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Michael Lichter Heavy Mettle Show

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Motorcycles and Art with Moxie in Sturgis 2020

For the last 12 years Michael Lichter has put on a Motorcycles Art Exhibit for Sturgis Rally riders at various locations.

Industry Guests had a special showing on Sunday by invitation only. The event was also open to the public for Free from 2 P.M. to 10 P.M. Saturday August 8 through Friday August 14, 2020

This year’s show was named Heavy Mettle and like previous years included the who’s who of the motorcycle builders from around the world.

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International Female Ride Day

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INDIAN MOTORCYCLE PARTNERS WITH INTERNATIONAL FEMALE RIDE DAY® MOVEMENT TO CELEBRATE AND EMPOWER MORE WOMEN THROUGH RIDING

14th-Annual Global Event Celebrates Female Motorcyclists with “Just Ride!” Call To Action; Indian Motorcycle Leverages Global Network to Reach Female Riders Around the World

MINNEAPOLIS (August 20, 2020) – Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, has partnered with International Female Ride Day® (IFRD), a globally synchronized ride day celebrating women riders and their passion for riding. IFRD will take place Saturday, August 22, on six continents in over 120 countries.

IFRD and the “Just Ride!” call to action were created in 2007 to focus on female motorcycle riders. Since then, women around the world have rallied behind the movement to celebrate and welcome the growing number of female riders.

“I started IFRD to advance the awareness of women motorcycle riders and inspire women everywhere. Working with Indian Motorcycle encourages even more women to join the celebration of riding and become part of the movement,” said IFRD Founder Vicki Gray. “It is truly an experience like no other — exhilarating, liberating, and fulfilling. The female riding community is one of expanding camaraderie on the open road.”

“Just Ride!” is the only requirement to participate in IFRD. Motorcyclists around the world can celebrate the day by simply getting outside for a solo ride, riding as a passenger, or riding with friends and family. Riders are also encouraged to join Indian Motorcycle, and its network of female riders and ambassadors around the globe by celebrating digitally and sharing photos on social media using the hashtags #IFRD and #InternationalFemaleRideDay.

“It’s encouraging to see more and more female riders around the world riding motorcycles as a pastime, and joining the Indian Motorcycle brand,” said Pam Kermisch, Chief Customer Engagement and Growth Officer. “IFRD is an incredible movement in its unique ability to rally the cause of female riders, and more importantly, female empowerment on a global level, and that’s something we are very proud to be a part of.”

No matter how or where you ride, Indian Motorcycle and IFRD encourage safe riding practices. Wear appropriate safety gear, perform pre-ride vehicle checks, and follow local and CDC guidelines for social distancing to protect against the spread of COVID-19. Visit the IFRD website to learn more, including ways to participate, helpful tips for preparing your ride and photo inspirations from previous years.

For more information on Indian Motorcycle visit IndianMotorcycle.com  and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

ABOUT INTERNATIONAL FEMALE RIDE DAY®

International Female Ride Day® (IFRD) is a globally synchronized ride day for women motorcycle riders. Now referred to as a “movement” by its participants, its action of “Just Ride!” asks women to be on their motorcycles, scooters or trikes on the first Saturday of May each year. Created in 2007 by Vicki Gray, a lifetime motorcycling advocate, road and race instructor – with the purpose to profile and highlight the many diverse women enjoying the activity of motorcycling. Its mission is to that of building awareness of female motorcyclists across all cultures while simultaneously encouraging other women to take up the sport. The event is managed under the MOTORESS® canopy.

ABOUT INDIAN MOTORCYCLE®

Indian Motorcycle is America’s first motorcycle company. Founded in 1901, Indian Motorcycle has won the hearts of motorcyclists around the world and earned distinction as one of America’s most legendary and iconic brands through unrivaled racing dominance, engineering prowess and countless innovations and industry firsts. Today that heritage and passion is reignited under new brand stewardship. To learn more, please visit www.indianmotorcycle.com.

Former motorcycle cop teaching safety, passion on two wheels

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by Peter Mallett from http://www.lookoutnewspaper.com

A former motorcycle cop is encouraging aspiring motorcyclists from the base to get the skills they need before embarking on their journey down the highway.

Bill Laughlin has been an instructor with the Vancouver Island Safety Council (VISC) since his retirement from the Victoria Police Department in 2003, concluding 27 years of service as a police sergeant.

“I have always been a motorcyclist and have been riding since I was 16, so when I was asked by a friend if I would be interested in teaching I knew I would really enjoy it,” says Laughlin.

Each year, he and approximately 20 other ICBC-licensed instructors teach over 400 students how to be safer motorcyclists. Their efforts are focused solely on rider training and education.

“All of our instructors have a passion for motorcycling. We are teaching because we want people to learn, be safe, but also have fun.”

Shortly after joining VISC, Laughlin became its executive director. Today the 66 year old spends most of his days working as an administrator with the end goal to equip novice riders with the necessary skills and knowledge to operate a motorcycle safely.

VISC offers weekday classes at its Western Speedway training centre in Langford; on the weekend training moves to the grounds of Interurban’s Camosun College.

Students train on one of VISC’s 11 well-maintained training bikes, and later in their instruction, 16 street-ready motorcycles as they move towards certification. Helmets are also provided, but other gear such as proper protective clothing is not.

Laughlin says VISC has trained several members of Victoria’s military community in past years and is convinced many of them buy into the philosophy of doing things right, getting the proper training, and learning the fundamentals before taking on any potentially dangerous activity.

You need to get your skills right before the fun part of riding a motorcycle can begin, says Laughlin. “Having fun while on a motorcycle is all about learning how to drive safely and not put yourself in dangerous positions. If you are professionally trained you will have the knowledge and confidence to truly get the most out of riding a motorcycle.”

Their courses are not just for beginners. There are many people who have drifted away from motorcycling over the years but suddenly decide they want two-wheeled transit back in their lives.

“It’s simply not a case of the old cliché: it’s just like riding a bike,” says Laughlin. “Over time the skills of people who haven’t been riding begin to deteriorate, so we highly recommend refresher courses for those looking to get back into riding a motorcycle.”

VISC is a non-profit organization that began its motorcycle training program in 1971. It then saw official sanctioning from the Canada Safety Council in 1974. Today, its novice level training program exceeds Insurance Corporation of British Columbia training course minimums, with its traffic course the most thorough and lengthy of all riding schools in B.C., says Laughlin.

Following a six-week shutdown due to COVID-19 social distancing measures, the VISC motorcycle training program resumed operations on June 1. Due to a backlog of students waiting for instruction during the shutdown, available spaces for August training sessions are almost completely full and its September dates are filling up fast.

Laughlin says VISC is always looking to recruit new instructors, and currently have a recruitment drive underway for paid positions and would greatly value the input of experienced motorcyclists from CFB Esquimalt to assist.

For more information about the VISC, visit their website: http://visafetycouncil.com

State police offer free motorcycle safety course

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by Arabella Thornhill from https://potomaclocal.com

Virginia State Police have invited local residents to take part in a free motorcycle self-assessment, “Ride 2 Save Lives,” course this Saturday.

It is a free course that will be held Saturday, July 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Morton’s BMW Motorcycles located at 5099 Jefferson Davis Highway in Fredericksburg. Space is limited to 30 people.

According to a press release from Public Relations Director for Virginia State Police Corinne Geller, Richmond Division Motors Unit will be instructing participants on all aspects of rider safety through the use of SIPDE (Scan, Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute). SIPDE is the same training required of all VSP motorcycle operators.

The course provides riders with proper techniques on how to handle hazards, special situations, interstate highways, curve negotiations, and much more, according to Geller.

Social distancing measures will be in place for the safety of those in attendance, according to Geller. Riders must have a valid operator’s license with a class “M” endorsement, appropriate riding attire, a helmet, and eye protection.

The motorcycles must be street legal and helmets must be Department of Transportation approved to participate in this program, according to the press release.

Registration closes Wednesday, July 22. For those interested, registration is available online through the Virginia State Police Facebook page under “events” or at eventbrite.com.

South African riders in Grand Prix motorcycle racing’s elite class

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by James Richardson from https://www.thesouthafrican.com/

Later this month Brad Binder will become the fifth South African rider in the history Grand Prix motorcycle racing’s elite class, here we look at those that went before.

Formerly classified as the 500cc class before it was transformed to MotoGP, Grand Prix motorcycle racing has not been an environment inhabited by South Africans very often.

Before 2020, just four South African riders had made it into the elite class with all three competing during the 500cc era.

SA riders in Grand Prix motorcycle racing’s elite class

Here we will only look at riders who have reached either the 500cc class or MotoGP.

1 Paddy Driver

The first South African to reach the premier class, Driver competed on the Grand Prix motorcycle racing circuit from 1959 to 1965. His best result came in his final year on the circuit when he rode a Matchless to a third-place finish in the 500cc world championship behind Mike Hailwood and Giacomo Agostini.

Having lined up in two Formula One Grand Prix Driver is part of a very small club of men who have raced in both the Grand Prix motorcycle World Championship and Formula One. That group also includes legends John Surtees, Mike Hailwood and Johnny Cecotto.

2 Alan North

North made his Grand Prix motorcycle racing in the elite class when in the 1975 season riding for Yamaha.

The Durban-born racer spent three seasons in the 500cc class scoring nine world championship points in that time. He won his only Grand Prix race in 1977 when he claimed the 350 cc 1977 Nations Grand Prix at Imola

3 Jon Ekerold

SA riders in Grand Prix motorcycle racing’s elite class 

Prior to Brad Binder’s 2016 Moto3 championship, Ekerold was the last South African to win a world title in Grand Prix motrocycle racing claiming the 1980 350cc championship as a privateer. Without the benefit of a motorcycle manufacturer’s support Ekerold defeated Kawasaki factory racing team rider Anton Mang to win world championship.

Ekerold appeared on the 500cc circuit in three seasons, racing in eight Grand Prix in the elite class.

His best race finish in the 500cc class came in his debut on the elite division’s grid in the 1976 Isle of Man TT where he placed sixth.

4 Kork Ballington

A contemporary of Ekerold, Hugh Neville “Kork” Ballington was born in what would become Harare in Zimbabwe but raced under the South African flag winning four Grand Prix motorcycle World Championships.

Ballington raced in the elite class in three seasons including the 1982 season when both he and Ekerold raced in the elite class. That would be the last time until 2020 that a South African rider took up a place on the grid in the elite class.

He finished on the podium twice in the 1981 season claiming third place at both the Dutch TT and the Finish Grand Prix.

In 1978 and 1979 Ballington won both the 250cc and 350cc championships, making him the most successful South African rider in terms of championships on the circuit.

5 Brad Binder

The 2016 Moto3 champion makes the step up to MotoGP as South Africa’s first representative at the pinnacle of Grand Prix motorcycle racing since the 1980s.

Binder’s younger brother Darryn is also a racer and joined Red Bull KTM’s Moto3 team in 2018.

The MotoGP season gets underway in Jerez later this month and will see Binder compete for Red Bull KTM alongside the best riders in the world. He will be the first South African rider to compete in the championship since it became the MotoGP.

Motorcycle policy shift stresses mentorship

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by Scott Prater from https://csmng.com

FORT CARSON, Colo. — Due to a recent increase in accidents and mishaps, Fort Carson active-duty, military-member motorcyclists must obtain a Fort Carson Motorcycle License, through their unit motorcycle mentor, to ride legally on or off post.

The policy, which affects military personnel only, is effective immediately, though military police and access-control-point personnel won’t begin enforcing the policy until July 15. Military members who are new to the installation will have a 30-day grace period to obtain the new license.

Though the new policy may seem stringent to some at first, it does follow Army regulation, and the process for obtaining the new license is fairly simple.

As part of the policy, most units on post are assigned a motorcycle mentor, who assists riders in obtaining the required rider training and filing the proper paperwork to earn their Fort Carson Motorcycle License.

“This new policy is designed to provide more mentorship to our motorcycle riders,” said Derrick Merriwether, safety specialist, 4th Infantry Division. “We’re training them to the best of our ability to ensure that they are safe on the roads. That’s what this is all about. When a rider joins the program, their unit motorcycle mentor will check the rider’s bike, check their personal protective equipment and their level of experience. Then the mentor will work with the rider to be better prepared for the road.”

All riders seeking a Fort Carson motorcycle license must hold a state issued driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement, and must pass the post’s Basic Rider Course, hosted regularly by experienced instructors at the Fort Carson Motorcycle Training Range.

“This really affects the new Soldiers — the (privates) through (specialists) — who buy these brand-new vehicles but are not very experienced riders,” Merriwether said. “The policy allows the command to see a rider’s exact proficiency on the motorcycle and then provides that all-important mentorship and knowledge.”

Motorcycle riding is inherently riskier than driving an automobile. Riders have no vehicle protective structure surrounding them, and are less visible to other motorists, so they must maintain awareness of other drivers, obstacles and potential escape paths to help mitigate that risk.

Maj. Chris Horton, the 4th Infantry Division motorcycle mentor, has been riding for roughly two decades and recounts a harrowing experience that occurred early in his riding days.

“I thought I was an experienced rider,” he said. “And after taking a basic rider course, I thought I knew everything I needed to know. I was as confident as I could be … then I had an accident.”

Horton’s description of the incident indicates it could have happened to any rider.

“A vehicle stopped suddenly in front of me,” he said. “I swerved to avoid it, but I ended up driving down into a roadside ditch, where my foot peg caught the side of the hill. I was able to repair the bike, but I injured my shoulder pretty badly and ended up needing surgery to repair it years later.”

In the rider courses at Fort Carson, mentors and instructors teach the best techniques for swerving, something Horton said would have helped him avoid his accident. Mentors also teach braking technique, obstacle avoidance, counter steering and finding escape paths.

“From the time a rider notices a hazard, it takes four seconds for him or her to execute a maneuver,” Horton said. “Executing a maneuver is a skill, and these are skills that can be learned and practiced.”

Skill development is a key part of the mentorship program. That’s why the new Fort Carson policy also requires riders to complete mandatory progressive training.

“We have two advanced courses at Fort Carson, the Basic Rider Course II and the Advanced Sportbike Course,” Horton said. “Required courses can be taken on or off post, but keep in mind that Fort Carson motorcycle training courses are provided to active duty military members at no cost to the service member.”

Early this week, several riders completed the Basic Rider Course at the Fort Carson Motorcycle Training Range on the post’s north side, near the railhead. Horton was on hand to mentor and teach along with other instructors.

Sgt. 1st Class Garret Pool, senior targeting NCO, Division Artillery, 4th Inf. Div., said he purchased a new bike in the last year and picked up motorcycle riding at the urging of friends.

“This has been helpful, even just the familiarization part,” he said. “I’ve learned some important new techniques, and I learned some things I already knew, but was performing sloppy. I’m not as proficient as I’d like to be, but I’m getting more familiar. We’re practicing things I’ve never thought about before, and I can see how they’ll be useful on the road. It’s obvious these instructors are extremely knowledgeable.”

Fort Carson motorcycle licenses are valid for five years. Riders can find more information about the new policy, reporting procedures, licensure and training requirements from their unit motorcycle mentor.

MMA & Princeton PD Team Up for Voluntary Sound Check

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Your Massachusetts Motorcycle Association is teaming up with the Princeton Police Department to conduct a Voluntary Motorcycle Sound Emissions Check at the Thomas Prince School on Route 62 in Princeton, Massachusetts on July 11, 2020 beginning at 11 AM.

This is a “no enforcement” and no cost awareness event aimed at educating riders and the public regarding the realities and implications of Motorcycle Exhaust emissions, specifically regarding sound levels.

On Tuesday, June 9, your Massachusetts Motorcycle Association was invited to participate in the Princeton Select Board meeting to address growing and continuing concerns among Residents concerning the problems of Motorcycle Sound Emissions and reckless riding in and around the town of Princeton.

Alerted by a MassMotorcycle member to the concerns, numerous potential approaches to tackling what is perceived as an invasion of residents rights to a safe and peaceful weekend were being discussed including Motorcycle Original Equipment Exhaust Enforcement, Traffic Restrictions for Motorcyclists, and other options. Your MassMotorcycle Association immediately contacted the Chief of Police, Michele Powers, to discuss the concerns and approaches. Chief Powers in turn discussed the MassMotorcycle feedback with the Select Board resulting in the invitation to speak with the Select Board at the June 9th Meeting.

In 2009, in response to similar concerns at the time and numerous town warrants and Legislative Bills aimed at addressing the issue, your MassMotorcycle Association created the “When in Town, Throttle Down!©” program to address a wealth of misinformation concerning Motorcycle Exhaust and Sound Issues, specifically aimed at education and awareness of “What’s the Noise about Noise?” The resulting program included a Voluntary Sound Check program, including investing in Sound Testing Equipment and Training. This program has been used with great affect around the Commonwealth in the following 11 years and the “noise” has significantly quieted down since.

This program has since also been used successfully in numerous towns across the Commonwealth, in other States around the Country, and education sessions have been given at regional and national conferences such as the ABATE of Oklahoma S.M.I.L.E. and Motorcycle Riders Foundation Meeting of the Minds.

To be conducted by the MMA in conjunction with the Princeton Police, the Voluntary Sound Check planned for July 11th will be a “no enforcement” awareness-only event. All riders are invited to stop by for a few minutes for a free bottle of water while they learn about the issues concerning Motorcycle Exhaust Sound Emissions, the legal limits of those emissions, whether their motorcycles are within them, and how to potentially control them. The testing takes only a few short moments – far less time than it will take to finish a bottle of water.

A motorcycle that legally passes these tests may still be perceived by some to be “too loud” depending on how the rider operates the motorcycle. Riders are aware that simple modifications regarding RPM control mitigates the motorcycles’ impact and sound emissions levels upon the public. All testing will be conducted according to Registry of Motor Vehicles stationary noise level standards defined by the Code of Massachusetts Regulations.

Non-riders are also invited to stop by to witness the testing and participate in the program.

Your MMA thanks the Princeton Police Department, Chief Powers, and the Princeton Select Board for inviting riders and the public to participate in this event.

For more information, please contact Chairman@MassMotorcycle.org or visit www.MassMotorcycle.org.

Harley-Davidson Launches Training Program with Personal Coaches for Beginners

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In September of 2019, Harley-Davidson announced an ambitious plan to have 1 million more riders on the road by the year 2027. That would be 4 million people riding Harley motorcycles, up from the 3 million recorded three years ago, in 2017.

To do that, the company announced a range of new bikes being prepared for the future, including the now obviously not that successful electric LiveWire. But having new bikes that can be ridden means of course nothing if people do not know how to ride them.

The company already has a training program it calls Riding Academy New Rider Course, but that doesn’t allow for personalized sessions. That’s why a new program was announced on June 30, dedicated to beginners who need a personal trainer.

Called Learn to Ride, the program is now open and availble to access at Harley dealers and allows for personal coaching sessions with trainers, either individually or as a group of up to four people. Each session lasts 90 minutes, and free rides are being given on a Harley-Davidson Street 500 motorcycle, specially equipped for beginners, on a practice course.

“For riders that always wanted to learn but couldn’t fit a multi-day course into their schedule or prefer to learn in private session, this program is what they have been waiting for,” the Milwaukee bike maker said in a statement when announcing the program.

“Sessions can be scheduled 1-on-1 or as a private party with up to 4 participants. This program is a great option for spouses, friends, and individuals to finally learn and fulfill their dreams of riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.”

If you plan to become a Harley rider, or just plan on using these guys as tools into learning the tricks of the trade and then move on to something else, you can head over to this link and get more info.

Ladies of Harley will still celebrate even though Female Ride Day moved to August

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from https://medicinehatnews.com

International Female Ride Day was scheduled for this Saturday, and while COVID-19 has pushed the date all the way back to Aug. 22, the local Ladies of Harley motorcycle group will still be celebrating this weekend with a safely-distanced ladies’ ride.

The trip is scheduled to begin at Badlands Harley Davidson at noon and will take roughly two hours with a socially-distanced pit stop planned for Echo Dale Park.

Anyone attending is encouraged to park at least six feet away from other bikes.

Motorcycle parade at veterans home shows heroes that even though they are isolated, they are not alone

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by Chris Best from https://www.wkrg.com

BAY MINETTE, Ala. (WKRG) — Veterans at the William F. Green State Veterans Home may be isolated, but they are not alone. 150 motorcycle riders wanted to send that message loudly this Saturday. They lined up and paraded around the home on their bikes, honking their horns and revving their engines.

Signs leading up to the home read “Heroes work and live here.” These bikers wanted to make sure that heroism is recognized. Just the day before the riders honored the heroes it was announced a 3rd employee at the facility tested positive for COVID-19. The state announced it would be ramping up testing at all state-run veterans homes as well. So far none of the residents of the home have tested positive. But there have been cases at other state homes.

The veterans have been isolated since the COVID-19 outbreak. Long-term care facilities are particularly high risk. Nursing homes across the country have become hot zones for the virus. The veterans are not able to see their friends, families or others who regularly come to visit them. The Patriot Guard Riders, Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association and American Legion Riders are among several of the groups that normally visit the heroes to raise their spirits. Unable to do that, they got together to plan the parade.

Employees in scrubs and masks came outside to wave at the bikers. Another stood in salute. The bikers circled the facility, some of the veterans able to come to their windows and see the excitement. And those who couldn’t certainly heard it.