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Yamaha Introduces Two New High-Performance Full Synthetic Engine Oils

By | General Posts

Yamalube Maximizes Reliability, Dependability, and Durability of Proven Off-Road Engines

/EIN News/ — MARIETTA, Ga., Dec. 02, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Yamaha Motor Corp., USA, today introduces the GP Racing Spec and Hi-Performance full synthetic Yamalube engine oils for superior performance applications. Yamalube is the only oil specifically made for the unique demands, operating characteristics, and specifications of Yamaha engines. These two new additions round out the Yamalube engine oil lineup, providing quality options for a variety of users and environments:  from weekend adventure seekers, to pure-sport, racing enthusiasts.

Yamalube’s new GP Racing Spec and Hi-Performance full synthetic oils are both available in SAE 10W-40 4T, with a modern balanced formulation designed for the superior performance and maximum durability necessary for today’s advanced, high-revving engine parts. All Yamalube engine oils are proprietary, thoroughly tested, and made in corroboration with Yamaha engine designers and global oil engineers to meet and exceed industry standards, including the Japanese Automotive Standards Organization for four stroke engines (JASO MA) and the American Petroleum Institute’s (API) SL requirements.

As the pinnacle of Yamalube’s ultra-high-performance engine oils, the GP Racing Spec is the newest generation of Yamalube’s 50-plus year lineage of competition blends. Derived from the same oil used in Yamaha’s YZR-M1 MotoGP bike, the new GP Racing Spec oil is blended using advanced additives for high thermal resistance, making it the ideal oil for the pure sport YXZ1000R and YFZ450R in closed course racing and other extreme environments. Classified as a JASO MA2, the GP Racing Spec oil maximizes engine power and enhances overall clutch and shifting performance with its extreme anti-wear and anti-friction properties. With an advanced-additive system designed to maximize a racing engine’s power and effectiveness, the GP Racing Spec oil is recommended for use in a maximum of two motos before being changed.

Classified as JASO MA for everyday full synthetic use in any of Yamaha’s Proven Off-Road ATV or Side-by-Side vehicle requiring 10W-40, Yamalube’s new Hi-Performance engine oil provides superior performance, durability, thermal stability and fuel efficiency by using only fully synthesized base oil.

Yamaha’s proprietary 4-stroke engine oils are backed by an industry-exclusive Yamalube Advantage, providing a 20-year or 100,000-mile (5,000 hours of operation on vehicles without an odometer) limited engine warranty on the performance of a qualifying vehicles. Further details are available at YamalubeAdvantage.com.

Learn more about Yamalube, Yamaha Genuine Accessories, Yamaha apparel, and more at ShopYamaha.com. To view the entire Proven Off-Road ATV and SxS lineup and learn more, visit YamahaOutdoors.com. Connect with Yamaha on social media via @YamahaOutdoors or search the following hashtags on all platforms: #Yamaha #ProvenOffRoad #REALizeYourAdventure #AssembledInUSA #Yamaha10YearBelt #Yamalube

BMW Unveils The Secrets Of Its New 1,800cc Boxer

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

BMW is working on the development of its biggest Boxer engine yet. The details surrounding the new engine, however, have been scarce, despite the manufacturer showcasing not one but two concepts built around the engine. The House of Munich has managed to keep the mill’s specs secret. Until now. The company has finally opened up and shared the details of the new engine. Here are the big lines.

We got our first look at the Big Boxer in December 2018, when the 1,800cc mill showed up in the R18 Departed custom design presented at the Yokohama Hot Rod Custom Show. It then popped again in Revival Cycles’ birdcage bobber custom. BMW finally came out with its own design in May, dubbed the R18 Concept.

We now know that the model is heading for production and that it will launch sometime in 2020. Until now, however, the engine that underlines the new big German cruiser has remained a bit of a mystery. The displacement and the number of cylinders were the only available specs. Not anymore! We now get a full portrait of what’s going on inside the massive block.

First off, to be specific, the engine’s displacement is 1,802cc rather than the round number it’s been referred to for the past few months. The two cylinders have a 107mm bore and the aluminum pistons, a 100mm stroke. The engine weighs a staggering 244.3 lb—including the transmission and the intake system.

The engine’s over-head valve with dual camshaft set up is inspired by BMW’s early Boxers like the one found in the 1936 R5. To avoid excessive vibration of the crankshaft caused by the cylinders’ massive volume, an additional bearing has been added at the center of the shaft.

What about power figures? We have those too! The new ginormous Boxer is expected to produce 91 horsepower and 116.5 lb-ft of torque at 3,000 rpm. BMW adds that the engine will max out at 5,750 rpm.

Availability of the BMW R18 (provided that will remain the name once it hits production) has yet to be announced.

For those of you familiar with all the technical lingo, I have joined the full BMW press release if you want to learn more about the finer details of the new engine.

BMW Motorrad says ‘Big Boxer’ is its most powerful boxer engine ever
by Sven Gustafson from https://news.yahoo.com/

BMW is dishing new details on the newly developed but throwback-style 2-cylinder boxer engine that features in four Motorrad concept bikes unveiled over the past year that look increasingly likely to presage production motorcycles.

Dubbed the “Big Boxer” by BMW, the 1,802 cc (1.8-liter) flat-twin features in the Concept R18/2, shown earlier this month at EICMA, the Concept R18, and the Motorrad-suppported concepts the Departed by ZON and Revival Cycles’ Birdcage. It’s said to be the most powerful BMW boxer engine, making 91 horsepower and 116 pound-feet of torque and is said to balance high pulling power and running smoothness.

BMW says the engine harkens to the first air-cooled Motorrad boxer engines that debuted in 1923 and stayed in production for about 70 years, with the same overhead valve drive and separate engine and transmission housings and built to be reliable and easy to maintain. but the new Big Boxer is air- and oil-cooled, of course, and the quenched- and tempered-steel crankshaft has an additional main bearing at the center to prevent against unwanted bending vibrations in the large-volume cylinders. It also has a vertically split aluminum engine housing. A wet sump lubrication system supplies the lubricating and cooling oil via a two-stage oil pump and a sleeve-type chain driven by the crankshaft.

It was also inspired by the 2-cylinder engines of the R5 and R51, from 1936 to 1941, and the R51/2, from 1950-51, that featured two camshaft driven by the crankshaft via a sleeve-type chain and similarly positioned to the left and right above the crankshaft. That makes for shorter pushrods and reduced moving masses, among other advantages, plus improved precision and higher speed stability. Rather than employ modern hydraulic elements for valve clearance, the new engine also borrows the legacy Motorrad boxer method of employing adjusting one screw and a lock nut for each steel valve.

The transmission is a constant mesh six-speed, with a reverse gear available as an option, and torque transmitted to the rear wheel via a propeller-shaft or universal-shaft drive. Both the propeller shaft and the universal joint are nickel-plated and open in another wink to Motorrad history on models through 1955.

Harley-Davidson’s® First Adventure Touring and Streetfighter Models Debut with All-New Revolution® Max Engines

By | General Posts

Models Beckon a New Era of Middleweight Capability, Performance, and Attitude from Harley-Davidson

Displayed for the first time publicly at EICMA in Milan, Harley-Davidson® is showcasing two all-new middleweight motorcycles, including the release of information surrounding the latest signature Harley-Davidson® V-Twin engine – the Revolution® Max. The powerful all-new 60-degree V-Twin has been designed for a new range of Harley-Davidson motorcycles in two different guises – 1250cc in the new Harley-Davidson Pan America™ and 975cc in the Harley-Davidson® Bronx™. Harley-Davidson® first announced expansion into new segments including new middleweight offerings in its More Roads to Harley-Davidson® accelerated plan for growth in July 2018.  These exhilarating new models will both launch in late 2020 extending the iconic brand into new market segment.

Pan America™

The Harley-Davidson Pan America™ is an all-new advanced adventure touring multi-purpose motorcycle equal parts campfire, wanderlust, and grit. The Pan America™ is a two-wheel multi-tool built to endure, designed to explore, and engineered for the unknown.

Bronx™

The new Harley-Davidson® Revolution® Max powertrain is also at the heart of an all new Bronx™. This middleweight streetfighter model rolls with an unapologetic attitude and performance to match.

Powering both the new Pan America™ and Bronx models is the new liquid-cooled 975cc and 1,250cc Revolution® Max engine. Created to power a range of new Harley-Davidson® models, the Revolution® Max is designed to offer flexible performance with a broad powerband that builds to a surge of high-RPM power. Minimizing weight and maximizing performance, the Revolution® Max provides a narrow powertrain profile that is integrated into the motorcycle as a stressed member of the frame to enhance center of gravity and handling. The fully balanced powertrain has an internal counter balancer that mitigates primary engine vibration to enhance rider comfort and improve vehicle durability. Its design is bold and contoured, classic and contemporary, strong and svelte – a representation of Harley-Davidson® performance and style.

Revolution® Max 1250 Engine Performance Targets

  • Displacement 1250cc
  • More than 145 horsepower
  • More than 90 ft. lbs. peak torque

Revolution® Max 975 Engine Performance Targets

  • Displacement 975cc
  • More than 115 horsepower
  • More than 70 ft. lbs. peak torque

Revolution® Max Engine Technical Features

  • Liquid-Cooled V-Twin Architecture
  • Since 1909 the V-Twin engine has been the centerpiece for legendary Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. This lineage continues into the middleweight performance space with the Revolution® Max engine.
  • A 60-degree vee angle of the cylinders provides space for dual down draft throttle bodies that maximize air flow and increase performance.
  • Liquid cooling maintains a controlled engine temperature for consistent performance in changing environmental and riding situations.

High Performance Development Collaboration– Braking and Tire

To optimize performance of the new Pan America™ and Bronx™ models, Harley-Davidson® tapped into the expertise of world class component manufacturers to deliver bespoke solutions for braking and tire performance. For braking, Harley-Davidson® collaborated with Brembo® to create a new radial monoblock four-piston caliper that combines sharp edges with softer curves designed to create a style that complements the personality of the bike and delivers outstanding braking feel and capability. For tires, Michelin® and Harley-Davidson® have worked closely to develop co-branded tires for each motorcycle model that optimize performance, feel and grip in all conditions.

Introducing the PowerPlus Engine

By | General Posts

Indian Motorcycles are delivering their all-new liquid-cooled PowerPlus V-twin, which is now the most powerful engine in its class.

We have raised the bar for American motorcycles with our most powerful engine to date, the PowerPlus. The all-new 108 cu in, liquid-cooled V-twin engine delivers a class leading 122 hp and 128 ft-lbs of torque, establishing a new standard for V-twin performance.

Tested, Refined, Proven
We put the PowerPlus through the industry’s most rigorous development and testing program. We piled on almost one million miles of simulated testing, including state-of-the-art dyno testing and over 250,000 miles on the road.

Power you can depend on
The PowerPlus motor’s overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder deliver incredible V-twin power. Hydraulic valve lash adjusters and hydraulic camshaft chain tensioners make it easy to maintain and reliable.

All new powertrain
Six-speed transmission with true overdrive, assist clutch to reduce effort and three ride modes – Rain, Standard and Sport. Now riders can customize throttle mappings and traction control settings to their riding preferences.

Iconic heritage
A nod to Indian Motorcycle’s iconic history, the new PowerPlus motor is named after one of our original motorcycles, produced from 1916 to 1924.

Modern performance

  • Engine Displacement: 108 cu in (1769 cc)
  • Power: 122 hp at 5,500 RPM
  • Torque: 128 ft-lbs at 3,800 RPM
  • Maximum Engine Speed: 6,500 RPM
  • Architecture: 60-degree V-twin, liquid-cooled
  • Timing: Overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder
  • Transmission: Six-speed with true overdrive, constant mesh
  • Clutch: Assist clutch

Our all-new liquid-cooled PowerPlus V-twin is the most powerful engine in its class. With overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder delivering a blistering 122hp and 128 ft-lbs of torque, it redefines American performance.

 

Hennessey’s Venom F5 engine bench tested at a furious 1,817 horsepower

By | General Posts

by Loz Blain from https://newatlas.com

It’s only been live for a week, but we’ve already had to update our list of the world’s most powerful cars, after Hennessey Performance surprised itself with an extreme dyno reading.

The Venom F5 is the car Hennessey hopes will demolish not only the fastest production car record now held by Bugatti, but also the 0-400-0 record recently reclaimed by Koenigsegg. With a long enough piece of road, there’s every chance this wild machine could be the first to break 500 km/h (310.7 mph), which is the next nice round number to aim at since the Chiron hit 300 mph (483 km/h) last month. That’s if Koenigsegg’s Jesko doesn’t get there first.

To claim the record, the Venom will need power. Lots and lots of power, to fight through the massive force of wind resistance you get at speeds more than four times faster than highway limits. Up until this morning, Hennessey was saying the Venom F5 would make some 1,600 horsepower, a truly staggering total and enough to place it equal fifth on our list of the most powerful production cars available, alongside the Jesko and the Chiron Super Sport 300+.

But the engine hadn’t been dyno tested until now. And while 1,600 horses was the target, even John Hennessey himself appeared surprised with the bench test readout of 1,817 hp and 1,193 lb-ft (1,617.5 Nm) of torque.

“We exceeded our target horsepower number. Actually, we blew our target number out of the water by delivering over 1,800 horsepower,” said Hennessey. “The F5 engine has a very broad power band with over 1,000 lb-ft of torque available from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. Give it the full throttle and it’s the most furious engine that we have ever built. Thus, we gave our F5 engine a special name: ‘Fury.’”

Fury indeed. Check out the rage in action on the dyno below, and imagine that sound happening when you put your foot down in a lightweight, sub-3,000-lb (sub-1,361-kg) hypercar.

And how might you squeeze 1,800 hp out of a 6.6-liter, twin turbo V8, you might well ask? Well, Hennessey has seen fit to publish a detailed set of components and specifications, which we have reproduced in full below.

Hennessey Venom F5 V8 Engine Specifications:

  • Power: 1,817 bhp @ 8,000 rpm
  • Torque: 1,193 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
  • Redline: 8,200 rpm
  • Displacement 6.6 liter (400 CID)
  • Bore: 4.125 in.
  • Stroke: 3.750 in.
  • Billet aluminum intake manifold with integrated air to water intercooler system
  • Forged aluminum pistons (10.0:1 compression ratio) with steel extreme duty wrist pins
  • Forged steel light weight H-bean connecting rods
  • Extreme duty forged steel connecting rod bolts
  • Light weight extreme duty billet steel crankshaft
  • Forged steel V8 engine block with billet main caps, increased cylinder wall & deck thickness & 6 bolts per cylinder
  • High-flow aluminum cylinder heads with canted titanium intake valves
  • Inconel exhaust valves with dual valve springs
  • Extreme duty billet steel hydraulic roller camshaft
  • Extreme duty hydraulic roller lifters
  • Extreme duty billet steel pushrods
  • Extreme duty stainless steel shaft mounted rocker arms
  • Dailey Engineering 4 Stage billet dry sump oiling system
  • Dailey Engineering Billet CNC aluminum oil pan
  • Precision ball bearing twin turbochargers (76 mm billet aluminum compressor wheels) rated at 1,350 bhp per turbo, making 23 psi boost pressure at 1,817 bhp
  • 3D printed titanium turbo compressor housings
  • High-flow twin turbo wastegates
  • High-flow twin turbo blow-off valves
  • High-flow billet aluminum 90 mm dual throttle bodies
  • High-flow fuel injectors, 2 per cylinder
  • High-flow stainless steel twin turbo headers with 1 7/8 in. primary tubes
  • High-flow stainless steel 3.0 in. twin turbo downpipes
  • High-flow catalytic converters
  • High-flow 3.5 titanium exhaust system

Exclusive in the Cantina

By | General Posts

Hall of Fame Collector Cards
Honoring Those Who Support Motorcycling
By Rogue

I was using the 2019 Official Sturgis Publication put out by the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum to make sure I had information correct in the article I was doing on the Hall Of Fame Induction Breakfast.

If you went to Sturgis, I hope you picked up a copy, if not you may want to contact the museum and see if they have any left. www.sturgismuseum.com

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REPORT – ONLY IN THE CANTINA

New Chassis, Engine & Design: Harley-Davidson introduces Next Custom Revolution with Eight New Iconic Softail Motorcycles

What are the benefits of the new Softail Frame over the old Dyna Configuration?
By Bandit and Harley-Davidson

To celebrate Harley-Davidson’s 115th Anniversary year, the Motor Company is launching a custom revolution: Eight all-new Softail® models that merge the hard-riding performance of the Dyna® line with the unparalleled custom look of the Softail line.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REPORT – ONLY IN THE CANTINA

SUBSCRIBE to the Cantina TodayClick Here to pay securely online

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

All the best motorcycline features, only at Bandit’s Cantina

S&S 550 Cam Chest Kits for the Milwaukee-Eight Engine

By | General Posts

Adding to their collection of complete cam chest kits, S&S Cycle recently launched a version featuring their monster 550 cam. Designed for 114 and larger M8 powered HD®’s, the 550 cam is good for 120hp and 128 lbs of torque on a 114’ motor with only a high flow air cleaner and header!. Kits include Cam, Outer Drive Gears for Gear Drive Kits, Cam Plate, Tappets, Tappet Cuffs, High Flow Oil Pump, Quickee Pushrod Kit, tappet cuffs (mandatory for high lift cams), heavy duty valve springs and all bearings and gaskets needed for installation. Each package is designed to work with everything around it and create optimum power and reliability for 2017-2019 114 and larger M8 powered big twins. The S&S cam chest kits includes their new oil pump with a best in the market 44% increase in flow, a 58% increase in scavenge paired with a chain or gear drive cam and pushrod tubes. More importantly, the kits are comprised of parts designed to work perfectly together and make serious and reliable power! Check out the details on their site at  https://www.sscycle.com/550-cam-chest-kit-for-m8

Check it out

2019 Ural motorcycles At Dealers Now

By | General Posts

2019 Urals Now Available at US Dealers.

Urals have Big Changes at Same Look in 2019

After a long awaited journey, the 2019 line up has officially hit dealers’ floors. This new Ural represents the culmination of countless late nights and endless hours spent making this Ural the best we’ve ever produced.

New 2019 Urals feature a number of changes from an overhauled engine, to a new EFI and a new universal rear wheel.

Although visually the difference between 2019 Urals and its predecessors is almost unnoticeable (as a matter of fact one can say the same thing about all Urals manufactured in the last 30 years), the new model year brings big changes to Ural family of sidecar motorcycles. All new EFI system and modernized top end make Ural’s 750cc “boxer” engine run cooler, smoother and work more efficiently.

Standard Accessories

• LED Sidecar Fog Lights (Gear Up)
• Sidecar Power Outlet
• Sidecar Tonneau Cover
• Jerry Can (Gear Up)
• Folding Utility Shovel (Gear Up)
• Luggage Rack (Gear Up)
• Universal Spare Wheel – Fits All 3 Positions

 

Engine and Transmission

  • Displacement, cc: 749
  • Engine type: OHV air cooled 2 cylinder 4 stroke “boxer” (flat twin)
  • Valve per cylinder: 2
  • Bore and stroke (mm x mm): 78 x 78
  • Max output (hp): 41 @ 5500 rpm
  • Max torque (ft-lbs): 42 @ 4300 rpm
  • Compression: 8.6:1
  • Fuel system: Throttle body EFI
  • Starting: Electric & Kickstart
  • Clutch Double-disc dry
  • Transmission type: Manual
  • Speeds: 4 forward 1 reverse
  • Primary drive (rear wheel): Driveshaft
  • Final drive ratio: 4.62
  • Engageable sidecar wheel drive: Yes, driveshaft

Physical Measurements

  • Overall length, inch.: 98.8
  • Overall heights, inch.: 54.3
  • Overall width, inch.: 63.6
  • Seat height, (unladen), inch.: 32.0
  • Ground clearance (unladen),inch.: 6.8
  • Dry weight, lbs: 730

Electrical

  • Alternator: Denso, Peak Output 40 Amp @ 14vdc, 560 Wt
  • Battery: FAYTX20HL (12V, 20A)
  • Headlight: H4
  • Spark plugs: NGK BPR6HS

Chassis

  • Front suspension: IMZ leading link fork
  • Rear suspension: Double sided swing-arm with two Sachs hydraulic spring shock absorbers, 7x adjustable
  • Sidecar suspension: Single sided swing-arm with Sachs hydraulic spring shock absorber, 7x adjustable
  • Wheels: 2.15X19 Aluminum rims with steel spokes
  • Tires: Duro HF-308, 4.0×19″
  • Front brake: 4-piston fixed Brembo caliper with 295mm floating NG rotor
  • Rear brake: HB big bore single piston integrated floating caliper with 256mm fixed NG rotor
  • Sidecar brake: 2-piston fixed Brembo caliper with 245mm floating NG rotor

Misc.

  • Fuel grade: 91 Octane, unleaded
  • Fuel tank capacity, gallons: 5.0
  • Reserve, gallons: app. 1
  • Estimated fuel economy, mpg: 31-37
  • Estimated range, miles: 155-185
  • Recommended max cruising speed, mph: 70
  • Max permissible weight, lbs:1325
  • Trunk volume, cubic ft.: 2.9

Warranty

  • 2-years parts and labor unlimited mileage.

Prices Start at $16,999* USD / $19,499* CAD

Visit : https://www.imz-ural.com

SEE VIDEO Nik Hays Discusses Improvements to the 2019 —

New JIMS M8 Balancer Bearing Remover

By | General Posts

The Milwaukee-Eight® engine design incorporates balancers to reduce engine vibration. For $148.05 this tool (Part No. 5832) can easily remove the balancer bearings in both Touring and Softail® models without damage to the crankcase.

For more information please contact us at (805) 482-6913, email us at sales@jimsusa.com, or visit www.jimsusa.com.

Your time in reviewing these current, past, or future press releases is greatly appreciated.

Visit www.jimsusa.com for Performance Parts for every Harley-Davidson motorcycles.

From humble beginnings in 1967, JIMS® has grown into one of the industry leaders producing performance parts, accessories, tools, transmissions, and high-performance engines all aimed at enhancing the Harley rider’s experience.

How to Handle the Four Most Common Road Emergencies

By | General Posts

You are out on the Highway, enjoying your getaway when suddenly your motorcycle stalls. What to do? Fortunately, the four most common road emergencies can usually be prevented by regular inspection and maintenance, but here’s what to do when that doesn’t work. FROM www.ridermagazine.com

1. Out of Gas
Run out of gas on the road and you’ll need a donor bike and a transfer device. To siphon, the fuel level in the donor bike must be higher than the level it will reach in the recipient bike; place the donor bike on a curb or rise. Carry a siphon hose, at least three feet of flexible, transparent hose that is easy to coil and stow under a seat or in a fairing pocket. Get one with a squeeze bulb and you won’t need to undergo the potentially disgusting ritual of siphoning raw gas with your mouth.

To avoid mouth siphoning immerse the hose deep into the donor bike’s fuel supply, cap the other end with your thumb and begin to slowly draw out the hose and lower it into the recipient bike’s fuel tank. Remove your thumb once the level of fuel in the hose drops below the top level of the fuel in the donor bike (that’s why a transparent hose is best), and the fuel will begin to flow.

If this is not possible, drain fuel into whatever is handy, such as a beverage container, sidecover or tool tray by removing a fuel line and turning on the petcock. This may not be possible if the donor bike has a vacuum-flow system. Rinse the container thoroughly with gasoline, and be certain ol’ Jimbo ain’t lightin’ up during this procedure.

Tools: Siphon hose

Prevention: Check the gauge, dummy! Zero your bike’s trip odometer when you fill up, and it will show the elapsed mileage.

2. Flat Tire:
Establish whether your bike has tube or tubeless tires. For the past few decades, most bikes with cast wheels have carried tubeless tires, while most with wire spoke wheels have had tube-type. If it’s a tube-type, you’ll have to “break the bead,” pull the tire away from the wheel (pack tire irons) far enough to expose the puncture in the tube. This may mean removing the wheel from the bike. Roughen the area around the puncture with the tool supplied in the patch kit and apply cement. Wait momentarily till the glue becomes tacky, and apply the patch.

For a tubeless tire, it’s only necessary to remove the nail and insert the tool from the patch kit to enlarge and roughen the hole. Cover a plug with cement and insert. Cut off excess and add air. The three methods of doing so are with CO2 cartridges, an electrical pump that runs off the battery and a hand pump.

Tools: Toolkit, tire patch kit, tire irons, air supply

Prevention: Inspect tire tread frequently for depth and foreign objects, and check pressure regularly. The last 10 percent of tire life results in 90 percent of the problems.

3. Low Oil:
Suddenly the oil light comes on. You’re a quart low—oops! Rodney has a quart along, but your bike runs that expensive 20W-50 synthetic bike oil and his is 40W cheapo car oil. Can you mix them?

The answer is yes. Considering that the alternative is either serious engine damage or sending someone on a 100-mile goose chase, mixing will not harm the engine, though it will dilute the properties of the high-quality oil. Change oil and filter at your earliest convenience.

Tools: Rag, funnel, extra quart

Prevention: Check oil

4. Sudden Engine Stop, Reason Unknown
A sudden engine cutout usually boils down to fuel or electricity. Check fuel supply, check for a clogged gas cap vent (does opening the cap suddenly and temporarily “solve” the problem?) or fuel filter. If your bike is carbureted and there’s fuel in the float bowl(s), the problem likely resides elsewhere.

Turn on the ignition and see if your bike has lights, horn and starter. If not, check that battery cables are tightly connected and clean. If your battery isn’t maintenance-free, are the cells properly topped up with distilled water? Spray WD-40 on the sparkplugs, wires and coils to displace any water.

If the lights and horn are strong, check fuses (know your bike’s fuse box location, and carry spares). With a clip lead and light, clip the lead to ground (a piece of bare metal on the engine) and place the point on either side of the fuse with the ignition on. If there’s power on both sides, the fuse is good.

If the starter cranks but the engine does not start, use the clip lead to establish if there is juice at the coils. If so, pull the spark plugs and establish if they’re sparking. If not, trace the wires back to the last place where there was electricity, then inspect upstream for bare wires or breaks. Listen and watch for obvious stray sparks. Wrap broken wire with tape to get you home.

Tools: Clip lead, electrical tape, fuses, WD-40

Prevention: Pray

And, of course, whenever you go for a ride, carry a cell phone, credit cards and some spare cash–sometimes calling in the cavalry is your only option. It’s also a good idea to have coverage with a roadside assistance plan, such as the one that’s included with annual membership at the American Motorcyclist Association.