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Travis Wyman joins Harley-Davidson Factory Team for King of Baggers

By General Posts

RACER TRAVIS WYMAN JOINS HARLEY-DAVIDSON SCREAMIN’ EAGLE FACTORY TEAM FOR KING OF THE BAGGERS SERIES

Brothers Travis and Kyle Wyman to Race Factory Road Glide Special Bikes at Road America

MILWAUKEE (June 10, 2021) – The Harley-Davidson® Screamin’ Eagle® factory racing team will field multi-talented racer Travis Wyman as a second entry in its MotoAmerica King of the Baggers road racing series. Travis Wyman will race a factory-prepared Harley-Davidson Road Glide® Special powered by a modified Screamin’ Eagle® Milwaukee-Eight 131 Performance Crate Engine. He joins his brother, Kyle Wyman, on the two-rider team for the King of the Baggers race June 11-13 at Road America near Elkhart Lake, Wis.

In addition to its factory team effort, Harley-Davidson is offering a nearly $30,000 cash contingency program for qualified Harley-Davidson® racers competing in the King of the Baggers series.

“We are ready to turn up the heat in MotoAmerica at our home track of Road America by adding Travis to the Screamin’ Eagle factory team,” said Jochen Zeitz, chairman, president, and CEO Harley-Davidson. “The King of the Baggers series is bringing big excitement for fans and we’re pleased to add to the show by expanding our team to two top riders representing Harley-Davidson and Screamin’ Eagle.”

The three-round MotoAmerica King of the Baggers series is for race-prepared, American V-Twin touring motorcycles equipped with a fairing and saddlebags. In the series debut on May 2 at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta, Kyle Wyman placed second on the Harley-Davidson Screamin’ Eagle factory Road Glide Special motorcycle.

Travis Wyman is the owner of Travis Wyman Racing, based in Las Vegas. He is currently also competing in MotoAmerica Stock 1000, Honos Superbike and Superbike Cup. The 29-year-old racer finished the 2020 MotoAmerica season in second place in the Superbike Cup and third in the Stock 1000 championship. Travis Wyman also competed in the MotoAmerica King of the Baggers invitational race last October at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, scoring a fourth-place finish aboard a Harley-Davidson Road Glide. Kyle and Travis Wyman are the sons of Kim Wyman, owner of Harv’s Harley-Davidson in Macedon, N.Y.

Round two of the King of the Baggers series is June 11-13 at Road America near Elkhart Lake, Wis. The series continues July 9-11 at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, Calif.

About the Screamin’ Eagle® Milwaukee-Eight 131 Performance Crate Engine: The Screamin’ Eagle® Milwaukee-Eight 131 is the most-powerful street-compliant performance engine offered by Harley-Davidson. Built from the bottom up in Milwaukee, this 131-cubic-inch (2147cc) Screamin’ Eagle® crate engine delivers 131 ft-lb of torque to the rear wheel, and may be installed in 2017-later Harley-Davidson Touring models.

Customised Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor sets speed record

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by Phil West from https://www.motorcyclenews.com

Who said Royal Enfields weren’t fast? Not Mid-Life Cycles, the dealer behind this special Interceptor 650 which recently posted a record 132mph at the Australian equivalent of Bonneville Speed Week.

Called the Sabre, the machine is based on a 2019 Interceptor 650 but puts out around 70bhp (up from 47bhp) and has been built to show the bike’s potential and as a test bed for parts and accessories to be offered to the public.

Created to conform to the ‘M-F 650’ class, an unfaired, production-based formula, the intention was to compete at 2020’s Speed Week at Lake Gairdner in South Australia, a salt lake similar to Bonneville in Utah, USA.

The pandemic scuppered those plans – until now, as rider Charlie Hallam posted a class record of 121.78mph first time out before gradually setting a new standard of 132.05mph. Not bad for an air-cooled, OHC parallel twin displacing just 648cc.

The engine has, of course, been heavily reworked, by specialists HRA Geelong. Although capacity is unchanged, as per the rules, the crank has been balanced, rods shot-peened and new pistons added to help raise compression to a heady 11:1 requiring 98 RON fuel.

Head and ports have been modified to flow as much fuel as possible and there are special custom valves while the single camshaft is now HRA’s ‘Competition Profile 1286 Racing Camshaft’. Open race pipes exit each side, the transmission’s gears were recut to reduce friction and special sprockets were made.

Although the frame is stock, the swingarm has been lengthened to the maximum permissible, suspension replaced by Öhlins front and rear, wheels are lighter, wider alloys, and ultra low clip-on bars and a more aerodynamically efficient front mudguard were fitted. Now the plan is for Mid-Life to offer performance and big-bore kits for the road.

“The 650 really lends itself to performance mods,” said Mid-Life Cycles CEO Michael Catchpole. “So we set out to build a Salt Racer using the standard Interceptor frame, as dictated by M-F-650 rules, but with a modified engine.

“We’ve kept the 648cc capacity but used various turning parts including a special cam developed by Hallam Racing. We’re also developing performance kits for the Interceptor and GT 650 road bikes based on using this cam, in Stage One, Stage Two, and Stage Three versions.”

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 breaks 4-year-old speed record at over 212 km/h
by https://www.financialexpress.com

The Mid Life Cycles’ Interceptor was entered in Class M-F 650, for 650cc un-streamlined motorcycles running commercial unleaded fuel. The old record of 191.93 km/h was set at Lake Gairdner in 2016.

Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 has broken a long-standing speed record in Australia. Mid Life Cycles’ Interceptor 650 Salt Racer has set the class record at the annual Speed Week run at Lake Gairdner, South Australia. The Interceptor 650 Twin broke the four-year-old class record on each of its runs, leaving the new mark at 212.514 km/h. The Mid Life Cycles’ Interceptor was entered in Class M-F 650, for 650cc un-streamlined motorcycles running commercial unleaded fuel. The old record of 191.93 km/h was set at Lake Gairdner in 2016.

The remarkable record was broken by Charlie Hallam on day one of Speed Week (Monday 8 March 2021), with his first run at 194.85 km/h. He backed that up with a 197.76 km/h pass, for a provisional record of 196.3 km/h.

On the morning of day two of the Speed Week, the Interceptor 650 clocked 206.29 km/h and 208.32 km/h for a new provisional record of 207.31 km/h. Charlie believed there was a little more to come.

That afternoon, the Interceptor ran 208.59 km/h and was then impounded overnight until it could do a back-up run the next morning. This run, under increasingly stormy skies, saw a stunning 214.04 km/h top speed, for a new record of 211.28 km/h.

The traditional twin-loop steel frame was carried over from the road bike to the racer, with minimal modifications allowed under the class rules.

This is the second time that we have established a remarkable feat with the Twins, in 2018, the Bonneville Racer recorded an impressive top speed of over 159 mph at Bonneville Salt Flats and this speed record is yet another remarkable feat for us. This recognition validates the tremendous progress we continue to make in our journey and we hope this will inspire many more motorcyclists to push their boundaries and achieve the pursuit of excellence, Vinod Dasari, CEO, Royal Enfield, said.

New Pan America motorcycle drawing national attention

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by Sarah Hauer from https://www.jsonline.com

Harley-Davidson Inc.’s newest bike — a less expensive and lighter motorcycle — is drawing national attention as the company tries to lure new riders.

Harley-Davidson’s Pan America is arriving at hundreds of dealerships now.

“(The Pan America) is definitely not your dad’s Harley-Davidson cruiser,” New York Times reporter Mark Gardiner wrote.

The Pan America is about $2,000 cheaper and 200 pounds lighter than Harley-Davidson’s most popular touring bikes. The base model of the Pan America is around 530 pounds and starts at $17,319.

Pan America’s launch was delayed a year. The company held a virtual launch event in February.

Kevin Duke, who writes about motorcycles, was impressed by his test ride of the new bike.

“The news about Harley for the past couple of years has been quite pessimistic,” said Duke, the editor in chief at Thunder Press in the New York Times article. “With the older demographic aging out, there was no real hint at what the company could do to gain market share, but this really changes it. The new motor is that good.”

The Milwaukee-based company has been trying to expand its customer base for years.

The company experienced a steep decline in sales during the COVID-19 pandemic. Motorcycle sales were up 9% worldwide for the company during its most recent fiscal quarter. That bump was driven by a 30% increase in North America motorcycle sales over the same three-month time period last year.

Harley-Davidson launched its all-electric motorcycle brand LiveWire in May. The first motorcycle branded as a LiveWire bike is scheduled to premiere at the International Motorcycle Show on July 9.

Six Ways to Sunday Racing

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One Rider’s Unique Racing Project
by Kyle Smith from Hagerty.com

I dreamt up the idea of racing six different disciplines on one machine about a year ago. Registered for all events in the Novice category, participating in events will encompass six racing disciplines in motorsports.

The final push: Six Ways to Sunday racing begins this week.

Click Here to Read this Fascinating Photo Feature on Race Preparation on Bikernet.

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

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Torrot’s New Enduro Motorcycles for Kids

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by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Torrot’s New Enduro Motorcycles for Kids, Double the Fun While Keeping Them Safe

The world of enduro can be just as exciting for kids as it is for adults, as long as parents can make sure that everything is safe and under control. Already known for making motorbikes for children, Torrot has recently launched a second-generation range, perfect for introducing the little ones to this great sport.

Spanish-based Torrot is not a newcomer on the market. In fact, it’s got quite a history since its foundation in 1948, which led to eventually developing electric bikes, in the last few years. The company’s KIDS range was meant to help children begin practicing for enduro and off-road trials. Kids could start to learn by riding on on-road tracks, with the help of one of the 3 models in the series, Trial One, Motocross One and Supermotard One.

Torrot has recently upgraded all the models in the series, for even better performance, but with the same excellent safety and control features. All 3 electric motorbikes come with new LiMnCo batteries that are lighter, which makes them easier to remove and recharge. And, in terms of components, they are made with a chrome-molybdenum chassis, a hydraulic aluminum front fork from EBR and MITAS tires.

The Trial Two, Motocross Two and Supermotard Two have a maximum speed of 24.8 mph (40 kph), and the best part is that the Torrot electric engine comes with a programmable controller. The power can be programmed from 600W up to 1500W, which is perfect for progressive learning and also makes the riding experience much safer.

Parents can do more than just adjust the power, thanks to the company’s ingenious “Parental Control” system. By simply using the Torrot KIDS App on their phone, parents can remotely make sure that their little riders are safe. They can configure power levels, speed and throttle response, limiting them when it’s necessary and they can even disconnect the motorbike completely.

Trial Two is currently available for orders, with a $3,180 (€ 2,599) price tag, and the other 2 models can be pre-ordered, for the slightly higher price of $3,300 (€2,699).

Ducati Multistrada V4: Zero to 5,000 in just six months

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Germany Becomes Home of the 5,000th Ducati Multistrada V4

Zero to 5,000 in just six months. It is the achievement of Italian bike maker Ducati’s Multistrada V4, which in just half a year managed to convince 5,000 riders it is the right choice for them.

Ducati announced the milestone this week, with the 5,000th two-wheeler ever made in the family ordered by a German rider from Ingolstadt. The bike is a fully-loaded V4 S Sport and was accompanied in the rider’s garage by a “sculptural reproduction” of the bike and a “personal letter certifying the motorcycle’s serial number.”

The V4 was presented by the Italians in November last year, and it is currently available in three versions, the V4, V4S, and V4 S Sport, all described as the most advanced of their kind ever. The most potent of them all can easily go in the high $20,000s (exact pricing is available upon request at dealers).

At the core of the bikes sits the so-called Granturismo engine, a 1,158cc piece of hardware rated at a massive 170 hp at 10,500 rpm and a maximum torque of 125 Nm (92 lb-ft) at 8,750 rpm. The engine is lighter than the one that preceded it and tips the scale at 66.7 kg (147 pounds).

But it is not only the engine that makes the bike special. The V4 is presently the first production motorcycle equipped with both a front and a rear radar, working together with the Adaptive Cruise Control (AAC) technology.

Only a limited range of colors is available for the bike, going from the Ducati Red of the entry-level to the “particularly aggressive dedicated livery“ of the S Sport. This one also gets an Akrapovic exhaust and carbon front mudguard.

The exhaust system is made of stainless steel and was designed to bring the motorcycle’s weight down by 5 kg (11 pounds) and increase the engine’s power output to 174 hp and 133 Nm (98 lb-ft) of torque.

Harley-Davidson 1907 Strap Tank Nets Close to $300K in Las Vegas auction

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a very hot weekend for motorcycle enthusiasts. On one hand, we had the MotoAmerica series of events over in Atlanta, and on the other the mammoth motorcycle auction conducted by Mecum over in Las Vegas.

As far as the Road Atlanta event goes, we’ve already seen how Indian once again crowned itself King of the Baggers by barely outrunning Harley-Davidson. But the Nevada auction had a champion of its own, and its name is 1907 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank.

Described by fans as the most desirable of all Harley-Davidsons, the Strap Tank family managed to score a number of records when it comes to the sums they went for over the past few years. Back in 2015, for instance, one of them sold for $650k, making it the most expensive Harley ever sold at auction until that time.

The one we have here sold for less, but for an impressive amount nonetheless. $297k is how much someone paid for it, making the model the most expensive one to sell at this year’s event.

Coming from a private collection, the motorcycle is somewhat related to the record-setting one from 2015. It was put together by its owner, Ronald Moreschini, and with the backing of the guy who purchased the $650k Strap Tank, Lonnie Isam.

Seeing how desirable these bikes were, Moreschini set out a few years back to come up with 13 Harley-Davidson Strap Tank replica motors. While doing this, he stumbled upon an original 1907 engine that still had the original carburetor, but also on the native gas and oil tank, forks, and belt tensioning gate.

The motorcycle we have here came to be around these original parts, and was further gifted with original seat and wheel hubs. The result is so exciting, that the two-wheeler was even shown at the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum for a while.

Now it is probably heading over to another private collection, where it will most likely spend some time before it will most definitely show up for sale once more.

Highlights

  • Color Grey
  • Not for highway or public road use
  • Engine # 1877
  • Original factory engine
  • Original carburetor
  • Original gas tank and oil tank
  • Original belt tensioner
  • Original front forks
  • Original wheel hubs
  • Original seat

Creating a 1916 Harley-Davidson from only an original engine

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Recreating a historic Harley-Davidson racing model without the original parts except the original engine.

Believe it or not, it’s been 118 years since the foundations of the company we now know as Harley-Davidson were laid. Somehow, the company managed to get through two hot world wars, a cold, long one, and more near-death experiences that we care count.

Such a long history means there are more models in the company’s past than in its present (and some, might argue, more than in the future). Some are so old it’s literally impossible to come across one, and people have to turn to all sorts of gimmicks to get their hands on a historic model.

Like the guys behind this build did. Trying to bring back one of Harley’s historic racing models, a Swedish museum by the name of MC Collection got their hands on an original motorcycle engine from 1916 and built a bike around it, trying to capture the essence of what was once the Model 11K racer.

The engine belonged to a Model F, and was slapped inside a full loop frame constructed (together with the forks) by former German road racing cyclist Christian Henn. The frame presents itself just like it did on the original Harley of more than a century ago, in the so-called keystone configuration, with stressed members and steel engine plates.

This way of building racers gave them better handling but, perhaps equally as important, allowed for the cylinder to be removed with the powerplant still fitted on the bike, allowing for quick intervention during races, if they were required.

This 1916 Harley was put together in Sweden more than a decade ago, and in the meantime it made it to the U.S. It was listed as for sale during the Mecum motorcycle auction this weekend, and it got sold for $57,750. As a side note though, whoever bought it will only be using it as a museum piece, because it is not street legal.

British engineers will try to break the 376.3mph motorcycle record in a 30-ft-long vehicle

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by Ian Randall from https://www.dailymail.co.uk

Guy Martin will attempt to break the 376.3 mph motorcycle speed record in a 30-ft-long vehicle incorporating a Rolls Royce engine used in helicopters

  • British engineer and ex-bike racer Alex Macfadzean, 77, and his team designed the new ‘streamliner’ bike
  • Racer turned TV presenter Guy Martin will make the record-breaking attempt in Bolivia next year
  • Britain last held the motorcycle land-speed record in 1937 after Eric Fernihough broke 169.72 mph
  • But Italy’s Piero Taruffi took the title by an extra 3.31mph in the October of 1937 and the title has changed hands amongst Germans, Italians and Americans since

A 30ft-long vehicle sporting a Rolls Royce engine normally used in helicopters will attempt to reclaim the motorcycle land speed record for Britain.

Engineer and ex-racer Alex Macfadzean, 77, and his team designed the ‘streamliner’ bike which will make its record attempt next year at the Uyuni Salt Flat in Bolivia.

Behind the wheel will be motorcycle racer turned TV presenter Guy Martin, who will attempt to beat the current record of 376.3mph and cross the 400mph threshold.

To try to advance the record, Mr Martin will run the new streamliner on a mile-long course twice in opposite directions, as per official land-speed record rules.

The bike’s 1,200 shaft horsepower Rolls Royce engine is the same found within the Westland Lynx helicopter once employed by the British Army and the Royal Navy.

The first official motorcycle land-speed record was set in 1920 by the American racer Gene Walker 103.5mph, building on unofficial efforts dating back to 1903.

Britain last held the record for six months in 1937 after Eric Fernihough broke 169.72mph on his Brough Superior-JAP.

But Italy’s Piero Taruffi took the title by an extra 3.31mph in the October of 1937.

The title has changed hands amongst Germans, Italians and Americans ever since.

At present, the motorcycle land-speed record is held by American racer Rocky Robinson, who claimed his title at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah in 2010.

‘It is a great target and just one of those things I have to do,’ Mr Macfadzean told the Telegraph.

‘I was asked recently where the line was between commitment and obsession.

‘I laughed, because I couldn’t say.

‘I guess I have always been too obsessed to have noticed.’

Mr Macfadzean has worked with engine builders for Formula One and Moto GP racing, and designed the vehicle that broke the 200 mph threshold in the British motorcycle land-speed record back in 1991.

A decade later, he also aided US driver Don Vesco who set a four-wheeled speed record of 458.4mph in the ‘Turbinator’ — a car which, like Mr Macfadzean’s streamliner bike, was also equipped with a helicopter engine under the hood.

For their streamliner — which began construction in 2008, and is still being refined — Mr Macfadzean acquired a Westland Lynx engine from military surplus.

Before Mr Martin takes his shot at breaking the motorcycle land-speed record, the new streamliner will first be assessed both on the road and in a wind tunnel in order to refine its aerodynamic design, which was inspired by RAF Tornado aircraft.

Following this, the bike will undergo relatively ‘low-speed’ tests at 200mph on a former RAF airfield.

Mr Martin is no stranger to record-breaking rides.

In 2016, he reached 274.2 mph on a specially-designed Triumph — the highest speed ever achieved by the British motorcycle manufacturer.