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Shimano-Powered Ducati e-Bikes Reaching U.S. This Month

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Trekking, mountain or enduro – whatever your pleasure, Italian company Ducati has you covered this winter. The Italian company announced the arrival on U.S. shores, starting this month, of three e-bikes it developed over the past year.

Ducati joined the e-bike game not long ago after it partnered with THOK. Since then, a whole range of such two-wheelers has been developed, and is already available across Europe. Starting December, American customers will be able to enjoy them as well, provided they find the resources and courage to pay thousands of dollars for one.

The first to be made available at American Ducati dealers this month is the e-Scrambler, meant both for city use and trekking. It’s a pedal-assisted machine powered by a Shimano Steps E7000 motor and a 504 Wh battery of the same make. With the wheels wrapped in Pirelli Cycle-e GT tires, it can be rolled off the lot in exchange for $3,995.

The second arrival is the MIG-S, a mountain bike also powered by Shimano hardware (E8000 motor and 504 Wh battery). The two-wheeler is packed with high-performance parts, including Marzocchi Bomber Z2 fork, Fox Float TPS rear shock, and 12-speed SRAM SX transmission. It goes for $5,295.

The most expensive of the three is the TK-01RR, an enduro bicycle running a Shimano EP8 drive unit and 630 Wh battery that gives it 85 Nm (62 lb-ft) of torque with a maximum servo assistance ratio of 400 percent. This one will become available in February next year for the princely sum of $7,995.

“The introduction of these e-bikes continues the Ducati tradition of creating exhilarating two-wheeled experiences and expands our product range into a growing segment,” said in a statement Jason Chinnock, Chief Executive Officer of Ducati North America.

“In addition to highlighting the connection between the world of cycling and the training regime of motorcycle racers the world over, including many of those on the Ducati Corse team, we’re looking forward to seeing our existing clients and those new to Ducati enjoy these new e-bikes, which are also part of a growing recreational segment.”

Meet Harley Davidson’s Mosh/CTY e-Bike

By | General Posts

by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

We have been warned that this was going to happen, and now it is. Harley has released preorders on four beautifully crafted e-bikes from the Serial 1 lineup, and this is the least expensive of the bunch.

Recently, the U.S. motorcycle manufacturer released a very special build known as the Serial Number One, where it showcased electric tech on a tribute bike resembling the oldest known Harley. From there, we got this new wave of two-wheeling ideas.

The first of these bikes from the legendary motorcycle creators is the Mosh/CTY. Now, it’s only first on the list because it’s the least expensive of the lineup and possibly the least capable, depending on how you see things.

Nonetheless, it still brings with it all the history and heritage of Harley Davidson. By now, most fans out there have already asked themselves, why the hell is Harley stepping into the e-bike game? It’s simple, really. It’s a market that’s becoming more and more motorcycle-like.

With advancements in technology, from battery capacity to motor power outputs, our ever-present bicycle is becoming more of a stepping-stone towards an electrified future. So, let’s see what the team has put together for us.

When first laying eyes on the bike, you are struck by a rugged and capable frame that doesn’t resemble any e-bikes. From the start, the frame instills you with a feeling of trust like that one special person in your life.

A lack of suspension means you’ll be feeling your urban terrains, but being made to smash around town, it doesn’t really need anything to soften your ride except the tires and your rubberized knees. Upon closer inspection, the frame includes visible welds. If for any moment you thought that was carbon fiber, now’s a good time to throw away that idea.

What we find on the Mosh, just like on the other Serial 1 bikes, is a hydroformed aluminum frame. But before you start getting upset about Harley’s choice of material, know that it’s the best material for what this bike needs to do and for the price of $3,399. So, relax and read on.

Now, like all things e-bike, the most important aspects are the motor and battery. For the motor, we find a hugely capable 250W Brose S Mag brushless rotor, set mid-drive to offer a perfect balance and center of gravity for the bike. Still, 250W sounds rather weak judging by what we’ve seen so far in the e-bike game.

However, this “half the power of my blender” motor somehow squeezes out 90 Nm (66 lb-ft) of torque, more than some of the biggest and best e-MTBs out there. True, it has a speed cap of 20 mph (32 kph), yet that can be changed if you’ve got the smarts for it.

Powering this sleeper is a 529Wh integrated battery that can also be removed. Now, the range with this set-up is anywhere from 35-105 miles (56-168km), depending on which of the four ride modes you use. Over 100 miles of range; that alone is worth every penny. Once out of juice, a 75% charge takes only 2.6 hours, with a full charge in 4.75 hours.

As for the drivetrain for this smashing e-bike, we find a single-speed freewheel with a Gates carbon drive belt. Top of the line, my fried. As for brakes, Tektro is the brand of choice with two-piston calipers with 203-mm (8-in) rotors.

For some reason, Harley chose to strap on some 27.5-inch wheels and tires. The reason is to ensure all-around control and comfort as 27.5s are highly used in MTB and Enduro biking for their ability to grip and climb while offering ease of maneuverability.

A few other perks like walking assist and internal cable routing are also found, as well as a Brose display and remote that connects to an app. Honestly, for this price, what you get is absolutely amazing. Check out the gallery and video below and then click here to stare at the billing screen.

Watch Video at https://youtu.be/GzP-fwPJNxs

 

 

Players dominating Electric Bike Market

By | General Posts

by Joe D’Allegro from https://www.cnbc.com

  • Harley Davidson and Honda are among the dominant motorcycle makers with big plans in electric bikes.
  • Harley also recently announced that it is spinning off a nascent electric bicycle business.
  • Uber is among the top investors in electric scooter company Lime, which just posted its first quarterly profit, while competitor Bird is reportedly planning to soon go public via a SPAC.
  • NIU Technologies, which makes smart scooters, has seen its share price soar.

Tesla reached a $500 billion market valuation this week, a sign of its dominance in the electric vehicle market. But Elon Musk has shown no real interest in one growing EV segment: battery-powered scooters and motorcycles. An accident he suffered as a youth on a motorbike — nearly fatal, Musk has said — turned him off two-wheelers, for now. But the manufacturing of battery powered bikes is growing and consolidating, which means it’s likely to produce one or more dominant players in the years to come.

The electric motorcycle and scooter market reached $30 billion in 2019, according to a June 2020 report by Preeti Wadhwani and Prasenjit Saha from the research company Global Market Insights (GMI). They estimated that the market — which includes everything from large motorcycles meant for interstate cruising to tiny stand-up scooters as used by Lime and Bird — will grow more than 4% annually for the next few years and hit $40 billion in 2026.

Concerns over vehicular emissions, increasing consumer awareness about air pollution, and increasing investments by government authorities in the development of EV charging infrastructure are all expected to keep the market growing. Another factor boosting electric bike prospects is the continued improvement in batteries.

E-bikes, scooters and motorcycles

Electric motorcycles and scooters are still relatively pricey, and none yet matches the range of the best gas bikes, but that’s slowly changing. Lithium ion battery costs are down 85% in the last decade, said Garrett Nelson, senior equity analyst at CFRA Research. Within another 10 years, electric motorcycles can achieve price parity with gas bikes, he predicts.

“The playing field is wide open,” says Nelson. He noted that Honda, Yamaha and Harley-Davidson together control about two-thirds of the global motorcycle market, and are each developing electric motorbikes. So too are other big established players, such as the Indian-multinationals Hero Motors and Bajaj Auto, and some smaller electric-only startups, including Zero Motorcycles and Energetica.

Electric mobility is leading to a manufacturing boom for vehicles sized between small foldable scooters and full-on motorcycles, said Sam Korus, an analyst at ARK Invest, which is known for its big bet on Tesla. Uber led a round of investment in Lime earlier this year, while Bird is reportedly considering a public offering through a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC).

Troy Siahaan, a road test editor at Motorcycle.com, races a lightweight custom-built electric bike, giving him insight into the similarities and differences between gas and electric two-wheelers.

“The riding experience of an electric bike is similar to gas-powered motorcycles in that you twist the throttle and go,” he said, “but you don’t get sound, vibration or engine heat with electric bikes. By and large, they also don’t require shifting, so they’re easier for new riders than most gas bikes.”

Siahaan also likes the torque output — a measure of the acceleration — of electric bikes, since it is all available at the outset.

Nelson noted that most growth right now is in the small- to mid-sized section of the electric motorcycle and scooter market. These are popular in China and Southeast Asia, where two-wheelers are more common as a mode of transportation, and pollution and noise reduction are socially and environmentally appealing.

Post-Covid-19 demand in urban mobility

Korus said Chinese scooter manufacturer NIU is among the promising players operating in the space between small folding scooters and large motorcycles. The company, which went public in 2018, sells its app-supported smart scooters in 38 countries across Asia, Europe and North and South America. Its stock has risen sharply. The stylish sit-on scooters offer up to 87 miles of range (140 km), multi-color dynamic gauge displays and GPS-based anti-theft systems.

NIU’s primary competition are low-cost manufacturers in China, which make scooters that are less “smart” than its offerings, as well as the higher-end players out of Asia and Europe, which tend to be priced higher. A NIU model may sell for roughly $3,100, while a comparable Honda is over $5,000, a Vespa over $7,000, and a BMW anywhere from $10,000 to $15,000, according to Vincent Yu, a Needham & Co. analyst.

Korus noted that NIU’s software actively collects data that can be used to support autonomous driving and allows the company to add value on top of just selling products. This is also a key feature of Tesla’s business model, which ARK Invest CEO Cathie Wood has pointed to in her bullish thesis on Musk’s company. But for NIU, monetization of autonomous driving may be fairly far off into the future. Yu said today there is high value in the smart features focused on theft prevention and vehicle maintenance, for example, knowing when parts need replacement. Its lightweight lithium-ion batteries are also an advantage over heavier, older electric scooters as consumers look for more portable batteries that are easier to swap in and out.

A big question for NIU is just how big the market can get and whether it can grow both manufacturing capacity and a retail store network along with it, Yu said. Asia is still heavily reliant on petroleum-based scooters, especially Southeast Asia, but that is changing. And, as the world emerges from the Covid pandemic, Yu is betting more travelers will shy away from mass transit and opt for scooters. In countries like China, they are much easier to obtain than cars thanks to lower costs and less regulation and permitting requirements, especially in larger cities.

NIU commands over 26% of the Chinese e-scooter sales market, and has risen in Europe to No. 3 over the past two years. Yu added that NIU is building a new factory, targeting major Southeast Asian markets like Indonesia, and adding more stores around the world to capitalize on the demand. In Q3, the company opened 182 stores and now has another 100 under construction.

Harley-Davidson and the electric future

In the U.S., smaller motorcycles suitable for urban transportation and only occasional highway use are not as popular as in Asia and Europe. Nelson said U.S. buyers tend to be older and favor larger bikes with traditional looks and the signature sounds of a combustion engine.

Harley-Davidson, the largest and oldest U.S. motorcycle manufacturer, has addressed these buyers with its LiveWire, an electric motorcycle with traditional cruiser styling and an impressive 105 horsepower that lets it accelerate to 60 miles per hour in a quick 3.1 seconds. The LiveWire is 7-feet long and nearly 550 pounds, giving it the size and weight to fit in with the company’s mainstream gas-powered offerings, but, at $30,000, it’s just too expensive for many potential customers.

With the traditional American motorcycle buyer aging, Harley sales are down almost 40% since their peak in 2006. “Demographics will be a problem for them,” Nelson said.

Harley is committed to electric under a relatively new management team, led by CEO Jochen Zeitz, who earned high marks for his focus on sustainability as CEO of Puma. “We believe electric needs to play an important role in the future of Harley-Davidson,” he recently told Wall Street analysts. He said sales volumes are low relative to traditional bikes, but added, “It must be an important segment in the long term future of the company and it’s also attracting new riders, new customers to the brand that might not have considered Harley-Davidson before.”

Craig Kennison, who covers Harley for RW Baird, said the priority for Zeitz and his team is to shore up Harley’s finances and focus its business on the key markets where it can generate the most profits from core consumers today, and it will continue to generate the vast majority of its business from its V-twin internal combustion engine cycles (sales for LiveWire are not disclosed but the assumption is they remain very minor). “It’s not a big number,” Kennison said.

Similar to the path chosen by Tesla to first focus on the luxury consumer, Harley needs to perfect the electric motorcycle technology and given the price points today — it cannot alone control the cost curve in key areas like battery technology — only over time will it become more affordable to a larger consumer market. But if Harley makes the right decisions on current profitability centers, it will support the investment in electric vehicles over the decades to come, he said. “Right now Harley has a huge market and needs to make as much money as they can, and servicing the core customer, which is still highly profitable, is the focus.”

Harley is headed into the pedal bicycle market as well. It recently announced that it will spin off its electric bicycle effort, which has been in research and development for a few years, retaining a minority stake in the new firm, Serial 1 Company, a reference to its first-ever machine.

Targeting the e-bicycle market, with pricing below $5,000, is a smart move by Harley’s new management, as it makes the brand affordable for the masses in a growing segment, said Brandon Rolle, Northcoast Research analyst. And similar to NIU’s target scooter market, riders may not need a driver’s license to operate these vehicles, which will help in Harley-Davidson’s appeal to urban commuters and casual recreational cyclists.

High-end bicycle makers like Specialized have an early lead in this market — e-bikes which generate power that is multiplied by the human pedaling activity — and it does have the potential for widespread appeal in the future, according to Kennison. “It lets ‘the everyman’ get on the road … especially during the pandemic people want to get outside and bicycling is a great way to do it, but depending on your fitness level, having the added electrical power creates a totally different experience. You can go 20 to 50 miles and it changes the appeal” he said.

Harley’s motorcycle competitors

In the near future, pent up demand for outdoor products caused by Covid-19 could benefit motorcycle makers, including Harley, which has had a “rough last five years” according to Wedbush Securities analyst James Hardiman. “A lot of investors have looked at Harley-Davidson and the broader motorcycle one as not benefitting,” from the new outdoors boom, the analyst said. But industry sales and used sales are both up, and those are precursors for a broader-based recovery in bike sales, Hardiman recently told CNBC. While the bear case about the aging demographics isn’t going away, it has been that way for a decade already, he said.

Among Harley’s competitors for the future full-size motorcycle buyer are not just traditional players like Honda and Yamaha, but Zero and Energetica, which have some of the most advanced electric bike technology currently available, Siahaan said.

Zero, founded in Santa Cruz, California, in 2006, isn’t a household name, but it’s one of the most established players in the field. It began selling electric motorcycles in 2009, making it one of the very first production two-wheelers (the earliest production electric motorcycles and scooters appeared in the 1970s and 1990s, respectively, but enjoyed limited success).

Zero’s current all-electric line-up includes everything from the FX, a small on- and off-road capable “dual-sport” motorcycle starting at $9,300, all the way up to the SR/S sportbike which starts at $20,000. The 110-horsepower SR/S can reach 124 miles per hour and is capable of more than 200 miles of range when equipped with an enhanced battery. The FR/S is so advanced Road and Track alluded to Zero getting close to the being the Tesla of two wheels in its review. Zero offers it with an app that lets users modify the bikes maximum speed, power, torque and regenerative braking parameters.

Zero reached a 10-year deal with Polaris, a recreational vehicle powerhouse, that should give it the resources to further expand manufacturing and distribution. It will bring Zero’s powertrain technology and software to Polaris’ lineup of snowmobiles and off-road vehicles.

The high-end brand Energetica was formed in 2010 as a subsidiary of CRP Group, a motorsport and aviation manufacturer based in Modena, Italy. It offers a small lineup of attractively styled bikes starting at $17,600 for the general-purpose Eva EsseEsse9, and ending with the top-of-the-line Ego+. The latter is a 145-horsepower sportbike with an eye-watering starting price of nearly $24,000, but a 150 mph top speed and up to 250 miles of range.

Saha of the Global Marketing Institute told CNBC that the company is investing highly in R&D and owns several patents related to electric vehicle manufacturing in Europe, Asia, and North America.

Of course, as the largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world, Honda Motorcycles of Japan, is not standing still. It recently filed patents for electric-powered versions of its CB125R and CB300R, these are small, easy to manage general purpose bikes with “café racer” styling.

Saha notes that Honda is also making large investments in the development of swappable battery technology for electric motorcycles to allow riders to quickly replace the batteries after use. These moves, and factors like its global dealer and distribution network will aid Honda, Saha said.

Tesla moving beyond cars

And then there is Tesla. Though Musk has said the company will not produce a road bike, he has announced plans to release an electric all-terrain vehicle, the Cyberquad, late in 2021, and has at least teased the possibility of one day making a two-wheeled electric bike. In the least, Tesla could easily pivot a portion of its battery business to supplying other manufacturers, says Nelson.

Generating revenue is a big concern for any start-up, but especially in the electric motorcycle space, where federal and state-level regulation abound and consumer expectations are high. Many of the companies that first entered the electric two-wheeler market place have failed or been absorbed by larger players. This includes Brammo, which launched in 2002 and sold bikes with six-speed transmissions like those in traditional gas bikes rather than the single-speed automatics most electric manufacturers use. It was first purchased by the recreational vehicle maker Polaris in 2015, then engine maker Cummins in 2017. Brammo-branded bikes are no longer sold, but its technology lives on with its purchasers.

A similar fate befell Alta Motors, a maker of technologically advanced off-road electric bikes. The company shuttered operations in 2018 and its assets were taken over by Bombardier’s Recreational Products business in 2019 for use across its product lineup, which includes Ski Doo snowmobiles and the Can-Am line of three-wheel motorcycles.

“It’s always difficult to predict the future,” Siahaan said. “A lot of companies come out with big, bold announcements, but never even come to market.”

“It’s very early, so it is difficult to see how it all plays out, but that’s typical of a true growth market,” added Kennison.

Harley-Davidson Serial 1 Electric Bike Lineup Revealed, Priced From $3,399

By | General Posts

by Mircea Panait from https://www.autoevolution.com

When you hear Harley-Davidson, what do you think of straight away? What kind of image does it spring into your mind? Easy Rider is one potential answer, but we can all agree that H-D stands for old-school motorcycles and a very strong culture built on these loud bikes.

The problem with Harley-Davidson, however, is the company’s reluctance to modernize, reinvent itself, and appeal to a younger audience. Japanese manufacturers are miles ahead in every respect, but H-D is trying hard to make amends for decades of resting on past laurels. The LiveWire is the perfect example of this change, and in the spring of 2021, the Serial 1 electric bicycle will be joining the electric motorcycle.

Revealed less than a month ago, the Serial 1 consists of four models at launch. These are the Mosh/Cty and Rush/Cty in three variants called the Regular, Speed, and Step-Thru. Capable of 20 mph (32 kph) or 28 mph (45 kph) from 250 watts of continuous power, these mid-drive electric bicycles don’t come cheap at $3,399 for the entry-level specification. At the highest end of the spectrum, you should prepare $4,999.

Classified as Class 1 e-bikes in the United States of America, the Serial 1 features a frame-integrated battery of the lithium-ion chemistry and a maintenance-free carbon belt drive designed by Gates. Coincidence or not, the LiveWire has a belt drive too.

At the time of writing, there’s a pre-order special offer for all Serial 1 bikes in the guise of free shipping in the Lower 48 States and Germany of all places. No fewer than eight sizes are offered in total, four for boys and four for girls. From S to XL, the Serial 1 lineup should be perfect for riders ranging from 4’11” to 6’5” or 149 to 195 centimeters.

All e-bikes ship as standard with integrated lights up front and at the rear, and the electric motor comes courtesy of Brose Drive. No fewer than four drive modes are offered in the guise of eco, tour, sport, and boost. As for the transmission, the Enviolo Automatiq is geared up mostly for ride comfort rather than out-and-out performance.

BSA to be reborn as electric motorcycle

By | General Posts

by Jasper Jolly from https://www.theguardian.com

Revived company plans to start assembling motorbikes in UK as soon as next year.

An Indian billionaire hopes to “resurrect the British motorbike industry” with a plan to build electric motorcycles in the UK under the venerable BSA brand.

Anand Mahindra, the chairman of the Mahindra Group conglomerate, is the main backer of a plan to restart production by the BSA Company, assembling motorbikes in the Midlands as soon as the middle of 2021.

The revived BSA Company will shortly begin building a research facility in Banbury to develop electric motorbike technology, before launching motorbikes with internal combustion engines closely followed by an electric battery model by the end of 2021.

BSA, which stood for Birmingham Small Arms, was originally founded in 1861 to manufacture guns at Small Heath, a setting for the hit BBC drama Peaky Blinders. Its metalworking factories were later turned to bicycles and then motorcycles. By the 1950s, it was the world’s largest motorcycle maker, but it went bankrupt and ceased production in the 1970s.

Anand Mahindra, who is worth $1.7bn (£1.3bn) according to Forbes magazine, said he had chosen to invest in the UK because of its history of motorcycle production. The company also received support from the UK government, which awarded the BSA Company a £4.6m grant to develop electric bikes, in the hope of creating at least 255 jobs.

“The UK was the leader in bikes right from the start,” Mahindra told the Guardian. “That provenance is something that we really want to retain.”

Mahindra Group is the world’s largest manufacturer of tractors and the 20th largest carmaker by sales. It owns the Reva electric car brand that produced the G-Wiz city car, and it is also the world’s biggest producer of three-wheeled electric rickshaws.

Mahindra also has experience in reviving motorcycle brands. In 2016, it picked up a controlling stake in a company that had bought the BSA brand, as well as Czech brand Jawa. Jawa was relaunched in 2018, with 50,000 sales in its first full year, an achievement Mahindra now wants to repeat with BSA.

The project is being run by Anupam Thareja, a former investment banker who initially bought the BSA brand. He said he wanted to continue the “quirky English charm” of the original BSA company. Thareja said he hoped to build a factory near the original Small Heath site but declined to give estimates on annual production.

Mahindra said its experience with electric bikes would help the broader group in its eventual move away from products that burn fossil fuels, although he said the company would not “be dismantling our [internal combustion] engines” until the market reached a “tipping point”.

The new BSA Company plans to start with assembling traditional internal combustion engine bikes costing between £5,000 and £10,000 with parts from various suppliers in the UK and beyond.

Thareja said it was wary about possible tariffs for exports under a no-deal Brexit, but believed motorcycle brands could benefit from customers’ desire to travel once the worst of the pandemic is over.

Introducing Serial 1 eBicycles! Pre-Sale starts now!

By | General Posts

The Serial 1 eBicycle Pre-Sale starts right now!

RUSH/CTY SPEED

Delivering Summer 2021

Full speed ahead! This Class 3 speed pedelec is the quickest way to navigate any city.

RUSH/CTY STEP-THRU

Delivering Spring 2021

An all-access ride to wherever you want to go, loaded with features and exceptional style!

RUSH/CTY

Delivering Spring 2021

The sophisticated commuter. The easiest, most intuitive way to get anywhere, without breaking a sweat.

MOSH/CTY

Delivering Spring 2021

The ultimate urban playbike. It’s quick, nimble, and an absolute ripper!

Inventory is limited and will start delivering Spring/Summer 2021. First purchases of each model get a special Serial Number 1 Tribute medallion. Serial 1’s debut line-up of pedal-assist eBicycles all feature mid-mounted motors, integrated batteries, belt drive, intelligent sizing, integrated LED lighting, and even more features that make these the easiest and most intuitive way to experience fun, freedom and adventure on two wheels. Delivery for most models will start in Spring of 2021, but quantities will be limited so to insure that you get one, consider buying yours today!

Porsche vs Harley-Davidson Drag Race Video

By | General Posts

by Vlad Mitrache from https://www.autoevolution.com

Up until very recently, the thought of a drag race between a Porsche (any model) and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle (any hog) was one of the most preposterous ones that anyone could come up with.

On the one hand, you have a German automotive brand with a strong history and deep roots in motorsport. Sure, it’s guilty of also building SUVs – with some even powered by diesel – but you’d be pushing it to call any of its models “slow”.

On the other hand, you have an American motorcycle specialist with an equally strong history and plenty of racing connections throughout its history, though less so in the more recent years. Indeed, these days Harley-Davidson is better known for its range of cruisers and choppers, the type of machines that don’t necessarily value speed.

However, when things go electric, speed always has a knack for making its way into the center of it. That’s probably because making electric vehicles go quick is surprisingly easy – there is no complicated transmission, no engine with a million moving parts – just an electric motor and tons of instant torque.

There’s also the fact that you can’t get too much range out of a 15.5 kWh battery pack – and you can’t fit a larger one on a bike – so if reaching faraway places is out of the picture, you still have to offer the buyer something. And that something is speed.

Harley-Davidson LiveWire can reach 60 mph (97 km/h) from a standstill in roughly three seconds and has an electronically limited top speed of 114 mph (183 km/h). Its motor produces 105 hp and 86 lb-ft (117 Nm) of torque to battle the 549 lbs (250 kg) that the rig weighs.

The Porsche Taycan Turbo, its competitor for the day, has obviously got very different figures, but the one that matters the most in this case is actually identical. Like the LiveWire, the Turbo will reach 60 mph from a complete stop in three seconds. Does that mean we have an even race on our hands?

Well, motorcycles very rarely manage to keep up with their four-wheeled counterparts during these drag races, and it’s usually in the second part of the competition where they make up ground as finding traction stops being a problem. With the Taycan Turbo being the grippy monster that it is, it’s hard to imagine the LiveWire stands any chance.

As the driver of the Taycan says (opinions about how likable or not he is in the comments below, please. I want to know if it’s just me), the most important thing to take away from this race isn’t so much the winner, but the performance potential of electric drivetrains for both cars and motorcycles.

 

Royal Enfield To Launch Classic Electric In 2023

By | General Posts

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Royal Enfield is looking to strengthen its position by expanding its portfolio both in domestic as well as overseas markets

Royal Enfield recently launched its cruiser motorcycle Meteor 350 after a long and arduous wait. The bike had been highly anticipated for almost a year now and since its launch has mostly received positive responses from different quarters. However, Royal Enfield will not be limiting itself with this launch.

The Chennai-based bikemaker is looking to expand its portfolio – both domestic and international – by introducing as many 28 new models, in the next seven years. Starting with the Meteor 350, which was recently launched, the next bike planned for launch is the new gen Classic 350 in next quarter. This is expected to be followed by new gen Bullet 350, Electra 350, Cruiser 650, Himalayan 650, Classic Electric etc.

Royal Enfield Future Plans
Speaking to PTI on Royal Enfield’s future plans, CEO Vinod K Dasari said that the company has got a product plan for the next seven years or so. He added that the brand is looking to launch a new product every quarter which means that at least 28 new bikes will be launched in the next seven years. This is to strengthen its position in the domestic as well as international markets.

Royal Enfield recently set up a new manufacturing facility in the Argentine capital of Buenos Aires which became the company’s first overseas production base outside India. The company is also looking to set up a new manufacturing facility in Thailand in the next 6-12 months followed by one in Brazil in the future.

He further goes on to add that all these new motorcycles will play in the mid-segment, i.e., 250cc-750cc displacement. Dasari did not divulge any details regarding the investment required for the upcoming models but said that the company will spend “several hundred crores on new products, new technologies like electric vehicles, digital solutions and so on”. Yes, an all electric Royal Enfield based on the Classic platform is due for launch in 2023.

Dasari further elaborates that the company has enough production capacity for the next 2-3 years and, therefore, a significant amount of its investments will be flown towards development of new technology including digital solutions, enhancements and new products including EVs; and global expansion.

Royal Enfield’s Growth Prospects This Year
When questioned about the brand’s growth prospects in the domestic market in the current fiscal year, Dasari said this year has to be seen on a month-on-month basis. The first four to five months businesses were seriously affected due to the outbreak of novel coronavirus and the subsequent nationwide lockdown.

However, now the company has achieved booking levels better than pre-Covid levels. He claims that even though Royal Enfield has received bookings for more than one month, it has inventory in the pipeline left to suffice 15-20 days.

Meteor 350
Royal Enfield, primarily known for its mid-segment displacement motorcycles, has been in the news very often lately due to the launch of Meteor 350. It is offered in three variants- Fireball, Stellar and Supernova and has been priced at Rs 1.75 lakh for the base variant and Rs 1.90 lakh for the top-spec variant. (Both prices are ex-showroom).

Futuristic Electric Scooter from BMW

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Back in 2017, BMW’s motorcycle company Motorrad did the unthinkable and presented not only a scooter, but an electric one. It was called Concept Link, and, it seems, the contraption is about to spawn a production version: it’s called, for now, Definition CE 04, and was shown as part of BMW’s #NEXTGen 2020 event this week.

BMW calls the two-wheeler you see in the gallery above a “near-series” version of the Concept Link. It’s not all that different, visually speaking, from the idea that led to its creation, and that’s a good thing because the first one looked really cool.

The Germans set out to seriously differentiate their product from everything else in the segment. And they kind of achieved that, as the scooter does look a lot more futuristic and high-tech than everything else out there. It’s perhaps even cooler than most of the motorcycles Motorrad is responsible and so famous for.

The two-wheeler is supposed to be high tech. It sports a massive 10.25-inch display – the largest in the scooter world – and it even comes with smart rider equipment. That translates into stuff like light guides integrated in the sleeves and hood, or inductive charging tech in the pocket of a parka for the smartphone’s needs.

“We have managed to transfer many innovative elements and details of the concept into the series,” said in a statement Alexander Buckan, Head of Vehicle Design BMW Motorrad.

“The new architecture has led to a visual revolution and has produced many new design themes. Maybe it will polarise, but it will definitely stand out.”

Of course, it all sounds way too good to be real, at least at this point in time. And BMW, despite claiming this scooter and the accompanying tech are near-series version, there is no mention as to when we should expect to actually see it on the road.

Also, we have no info yet on the powertrain for the thing, apart from the fact that it would be electric.

 

Voxan Wattman the fastest electric motorcycle in the world

By | General Posts

Max Biaggi and Monegasque electric motorcycle constructor Voxan marked the Venturi Group’s 20th anniversary in style, setting a total of eleven new world speed records at Ch�teauroux airfield in France, on 30 and 31 October and 1 November. The outright top speed achieved over the three days was 408 km/h (254 mph).

On the morning of Saturday 31 October, Max Biaggi and the Voxan Wattman achieved their primary objective, beating the most sought-after of the twelve world records they had been targeting this weekend. With a speed of 366.94 km/h (228.05 mph), the team set a new record in the prestigious “partially streamlined electric motorcycle over 300 kilos” class. In doing so, they dethroned previous holders Ryuji Tsuruta and Mobitec EV-02A with their speed of 329 km/h (204 mph).

In line with FIM (F�d�ration Internationale de Motocyclisme) regulations, the Voxan Wattman’s speed was measured from a flying start over 1 mile in opposite directions, within a period of two hours. Under Federation regulations, the final speed is the average of the two speeds recorded over these two runs. The Voxan, with its grey Sacha Lakic-designed fairing, sent records tumbling as the GPS speedometer peaked at an instantaneous speed of… 408 km/h (254 mph).

Given the relatively short track (3.5 km / 2.17 mi), reaching such an impressive top speed has encouraged Voxan to set its sights even higher. When they make their next attempts on a longer course, the team now has serious designs on an average speed in the region of 400 km/h (249 mph).

349.38 km/h (217.14 mph) for the non-streamlined Wattman

On Friday 30 October, a non-streamlined version of the Voxan Wattman without its fairing also took on the challenge over a distance of 1 mile, from a flying start. The principle was identical: 1 mile in opposite directions, within a period of two hours. Once again, the final speed was the average of the two speeds recorded over these two runs: 349.38 km/h (217.14 mph).

Yet the on-board systems showed that the Wattman, propelled by its powerful 270 kW (367 CH) engine, peaked at a top speed of 372 km/h (231 mph). This measurement augurs well for the next attempts planned, with Voxan set to take on more records until the end of 2022.

Nine other records

Gildo Pastor’s team had a number of other world records in their sights. After these three days of attempts, the final record tally is as follows:

– � mile, flying start, partially streamlined: 394.45 km/h (245.10 mph) – no previous record

– � mile, flying start, non-streamlined: 357.19 km/h (221.95 mph) – no previous record

– 1 km, flying start, partially streamlined: 386.35 km/h (240.07 mph – previous

record: 329.31 km/h (204.62 mph)

– � mile, standing start, non-streamlined: 126.20 km/h (78.42 mph) – no previous record

– � mile, standing start, partially streamlined: 127.30 km/h (79.10 mph) – previous

record: 87.16 km/h (54.16 mph)

– 1 km, standing start, non-streamlined: 185.56 km/h (115.30 mph) – no previous record

– 1 km, standing start, partially streamlined: 191.84 km/h (119.20 mph) – previous

record: 122.48 km/h (76.11 mph)

– 1 mile, standing start, non-streamlined: 222.82 km/h (138.45 mph) – no previous record

– 1 mile, standing start, partially streamlined: 225.01 km/h (139.81 mph) – no previous record

Quotes

“It was important to me to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Venturi Group’s electric adventure. Given the health situation, it hasn’t been easy, but thanks to the hard work and mentality shown by Max and my teams, we proved ourselves up to the challenge. Twenty years after buying Venturi, I am delighted that the Group can now claim to have created the fastest ever electric vehicles on two and four wheels (Venturi VBB-3, FIA record: 549 km/h – 341 mph), but also in the four-wheel fuel cell category (Venturi VBB-2, FIA record: 487 km/h – 303 mph). On each project, we have worked openly with major companies to share with them our expertise in the field of ground-breaking technologies, and in doing so contributed to improving ecomobility. That modest contribution reflects my commitment to ensuring we are fully line with the values of the Principality in terms of sustainable development. So I am sharing these records with my country, Monaco.” – Gildo Pastor, President of Venturi

“When Gildo Pastor, the President of the Venturi Group, approached me about this project, I was curious, very motivated, and at the same time a little uncertain. Having said that, right after our first meeting, I quickly realised that, like Gildo, his teams were driven by an incredible belief and determination. They told me “we came close to 600 km/h (373 mph) on four wheels, and now we want to flirt with 400 km/h (249 mph) on two wheels, nothing’s going to stop us!” These records make me a happy man! I’m proud of the team and delighted to bring these titles back to Monaco!” – Max Biaggi, rider of the Voxan Wattman

“At ROKiT we believe electric vehicles are the future and we are proud to partner with the fastest electric motorcycles in the world. Venturi and Voxan are true innovators and it’s exciting for ROKiT to be part of history in the making.” – Jonathan Kendrick, Co-Founder and Chairman ROKiT.

About Voxan

In 2010, the iconic motorcycle manufacturer Voxan Motors was bought by Venturi. Its President, Gildo Pastor, immediately refocused the constructor on a new core business: electric engines.

In 2013, Venturi unveiled the Voxan Wattman, a symbol of the brand’s rebirth and its radically new technical direction and styling.

In 2019, the teams began work on a new, high-performance version of the Wattman, specially designed to set new world speed records.