway Patrol asking motorists to drive with caution

from https://www.kget.com

The California Highway Patrol is recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

The department says as the weather warms up, more and more motorcycles and cars are expected to be hitting the road. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

Here in Kern County, at least eight people have died in motorcycle crashes so far this year.

The CHP is asking motorcyclists to be responsible and properly equipped. They’re also asking drivers to watch out for motorcyclists on the road.

CHP: Motorcycle safety requires everyone’s attention
by Jaime Coffee, Information Officer II, California Highway Patrol from http://antiochherald.com

The warming weather and increasing number of vehicles traveling on California’s roadways offer a timely reminder of the importance of motorcycle safety awareness for motorcyclists and motorists alike. By recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) emphasizes safe riding and driving practices for everyone.

“Motorcyclists who are responsible, informed, and properly equipped can help reduce rider deaths and injuries,” CHP Commissioner Amanda Ray said. “Motorists are also key to reducing crashes by being aware of the dangers and challenges of motorcycle riding. Taking the time to look twice for motorcyclists can save a life.”

“Motorcycle riders are more vulnerable out in the elements, which is why it is important for drivers to always be mindful of riders,” California Office of Traffic Safety Director Barbara Rooney said.

With more than 1.4 million licensed riders, motorcycles are a popular mode of transportation for Californians, another reason motorcycle safety awareness is paramount. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

As part of its continual motorcycle safety program, the CHP strongly encourages all riders, new and experienced, to enroll in the California Motorcyclist Safety Program (CMSP). The CMSP has 98 training sites throughout the state and trains approximately 55,000 motorcyclists each year. For more information or to find a training site near you, visit californiamotorcyclist.com or motorcyclesafetyca.com.

Motorcyclists can help protect themselves by always wearing the proper safety gear, including a U.S. Department of Transportation-compliant helmet, observing the speed limit, riding defensively, and always riding sober. Drivers should always look at their mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes and always keep a safe distance.

The CHP promotes motorcycle safety with the Get Educated and Ride Safe (GEARS) program, funded by a $750,000 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. All eight CHP field Divisions will hold outreach events to promote motorcycle safety throughout 2021 under the GEARS grant.

The mission of the CHP is to provide the highest level of Safety, Service, and Security.

TxDOT urges motorists to ”Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles’
from https://www.heraldbanner.com

Despite less traffic on the road in 2020 and a 2% reduction in motorcycle crashes, safety officials are alarmed by a 17% increase in Texas motorcycle fatalities compared to 2019. On average, a motorcyclist is killed in a crash on Texas roads every day—last year 482 died. Motorcyclists account for 12% of all traffic fatalities statewide.

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, and the Texas Department of Transportation’s annual “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign gets underway to call attention to the safety precautions motorists can take to protect motorcyclists and themselves. In 2020, in the 7,481 motorcycle crashes in Texas, 1,856 motorcyclists were seriously injured and 482 were killed.

“May through October is an especially dangerous period for motorcyclists in Texas,” said TxDOT Executive Director James Bass. “Of all the motorcyclist deaths in Texas during 2020, more than 61% happened in that period. It’s so important to remember that these motorcyclists don’t have the same protections that drivers in vehicles have, and that’s why we’re urging all motorists to stay watchful and alert when traveling alongside motorcycles so everyone can reach their destination safely.”

The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) reports that fatal crashes between motorcyclists and drivers often occur when drivers misjudge the motorcycle’s distance and speed and make left turns in front of an oncoming motorcyclist. Last year, almost one-third of Texas motorcycle fatalities occurred in an intersection or were intersection-related. TTI also points to driver inattention as a contributing factor to motorcycle crashes.

TxDOT has these safety tips for drivers to protect motorcyclists and prevent crashes:

  • Take extra care when making a left turn. It’s safest to let the motorcycle pass to avoid turning in front of the rider.
  • Pay special attention at intersections. Nearly one in three motorcycle fatalities happens at a roadway intersection.
  • Give driving your full attention. Even a momentary distraction, such as answering a phone call or changing the radio station, can have deadly consequences.
  • Look twice when changing lanes. Check mirrors, check blind spots, and always use turn signals.
  • Give motorcyclists room when passing them. Move over to the passing lane and don’t crowd the motorcyclist’s full lane.
  • Stay back. If you’re behind a motorcycle, always maintain a safe following distance. When a motorcyclist downshifts instead of applying the brake to slow down, it can catch drivers off guard since there are no brake lights to signal reduced speed.
  • Slow down. Obey posted speed limits and drive to conditions.

The “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign is a key component of #EndTheStreakTX, a broader social media and word-of-mouth effort that encourages drivers to make safer choices while behind the wheel, like wearing a seat belt, driving the speed limit, never texting and driving and never driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. November 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways. #EndTheStreakTX asks all Texans to commit to driving safely to help end the streak of daily deaths on Texas roadways.

Texas Motorcycle Fatalities Increased by 17% in 2020
by Demetrius Harper from https://www.nbcdfw.com

More than 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways last year.

The Texas Department of Transportation says the number of motorcycle riders killed on Texas roadways spiked in 2020.

TxDOT said 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways in 2020. Of the nearly 7,500 crashes involving motorcycles that were reported in 2020, 482 were fatalities — a 17% increase over the year before.

The Irving Police Department made a similar plea last month after a motorcycle officer was seriously injured when he was struck by a driver who turned in front of him.

Nov. 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways.

Pentagon rejects permit request by veterans group for Memorial Day motorcycle ride

By General Posts

by Nikki Wentling from https://www.stripes.com

WASHINGTON – The Defense Department rejected a request from organizers of a traditional Memorial Day weekend motorcycle ride in the nation’s capital, throwing logistics of the event into uncertainty just weeks before it is scheduled to take place.

Motorcyclists typically use the Pentagon’s parking lot as a staging area for the ride, but defense officials denied the permit application Friday for this year’s event. Officials cited the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and the size of the expected crowd as the reason.

Despite the denial, thousands of motorcyclists are planning to gather in Washington during Memorial Day weekend. As of Monday, organizers didn’t know where to gather the riders before and after they drive along the National Mall.

AMVETS, a national veterans organization, is coordinating the motorcycle ride. The group said it was committed to still running the event on May 30 and organizers were searching Monday for a backup plan.

“There are no options with as much space and convenient routes to the memorials, meaning it will be more difficult, disruptive, and expensive than if the Pentagon parking lots were available,” said Joe Chenelly, national executive director of AMVETS.

The group criticized the Pentagon’s slow decision-making process. Chenelly said he applied in July to use the Pentagon parking lot on May 30. He was expecting to hear back by January.

Chenelly told the Pentagon last month that he needed an answer by April 16. Officials called with their decision on Friday.

“The biggest disappointment in the Pentagon’s denial was that AMVETS was ignored for months as its professional staff in Washington requested numerous times an opportunity to hear the Defense Department’s concerns and present a [coronavirus] safety plan,” Jan Brown, the national commander of AMVETS, said in a statement.

AMVETS leaders said they were confident they could hold a “safe, reasonable demonstration outdoors that incorporates social distancing, masking where appropriate, and sanitation stations.”

The group said it is a member of President Joe Biden’s new COVID-19 Community Corps, which is a contingent of local leaders and prominent organizations who were recruited to help inform and encourage Americans who might be hesitant to receive a vaccine.

“The administration included AMVETS in this new group as ‘a trusted voice in communities across the United States,’ but the Pentagon wouldn’t have a conversation with us to share their concerns and give us the chance to address them before deciding to refuse our application,” Chenelly said.

Rolling Thunder operated a motorcycle ride through Washington for 32 years before hosting its last event in 2019. AMVETS took over in 2020 and planned an event to replace the popular ride. It was designed to raise awareness for prisoners of war and troops still missing in action, as well as the issue of veteran suicide.

The event, now titled Rolling to Remember, was canceled last year because of the coronavirus pandemic.