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Chinese Copycat Motrac Unicorn 800 thinks it’s an MV Agusta Superveloce

By General Posts

by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

China does it again! The home country of Covid-19 is now in the news headlines for one more shameful reason and that is copycat bikes. Here is one more example!

Chinese are very well known for copying designs of some highly respected products and coming out with cheap clones. Auto manufacturers in China have been doing this for years now and very recently, we have come across one more example. This time around, the very gorgeous-looking MV Agusta Superveloce 800 falls prey to this copycat treatment in China. The clone bike is better known as the Motrac Unicorn 800. The Hong Kong-based brand also had the guts to showcase this bike publically at this year’s Chongqing Auto Show in China. Starting with the front section, the bike gets the same circular headlamp as the Superveloce and the front fairing looks quite similar too, however, it fails to make a mark because well, a copy is always a copy.

As you proceed towards the rear, things start to turn ugly as the bike gets a quite regular box-section swingarm compared to the single-sided unit that further adds to the enchanting visuals of the MV Agusta Superveloce. The dual exhausts on the right look no less than an eyesore as well and the rounded rear tail lamp mimics the rear end of the Agusta, however, this again fails to look half as pleasing and doesn’t gel well with the overall design. Speaking of the cycle parts, the bike gets 17-inch wheels at both ends paired with a 140-section front and chunky 200-section rear tyres. The Motrac Unicorn 800 gets its stopping duties done with the help of twin 320mm discs upfront along with a single 300mm disc unit at the rear, coupled to a standard dual-channel ABS.

Powering the Motrac Unicorn 800, as the name suggests, is an 800cc twin-cylinder engine that is good for developing 60 hp of power along with 70 Nm of torque. In comparison, the original Italian beauty draws power from a 798cc, three-cylinder motor that churns out 146 hp of power while the peak torque output is rated at 88 Nm. That said, the performance of the MV is something that its Chinese clone can only dream of.

Using 3D printing to make a 1919 Harley-Davidson rideable

By General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

This 1919 Harley-Davidson Is Now Rideable Thanks To 3D Printing. Vintage problems require modern solutions.

Let’s say you’ve decided to take on a vintage Harley as a project. Maybe you’re passionate about the early days of Harley-Davidson, for example, and you see an opportunity that’s just too good to pass up. The Motor Company has been around for over a century, though. While it has fans all over the world, as you might guess, some parts are easier to find than others.

That’s the problem faced by one Harley enthusiast in the Netherlands. He’d gotten his hands on a 1919 Harley-Davidson, and had been diligently doing hands-on restoration work for the better part of 50 years. Clearly, this guy was almost unbelievably patient. Eventually, though, even he got to a point where he had to think creatively to replace the one part that was holding him back from finally being able to go for a ride: a broken Bakelite distributor cap.

As the story goes, the man had searched high, low, and everywhere in between for a spare. Since there probably aren’t many out there to begin with, finding one on the used market seemed chancy. So, the restorer (who appears to want to remain nameless) reached out to Carl van de Rijzen from Visual First in the Netherlands, which is known for creating 3D scans of existing items.

1919 Harley-Davidson with 3D Printed Distributor Cap
Van de Rijzen, in turn, frequently collaborates with Edwin Rappard of 4C Creative CAD CAM Consultants to successfully 3D print the components he’s scanned. This was a unique challenge, for sure. They had the broken original distributor cap to scan, but a large chunk had broken off. How can you scan what isn’t there?

Luckily, the broken part was a mirror of what already existed, and not some other unique shape. Between the two technicians, they were able to successfully come up with a suitable 3D printed replica part. Since the original part was made out of Bakelite, crafting a 21st century polymer substitute so close to the bike’s 100th birthday seems kind of poetic.

It’s an incredibly modern solution to an age-old problem, and it will be interesting to continue seeing what motorcycle enthusiasts are able to accomplish using tools like this. For those who want to actually be able to go out and ride their vintage machines, it seems like a pretty great solution.

May Motorcycle Bikernet Weekly News for May 6, 2021

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Hey,

What’s the deal today? It’s motorcycle month. The sun is shining in Deadwood. The news is packed, and I’m waiting to close on our Sturgis property so I can unpack.

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

Click Here to read the Weekly News on Bikernet.

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MRF: Stop The Profiling of Motorcyclists – Support H. Res 366

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Bikers Inside The Beltway – Stop The Profiling of Motorcyclists – Support H. Res 366

Bikers Inside The Beltway Meeting With Congress To Stop Profiling

H.RES 366 – your MRF is moving forward and making it happen. Profiling is not going to go away without your immediate action. See the attachment for more details. In the meantime…

  • Have you registered for Bikers Inside the Beltway? It’s free but time is running out! CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
  • Have you made your appointments to visit your members of Congress? Make your appointments now in your district or in Washington, D.C.
  • Have you made your hotel reservations? Final date for hotel registration, May 13, 2021: 703-684-5900 Embassy Suites by Hilton Alexandria, 1900 Diagonal Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22314

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation is moving forward to make the 2021 Bikers Inside the Beltway our most effective event ever. Thank you for your commitment to the MRF’s mission. Thank you for making appointments with your members of Congress. Thank you for taking action and asking your members of Congress to support H.RES 366. Click here to see the position paper for H.RES 366.

Thank you for your membership and support of the Motorcycle Riders Foundation.

Fredric Harrell
Director, Conferences & Events
Motorcycle Riders Foundation
P.O. Box 250
Highland, Illinois 62249

Husqvarna motorcycles partnership with clothing brand Replay

By General Posts

from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Husqvarna rides in ‘Replay’ edition of Vitpilen 701, 701 Supermoto and 701 Enduro LR. The bikes are in partnership with clothing brand Replay

Swedish automaker Husqvarna has introduced a range special edition variants of Vitpilen 701, 701 Supermoto and 701 Enduro LR in partnership with Italian clothing brand Replay.

The Vitpilen 701 is a cruiser with a large single – cylinder engine mated to a lightweight chasis. The 701 Supermoto takes things off road with a 74hp single-cylinder engine bound to a 148kg chasis. The 701 Enduro LR is for those who wish to go a bit further off the tarmac. The LR which stands for Long range is due to its massive fuel tank, nearly twice the capacity of the standard 701 Enduro.

More details about the bikes are yet to be made public. The manufacturer has also promised that more models are on the way under the partnership with Replay that began in 2020.

It marked the beginning of a new chapter for both Husqvarna Motorcycles and REPLAY, as Husqvarna Motorcycles re-entered the Moto3 World Championship, while REPLAY took a strategic step into the motorcycle sector, the statement read.

Ride Review of BMW R18

By General Posts

by Anthony Conroy from https://www.post-gazette.com

BMW’s R18 First Edition is powerful, simple and sophisticated

Size isn’t everything, the old saying goes, but when you take a ride aboard BMW Motorrad’s R18 First Edition, its size is impossible to ignore.

Put a leg over the seat, settle in and take in those two massive, chromed cylinder covers sitting in front of you, each one its own 901cc power-making factory. It’s like sitting on the neck of a shiny hammerhead shark.

The engine — a twin-cylinder configuration known as a Boxer — has been BMW’s signature since 1923. But the Boxer on the R18 is the largest the German manufacturer has ever produced, with a claimed output of 91 horsepower and 116 pounds-foot of torque.

Other manufacturers will claim to have bigger and better numbers, but the R18 isn’t designed for life on the rowdy edge. It’s a power cruiser, but with the soul of something vintage and simple. A modern throwback, if you will.

In fact, despite the $20,000 price tag, there aren’t many frills. Some adjustability in the rear, none in the front. Heated grips. A reverse gear. BMW’s automatic stability control, which is essentially traction control. And three power modes: Rock, Roll and Rain. For our purposes, those might as well have been called Road Rage, Easy Jaunt and Tip-Toeing Through the Puddles.

In other words, let’s Rock.

The R18 has a keyless ignition and once the starter is pushed, the bike thunders and shudders to life. At stops, there’s quite a bit of vibration, but that’s exactly what you’d expect with two giant metal buckets rotating and internally combusting between your legs. The vibrations don’t exactly fade away once on the go — you’ll see a lot of blurring in the rear view mirrors, but I never felt any numbness in the hands, feet or butt after long rides.

Rock mode taps into the full potential of the beastly Boxer. You’ll feel the torque at 3,000 rpm. Max horsepower comes at 4,750 rpm. The best part is there’s nothing grabby or choppy about its power delivery. A sharp pull on the throttle produces smooth, linear power through six gears. Despite the nearly 800 pounds of motorcycle sitting beneath you, the bike requires minimum inputs at speed. A long wheelbase and a wonderful center of gravity contribute to the bike’s stability. Handlebars that are wide but nicely swept provide excellent leverage and contribute to the bike’s agility.

And it is agile — at speed anyway. It actually feels light going around fast, sweeping turns. And going faster feels right, as your feet are not in front of you, like with most American cruisers. They’re underneath you, which seems more natural during aggressive riding.

At the front wheel, twin four-piston calipers developed in-house by BMW are paired with dual 300mm discs to slow down the big Beemer. When the pace gets really slow — like in a parking lot — the R18’s weight does feel a bit cumbersome, like pushing around a fully-dressed Harley-Davidson without the cabinetry.

Potential buyers also will need to carefully decide how they intend to ride the bike, particularly if long hauls are on the agenda. Those massive cylinders look great, but they make the prospect of having highway pegs impossible. There’s also no back rest or cruise control (at least not on the First Edition), so it’s not the kind of bike you’ll be able to kick back on while eating up highway miles. The tank holds 3.2 gallons of fuel with a 1-gallon reserve, so expect to get around 120 miles per fill-up. For some reason, BMW opted against a fuel gauge. However, a warning light will let you know when you have about 20 miles left to go.

Riders looking for a more travel-friendly R18 right out of the box may want to opt for the Classic model, which comes with a windscreen and baggage, rather than the First Edition. To be honest, there will be no shortage of aftermarket accessories for any model marketed under the R18 badge.

The BMW was flawless in tearing around town and rural backroads, with the seating position and seat itself good for all-day riding. There’s 3½ inches of travel at the rear suspension, but it’s a bit stiff. Best to avoid the bumps. Ergonomically, there wasn’t much to complain about.

One complaint, if you can call it that, is that the R18 has a very quiet transmission. When going from neutral to first gear, there was hardly ever a sound or a shimmy — no knock, ping or usual KERTHUNK! that I’m used to hearing (and feeling). Without that, quite frankly, I sometimes found myself doing double-takes for the neutral light to make sure I was in gear before speeding away.

In other words, leave it to the Germans to make something so mechanically perfect that it’s worth complaining about.

Aesthetically, it’s hard to miss those giant cylinders, but there are other visual items that shouldn’t go unnoticed.

If chrome is your thing, there’s no shortage of it, especially on those those wonderful looking fishtail mufflers. They don’t make a lot of sound, but they are beautiful to look at and give the R18 a distinctive look. Also chromed is the front of the engine housing. Overall, the housing eliminates clutter and gives the bike a polished, clean look, but it does make everything else — apart from the cylinder heads — a bit of a mystery.

Thankfully, for those who need to see something mechanical to soothe our inner motorhead, BMW’s engineers gave us an exposed bevel-geared driveshaft. Seeing it in action while actually riding is a bit of a task, but we’ll take mechanical porn however we can get it.

Overall, this Beemer is an excellent motorcycle. The price tag may be a bit on the high side, but the R18 is for owners wanting two things: a cruiser with impressive performance and one that distinguishes itself from American cruisers and Japanese knock-offs. The R18 First Edition definitely accomplishes both goals.

Damon Motorcycles new members

By General Posts

A big welcome to Doug & Michael!

At Damon, we continue to expand and grow our team to deliver not just a ride, but an enhanced experience for the next-generation of motorcyclists.

Thus, we are proud to welcome CMO & VP Brand Doug Penman and Head of Design Michael Uhlarik to Damon’s executive team.

Doug Penman, CMO & VP, Brand – “I look forward to creating the most exhilarating, unexpected, and fierce mobility brand the motorcycle industry has ever seen.”

Michael Uhlarik, Head of Design – “I’m excited to design the Damon motorcycles of the future… and to cement the company’s legacy as the leading innovator in two-wheel safety, technology, and performance.”

An international award-winning motorcycle designer and product planner, Uhlarik created the market-leading Yamaha TZR-50 and the award-winning Yamaha MT-03. He has also contributed to designs for the R6, FJR1300, & M1 MotoGP bike, collaborated on motorcycles such as the Aprilia Dorsoduro, SportCity, & Atlantic, and authored the Derbi Rambla.

Penman is an entrepreneur and creative with broad-ranging venture capital, marketing strategy, and brand expertise. He has launched and accelerated the momentum for Intel, Microsoft, Volvo, Toyota Scion, Peugeot, SanDisk, QuantumScape, Dell, Coca-Cola, UBTech, and Philips.

As pioneers in their respective fields, Doug and Michael are tightly aligned on both purpose and creative vision to fuse the functions of product design and brand & marketing.

Their work will ultimately give you a more charged, inspired, and personal riding experience.

Celebrate with us.
2021 Green GOOD DESIGN Award
We’re honoured to win an accolade from the oldest and most established awards program for the most innovative and visionary new product design worldwide. ⁠

2021 Fast Company World Changing Idea Award
We’ve been recognized with an “Honorable Mention” in the Transportation category for this prestigious award.

21 New Damon Family Members
We’ve welcomed 21 new individuals from all around the world in the past month. And we’re still hiring!

You can join Damon, too.
Become a Damon Brand Ambassador
Love talking about us and sharing our bikes on social media? Do it officially as a Damon Brand Ambassador.

We’re building relationships with passionate, creative influencers and content creators, who share our vision in making motorcycling better, safer, and smarter! Could this be you?

Join the Team
We’re in search of top-tier talent for all departments from Engineering to Marketing. Help us change the world.

View our current openings and apply for your next challenge.

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya

By General Posts

from https://africa.com

Uber Launches Electric Motorcycles And Scooters For Rides And Deliveries In Kenya And For The First Time In Africa.

Uber has announced the launch of electric BodaBodas and bicycles for earners on UberBoda, Uber Connect and Uber Eats in Kenya, allowing riders and eaters the ability to choose a more sustainable option to move around and to have deliveries made. The launch is a first for Uber in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Sustainable rides with UberBoda Green

The launch of electric BodaBodas will not only offer an affordable and reliable manner of transportation within the city, but riders will be able to select a zero-emissions ride to help drive a green recovery. Using electric UberBoda vehicles will cost the same as a regular journey, as going green should never be more expensive. Riders can also expect the same door-to-door safety experience.

The launch of electric boda presents a 45% reduction in overall costs for Uber Boda and Uber Connect drivers, for whom fuel is the most significant operating cost. In Kenya, the boda boda sector employs over 1.6 million youths, the vast majority of which are based in Nairobi.

“We are doing our part to help transform mobility in the country so that Kenyans can play their part in reducing carbon emissions. Uber is continuously looking for ways to improve the customer experience, and we have a responsibility to invest in offering product innovations that make a difference to cities. We believe this collaboration will do just that”, says Brian Njao, Head of East Africa for Uber.

Reducing emissions while making deliveries

With consumers being environmentally and health-conscious, it is important for Uber Eats to be part of the journey. The introduction of electric BodaBodas can allow consumers to order their favourite meals while giving them peace of mind that their food is delivered in transportation with low emissions. In addition, Uber Connect deliveries will also be done using the newly launched electric motorcycles and bicycles.

“Uber Eats has grown exponentially across Kenya, with the app being available in Mombasa, Nakuru and Nairobi, which means more delivery people on the road. Providing electric BodaBodas to delivery people means that transportation emissions can be cut drastically, says Nadeem Anjarwalla, General Manager of Uber Eats in Kenya.

Uber will continue to actively work with cities to introduce eco-friendly products to decrease air pollution, reduce urban congestion, and increase access to clean transportation modes.

More Motorcycle Safety Awareness campaigns by authorities

By General Posts

California Highway Patrol asking motorists to drive with caution

from https://www.kget.com

The California Highway Patrol is recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

The department says as the weather warms up, more and more motorcycles and cars are expected to be hitting the road. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

Here in Kern County, at least eight people have died in motorcycle crashes so far this year.

The CHP is asking motorcyclists to be responsible and properly equipped. They’re also asking drivers to watch out for motorcyclists on the road.

CHP: Motorcycle safety requires everyone’s attention
by Jaime Coffee, Information Officer II, California Highway Patrol from http://antiochherald.com

The warming weather and increasing number of vehicles traveling on California’s roadways offer a timely reminder of the importance of motorcycle safety awareness for motorcyclists and motorists alike. By recognizing May as Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the California Highway Patrol (CHP) emphasizes safe riding and driving practices for everyone.

“Motorcyclists who are responsible, informed, and properly equipped can help reduce rider deaths and injuries,” CHP Commissioner Amanda Ray said. “Motorists are also key to reducing crashes by being aware of the dangers and challenges of motorcycle riding. Taking the time to look twice for motorcyclists can save a life.”

“Motorcycle riders are more vulnerable out in the elements, which is why it is important for drivers to always be mindful of riders,” California Office of Traffic Safety Director Barbara Rooney said.

With more than 1.4 million licensed riders, motorcycles are a popular mode of transportation for Californians, another reason motorcycle safety awareness is paramount. Preliminary data from the CHP’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System show more than 500 people were killed in motorcycle-involved crashes in California in 2020 and more than 11,500 people were injured.

As part of its continual motorcycle safety program, the CHP strongly encourages all riders, new and experienced, to enroll in the California Motorcyclist Safety Program (CMSP). The CMSP has 98 training sites throughout the state and trains approximately 55,000 motorcyclists each year. For more information or to find a training site near you, visit californiamotorcyclist.com or motorcyclesafetyca.com.

Motorcyclists can help protect themselves by always wearing the proper safety gear, including a U.S. Department of Transportation-compliant helmet, observing the speed limit, riding defensively, and always riding sober. Drivers should always look at their mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes and always keep a safe distance.

The CHP promotes motorcycle safety with the Get Educated and Ride Safe (GEARS) program, funded by a $750,000 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. All eight CHP field Divisions will hold outreach events to promote motorcycle safety throughout 2021 under the GEARS grant.

The mission of the CHP is to provide the highest level of Safety, Service, and Security.

TxDOT urges motorists to ”Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles’
from https://www.heraldbanner.com

Despite less traffic on the road in 2020 and a 2% reduction in motorcycle crashes, safety officials are alarmed by a 17% increase in Texas motorcycle fatalities compared to 2019. On average, a motorcyclist is killed in a crash on Texas roads every day—last year 482 died. Motorcyclists account for 12% of all traffic fatalities statewide.

May is National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, and the Texas Department of Transportation’s annual “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign gets underway to call attention to the safety precautions motorists can take to protect motorcyclists and themselves. In 2020, in the 7,481 motorcycle crashes in Texas, 1,856 motorcyclists were seriously injured and 482 were killed.

“May through October is an especially dangerous period for motorcyclists in Texas,” said TxDOT Executive Director James Bass. “Of all the motorcyclist deaths in Texas during 2020, more than 61% happened in that period. It’s so important to remember that these motorcyclists don’t have the same protections that drivers in vehicles have, and that’s why we’re urging all motorists to stay watchful and alert when traveling alongside motorcycles so everyone can reach their destination safely.”

The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) reports that fatal crashes between motorcyclists and drivers often occur when drivers misjudge the motorcycle’s distance and speed and make left turns in front of an oncoming motorcyclist. Last year, almost one-third of Texas motorcycle fatalities occurred in an intersection or were intersection-related. TTI also points to driver inattention as a contributing factor to motorcycle crashes.

TxDOT has these safety tips for drivers to protect motorcyclists and prevent crashes:

  • Take extra care when making a left turn. It’s safest to let the motorcycle pass to avoid turning in front of the rider.
  • Pay special attention at intersections. Nearly one in three motorcycle fatalities happens at a roadway intersection.
  • Give driving your full attention. Even a momentary distraction, such as answering a phone call or changing the radio station, can have deadly consequences.
  • Look twice when changing lanes. Check mirrors, check blind spots, and always use turn signals.
  • Give motorcyclists room when passing them. Move over to the passing lane and don’t crowd the motorcyclist’s full lane.
  • Stay back. If you’re behind a motorcycle, always maintain a safe following distance. When a motorcyclist downshifts instead of applying the brake to slow down, it can catch drivers off guard since there are no brake lights to signal reduced speed.
  • Slow down. Obey posted speed limits and drive to conditions.

The “Share the Road: Look Twice for Motorcycles” campaign is a key component of #EndTheStreakTX, a broader social media and word-of-mouth effort that encourages drivers to make safer choices while behind the wheel, like wearing a seat belt, driving the speed limit, never texting and driving and never driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. November 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways. #EndTheStreakTX asks all Texans to commit to driving safely to help end the streak of daily deaths on Texas roadways.

Texas Motorcycle Fatalities Increased by 17% in 2020
by Demetrius Harper from https://www.nbcdfw.com

More than 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways last year.

The Texas Department of Transportation says the number of motorcycle riders killed on Texas roadways spiked in 2020.

TxDOT said 2,300 motorcyclists were killed or seriously injured on Texas streets and highways in 2020. Of the nearly 7,500 crashes involving motorcycles that were reported in 2020, 482 were fatalities — a 17% increase over the year before.

The Irving Police Department made a similar plea last month after a motorcycle officer was seriously injured when he was struck by a driver who turned in front of him.

Nov. 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways.