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Custom Motorcycle with Three Engines

By General Posts

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Custom Motorcycle With 3 Honda CB750 Engines made with the objective of participating in Land Speed Racing.

Once in a while we come across an engineering marvel that makes us wipe our eyes and maybe even scratch our heads. Now, branding the latest case as a marvel would be an outstretch but it surely does make us carry out the last two acts. If you think you have witnessed insane aftermarket modifications that can’t be matched, this one might force you to rethink.

When you see a single motorcycle is powered by three engines, yes you read that right – three engines in one motorcycle, probably can be called MotorsCycle. You can easily judge for yourself the number and kind of mod jobs that would have been carried out. Named ‘The Galaxy’, this behemoth is powered by three bored-out CB750 motors which essentially makes it a 12-cylinder 2,508cc glory.

Idea of Three Engine Motorcycle
This motorcycle is a creation of California-based custom motorcycle builder Mitsuhiro ‘Kiyo’ Kiyonaga who intends to take this monster to Land Speed Racing. Kiyonaga started his aftermarket workshop in Los Angeles in 2013 and his first project ‘Cherry Blossom’ was a custom-built stretched land speed racer that featured a turbocharged Honda CB750 engine housed in a frame built from scratch.

A few years later he followed it up with another 1970s top fuel-style bike but powered by twin motors this time and named it ‘Gekko’. Even though the Galaxy was Kiyo’s pet project which he has dreamt of since his childhood, it was seriously materialised only when his first two motorcycles were acquired by Haas Moto Museum. Work on the bike only started when owner of the museum, approved and officially commissioned the project.

Galaxy- Powertrain specs
Coming to its specification, Galaxy draws its energy from three four-pot motors sourced from F2 large port heads. Each of these engines has been bored-out to 836cc has been completely rebuilt with balanced and lightened crankshafts, performance cams, oversized stainless steel valves and heavy-duty connecting rods. Special care was taken to ensure that each internal configuration was in line with the original spec.

The motors are held by a three-piece chassis that constitute a tubular upper frame, and two huge engine mounting plates that also act as a rigid swingarm. Front half of Galaxy has been integrated into the frame which hides the pump, fuel tank, battery and all other functional components under its skin.

That tail section is a hand-built aluminium piece that can hold up to 9.5 litres of gasoline for the oil-sucking engines. A tiny port found at back is essentially an outlet for the engine breather hose.

The alloy wheels made out of aluminium are a piece of art with holes cut out on the front wheel in order to limit the effect of crosswinds at high speeds. With stretched-out ergonomics, ‘rider triangle’ was carefully calculated that offers impressive control and grip when racing across salt tracks.

The designer claims that every component on the bike has been modified and built by hand without aid of any designing software which deserves high applause. The Galaxy now finds shelter in the same museum as Kiyo’s previous two projects. However, Kiyo is yet to tick off all boxes and that would happen only when he takes to Land Speed Racing.

How a Florida woman helped change the motorcycle industry

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by Daniel Figueroa IV from https://www.wmnf.org

These days, motorcyclists live and die by their Dyno sheets, the ultimate measure of an engine’s power. But when the machines came out in the late 80s, it was a women in Florida who bought one of the first units and helped reshape the world of motorcycling.

Fifty years later Pam Brown remembers how she got her start wrenching on engines with her dad. They’d work on Volkswagen parts together because he happened to need a hand and she was the one who was around.

But when he bought her brothers some single-speed mini bikes, small motorcycles, they were off limits.

“He said I could not ride a motorcycle because you are a girl,” Brown recalled. “Girls don’t ride motorcycles.”

Fortunately for her, Brown’s neighbor had a crush and a full-fledged motorcycle.

“Jimmy Keeler, that’s right” she said. “Eighty cc Binelli.”

He let her take a ride. She let the clutch out a little too quick and popped an accidental wheelie, sped down a hill and went – maybe a little too quickly – into a turn. But she made it. And she fell in love.

Brown is one half of the couple behind Cycle-Rama, a high performance machine shop in Pinellas Park known over the world for building some of the most coveted aftermarket engine parts in the V-Twin motorcycle world. She’s been there for 38 of the shop’s 45-year existence.

But it was in 1989 that Pam Brown put her foot down and made a purchase that helped reshape the world of powersports.

The chassis dynamometer

In the late 80s, Mark Dobeck invented the first chassis dynamometer. Before that, a mechanic had to ride a bike to tune it and measuring horsepower and torque was mostly a guessing game. Dobeck’s Dyno allowed bikes to be tested and tuned right in the shop.

Henry Tecza was one of the first to have a dynamometer in his Las Vegas Shop. He said those early adopters changed the game.

“I mean, you had a piece of equipment that was rare in the motorcycle industry,” Tecza said. “It kind of put you ahead of anybody else as having the latest tuning abilities.”

With the dyno, motorcycle mechanics were able to test the power claims made by parts manufacturers and fine-tune a motorcycle’s performance to pull the most out of a bike. These days the machines are staples.

“It’s not uncommon for every serious shop to have a Dyno. It’s a necessary tool.”

Oh my gosh, it’s a girl riding that motorcycle

By 1989 Brown had been in the motorcycle world for almost a decade. She got her start with a parts distributor in Atlanta. She was one of few women in the shop and quickly started out performing some of the men. That earned her a promotion to being the only woman delivery driver and eventually the only woman in the sales department. Women ridership has doubled in the last decade. But at that time, women weren’t prominent in the motorcycle world.

“Even just riding motorcycles,” she said. “When I would get off my motorcycle people were shocked that ‘Oh my gosh it’s a girl riding that motorcycle.’”

The job in Atlanta led to her meeting Wes Brown, Cycle-Rama’s founder. After a few years in Atlanta she moved to Florida to be closer to Wes. She took a job in Tampa with another distributor, but they wanted her to use her voice for more than selling.

“If I’m giving you the right information, you’re gonna buy stuff from me and I know this because I’d been doing it for two-and-a-half years,” Brown said. “But they wanted me to be vulgar. They wanted me to be like a phone sex line and I didn’t agree with that and I wouldn’t do it.”

So, she started working with Wes full time. Within a year, they were married.

Changing the game

When Dobeck came out with his chassis dynamometer, Pam Brown saw it’s potential. Her husband wasn’t so sure.

“I didn’t convince him so much as I strong-armed him into it,” she said. “I said ‘with or without you, I’m buying this machine.’”

Not only did she buy it, she was the one who ran it.

“I used cardboard and duct tape and pieces of plywood and Pepsi cans to change the airflow just to see what would happen,” she said.

Cycle-Rama soon had the first dyno machine in Florida and one of the only ones on the east coast. Companies reached out to have their products put on the Dyno. Brown was able to test all kinds of new parts and help design the company’s own performance components.

Dobeck remembers those early days.

“I must’ve dropped their name a hundred times,” he said. “Say oh, well Cycle-Rama has one. It was a great relationship.”

Nothing like getting mansplained your own parts

Now 59, Pam Brown is still respected through the industry. John Dahmer owns Darkhorse Crankworks. Darkhorse specializes in motorcycle bottom ends, while Cycle-Rama specializes in top ends. He said in an industry still dominated by men, Pam Brown is not one question.

“The motorcycle market I think as a whole can be very tough on women. It’s a bit more male-dominated industry,” Dahmer said. “A lot of guys will either test her or challenge her as far as her knowledge. She knows it inside and out and when you know it inside and out somebody trying to challenge it isn’t going to fare very well.”

But Brown said that doesn’t stop them from trying. Even when it comes to parts she helped design.

“Nothing like getting mansplained your own parts,” she said.

She doesn’t let it get to her though and said other women in motorcycling shouldn’t either. At the end of the day, she’s still one of the best at doing what she loves – helping diagnose and fix engines.

“I ask a lot of questions and then I can see it in my mind because I’ve taken motorcycles apart,” she said. “If I could just do that all day, that would be awesome to me. Just take motorcycles apart to see what happened.”

Motul Set For 2021 MotoGP Campaign With Team Suzuki And Pramac Racing

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from https://www.scoop.co.nz

Motul continues winning partnership with reigning MotoGP champions Team Suzuki- Motul and PRAMAC Racing sign exclusive deal for 2021

The 2020 MotoGP World Championship season was an incredible year, which saw Team Suzuki and Motul claim a clean sweep across the Drivers and Teams Titles. The famed Japanese manufacturer will continue with riders Alex Rins and Joan Mir, a line up that remains unchanged since 2019, with a clear aim of repeating the championship successes in 2021.

Motul will continue as the Official Lubricant Partner of the Suzuki factory team, extending the close working relationship between the two brands that have delivered success at the top flight of motorcycle racing for the past 32 years. This partnership has pinned its hopes on the championship-winning Suzuki GSX-RR, which has seen only minor upgrades due to a MotoGP engine freeze over the winter. The aim is clear for 2021 – to repeat the success of 2020 and achieve back-to-back titles.

Motul also confirms a key technical partnership with PRAMAC Racing for the MotoGP World Championship, inking a three-year deal which will see Motul and PRAMAC Racing competing at the top flight of motorbike racing until 2023. Jorge Martin and Johann Zarco will be leading the charge in 2021, both on the highly competitive Ducati Desmosedici GP bike which scored 5 podium finishes in the hands of PRAMAC Racing during the 2020 season.

This partnership extends away from the race track, where Motul Heavy Duty will be working closely with PRAMAC’s industrial applications in the energy and material handling sector. Motul will provide first fill lubricants at factory level for PowerGen equipment, providing high-performance diesel and gas lubricants to improve mechanical efficiency.

The 2021 MotoGP World Championship season begins this weekend, at the Losail International Circuit in Qatar on the 26-28 of March 2021. The action begins with the two Free Practice sessions on Friday, with Qualifying on Saturday and the Grand Prix on Sunday.

Royal Enfield Tops Clean Manufacturing Test

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Royal Enfield Tops Clean Manufacturing Test With BMW, Honda, KTM, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Ducati

Japanese motorcycle manufacturers along with their European counterparts are considered clean enough barring those from Italian manufacturers.

Ever wondered which bike manufacturer has the cleanest running motors. No, we are not exactly talking about emission standards of a motorcycle which are very much equal thanks to emission standards. We are talking about the preciseness of the company’s manufacturing process which results in minimum quantities of impurities getting through an engine from an assembly line.

Test by FortNine
FortNine recently collaborated with a laboratory that evaluated similar criteria for various car makers across the world. The lab tests the first service oil from various manufacturers and checks the presence of impurities of different magnitudes and sizes which are a result of less than a perfect manufacturing process.

A similar evaluation was conducted for several motorcycle manufacturers. FortNine collected first service engine oil from twelve random brands of motorcycles and sent them to the labs for testing. These brands are Royal Enfield, BMW, KTM, Yamaha, Kawasaki, Honda, Triumph, Suzuki, Harley Davidson, Aprilia, Ducati and Yin Xiang.

The results which arrived recently, around seven months later, might be a little surprising to motorcycle enthusiasts, especially those from India. Royal Enfield has beaten the rest, and managed to top the list in the clean manufacturing process test.

Quantity & Nature of Impurities
The impurity measured were of various sizes with particles ranging from less than 5 micrometres to 100 micrometres. The laboratory even tried evaluating larger particles but some of the samples were so messed up that they formed alliances with smaller sized impurities which made it hard for scientists to make an accurate reading. However, readings taken were pretty consistent for impurity particles of all sizes. Take a look at the detailed test video below.

While impurities such as carbon and metal shavings are expected to be part of any automobile assembly line and likely to trickle into an engine, the findings suggested presence of other uncommon impurity materials such as cloth fibre, sand, plastic, chips of wood and others. 100ml of each sample was tested for the quality of engine oil, the presence of carbon content in it and the magnitude of impurities.

Yin Xiang Performs Worst
However, impurities in the Chinese manufacturer Yin Xiang’s sample were so large and frequent that scientists could only test 25ml of the sample and multiplied the result into four. No wonder that the manufacturer recorded over an astounding 11.88 million impurity particles in its sample which measured less than 5 micrometres. Two Italian manufacturers Aprilia and Ducati were the next with impurities worth 2.3 and 1.8 million respectively.

Iconic American motorcycle brand Harley Davidson also did not have a favourable result as it fared just a little better than its Italian counterparts. Rest of the makers were considered as clean enough at least for now. While most motors will not have a problem complying with stricter emission norms in future, the Italians and the Chinese manufacturers will have their task cut out.

Royal Enfield-Cleanest of All
The surprising part was that the list was topped by none other than India’s Royal Enfield which had the least number of impurity particulates in its sample. Therefore, it is considered to be one of the cleanest motors, if not the cleanest, in the world.

Currently, lead is used to manufacture spinning parts of motorcycles which is soft enough to absorb impurities rather than grinding them. However, stricter emission norms will ban use of heavy metals which means no more lead. This will pose further challenges to manufacturers in coming days

 

Vance & Hines Launches New Four-Valve Suzuki Racing Engine

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Racing Applications include Pro Stock, Pro Mod and Pro Street Classes

https://vanceandhines.com/

February 1, 2021 – Santa Fe Springs CA – Vance & Hines today launched the company’s long-expected four-valve motor for Suzuki GS-based drag racers. The new powerplant will debut at the NHRA Gator Nationals in Gainesville FL in mid- March. Several teams will be competing with the new Suzuki-based motor and a new Vance & Hines-designed chassis at that event.

“The scale of this launch is unprecedented in the drag racing world and it highlights our company’s technical capabilities,” said Vance & Hines President Mike Kennedy. “This engine and the cylinder head design are applicable to several racing classes and easily adaptable to every team that is currently running a two-valve Suzuki GS. This launch is a proud moment for Vance & Hines and hopefully will net many victories for our Suzuki riders in 2021 and beyond.”

The new four-valve head modernizes the technology in Suzuki drag racing motors. It replaces the two-valve design which was introduced in 1998 and it retains the 1850 cubic centimeters engine displacement.

For the first time, Vance & Hines has integrated finger follower technology rather than a shim-under-bucket design in a drag racing cylinder head, which allows for less mass in the valve train and increased RPM.

The intake and exhaust port spigots are modular, so they can be adapted to different air boxes and exhaust pipes without redesigning or remanufacturing the head itself. This allows the new head to be used not only in NHRA’s Pro Stock Motorcycle class, but also in the Pro Mod and Pro Street classes.

Design credit for the motor, code named “VHIL18504V,” goes to six-time NHRA champion Andrew Hines. The head was completely developed in Solid Works CAD design and was a fully functional running model prior to production.

“The 1850cc motor is approaching nearly 400hp and we believe that this is just the start of a new era of Suzuki drag racing championships,” said Andrew Hines. “Right now, this four-valve design is more powerful than the best of our two-valve motors. And there’s room to get better and faster with this architecture.”

Vance & Hines is the preferred provider of racing equipment for many teams in drag racing. The company is known for fully supporting customers by having all the necessary components in stock and available for racing teams. Currently Vance & Hines is taking orders for complete motors or individual cylinder head packages. The new chassis, which leverages the learnings from thousands of runs in NHRA competition, is available as well.

Harley-Davidson Milwaukee Eight Gets Bigger and Meaner

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Harley-Davidson Milwaukee Eight Gets Bigger and Meaner with New 131 S&S Kit

Do you know that saying “there’s no replacement for displacement?” It applies to all types of internal combustion engines, fitted on both cars or motorcycles, and has been the driving force behind many stunning machines over the years.

In the motorcycle world, Harley’s Milwaukee Eight engine is one of the most famous powerplants. Part of the big twin family that has been around for eight decades, it was introduced in 2016 with a total of eight valves – four for each cylinder – hence the name.

Generally, these engines come in three displacement options, namely 107, 114, and 117 ci. There’s an even bigger variant on the market, the Screamin’ Eagle Milwaukee Eight 131, “the biggest, most powerful street-compliant engine Harley-Davidson has ever created,” but this one is offered as a crate solution.

Those looking to get more cubic inches and more power have several solutions at their disposal. The latest comes from S&S and is designed for Milwaukee Eights fitted on bikes from 2017 to the present day.

Comprising upgrades like a new-design forged piston and 4.25-inch cylinders, the kit can take engines all the way to 131 ci (2.1 liters), but only when paired with the company’s stroker crank – we’re told the upgrade works with stock crankcases as well. According to S&S, the stock engine height remains after the kit is fitted, and so do the original serial numbers.

There are three variants of the kit available, namely Wrinkle Black with highlighted fins, Wrinkle Black with non-highlighted fins, and Black Granite with highlighted fins.

Regardless of the version, the price is $1,299.95, but that increases to $1,529.95 when opting for the stroker crank as well. Still, that should be peanuts given what the hardware offers, according to S&S product manager Grant Hilligass.

“We build our big bore kits and cranks to much tighter tolerances and with higher quality materials than the factory parts,” he states.

See https://www.sscycle.com/

Meet the Ducati master re-creating Isle of Man-winning motorcycle

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by Ellie Honeybone from https://www.abc.net.au

You may be forgiven for assuming the world’s leading manufacturer of Ducati bevel drive engine parts would live in a bustling city, perhaps in Italy or the United States, somewhere central and close to consumers.

But in fact, this talented engineer and self-described “petrol head” lives in a tiny historic town, deep in the forests of south-west WA.

Even though shipping his handmade engine parts around the world from Nannup is a logistical nightmare, Brook Henry wouldn’t have it any other way.

A family business

Mr Henry grew up surrounded by Ducatis.

His older brothers imported and distributed the high-performance motorcycle brand in New Zealand from the late 1960s through to the 1980s.

“I spent pretty well all my time at the workshop, fixing, racing and working on Ducati bevel drive twins and singles,” Mr Henry said.

“I also did an apprenticeship outside that business as a toolmaker, but I never liked doing toolmaking and I always wanted to go back to motorcycles.”

That love of motorcycles grew and continued for the next 40 years with Mr Henry now a household name and ‘master’ in the Ducati world.

He has travelled extensively, inspected designs inside Ducati’s Bologna factory and even appeared on bike lover Jay Leno’s US television show.

After settling down first in Perth and then further south in Nannup, Mr Henry developed a business building, designing and shipping bevel drive parts, engines and complete motorcycles across the world.

Pandemic revives restoration projects

There are only so many original bevel drive Ducatis in existence, making Brook Henry’s business incredibly niche.

These bikes were built during the 1970s and 80s and made famous after legendary British champion Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man race in 1978.

When the world went into COVID-19 lockdown during early 2020, many owners of bevel drive bikes decided it was the right time to blow off the cobwebs and reignite their restoration projects.

“I’ve never been so busy because guys who bought bevel drives put them in the back of a shed and chucked a rag over them,” Mr Henry said.

“The wives got sick of their husbands being in the kitchen and told them to go out and find something to do in the shed.

“So they went out and pulled the cover off the old Ducati bevel drive and started looking around to where they could get the parts to start putting it back together.

“Our customer base worldwide has been huge with COVID because anyone who’s got a bevel drive has gone and started working on it.”

The next chapter

In addition to supplying global customers with all the parts they need for their pandemic restorations, Mr Henry has another project in the works.

Through what he calls a “crazy set of circumstances”, he purchased the drawings for the original engine used in the late Mike Hailwood’s Isle of Man race winning bike, of which only a handful were ever made.

“We’ve actually been talked into making 12 exact replicas of Hailwood’s bike,” he said.

“We decided that we would make a limited run of them and the number we decided on was 12, because that was his racing number.”

While there will only be a dozen of these Hailwood recreations made, the engine — dubbed the ‘Ritorno’ — is available on its own with the approval of the Ducati factory.

“The business is expanding at 100 miles an hour because people worldwide want that engine and want parts for it,” Mr Henry said.

“So we’re gathering speed at a frightening rate at the moment, but I’m so passionate about it and I love what I do.”

Government funding leads to expansion

Mr Henry has big plans for expansion after receiving a $113,000 Regional Economic Development grant from the WA Government.

The investment will be used to employ more staff and purchase state of the art manufacturing equipment to build Mr Henry’s own version of the iconic bevel drive engine.

“I like to keep the outside of the engine looking the same where I can,” he said.

“And now I’ve got the opportunity to basically build my own internals and to improve on the existing engine.”

Despite being extremely busy these days, Mr Henry still enjoys the occasional ride through the scenic forest roads near his home.

“They say that motorcycles are built to transport people, but Ducatis are built to transport the soul,” he said.

“The only thing is, you do not have any control over emus and wildlife, kangaroos running out of the bush, all that sort of thing.

“So I really don’t want to hurt myself, because I’ve got too much to do — and it’s a damn shame I’m 66 and not 36.”

Video: TMC Dumont is a 300hp motorcycle fitted with a Rolls-Royce aircraft engine

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by Jahla Seppanen from https://www.themanual.com

When you’re a retired Formula One driver, what else can you do in your free time except build mind-bending concept motorcycles? In the case of Tarso Marques of Brazil, that’s exactly what he’s doing with the insane TMC Dumont motorcycle.

Yes, it’s still a concept so, no, you can’t drive it yet. In fact, you might be wondering how it even works because the construction shouldn’t make sense in real life.

This hub-less bike swaps a traditional car engine for a 1960s Rolls-Royce aircraft engine, creating an absolutely sick design with a body aesthetic that is futuristic, svelt, and should definitely be in the next 007 movie.

Anatomically, the aircraft engine is positioned where a standard motorcycle engine and fuel tank would be, but takes up an enormous amount of space. Basically, as much as a full frame, radiator —the works. The massive 36-inch wheels are essentially spoke-less and completely open in the center, so with the 300-horsepower engine, we’re hoping the brake disk and caliper have something to hold on to … because we can’t see it.

Based on the low-riding profile of the seat and engine, it’s questionable how the bike could sit above the ground, but it does. At least, the concept does. Just pray for a road without speed bumps.

Some motorcycle enthusiasts have questioned the safety and turning abilities that would result from having the back “wheel” so close to the rider — hello, wedgie or mega backside tire burn — and have called the bike “impractical.” That being said, TMC Dumont drove away with the “Best of Show” award at the 2018 Daytona Bike Week.

This isn’t the first time a motorcycle fanatic has strapped an airplane engine to their hog. Back in 2013, the Red Baron bike featured the 150-horsepower, nine-cylinder Rotec Radial engine used in WWI-era planes. However, in terms of pure looks, we’ve never seen anything like TMC Dumont. The motorcycle has been compared to everything from a piece of art to a Tron bike — ultra-sleek, and record-breaking.

Previewing the other passion projects Marques is developing with his brand Tarso Marques Concepts makes us mildly jealous, somewhat shook, and overall excited to finally get back out on a bike.

 

Ducati Multistrada V4 Engine Revealed as 170 HP Granturismo

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Come November 4, a new Ducati bike will be revealed. Called Multistrada V4, the two-wheeler is supposed to be the world’s first production motorcycle to be fitted with front and rear radars. But perhaps of more importance to us is the fact that it will use a brand new V4 engine, one the bike maker revealed on Thursday (October 15).

Because the powerplant is meant to animate the fourth and most advanced generation of the Multistrada V4, nothing was left to chance and, starting from the existing tech and taking inspiration from MotoGP, a beautiful piece of hardware was created.

Somewhat smaller that the version it replaces (85 mm shorter, 95 mm lower, but 20 mm wider), the engine is also light. It weighs 66.7 kg (147 pounds), 1.2 kg (2.6 pounds) less than the current record holder, the Testastretta twin-cylinder used on the previous Multistrada 1260.

1,158cc in displacement, the engine makes use of a new distribution with a spring valve return system, part chain/part gear – timing distribution, and a counter-rotating crankshaft. All this and a host of other engineering tricks allow the V4 Granturismo to spit out a massive amount of power: 170 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a maximum torque of 125 Nm at 8,750 rpm.

As said, apart from the engine the new Multistrada bike will bring to the table rider-assistance technologies that are not to be found anywhere else in the motorcycle industry.

More precisely, the bike comes with a front radar that governs the Adaptive Cruise Control (AAC) technology. It calculates and adjusts the distance from other vehicles, when the bike’s speed is between 30 and 160 km/h (18 to 99 mph).

At the rear a similar system will act as a type of early warning system and blind spot detector, alerting the rider when a vehicle approaches from behind at high speed.

So, we know most of the things we needed to know about the new Multistrada V4. All we have to do now is sit tight for a couple more weeks and wait for to Ducati to actually show it in the metal.

 

New Harley-Davidson Stage IV Kits Turn Softails into Meaner Screamin’ Eagles

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It was only at the end of August that Harley-Davidson announced the availability of “the biggest, most powerful street-compliant engine Harley-Davidson has ever created,” the crate Screamin’ Eagle 131. But since a complete engine swap might seem a bit extreme for some, here come some upgrade kits for a slightly smaller tuning job.

There are a number of them made available this week by the Milwaukee bike maker, dedicated to Softail bikes manufactured from 2018 and Touring motorcycles made from 2017.

The biggest and most extreme is the 114ci to 131ci upgrade, one that is described by the company as “the largest Harley-Davidson bolt-on engine upgrade to any Milwaukee-Eight motor.” Sporting things like CNC-ported heads with 1 mm bigger valves, high-lift SE8-517 cam, high compression pistons and a 64 mm throttle body and intake manifold, the kit gets the engine’s power all the way up to 124 hp and 135 ft-lb of torque – these levels are achieved when the upgrade kit is backed by the Screamin’ Eagle Street Cannon Mufflers.

Next up is the 107ci to 128ci upgrade, featuring, naturally, about the same changes. In this case, the output levels go to the same horsepower rating as with the larger kit, 124 hp, but torque output is somewhat lower, at 127 ft-lb of torque – Screamin’ Eagle Street Cannon Mufflers are needed here as well.

The 114ci/117ci to 122ci upgrade also brings increased power. Depending on the bike it is used on, there are up to 15 percent more horsepower and 13 percent more torque squeezed out of the engine. Last but not least is the 107ci to 119ci upgrade that adds 23 percent more horsepower and 17 percent more torque.

The new kits are already out, and you can find more information about them on the bike maker’s website. You should note that Harley offers 24-month vehicle limited warranty when the kits are dealer-installed within 60 days of vehicle purchase, or 12 month otherwise.