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Proposed California Fee Increases Threatens Motorcycle Industry

By | General Posts

September 17, 2020

For Immediate Release

“Proposed California Fee Increases Threatens Motorcycle Industry”

Empowered by changes to state law, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has begun the process of increasing certification fees for original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket manufacturers. The CARB certification is required to sell motorcycles and parts in the state of California and has ripple effects throughout the nation. The stated goal of the increases is to help offset the cost to California for enforcement and operations of its clean air policies.

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) is concerned that grossly inflated certification fees will further hamper the aftermarket parts industry’s ability to remain viable. In these trying economic times, increasing fees on the manufacturing industry will no doubt have wide ranging effects.

MRF President Kirk “Hardtail” Willard stated, “Putting additional financial strain on aftermarket parts manufacturers will without question impact the average consumer. Motorcycle shops, dealers, manufacturers and distributors are all key components of the motorcycle ecosystem. Anything that impacts the motorcycle industry eventually impacts the motorcycle consumer. The state of California should not destroy the motorcycle industry in an attempt to balance its budget.”

Register for MOTM

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It’s taken 36 years for the Motorcycle Riders Foundation to get to a point that an event agenda can be pulled together in a few months, plus or minus a few days. If you’ve been following these E-blasts, then you may have recognized an undercurrent of the “five W’s” – WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN and WHY, and a constant reminder that the 36th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference is getting close.

You’ve been given samples of WHO helped start the Meeting of the Minds and the MRF, along with WHAT it was all about, WHERE and WHEN it came from and WHERE it’s heading, along with WHY it’s so important to attend. Here’s the tentative (subject to change) agenda for the 36th Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference. Time’s running out to use this link and register at Meeting of the Minds 2020. Room Reservations:  317-767-4769.

For those of you getting in on Thursday, September 24, join the MRF Board of Directors in a “Meet & Greet” at 7:00 p.m. in the Main Ballroom.

 

With a presentation of the Colors, the General Session opens at 9:00 a.m. Friday, then it’s non-stop with…

  • Opening Remarks – Kirk “Hardtail” Willard
  • MRF Financial Report – Kirk “Hardtail” Willard
  • Legislative Update – Rocky Fox
  • Election Year & Effective Use of CQ – Rocky Fox
  • A series of MRF award presentations by Dave Dwyer & Ryan Hubbard, Michelle Holcomb & Duane Justus.

Then it’s on to more presentations, a few awards and recognition of the future of motorcyclists’ rights…

  • MRFA&E – Deb Butitta
  • MRFA&E Young Activist Awards – Deb Butitta
  • Young Activist Scholarship Winners Panel – Deb Butitta
  • MRF Rep/Reps of the Year Awards – Doc D’Errico
  • Presidents Cup – Kirk “Hardtail” Willard
  • A Primer: How Strategic Planning can help your SMRO – Mark Buckner

Lunch by Bill the Chef; a riding and turning demo by Lane Triplett, then an afternoon of workshops…

  • 2020-21 Legislative Strategy – Kirk “Hardtail” Willard
  • 3R’s MRFA&E – Ron Braaksma & Lane Triplett
  • Media Madness: How to Survive these Wild Times – Brian “Skinny Bob” Clifford
  • Executive Directors Town Hall – Kirk “Hardtail” Willard
  • Kickin’ Ass and Taking Names – Pennsylvania’s 35-year Winning Quest for Freedom of Choice – Charles Umbenhauer
  • Public Relations in a Changing World – Cathy Brush

 

The afternoon winds into dinner by Bill the Chef and moves into an “evening of festivities and a rodeo!” provided by the folks from ABATE of Indiana.

Saturday morning begins with a breakfast by Bill the Chef… In case you’re wondering, for the first time in recent memory, meals are included with your registration packet. Bill the Chef, renowned for his biker pleasing menus, generous proportions and never failing to make a few thousand hungry bikers happy at ABATE of Indiana’s world famous, Bean Blossom Boogie! You’ll have to specifically ask for a PBJ or a county jail bologna sandwich! They aren’t on Bill the Chef’s menu!

Saturday’s General Session opens with Jay Jackson and blasts WFO into…

  • State of the Safety Training Programs – Jay Jackson
  • Ron Sheppard Award – Jay Jackson
  • Strategic Planning for Your SMRO: Writing Your Own Plan – Mark Buckner
  • Political Action Committee? Why the Hell Does a Biker Need One? – Ryan Hubbard
  • MRFPAC Awards – Ryan Hubbard
  • State Reps Meeting – Doc D’Errico
  • With Freedom Comes Responsibility – Dave “Chubby” Charlebois
  • Bridging the gap Clubs/SSMRO – Russell Radke & Paul Landers

All of that before it’s lunch with Bill the Chef! Plus, another Lane Triplett riding demo. After lunch it’s another afternoon filled with more information than you can haul home in two saddlebags!

  • Sustaining Clubs Meeting – Russell Radke
  • Advocacy – Beyond Face to Face – Rocky Fox
  • Kickin’ Ass and Taking Names – Pennsylvania’s 35-year winning quest for freedom of choice – Charles Umbenhauer
  • CQ & Using technology to Win in Washington – Rocky Fox
  • Media Madness: How to Survive these Wild Times – Brian “Skinny Bob” Clifford
  • Public Relations in a Changing World – Cathy Brush

Yeah, there’s a few duplicates, because the presenter and the subject are in such demand there’s only one way to satiate this crowd’s demand – give them the information and tools they need to be more effective at their state legislatures!

Saturday “slows down” just enough for a quick thirst quencher before the banquet starts. It’s an evening filled with a soon-to-be-announced keynote speaker, dinner by Bill the Chef, awards, and a live auction that if history ever repeats itself, this will be one not to miss.

Sunday morning travelers get sent out on the road after a “Blessing of the Bikes” and while everyone else is heading home, the MRF Board hunkers down for a review of The Good, The Bad, The Ugly, of the entire conference and ending it with a commitment to take everything that was learned at the 36th Meeting of the Minds Conference and put it to use on behalf of motorcyclists’ rights.

NCOM Biker Newsbytes July 2020

By | General Posts

THE AIM/NCOM MOTORCYCLE E-NEWS SERVICE is brought to you by Aid to Injured Motorcyclists (A.I.M.) and the National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM), and is sponsored by the Law Offices of Richard M. Lester. If you’ve been involved in any kind of accident, call us at 1-(800) ON-A-BIKE or visit www.ON-A-BIKE.com.

NCOM BIKER NEWSBYTES

Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish,

National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM)

CLICK HERE TO READ NCOM NEWS ON BIKERNET

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NCOM Biker Newsbytes May 2020

By | General Posts

All 50 states are now in various stages of reopening, and along with restrictions being lifted and the COVID-19 curve flattening, hopes for more normalcy are high; and none higher than amongst the motorcycling community.

Most industries have been hit hard by the global pandemic, and motorcycle sales and production have been among the most impacted, with factories shut down, dealerships closed, events cancelled or postponed, and even ridership restricted in many parts of the world.

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Missouri motorcycle helmet law repeal has governor’s support, but it’s a small part of a larger bill

By | General Posts

by Ashley Byrd from https://www.missourinet.com

One of the proposed laws tucked into a massive state transportation bill would allow motorcyclists to drive without helmets, but they must be at least 26 years old and have medical insurance and proof of financial responsibility.

Representative Jared Taylor of Republic in southwest Missouri says the governor promised he’d sign it, but Parson’s spokeswoman says while he has “indicated he is supportive of this issue, but like always, there will be a thorough bill review to see what else is in the bill.’

Democrat from St. Louis, Rep. Gina Mitten opposed this part of the bill on the House floor.

None of my constituents probably care a bit about the myriad of other things in this bill, except for the helmet law,” she told colleagues. “I don’t know about the other folks in this room, but I got a ton of emails over the past few days saying, ‘Do not do this.’”

Mitten says there is a financial cost to citizens for this proposed law.

“You get a traffic ticket, you’re going to pay money to the Brain Injury Fund. That’s basically money for motorcyclists who get brain injuries because they are not wearing helmets or they do stupid things.”

Supporters of helmet repeal want the freedom to ride without a helmet.

Magnificent Bikernet Weekly News for April 30, 2020

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Life is Amazing, but a lot of Events are Cancelled

Hey,

Is life wonderful or not. As we roll into May, more bored folks are coming up with wild conspiracy theories regarding the Covid attack, from political twists to Chinese takeovers.

I’m too busy repairing the Salt Torpedo, working on the expanding headquarters in Deadwood, building Dr. Hamster’s Pandemic Panhead and hammering away on the second chapter of my third Chance Hogan book. A friend from Simon and Shusters recommended, years ago, that I write a series. I spoke to the recently passed, Clive Cussler, from Phoenix, who wrote one series after another. He agreed.

Just be thankful for what you got–William De Vaughn 

See, life is amazing from the plants blooming in the Bikernet patio, to the lines on Christian’s bike, to the scalloped paint job Deny 925 is creating, to another magnificent sunset over the harbor and the thoughts of building another shop in Deadwood surrounded by rolling pine covered hills.

We will deal with this punk virus and keep riding towards the light. It’s an interesting news, hang on.

 

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The Bright Light Bikernet Weekly News for April 23, 2020

By | General Posts

It’s just life and it’s inspirational the Human Spirit
By Bandit, Rogue Wayfarer, Barry Green, Bob T., Sam Burns, the Redhead, Laura, Andreas, Gearhead and the rest of the crew#

Hey,

I love all the doom and gloom, the blame and the conspiracy theories. As you will see, Joe Smith sent us some damn interesting images from the Spanish Flu era in 1918 that killed 500,000. We survived to have an economic collapse in 1929. There’s never a dull moment in life. The light at the end of the tunnel is bright!

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NCOM Biker Newsbytes Feb 2020

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National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM)
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

READ THE NCOM NEWS BY CLICKING HERE

Quebec wants to tighten rules for access to motorcycle licences

By | General Posts

by Amy Luft from https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/

MONTREAL — Quebec wants to tighten regulations for motorcycle drivers in the province following an expect report on motorcycle safety.

Under the proposed regulations, Transport Minister François Bonnardel wants zero tolerance for alcohol for apprentice motorcycle driver, as is the case for drivers of other vehicles.

Bonnardel also said he would amend licensing regulations to prohibit anyone with four or more demerit points on their driving records from getting a motorcycle licence.

Bonnardel made the announcement Thursday after receiving a report from the Expert Committee on Motorcycle Safety.

The report is based on the causes and circumstances surrounding the deaths of 189 motorcyclists in 182 crashes between Jan. 1, 2013 and Dec. 31, 2016. The main causes of those crashes were speed, reckless driving, inexperience, distraction, inattention and alcohol impairment.

Electric scooters can help cities move beyond cars v pedestrians

By | General Posts

by Alex Hern from https://www.theguardian.com

The government is showing signs of legalising electric scooters on roads, but new laws should be about safety, not horsepower

If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that being hit by a scooter hurts less than being hit by a bike. That may sound like a strangely negative place to start, but it’s sort of fundamental to why I’m glad the government is finally showing signs of legalising the use of electronic scooters on public roads across the UK.

The current state of the law is a mess. Its broad strokes are reasonable enough: powered vehicles require an MOT and registration to use on public roads, while unpowered vehicles do not. Pavements are for foot traffic only. Access requirements complicate matters, but only a little: wheelchairs, both manual and powered – legally, “class three invalid carriages” – can go on pavements, while some – class four – can go on roads as well.

Then, in the 1980s, the law was modernised to support the first generation of electric bikes. Fitted with simple motors that aided hill climbs, it felt silly to ban them as electric vehicles, and so a new category – the “electrically assisted pedal cycle” – was invented, and the laws amended further in 2015 to remove weight limits, allow for four wheels and increase the maximum power of the motor.

Which means, as the law stands, you can ride a four-wheeled vehicle of potentially unlimited weight, largely powered by a motor up to 15.5mph, on public roads without training, licensing or registration. But not an electronic scooter. Nor, for that matter, a 5kg, 10mph “hoverboard”, unlikely to hurt anyone save its rider.

Looking at the laws from the ground up, the distinguishing characteristic should be safety, not how a vehicle is powered. It’s hard to argue that an electric motor is inherently more dangerous than pedal power. In fact, given the variability of human strength, it’s almost possible to argue the opposite: electric motors in e-bikes are capped at 250W of power, after all, but no such limit is possible for people, where a fit cyclist can easily exceed 300W or more.

And so a set of regulations which allowed, alongside bikes, skateboards and scooters, electric vehicles of limited weight, power and speed is surely the only justifiable outcome of any consultation.

But more than justifiable, such a set of rules would be good. One of the truisms of the cycling world is that the safest thing for cyclists on the road is more cyclists on the road. It’s not all about public policy and accessible cycle lanes: sheer weight of numbers is important too, in forcing other road users to treat cyclists as a viable third transportation mode, rather than just annoying slowpokes ripe for close passes and aggressive overtakes.

Expanding that constituency, to encompass a wide variety of mid-speed vehicles, would only help push cities towards the tipping point where they can consider transport beyond a simple car/pedestrian binary. And that’s a point every city needs to reach, sooner rather than later, in the face of a climate crisis that much see car usage drastically curtailed.

But. While laws need to be rewritten to support electric scooters, they don’t necessarily need to support the peculiarly American model of dumping a load of scooters on a pavement and hoping enough people will ride them before they get stolen or damaged for the unit economics to work out favourably. That model, unfortunately, has defaulted to its present state: unregulated, unmanaged and cutthroat, with councils left fighting back with nothing but their powers to prevent littering.

Here, the trade-off is more painful. Dockless rideshare – of bikes, e-bikes or e-scooters – can be great for promoting access, but it can also harm those least able to cope, as anyone who has tried to navigate a wheelchair or pram around a pile of Uber bikes knows. Micromobility can succeed with or without the Silicon Valley business models – but it can’t succeed without being given a chance on the roads.