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Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle Documentary

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“Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” Documentary – Coming Soon

Slinger, Wisconsin – March 8, 2021 – The Edge Ltd., producer of “Hogslayer: The Unapproachable Legend,” announces the release of “Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” documentary.

Walter is a feature-length narrative documentary featuring Walter, a 1913 Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck, and his former caretaker Michael W. Schuster. A meticulous restoration by Ally Schuster and his grandson Michael, Walter ultimately became an acknowledged motorcycle artifact recognized as the last-known Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck in existence.

In 1913 an unusual motorcycle negotiates through the mud-rutted streets of old Milwaukee. This is one of the first Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck forecars and represents a unique early venture in commercial service delivery motorcycles for the Motor Company. Fast-forward to the present-day as that very same motorcycle truck negotiates through the world of motorcycle collectible artifacts. This is the last-known Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Truck in existence, a remarkable motorcycle affectionately known as Walter.

This documentary chronicles the life and times of Walter the forecar from its early days of service, through many decades of desolation stored in a horse barn, and then many years of restoration to eventually become the most valuable service motorcycle in the world. Along the way, the producer explores the history of three-wheeled vehicles; the Harley-Davidson Motor Company’s development of commercial service motorcycles, and most importantly documents one man’s adventure in restoring a motorcycle that has been in his family for a century. Independent producer James Cutting considers the discovery of Walter to be the most extraordinary barn-find of our times. In the end, Walter delivers a lesson to embrace our past and forge relationships for our future.

“Walter: The Missing Link – Discovery of a Centennial Motorcycle” documentary will be released in 2021. A late-summer premiere is planned in Milwaukee. For more information please contact executive producer James Cutting.

For more “Walter” documentary content visit www.walterdoc.com

Friend Walter on Facebook @Walterthemissinglinkmotorcycledocumentary

“Walter” documentary trailer –

 

SAVE OUR RACECARS: SEMA CHALLENGES EPA IN COURT!

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Following years of frustration felt throughout the automotive community, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to deny the very foundation of motorsports. According to the EPA, current law does not allow street vehicles—cars, trucks, and motorcycles—to be converted into racecars.

A recent lawsuit between the EPA and an aftermarket manufacturer is the agency’s latest action against racing. In the lawsuit, the EPA again maintains that once a vehicle has been certified as a street vehicle, it cannot be converted into a racing vehicle even if that vehicle is trailered to the track and is never driven on public roads.

The EPA’s position left the SEMA Action Network (SAN) with no choice but to strike back. The SAN filed a brief in court arguing that the Clean Air Act does not apply to certified vehicles used exclusively on the track.

As racers and fans know well, members of Congress introduced SAN-sponsored legislation to confirm what had already been understood for the previous 45 years: that the CAA did not apply to vehicles modified for racing use only. Hundreds of thousands of enthusiasts have since contacted Congress urging passage of the “Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act” (RPM Act). Enactment of this important critical bill into law would remove any doubt that it is legal to modify a motor vehicle for exclusive use on the track. It also would confirm that it is legal to produce, market and install racing equipment. The SAN continues to work tirelessly to pass this important legislation to counter EPA overreach.

–SEMA

We should watch this case closely. This will ultimately also apply to motorcycles. Also, there needs to be open dialog regarding climate change and fossil fuels. –Bandit

Ducati Monsters 2021 Start Crawling Out the Factory Doors, Available From April

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati planned to break the mold with the unveiling of the new Monster motorcycle back in December last year. At least on paper, it succeeded, as the specs for the “lightest, most compact” bike of its family are impressive. All we have to do is see if the real-world numbers match.

And there’s no reason to suspect they won’t. Ducati gave birth to the sports naked Monster range all the way back in 1993. Since then, the moniker has grown into a monstrous force, selling no less than 350,000 units, each generation becoming its own market hit.

The new one is getting ready to do the same from next month when the first examples are expected to reach dealerships across the world. And there’s no going back now, as the Italian bike maker announced on Thursday, March 4, that production lines for the Monster have begun rolling over in Italy.

Weighing in at 166 kg (366 pounds) dry, the new Monster is powered by the new Testastretta 937cc twin-cylinder L-shaped engine, which replaces the 821cc used on the previous incarnation. 2.4 kg (5.2 pounds) lighter than before, the powerplant is rated from the factory at 111 hp at 9,250 rpm.

The new Monster was designed in such a way as to be reminiscent of the first one from three decades ago, and it sports elements like the bison-back fuel tank and the circular headlight, among others.

Unlike the 1993 version, though, this one is packed with advanced technology, including ABS Cornering, Traction Control, and Wheelie Control. Three riding modes are available for the new Monster, namely Sport, Urban, and Touring, each of them selectable through the handlebar controls and the 4.3-inch TFT screen.

For the American market, the Monster sells from $11,895, but that, of course, can go higher depending on options and colors. The slightly more pretentious Monster Plus kicks off at $12,195.

Bonhams Motorcycles Kick Start 2021 with Return to Stafford

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by Ben Walker from https://www.bonhams.com/press_release/31686/

The Summer Sale
The International Classic MotorCycle Show (The Postponed Spring Sale)
3 – 4 Jul 2021
Stafford, Staffordshire County Showground
The Gentleman’s Collection

A selection of wonderfully restored Vincent-HRD’s consigned to the Spring Sale

Following a successful year of sales at its Bicester Heritage base – with a 93 per cent sale rate – Bonhams Motorcycles is returning to Stafford for the first auction of 2021. The Summer Stafford Sale will take place on 3 and 4 July, in line with the rescheduled International Classic MotorCycle Show.

Consignments are now invited to the auction to join early confirmed lots including two important collections, one of Italian sports bikes and the other a selection of classic Vincent-HRDs, the world’s fastest motorcycles of their time.

THE RON CODY COLLECTION

A selection of motorcycles offered from the Ron Cody Collection

Well-known in MV Agusta club circles, the late Ron Cody, a former sports car racer and engineer, turned to his passion for building up and restoring his collection of Italian machines as a retirement hobby. This collection offers 48 motorcycles, with many examples of MV Agustas as well as other Italian marques. Highlights include:

1964 MV AGUSTA 150CC RAPIDO SPORT, £3,000 – 4,000
Like their larger siblings, the small MVs were very expensive, costing as much as a British 500, which explains why so few of these exquisitely engineered little motorcycles were sold in the UK. This 150 Rapido Sport displays a total of only 125 kilometres on the odometer since restoration.

1953 MV AGUSTA 125CC TEL ‘SPORT COMPETIZIONE’, £4,000 – 6,000
With superb engineering compared with any British contemporary, the MV Agusta’s 125cc TEL ‘stroker’ of 1949 was powered by a neat unitary construction single-cylinder engine which, somewhat unusually for a post-war design, featured detachable transfer ports. The 125 MV offered here is presented in Competizione specification, intended for Italy’s popular long-distance races such as the Milan-Taranto and the Moto Giro d’Italia.

C.1958 GILERA 175CC ROSSA EXTRA RACING MOTORCYCLE, £2,400 – 2,800
Throughout the early 1950s, Gilera’s racers made the headlines, taking six individual World Championships and five manufacturers’ titles. Its road bikes paid the bills, with the 175cc being a top seller, although its high price abroad made it a relatively rare sight outside Italy.

Introduced for 1957, the Rossa Extra was essentially a deluxe version of the 175 Sport. Apparently cosmetically restored and very nicely presented, this Rossa Extra racer features a Scitsu tachometer, Dell’Orto UBF24BS carburettor, Ceriani forks, and ventilated brakes.

1958 PARILLA 175CC SPORT, £4,000 – 7.000
One of the first Italian motorcycle manufacturers that went into production after the Second World War, Parilla introduced the ‘high cam’ (camme rialzata) model, for which it is best remembered, at the 1952 Milan Show. This 175cc single-cylinder motorcycle featured a chain-driven camshaft mounted on the side of the cylinder head, the valves being operated via short pushrods. Stunningly beautiful, Parilla’s production racer was also exceedingly quick.

AN IMPORTANT VINCENT-HRD COLLECTION
A stalwart of the golden age of British motorcycles, the Vincent marque is synonymous with design innovation, engineering excellence but mostly record-breaking high performance.

1951 Vincent-HRD 998cc Black Shadow, estimate £60,000 – 75,000

Leading this important collection of Vincent-HRDs is a matching numbers 1951 Series C 998cc Black Shadow, an example of the marque’s most famous model and the first genuine two-miles-per-minute production bike, with a reputed top speed of around 125 mph.

Off the road for 40 years, the motorcycle was completely restored by the vendor over a four-year period, with the result being judged ‘Best in Show’ at Stafford in 2010. Having since been displayed at the Lakeland Motor Museum, the Shadow is offered with a continuation RF60 buff logbook dating from April 1963 and the original registration number ‘LOV 579’. Estimate: £60,000 – 75,000.

Lining up with the Shadow is a loving recreation of its racing sibling, a Vincent HRD 998cc Black Lightning Evocation Special. Only 31 Black Lightnings were produced between 1948 and 1952 and their value reflects their rarity – Bonhams set a world record for the model in 2018 when the ex-Tony McAlpine, Jack Ehret, Australian Land Speed Record Breaking example sold for $929,000 (£656,630).

The vendor decided to create this Evocation for parades and track days. Buying a quantity of engine parts and main frame components in 2003, he embarked on a three-year project, restoring the rolling chassis himself, while entrusting the engine rebuild, to Black Shadow-plus specification, to well-known Vincent exponent Mick Ruocco.

Completed in 2006, it was commissioned by John Renwick, who made adjustments to the carburetion and started and ran the bike on his dynamometer. The Lightning was voted Best Classic Racer at the TT 2006 Lap of Honour and judged Best Classic Racer at the 2006 Stafford Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show.

It has since completed many closed-road parades at the TT and Classic TT and was used the machine regularly until 2014, when it was put on display at the Lakeland Motor Museum. Estimate: £30,000 – 40,000.

1937 Vincent HRD 498cc Comet Series A, estimate: £35,000 – 45,000
The rare Series A was the first model to use the Philip Vincent-designed engine, with high-camshaft layout. This example also underwent a complete restoration, from rebuilding the engine and gearbox to refurbishing the petrol tank.

The restored Comet was awarded Best Post-Vintage machine at the 2009 Stafford Spring Classic Motorcycle Show. Covering a mere 100 ‘shake down’ miles since restoration the bike has, for the past decade, been displayed at the Lakeland Motor Museum.

Ben Walker, International Department Director for Bonhams Collectors’ Motorcycles, said: “We are looking forward to coming home to Stafford and hosting the UK’s longest established dedicated motorcycling auction in a live format again, subject to the local restrictions relating to Covid-19.”

“Entries are coming in thick and fast and with two important collections already in place, we are sure there will be much interest. As we’ll be heading into summer, the auction will provide the perfect opportunity to buy a classic motorcycle and enjoy post-lockdown freedom of the road.”

Further early highlights of the sale include:

c.1950 Peugeot 125cc TD55, estimate £5,000 – 7,000 (pictured back row)

c.1947 Norton ‘Manx’ Sprint Special, estimate £10,000 – 15,000 (left middle)

Norton Sprint Special, estimate £6,000 – 8,000 (right middle)

1925 Sunbeam 347cc Model 2, estimate £5,000 – 7,000 (front left)

1916 Levis 2.5hp, estimate £4,000 – 6,000 (front right)

Further entries are invited to join the motorcycles already consigned.

Visit www.bonhams.com/motorcycles to submit a complimentary auction appraisal request or contact the Bicester Motorcycle Office +44 (0) 20 8963 2817 ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com to discuss the sale of your important motorcycle(s).

Montana Passes Motorcycle Lane-Filtering Legislation

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from https://www.cyclenews.com

This is a press release from American Motorcyclist Association.

Montana becomes the third U.S. state to allow filtering in traffic.

Montana has become the third state to recognize lane filtering, with the Gov. Greg Gianforte’s signature on a bill legalizing filtering of motorcycles under certain conditions.

“We applaud the efforts of Montana’s motorcycling community and the state’s legislators, and thank Gov. Gianforte for signing this legislation into law,” said Russ Ehnes, chair of the AMA Board of Directors.

S.B. 9 allows the operator of a two-wheeled motorcycle to overtake stopped or slow-moving vehicles at a speed not in excess of 20 mph, to filter between lanes of stopped traffic traveling in the same direction as conditions permit, and specifies reasonable and prudent motorcycle operation while lane filtering.

“With the signing of S.B. 9, Montanans have recognized the benefits of lane splitting, which allows motorcyclists the choice to filter in traffic when it is safe to do so,” said Tiffany Cipoletti, on-highway government relations manager for the American Motorcyclist Association.

The bill, sponsored by state Sen. Russ Tempel (R-SD14) and state Rep. Barry Usher (R-HD40), was signed by Gov. Gianforte on March 2 at a public signing ceremony in Helena. Ehnes was in attendance. The bill takes effect October 1, 2021.

California (A.B. 51, 2016) and Utah (H.B. 149, 2018) were the first two states to codify and sign lane-splitting or lane-filtering legislation. Efforts to legalize and formally recognize lane filtering/splitting is under consideration in three other states during the 2021 legislative session.

The AMA endorses lane splitting, given the long-term success in California and the University of California-Berkeley research study showing that the practice enhances motorcycle safety. The AMA will assist groups and individuals working to bring legal lane splitting and/or filtering to their state.

“As lane splitting support continues to gain traction across the country, I am eager to help more motorcyclists engage their state legislatures on this issue,” Cipoletti said.

The full AMA position statement on lane splitting can be found at americanmotorcyclist.com/lane-splitting/.

Vintage bike as authentic as possible in a discreet bobber look

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

“A vintage bike as authentic as possible in a discreet bobber look.” These are the words used by German custom motorcycle shop Thunderbike to describe one of its more complex projects. Officially titled Bel-Air, it pairs some original and old Harley-Davidson parts with the benefits of more modern hardware in a unique, pure-European custom package.

Thunderbike has been modifying Harley-Davidsons for close to three decades now, and its work has oftentimes been recognized by the American company itself. Most of the time, the shop goes about transforming production bikes to customer specification, but every now and then it sets out to create something a bit more special.

That is the case with the build we have here, which started life as a Harley from 1954. It went through Thunderbike’s doors in 2016 and came out the other way looking like it does now.

The bike’s frame was molded into supporting an S&S shovelhead engine 92ci (1.5L) in displacement and rocking a Super E carburetor and an air cleaner from the same make. The entire thing was then tied to a Paughco Shotgun exhaust system.

Visually, the motorcycle sets itself apart first and foremost through the choice of colors used on the body parts. We’re dealing with a combination of red and white that was allegedly inspired by the Harley-Davidson Duo Glide and looks perfectly in sync with the Chevrolet Bel Air used as prop during the photoshoot and as inspiration for the name.

A 3.5-gallon (13-liter) fuel tank, a shortened rear fender, a Fat Boy front end, and 16-inch wheels wrapped in Avon Gangster tires complete the look of this two-wheeled machine.

Sadly, we are unable to determine how much the build cost to make. With the exception of the exhaust, endcaps and tires, which are still being sold by Thunderbike, all the other elements are custom made or adapted for this project.

The Story Behind the Notorious Widows Sons

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A Family Riding Club within the FreeMason Organization
By Bandit with photos from David Dolph

And no, they are not destined to take over the world. A brother in the Widows Sons club contacted Bikernet recently. David Dolph told me, “We are a Masonic Riders Association and a group of Master Masons who have come together to promote Freemasonry within the motorcycling community and help introduce motorcycling to our non-riding Masonic brothers. Our first priority, is to aid & assist widows and orphans of Master Masons.”

Click Here to read this Feature Article on Bikernet.

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The Bling Bikernet Weekly News for March 4th, 2021

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All Wild and Chrome

I’m working on a new Sam’s Picks story. He’s a cool dude, who is facing some health issues. I hope he can get a tune-up and be good as gold shortly.

I’m also working on a story about a Masonic based bike club that’s all over the country. It’s called the Widow’s Sons. And I’m packing all the rusting bling in the shop for shipment to South Dakota. I’ll take a picture of the shop. It’s getting crazy. Let’s hit the news.

With news from car haters, the NMA, the MRF, Lowbrow, S&S, Full Throttle Saloon, Flying Pistons, WindVest, Hamsters, OCC Road House, War on Parking, Toyota, the Future of Harley, JIMS Machine, Lane Splitting and we’re just scratching the surface.

Ride Fast and Free Forever,

–Bandit

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Honda Ruckus 2022 now in Canada

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from https://voiceonline.com

One of Honda’s most unique and iconic products, the new 2022 Ruckus® will be available in Canada in May 2021.

The Ruckus oozes personality and attitude complete with its industrial-looking design highlighted by dual, round headlights and an exposed frame. More practical features include nimble handling, unmatched reliability and frugal fuel efficiency, making the Ruckus a great choice as a platform for personalization or affordable, around-town transportation. Ruckus Specifications for the Engine and Drivetrain include: Lightweight 49cc four-stroke OHC liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine provides ample power for in-town riding, Fuel-sipping constant-velocity (CV) carburetor with automatic choke, electric starter system allows easy push-button starting, Maintenance-free ignition system, Electronic Control Unit (ECU) provides control for ignition timing, alternator regulator, ACG starter, electric fuel pump and automatic choke, ultra-quiet exhaust system, and Automatic Honda V-Matic belt-drive transmission provides spirited acceleration and smooth operation.

Chassis and Suspension updates include: Two-piece, die-cast aluminum front frame with steel upper-rear frame, Twin-down tube fork provides 56 mm (2.2 in.) of plush travel for a well-controlled ride. Single-side aluminum swingarm with single-shock rear suspension has 66 mm (2.6 in.) of travel for a compliant, comfortable ride. front and rear drum brakes offer predictable stopping, Well-padded seat boasts a low, 735 mm (29.9 in.) seat height for added confidence at stops. The instrumentation includes analog speedometer, odometer and indicator lights for fuel, coolant temperature and low/high beams. Fuel-indicator light comes on with 1.1 litres remaining. Also added is a Maintenance-free battery. Easy-to-use parking brake and a Helmet holder that locks helmet into place under seat. The 2022 Honda Ruckus is available in ur: Gray paint with a MSRP: $3,599. The latest model that launched an entire scooter-customization subculture coming to Canada this spring

Honda Canada Inc. was established in 1969 and is the sole distributor of Honda motorcycles, scooters, ATVs and side-by-sides in Canada. The Honda Canada Motorcycle Division is responsible for sales, marketing, and operational activities for these products through authorized Honda dealers. For more information on Honda Canada powersports products, please visit: https://motorcycle.honda.ca/.

New Neurobiological Study Finds Riding a Motorcycle Can Decrease Stress and Improve Mental Focus

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from http://www.healthnewsdigest.com

The results of a neurobiological study, today published in Brain Research, yielded pioneering scientific evidence revealing the potential mental and physical benefits of riding a motorcycle.

Researchers recorded participants’ brain activity and hormone levels before, during, and after motorcycling, driving a car, and resting. While riding a motorcycle, participants experienced increased sensory focus and resilience to distraction. Riding also produced an increase in adrenaline levels and heart rate, as well as a decrease in cortisol metrics – results often associated with light exercise and stress-reduction.

“Stress levels, especially among young adults, continue to rise, and people are exploring pathways to better their mental and physical health. Until recently, the technology to rigorously measure the impact of activities like motorcycling on the brain didn’t exist,” said Dr. Don Vaughn, the neuroscientist who led the research team. “The brain is an amazingly complex organ and it’s fascinating to rigorously investigate the physical and mental effects riders report.”

Results Highlights:

  • Riding a motorcycle decreased hormonal biomarkers of stress by 25%
  • Sensory focus was enhanced while riding a motorcycle versus driving a car, an effect also observed in experienced meditators vs non-meditators
  • Changes in study participants’ brain activity while riding suggested an increase in alertness similar to drinking a cup of coffee

“While scientists have long-studied the relationship of brain and hormone responses to attention and stress, doing so in real-life conditions such as these is rare,” explained Professor and senior team member, Dr. Mark Cohen. “No lab experiment can duplicate the feelings that a motorcyclist would have on the open road.”

“The differences in participants’ neurological and physiological responses between riding and other measured activities were quite pronounced,” continued Dr. Vaughn. “This could be significant for mitigating everyday stresses.”

Research Overview

The research team monitored participants’ electrical brain activity and heart rate, as well as levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol. The Harley-Davidson funded study, entitled “The mental and physical effects of riding a motorcycle” measured the biological and physiological responses of more than 50 experienced motorcyclists, using mobile EEG technology.

Study Disclaimer

Study of healthy, experienced adults, riding their own motorcycles on a designated 22-minute route, under normal conditions. Provided for informational purposes only. Sponsor makes no guarantee that you will experience similar results; actual effects will vary based on equipment, driving conditions and age/health/experience of rider. See research summary here. Views expressed and conclusions reached are solely those of the author, Dr. Don Vaughn, in his personal capacity, and do not necessarily represent the views of UCLA. Sponsor: Harley-Davidson Motor Company.