Tag

event Archives — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Bonhams Motorcycles Kick Start 2021 with Return to Stafford

By General Posts

by Ben Walker from https://www.bonhams.com/press_release/31686/

The Summer Sale
The International Classic MotorCycle Show (The Postponed Spring Sale)
3 – 4 Jul 2021
Stafford, Staffordshire County Showground
The Gentleman’s Collection

A selection of wonderfully restored Vincent-HRD’s consigned to the Spring Sale

Following a successful year of sales at its Bicester Heritage base – with a 93 per cent sale rate – Bonhams Motorcycles is returning to Stafford for the first auction of 2021. The Summer Stafford Sale will take place on 3 and 4 July, in line with the rescheduled International Classic MotorCycle Show.

Consignments are now invited to the auction to join early confirmed lots including two important collections, one of Italian sports bikes and the other a selection of classic Vincent-HRDs, the world’s fastest motorcycles of their time.

THE RON CODY COLLECTION

A selection of motorcycles offered from the Ron Cody Collection

Well-known in MV Agusta club circles, the late Ron Cody, a former sports car racer and engineer, turned to his passion for building up and restoring his collection of Italian machines as a retirement hobby. This collection offers 48 motorcycles, with many examples of MV Agustas as well as other Italian marques. Highlights include:

1964 MV AGUSTA 150CC RAPIDO SPORT, £3,000 – 4,000
Like their larger siblings, the small MVs were very expensive, costing as much as a British 500, which explains why so few of these exquisitely engineered little motorcycles were sold in the UK. This 150 Rapido Sport displays a total of only 125 kilometres on the odometer since restoration.

1953 MV AGUSTA 125CC TEL ‘SPORT COMPETIZIONE’, £4,000 – 6,000
With superb engineering compared with any British contemporary, the MV Agusta’s 125cc TEL ‘stroker’ of 1949 was powered by a neat unitary construction single-cylinder engine which, somewhat unusually for a post-war design, featured detachable transfer ports. The 125 MV offered here is presented in Competizione specification, intended for Italy’s popular long-distance races such as the Milan-Taranto and the Moto Giro d’Italia.

C.1958 GILERA 175CC ROSSA EXTRA RACING MOTORCYCLE, £2,400 – 2,800
Throughout the early 1950s, Gilera’s racers made the headlines, taking six individual World Championships and five manufacturers’ titles. Its road bikes paid the bills, with the 175cc being a top seller, although its high price abroad made it a relatively rare sight outside Italy.

Introduced for 1957, the Rossa Extra was essentially a deluxe version of the 175 Sport. Apparently cosmetically restored and very nicely presented, this Rossa Extra racer features a Scitsu tachometer, Dell’Orto UBF24BS carburettor, Ceriani forks, and ventilated brakes.

1958 PARILLA 175CC SPORT, £4,000 – 7.000
One of the first Italian motorcycle manufacturers that went into production after the Second World War, Parilla introduced the ‘high cam’ (camme rialzata) model, for which it is best remembered, at the 1952 Milan Show. This 175cc single-cylinder motorcycle featured a chain-driven camshaft mounted on the side of the cylinder head, the valves being operated via short pushrods. Stunningly beautiful, Parilla’s production racer was also exceedingly quick.

AN IMPORTANT VINCENT-HRD COLLECTION
A stalwart of the golden age of British motorcycles, the Vincent marque is synonymous with design innovation, engineering excellence but mostly record-breaking high performance.

1951 Vincent-HRD 998cc Black Shadow, estimate £60,000 – 75,000

Leading this important collection of Vincent-HRDs is a matching numbers 1951 Series C 998cc Black Shadow, an example of the marque’s most famous model and the first genuine two-miles-per-minute production bike, with a reputed top speed of around 125 mph.

Off the road for 40 years, the motorcycle was completely restored by the vendor over a four-year period, with the result being judged ‘Best in Show’ at Stafford in 2010. Having since been displayed at the Lakeland Motor Museum, the Shadow is offered with a continuation RF60 buff logbook dating from April 1963 and the original registration number ‘LOV 579’. Estimate: £60,000 – 75,000.

Lining up with the Shadow is a loving recreation of its racing sibling, a Vincent HRD 998cc Black Lightning Evocation Special. Only 31 Black Lightnings were produced between 1948 and 1952 and their value reflects their rarity – Bonhams set a world record for the model in 2018 when the ex-Tony McAlpine, Jack Ehret, Australian Land Speed Record Breaking example sold for $929,000 (£656,630).

The vendor decided to create this Evocation for parades and track days. Buying a quantity of engine parts and main frame components in 2003, he embarked on a three-year project, restoring the rolling chassis himself, while entrusting the engine rebuild, to Black Shadow-plus specification, to well-known Vincent exponent Mick Ruocco.

Completed in 2006, it was commissioned by John Renwick, who made adjustments to the carburetion and started and ran the bike on his dynamometer. The Lightning was voted Best Classic Racer at the TT 2006 Lap of Honour and judged Best Classic Racer at the 2006 Stafford Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show.

It has since completed many closed-road parades at the TT and Classic TT and was used the machine regularly until 2014, when it was put on display at the Lakeland Motor Museum. Estimate: £30,000 – 40,000.

1937 Vincent HRD 498cc Comet Series A, estimate: £35,000 – 45,000
The rare Series A was the first model to use the Philip Vincent-designed engine, with high-camshaft layout. This example also underwent a complete restoration, from rebuilding the engine and gearbox to refurbishing the petrol tank.

The restored Comet was awarded Best Post-Vintage machine at the 2009 Stafford Spring Classic Motorcycle Show. Covering a mere 100 ‘shake down’ miles since restoration the bike has, for the past decade, been displayed at the Lakeland Motor Museum.

Ben Walker, International Department Director for Bonhams Collectors’ Motorcycles, said: “We are looking forward to coming home to Stafford and hosting the UK’s longest established dedicated motorcycling auction in a live format again, subject to the local restrictions relating to Covid-19.”

“Entries are coming in thick and fast and with two important collections already in place, we are sure there will be much interest. As we’ll be heading into summer, the auction will provide the perfect opportunity to buy a classic motorcycle and enjoy post-lockdown freedom of the road.”

Further early highlights of the sale include:

c.1950 Peugeot 125cc TD55, estimate £5,000 – 7,000 (pictured back row)

c.1947 Norton ‘Manx’ Sprint Special, estimate £10,000 – 15,000 (left middle)

Norton Sprint Special, estimate £6,000 – 8,000 (right middle)

1925 Sunbeam 347cc Model 2, estimate £5,000 – 7,000 (front left)

1916 Levis 2.5hp, estimate £4,000 – 6,000 (front right)

Further entries are invited to join the motorcycles already consigned.

Visit www.bonhams.com/motorcycles to submit a complimentary auction appraisal request or contact the Bicester Motorcycle Office +44 (0) 20 8963 2817 ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com to discuss the sale of your important motorcycle(s).

Tennessee Motorcycle & Music Revival in May 2021

By General Posts

A 4-DAY RALLY HELD IN TN, THAT SHOWCASES THE AREA’S DEPTH AND DEVOTION TO MUSIC, MOTORCYCLES, FRIENDS, FAMILY AND GENUINE SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY.

The Tennessee Motorcycles and Music Revival is located at the majestic, 3,500 acre, Loretta Lynn’s Ranch & Campground, owned by country music legend, Loretta Lynn, and home of the AMA Motocross Championships. The Revival will showcase the area’s depth and devotion to Music, Motorcycles, Food, Art, Entertainment, and Southern Hospitality. Join us as we host 4,500+ on-site campers on 400 acres of manicured countryside that adjoins the meandering Hurricane Creek.

A one-of-a-kind experience with a backstage vibe. Nothing better describes the feeling of attending TMMR like the word REVIVAL. It brings you back to what we love the most about Motorcycles, Music, and Friends. Join us for Tennessee’s biggest and best bike rally and music festival wrapped up in one 4-day event!

Live Music featuring Nashville’s Next * Outlaw, Country, Rock, Bluegrass * Singer-Songwriters * Hooligan Racing * Biker Games * Harley-Davidson Demos * Pan America * H.O.G. Pin Stop * BC Moto Invitational Hand-Crafted Custom Motorcycles * Enduro Off-Road Loop * Wall of Death * Speed Shack Bar * Waterin’ Hole * Loretta’s Roadhouse * Bonfires * Bike Shows * Hurricane Creek * Tour Loretta’s Ranch * Swimming Pool * Full Liquor Bars * Food Trucks * Vendors * Official H.O.G. Pin Stop & Much Much More!

The Tennessee Motorcycles & Music Revival is proud to host the 4th edition of the BC Moto Invitational during its celebration of all things “Motorcycles and Music” at the historic Loretta Lynn Ranch. Bill Dodge’s “BC Moto Invitational” is a custom motorcycle showcase featuring hand-selected craftsmen displaying some of the country’s best custom motorcycles. It will be aptly situated in the unique setting of a picturesque, creek-side horse barn at Loretta’s.

Click here to purchase your general admission tickets and camping accommodations.

San Francisco International showcases early American motorcycles

By General Posts

by Colleen Morgan from https://www.moodiedavittreport.com

An exhibition exploring the history and development of motorcycling has opened at San Francisco International Airport (SFO).

The SFO Museum exhibition, in the International Terminal Departures, started on 11 February and will run through 19 September 2021.

According to exhibition organisers, early American motorcycles “reflect a bygone era of mechanical innovation and bold industrial design”. They are prized by collectors around the world and displayed on vintage rides, endurance runs, and at special events.

The exhibition presents fourteen ‘exceptional’ examples made prior to 1916, along with a collection of rare engines and photographs from the pioneering era of motorcycling.

It follows the development of the motorcycle – “one of the earliest and most exciting applications of another new invention, the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine” – from the 1890s until 1915. The exhibition highlights the progress of motorcycle technology during that period and the evolvement of riding “from a novelty, to a hobby, sport and a reliable source of transportation”.

As the presentation points out, “motorcycling in the early twentieth century was always an adventure”.

“Road conditions were generally poor and hitting a pothole or other hazard on a motorcycle supported by a primitive, stiffly sprung suspension could easily throw a rider off the bike”.

It also underlines the need for “athletic ability” to start and ride these machines and that motorcyclists had to be mechanically minded to keep them in working condition.

Early American Motorcycles is one of several exhibitions which are running for limited periods at the SFO Museum. Others include Hair Style, Instrumental Rock ‘n’ Roll, Paula Riff, Amelia Konow   and Alternative Process by the San Francisco University School of Art.

The airport also offers a strong line-up of permanent exhibitions which include Pan American Airways, Harvey Milk ‘Messenger of Hope’ and Spirogyrate, an interactive children’s exploration area featuring artwork by Bay Area artist Eric Staller.

The SFO Museum,  a division of San Francisco International Airport, is a multifaceted programme with rotating exhibitions on a wide variety of subjects and interactive play areas featured throughout the terminals.

Its mission is to “delight, engage, and inspire a global audience”; to collect, preserve, interpret and share the history of commercial aviation, and to enrich the public experience at San Francisco International Airport.

Modified motorcycles roll into Packard Museum

By General Posts

by Andy Gray from https://www.tribtoday.com

Some people aren’t satisfied with a motorcycle straight off of the lot.

Collectors and motorcycle enthusiasts often modify those dealer purchases, restore damaged bikes that look like scrap metal to everyone else or build their own motorcycles from scratch.

The 21st Vintage Motorcycle Exhibit at the National Packard Museum celebrates those kinds of machines with “Roll Your Own,” which opens Saturday and runs through May 22.

“Last year when we were working on the exhibit ‘Two Wheels at the County Fair,’ we realize there were a lot of bikes that were highly modified, that guys got real crazy with,” museum Executive Director Mary Ann Porinchak said. “We decided to show off some of that creativity.

“The challenge was to find enough bikes, but once we started, they came out of the woodwork. It snowballed and had a life of its own, and there are some truly unique pieces that came about … One bike was built from the ground up from just a pile of parts. That shows a determination to ride and a fair amount of ingenuity.”

For the restorers, it’s a point of pride. Bruce Williams, a past organizer of the motorcycle show, has reconstructed several machines from most humble beginnings.

“People see you have half a motor (and ask), ‘What are you gonna do with that?’ I’ll build a bike,” Williams said. “They’ll say, ‘You’ll never do that,’ and a year and a half later, there it is.”

That doesn’t mean it’s easy. For one 1906 motorcycle he rebuilt, Williams had to hire a guy in Holland who could build the rims and back pulley he needed. Since that kind of rim was outlawed in the U.S. in the 1930s, the guy in Holland wouldn’t ship it to Williams directly. The parts were shipped to England and then to the U.S., and Williams had to pay duty fees on the parcel twice.

“I had $2,000 (invested) in two bare unfinished rims and a pulley, but it was the only guy I could find in the world who could make it for me,” Williams said.

For another restoration, he found a photograph of the motorcycle model when it was for sale in England. He knew the size of the rims, so he had the photo blown up to actual size and used it to create the bike’s frame and the other parts he needed.

A full list of the motorcycles usually is included with the preview story, but some of machines on display truly are one of a kind. One was built around 1922 Villiers frame. Another was assembled from parts from various Triumph motorcycles from the late 1960s and early ’70s and started with a single bolt.

Some of the motorcycles featured this year are a 1902 Sylvester & Jones, 1905 Riddle (with a Thor motor), 1908 Crouch, 1912 Indian Beltdrive, 1922 Agricycle, 1923 Douglas Model W, 1928 Indian Scout, 1949 Harley Panhead, 1951 Vincent black Shadow, 1954 BMW R-25/3, 1967 Triumph T-100R, 1968 Triumph T-100C, 1971 BSA Diesel 2 cylinder, 1971 BSA-A65 Lightning, 1974 Triumph T140V, 1974-75 Penton Custom, 1976 Yamaha TT 500 Hill Climber, 1976 GS750 Suzuki, 1984 BMW R80 RT and 1996 Buell ST Lightning.

Not all of the motorcycles are vintage. There are a few 21st century bikes in the show, including a 2021 Triumph Scrambler inspired by the motorcycle featured in the upcoming James Bond film “No Time to Die.”

William Dennis, president of the Packard board, has his 2015 California Custom show bike on display.

“Every piece of bling on there is an accessory that’s in their catalog,” Dennis said. “It has every accessory they make except for the fringe seat. Every piece of chrome on there is an add-on. The paint is a custom color. It emulates a Harley-Davidson paint scheme from years and years ago.”

Dennis said he and his son bonded over their mutual love of motorcycles and they’ve restored several bikes over the years.

The annual motorcycle show is popular attraction, and it’s earned the National Packard Museum several awards, including the Antique Motorcycle Foundation’s highest honor, the Award for Excellence, as well as three consecutive first place awards in the Interpretive Exhibits Category from the National Association of Automobile Museums.

Dennis is one of the people who became involved with the museum because of the motorcycle show, and he said he would like its success to guide the museum’s future programming by preserving the Packard history but also exploring other areas.

“I would like for this museum to be a mecca for transportation,” he said. “The people who own Packards are older … You ask young folks today about a Packard, they think you’re talking about Hewlett Packard.

“My thought is looking backward to move forward. What did we do in the past that worked and what can do in the future to keep going?”

One new challenge in organizing this year’s motorcycle show was the COVID-19 pandemic, which kept the committee members from being able to meet and interact the way they normally do.

“With the motorcycle guys, their excitement and enthusiasm feeds off each other,” Porinchak said.

As a result, there aren’t as many supplemental items accompanying the motorcycles compared to past shows, but one addition for 2021 is a piece by Youngstown artist Guy Shively that is part of the permanent collection of the Butler Institute of American Art.

“It’s a black-and-white piece, a pile of just motorcycle parts,” Porinchak said. “One of our committee members remembered seeing it there and said let’s see if we can borrow that piece and hang it up here. It’s the epitome of what we’re doing with this show. It’s a nice partnership, collaboration with them.”

If you go …

WHAT: 21st Vintage Motorcycle Exhibit — “Roll Your Own”

WHEN: Saturday through May 22. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday.

WHERE: National Packard Museum, 1899 Mahoning Ave. NW, Warren

HOW MUCH: $8 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and children ages 7 to 12 and free for children 6 and younger. For more information, go to www.packardmuseum.org or call 330-394-1899.

The 60th Annual Woodville Weekend

By General Posts

Press Release: Bikesport NZ from https://www.scoop.co.nz

It was a special weekend of motocross that had everything – high intensity dirt bike action, a slew of different race winners, weather that remarkably switched from chilly to baking hot and, of course, a significant birthday party.

The 60th annual Honda-sponsored New Zealand Motocross Grand Prix at Woodville on Saturday and Sunday was a celebration of the sport, the popular event at the eastern end of the Manawatu Gorge achieving a landmark in more ways than one.

It was not only marking six decades since the sport was properly introduced to New Zealand in 1961 by now-87-year-old Palmerston North man Tim Gibbes, but it was also for the first time being run in conjunction with the first round of four in the 2021 New Zealand Motocross Championships.

It was a rare double honour – the opening round of the national championships tied in with New Zealand’s largest stand-alone motocross event – and the riders rose to the occasion.

With all three races in each class counting towards the Woodville GP titles and only the first two of the three races being deemed eligible for the national championships, the event threw up separate podiums in each class.

Taupo’s Wyatt Chase therefore won the Woodville GP crown for the first time and West Auckland’s Hamish Harwood, incidentally the GP title winner last season, missed out on repeating the feat, but Harwood left Woodville with a slender six-point lead in the premier MX1 class for the national title hunt, the national series continuing on at Rotorua in three weeks’ time (on Sunday, February 21), with round three to follow at Pukekohe on Saturday, March 20. It all wraps up at Taupo on Sunday, March 28.

Mangakino’s Maximus Purvis won the MX2 (250cc) class for the Woodville GP trophy and he also leads that class for national honours, while the same applies for Matamata’s Brodie Connolly in the MX125 class. In addition, Connolly also leads the points in terms of Under-19 years’ age-group honours.

Motueka’s Roma Edwards topped the women’s class at Woodville and she also leads the chase for Women’s Cup honours.

Motorcycling New Zealand Motocross commissioner Ray Broad said it was a spectacular weekend of racing, with so many riders and a large crowd thrilled to be a part of the 60th celebrations.

“The first two races of GP carry over points towards New Zealand titles, so when we head to round two at Rotorua, those riders still have it all to play for and the fierce battling that we saw at Woodville will continue on.

“We knew that, with all that goes on here at Woodville, it was always going to be difficult getting through three championship-length races, which is why the last round of sprint races weren’t counted towards national championship points.”

Broad added that the 2021 Honda New Zealand Motocross Grand Prix at Woodville, and all of the other rounds of the nationals too, would be live-streamed on the Sky Sport Next programme and also repeat screened on Sky Sport.

For 21-year-old Taupo rider Chase it was a particularly special weekend as he won his first Woodville GP title in the premier 450cc MX1 bike class.

“This is a massive win for me,” said Chase. “This is a title that all motocross riders want to win and it’s great that my name will go on the trophy alongside so many legendary riders that have gone before me.”

The New Zealand Motocross Championships are supported by Aon Insurance, Kawasaki New Zealand, Pirelli tyres and Fox apparel.

Class winners from the weekend’s 60th annual New Zealand Motocross

Woodville GP seniors (Sunday):

Woodville GP: Taupo’s Wyatt Chase (MX1 class and main Woodville GP trophy); Mangakino’s Maximus Purvis (MX2 class); Matamata’s Brodie Connolly (MX125); Motueka’s Roma Edwards (Women); Rotorua’s Cam Negus (Veterans); Palmerston North’s Paul Whibley (River Race); Connolly (Roddy Shirriffs Under-19 trophy).

Senior NZ Motocross Champs points:

MX1 class: 1. West Auckland’s Hamish Harwood, 47 points; 2. Chase, 41; 3= Mount Maunganui’s Cody Cooper and Hamilton’s Kayne Lamont, 40.

MX2 class: 1. Purvis, 50 points; 2. Oparau’s James Scott, 44; 3. Mount Maunganui’s Josiah Natzke, 40.

MX125 class: 1. Connolly, 47 points; 2. Silverdale’s Hayden Smith, 45; 3. Clevedon’s Cobie Bourke, 40.

Women’s Cup: 1. Edwards, 72 points; 2. Opunake’s Taylar Rampton, 69; 3. Hamilton’s Amie Roberts, 58.

Under-19 class: 1. Connolly, 50 points; 2. Tauranga’s Donovan Ward, 38; 3. Te Aroha Luke Van der Lee, 36.

Woodville GP juniors (Saturday):

Pukekawa’s Tyler Brown (14-16 years’ 250cc class); Invercargill’s Jack Symon (15-16 years, 125cc class); Te Puke’s Flynn Watts (12-14 years’ 125cc class); Auckland’s Lachlan Bourn (14-16 years’ 85cc class); Waitoki’s Cole Davies (12-13 years’ 85cc class); Taupo’s Declan Connors (8-11 years’ 85cc class); Tauranga’s Levin Townley (8-11 years’ 65cc class); Palmerston North’s Hannah Powell (12-16 years’ women 125cc/250cc); Raetihi’s Karaitiana Horne (12-16 years’ women’ 85cc/150cc); Taupo’s Mikayla Griffiths (8-11 years’ 85cc/150cc).

Senior 2021 NZ Motocross Champs calendar:

Round One: January 30-31, 2021 (in conjunction with the NZMX Grand Prix at Woodville). Manawatu-Orion MCC. MX1 (& 2T Cup), MX2 (& under-19), MX125 & round one of the Women’s Cup.

Round Two: Sunday, February 21, 2021. Rotorua Motorcycle Club. MX1 (& 2T Cup), MX2 (& under-19), MX125 & MX3.

Round Three: Saturday, March 20. Pukekohe Motorcycle Club. MX1 (& 2T Cup), MX2 (& under-19), MX125 & MX3 (followed by Junior and Mini open at Pukekohe on Sunday, March 21).

Round Four: Sunday, March 28. Taupo Motorcycle Club. MX1 (& 2T Cup), MX2 (& under-19), MX125, MX3 & round two of the Women’s Cup. Prize giving is arranged for that evening.

The Motorcycle Australian Exhibit

By General Posts

Passion, Desire and Action

Curated by US-based design curator and physicist Professor Charles M Falco and writer and filmmaker Ultan Guilfoyle in collaboration with QAGOMA

Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) opens the world exclusive exhibition ‘The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire’ tomorrow, featuring 100 exceptional motorcycles from the 1870s to the present.

Queensland Art Gallery, Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) Director Chris Saines said ‘The Motorcycle’, showing until 26 April, 2021 celebrates 150 years of motorcycle history and included multiple interactive experiences for all ages.

‘Curated by US-based design curator and physicist Professor Charles M Falco and writer and filmmaker Ultan Guilfoyle in collaboration with QAGOMA, the exhibition features pioneering motorcycles and classic commuters, off-road bikes and speed machines, as well as custom creations and numerous electric bikes heralding the future,’ Mr Saines said.

Click Here to Read this Photo Feature on Bikernet.

Join the Cantina – Subscribe Now.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Motorcycle Riders Foundation Announces Historic First

By General Posts

Atlanta, Georgia – The Motorcycle Riders Foundation, based in Washington, D.C., along with ABATE of Georgia, announced a historic first with the announcement that the organization’s annual Meeting of the Minds Conference will take place in Atlanta in September this year.

“The MRF has met several times in the Southeast. However, we have never had the opportunity to meet in Atlanta, and we’re looking forward to the occasion.” MRF Conferences and Events Director, Fredric Harrell announced at the organization’s 2020 annual conference in Indianapolis in September.

“ABATE of Georgia worked to meet the MRF’s conference guidelines and we’re reaching out to our neighboring state motorcyclists’ rights organizations for participation.” Donna Nunez, ABATE of Georgia Activities Director, said when the 2021 conference was announced.

This “historic first” will bring the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Minds Conference to the JW Marriott Atlanta Buckhead Hotel, September 23-26 and will be the kick-off point for the Motorcycle Riders Foundation’s 2022 legislative agenda. Attendees are encouraged to make reservations as early as possible for this much-demanded conference.

Past keynote speakers at the annual event include, Keith “Bandit” Ball, former editor of Easyriders Magazine, Dave Zein, former Wisconsin State Senator, Paul Landers, Texas Freedom Fighter, Chopper & Slider Gilmore, Freedom Fighters & Motorcycling Safety Advocates, Mark Buckner, Former MRF President & current MRF Executive Director, among other notables who have added insight, levity and strong messages on freedom and individual rights to the MRFs annual conference. Conference agenda includes, but never limited to general sessions, 15 break-out sessions, safe riding demonstrations and awards banquet.

The first Meeting of the Minds Conference, held in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1985 witnessed barely 100 motorcyclists’ rights advocates and a very limited agenda. The Meeting of the Minds Conference has grown to over 500 participants from state motorcyclists’ rights advocacy groups in addition to representatives from Canada, the European Union, Australia and Liberia.

The Motorcycle – Design, Art, Desire at the Gallery of Modern Art

By General Posts

28 Nov 2020 – 26 Apr 2021
GOMA | Gallery 1.1 The Fairfax Gallery, Gallery 1.2, Gallery 1.3 Eric & Marion Taylor Gallery | Ticketed

Discover a whole new perspective of The Motorcycle.

https://www.qagoma.qld.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/themotorcycle

Get your motor running… ‘The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire’ opens the throttle on the ground-breaking designs that shaped one of the most iconic objects the world has ever seen.

Featuring radical concepts, record breakers and road icons, the fully-immersive exhibition showcases 100 of the greatest motorcycles ever assembled.

Show off your ride with #MotorcycleGOMA | Read more about the motorcycles

Tickets are also available to purchase onsite between 10.00am – 4.15pm. Visit our ticket information page for details on ticket prices, accepted concessions, companion cards, season tickets etc.

The accompanying cinema program ‘Motorcycles on Screen‘ explores film depictions of motorcycles from around the world, looking back at more than a century of motorcycles on screen. It includes iconic classics (The Wild One 1953, Easy Rider 1969), cult favourites (Scorpio Rising 1963, Akira 1988) and recent films (Finke: There and Back 2018, The Wild Goose Lake 2019). Explore themes of freedom, danger, and fraternity, as well as surveying the vehicle’s history and looking ahead to the roles it may play in future societies.

Drawing on QAGOMA’s unique cutting-edge design technology, the exhibition will feature a range of immersive interactives to enhance the visitor experience. Discover more about the art, design and historical context of each bike through the exhibition companion website. Take a virtual seat on a 1950s Vespa, 1960s Dirt Bike or an Electric ‘Future’ Bike and go riding in real-time through a themed landscape. Spend some time building and customising your own bike, on a touch-screen interactive, maybe with a little help from our virtual Ellaspede consultant.

Full Face: Artists’ Helmets’ introduces visitors to the interwoven themes of art and design that ‘The Motorcycle’ explores. 15 contemporary Australian artists – Monika Behrens, Kate Beynon, David Booth (ghostpatrol), Eric Bridgeman and Alison Wel, eX de Medici, Shaun Gladwell, Madeleine Kelly, Callum McGrath, Archie Moore, Robert Moore, Nell, Reko Rennie, Brian Robinson, TextaQueen, Guan Wei – individualise a Biltwell Gringo ECE ‘full face’ helmet.

Teens Motorcycle Helmet Design Competition – Take inspiration from ‘The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire’ and create a design for a motorcycle helmet. The design will be judged on its creativity, presentation, idea and concept. Open to designers and artists between the ages of 13 and 18. Submissions close 24 January 2021. Details on how to enter.Get up to speed at The Motorcycle Exhibition Shop, a pop-up retail experience featuring an exciting range of publications and products that explore the culture, vibe, and aesthetic that inspired ‘The Motorcycle’ exhibition. Highlights include exclusive exhibition apparel and accessories by cult brand Deus ex Machina, and bespoke design pieces produced by local heroes Ellaspede. The publication The Motorcycle: Design, Art, Desire is available at the QAGOMA Store and online

Entry to ‘The Motorcycle’ exhibition will be staggered to allow visitors to enter in safe numbers and allow for free movement throughout the exhibition while following social distancing advice. This means there may be a short wait before you can enter the exhibition. Purchasing your exhibition tickets in advance will help the queuing run smoothly. Contact tracing details will be required on arrival for access to the Gallery. For more details visit our COVID-safe practices plan.

 

Americade reschedules 2021 motorcycle rally for Sept. 21-25

By General Posts

from https://www.news10.com

After last year’s rally being canceled, the 2021 Americade Motorcycle Touring Rally is playing things as safe as possible in order to rev the engines around the COVID-19 pandemic.

The 38th annual Americade rally has been rescheduled from its original planned June dates to Sept. 21-25, according to event manager Christian Dutcher. That additional time was added to make the difference in safety confidence for riders, vendors, and the village of Lake George.

“We want to make 100% sure that a 2021 Americade will happen, but we’re not confident an event of this size will be permissible in June,” said Dutcher. “But, moving it to September gives us a very high likelihood of it happening. And, September is also a perfect time of year for riding, with mild temperatures, no rain, and foliage season beginning. It should be beautiful.”

Americade said that the decision also helped them to secure certain venues, some of which can more easily agree to involvement with more time for vaccines to be administered across the state and nation, and ideally for coronavirus restrictions to be lifted.

The new dates also allow riders and visitors to enjoy the village during the fall, not too far past the summer tourist season, without bumping heads against Labor Day weekend.

“We’re very lucky to have found a 2021 date that works for the community and for the motorcycle industry,” said Dutcher. “I feared we may have to cancel until Americade 2022, but miraculously we are able to slide it into September.”

Dakar 2021: Honda registers back-to-back win in motorcycle class

By General Posts

from https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Argentine Kevin Benavides, riding a Honda, on Friday won the motorcycle category of the 2021 Dakar Rally becoming the first South American to achieve the feat.

Ricky Brabec, the 2020 champion in the motorcycle class, finished second to teammate Kevin Benavides to clutch the first one-two Dakar Rally finish for Honda since 1987. Sam Sunderland, the 2017 champion in the category, finished third riding a KTM.

Benavides clinched the title on the 12th and the final stage of the category held on Friday. Honda has now registered a back-to-back win in the motorcycle class.

The finish of the final stage was completely overshadowed by the death of the French rider, Pierre Cherpin, who had been in an induced coma since his crash on the 7th stage.

“On stage five I was worried because I crashed so fast and hit my head and my ankle and felt a lot of pain. On that day I said maybe the Dakar is finished for me. But I continued pushing. I still have some pain, but at the moment I am more happy than in pain,” said Kevin Benavides after the finish.