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electric Archives — Page 5 of 8 — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

This dirtbike can run at 120 kmph and it’s fully electric

By | General Posts

Ottobike MXR comes powered by an 11 kW continuous rated mid-drive motor that has a liquid cooling system along with electric speed controller.

Taiwan-based Ottobike has showcased a fully electric dirtbike concept at the 2019 EICMA Milan motorcycle show, dubbed as the Ottobike MXR.

The MXR stands for Maxi Extreme Rider and this motorcycle concept is capable of running at a speed of 120 kmph, claims a media report. It comes powered by an 11 kW continuous rated mid-drive motor that has a liquid cooling system along with electric speed controller.

The electric dirt bike is claimed to have a maximum torque output of 45 Nm and it weighs 100 kg.

The dirtbike looks rugged and aggressive. Instead of a proper headlamp, it gets three vertically positioned LED bars, while an LCD dashboard is there, which displays a wide range of information. Ottobike has used Android OS for the display to show the riders GPS directions, live maps and incoming calls, among other features, as claimed by the report.

It houses a non-removable battery that has a capacity of nearly 5 kWh and a 1.2 kW battery charger as well. Ottobike claims the bike’s battery takes 2.25 hours for a 20-80 per cent charge, while to get fully charged it requires around 4 hours of time.

Harley-Davidson has three models of electric bike going on sale next year

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by Robin-Leigh Chetty from https://www.htxt.co.za/

While Harley-Davidson is not the first name that springs to mind when it comes to electric vehicles, every time we’ve written about the company, it’s had to do with one of its EVs.

This time around is no different, as the company offered up the first looks at its new trio of pedal-assisted electric bikes at 2019 EICMA Motorcycle Show in Milan earlier this week.

Electrek was on hand to take a closer look at the bikes, and you can check out a full gallery of images on its site.

https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/motorcycles/future-vehicles/e-bicycles.html

With the trio of electric bikes yet to have official names, we’re more interested in what Harley-Davidson’s plans are moving forward, and luckily the firm has offered up some insight in that regard.

An unnamed spokesperson has noted that Harley-Davidson will be gauging the interest and demand for pedal-assisted electric bikes in coming months, with a view to launch them some time in 2020.

Based on the concept models shown in Milan, it looks the company is targeting a more premium customer, with The Verge believing that a price tag around the $1000 mark is not out of the question. This makes sense considering the electric LiveWire motorbike goes for a cool $30 000 on pre-order.

These bikes are not the only EVs that Harley-Davidson is working on, with the company also revealing an interesting looking e-bike concept last year, but sadly no word on whether that will go into production.

It’s also unclear which regions outside of the US the firm plans to launch these upcoming electric bikes, or indeed its LiveWire. With a number of dealerships locally, there is certainly a demand for the brand, and perhaps some of its future EVs too.

Kawasaki to launch electric Ninja

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Yoshimoto Matsuda, Senior Manager, Innovation Department division at Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. and his team have been working on the electric motorcycles since the 2000s.

Japanese premium motorcycle manufacturer Kawasaki is working on an electric motorcycle that is likely to come with the Ninja badge upon launch, reveals a media report.

Yoshimoto Matsuda, Senior Manager, Innovation Department division at Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. and his team have been working on the electric motorcycles since the 2000s.

The motorcycle maker has teased a test mule in a video that looks like the upcoming electric Ninja. As Kawasaki hints, the electric motorcycle will be fun to control, exciting and it will reflect the passion of the brand.

The video hinted that Kawasaki is testing the electric powertrain on a 2017 Ninja 650. However, the details about this powertrain are not clear yet.

The media report quoted, Yoshimoto, who said, “We have been thoroughly studying and patenting features ranging from packaging and chassis geometry to transmissions and thumb brake activated energy recovery systems.”

The test mule hs a range of 100 km but the production model is likely to come with improved range. Speaking about the launch date of the electric Kawasaki Ninja, the motorcycle is likely to come sometime in early next decade.

On Tuesday, Kawasaki confirmed that the brand is joining the EV (electric vehicle) revolution by officially announcing that an electric motorcycle is on the way.

Following in the footsteps of Harley Davidson, Kawaski announced that an electric motorcycle — albeit it being a concept model — is currently in development.

In a video demonstrating the speed of the bike, the company’s Innovation Senior Manager Yoshimoto Matsuda stated that the motorcycle is equipped with a next-generation power unit which has been in the works since the turn of the century.

Like their engine powered bikes, the electric iteration has been designed in accordance with the company’s Rideology philosophy which means that it will be fun to ride.

Of the few specs revealed by the company, it has been confirmed that the motorcycle will have a manual transmission, “performance on par with a mid-size displacement model,” and a 100km range.

Matsuda stated that Kawasaki has been busy patenting technologies for electric bikes over the years like a thumb brake-activated energy recovery system, but he did not confirm whether such components will be present on the concept or not.

In any case, this concept basically functions as a preliminary version of upcoming production models which will doubtlessly incorporate some of these elements.

After years and years of development, Kawasaki only revealed that their electric motorcycle will be unveiled in the near future.

Hadin Panther Brings American Cruiser Look to Electric Motorcycles

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In the past few years, the electrification bug has spread to the motorcycle industry. A great deal of startups have come and went, presenting the weirdest of concepts and, at times, bikes that would actually (probably) make it into production. But, so far, nothing truly extraordinary great has made it our way.

Some could argue that Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire motorcycle is the breakthrough they’ve been waiting for. Technologically speaking, that may be true, but as far as design goes, the LiveWire is far from the look some were anticipating.

To date, very few, if none, cruiser-shaped electric bikes have been shown. But that could change as soon as next week’s EICMA 2019 show in Milan, Italy.

We’re expecting to see a wealth of high profile bikes on the floor of the Rho Fairgrounds, but few will probably be as exciting as the Hadin Panther.

Little is known at the moment about both the bike and the company that supposedly makes it. Hadin is said to be a California-based enterprise that took it upon itself to create a more Harley-like electric motorcycle that Harley itself is capable of. A bike that is „smart, comfy, clean, safe and steady.”

Officially, nothing was revealed yet about the bike’s technical capabilities, but there are rumors about the so called Hadin Panther providing 100 miles of range (160 km), a top speed of 80 mph (130 kph), and an electric motor capable of churning out a shameful 60 hp of power.

There are a few images of the bike circulating online, showing a very American-looking bike, but we’ll have to wait for the official unveiling to see some more.

If you plan on finding more about the bike and the company, you could head over to the official website, but you’d only be greeted by a landing page meant to build anticipation for the official presentation.

Bajaj made Triumph motorcycles launch in 2022 – Will also be exported

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by Nithyanandh Karupp from https://www.rushlane.com

Could be called Bajaj Avenger 400 / 500 upon launch in India.

Over the years, Bajaj Auto has created a solid export operation which has proved to be quite useful when the domestic market undergoes a rough patch such as the ongoing one. About 40% of Bajaj Auto’s production is shipped out of the country to around 80 markets worldwide. With its partnership with British sportsbike brand Triumph, Bajaj is looking to further improve those export statistics.

The Pune-based two wheeler maker had announced a non-equity partnership with Triumph Motorcycles in August 2017 and is currently in the process of finalizing the finer details of the agreement. Things should start materializing from end-2019 and we are expecting the first product to be born out of this partnership to be ready in the next 3 years.

Bajaj will take the responsibility of manufacturing the products at its facility in a cost effective manner while its British partner will be in charge of engineering and development. Needless to say, the platforms developed under this partnership will spawn both Bajaj and Triumph branded motorcycles.

The made-by-Bajaj Triumph compact displacement motorcycles will be exported to several markets including the US, Europe and Japan. This was revealed by Rajiv Bajaj at a recent event in Delhi.

With small displacement sportsbike segment steadily gaining popularity across the world, adding Triumph to its production portfolio is expected to boost Bajaj’s already strong export operations significantly. Details regarding body styles and displacements of Bajaj-Triumph products are still under wraps but expect them cater to sub-500cc category.

With the KTM Duke and RC ranges, Bajaj Auto has successfully demonstrated its capability to manufacture compact premium motorcycles that can hold their own in international markets. With well established vendor base and know-how of premium product production, the company can easily manage compact displacement Triumphs. It is to be noted that Bajaj is also gearing up to manufacture and export Huqsvarna Vitpilen 401 and Svartpilen 401 street fighters.

Bajaj is also upbeat about the domestic electric two wheeler market which is expected to flourish in the coming years. The recently Chetak electric scooter will be spearheading the brand’s electric charge while more such products are in the pipeline. Bajaj is also developing an premium EV platform with KTM for international markets. Qute electric has also been spied on test ahead of launch.

An Aston Martin motorcycle will grace the world soon enough

By | General Posts

by Sean Szymkowski from https://www.cnet.com
by Luke Wilkinson from https://www.autoexpress.co.uk

The bike will be a collaboration between the automaker and Brough Superior.

Aston Martin is prepared to dive into the world of motorcycles, thanks to a collaborative effort between it and storied British motorcycle maker, Brough Superior.

Motorcycle fans will see the Aston Martin badge grace a two-wheeled contraption for the first time next month when the automaker and motorcycle maker unveil a carefully crafted bike. Aston Martin said Thursday the first motorcycle coming to life will debut at the EICMA show in Milan, Italy, on Nov. 5.

Details are, obviously, absent for now. However, the British carmaker underscored that it tapped into its decades of engineering and design expertise to help Brough Superior craft something only the two companies could create. It’s something of a passion project, too, as Aston Martin Executive Vice President and Chief Creative Officer Marek Reichman and Brough Superior CEO Thierry Henriette are both motorcycle enthusiasts.

“The opportunity to collaborate with Brough Superior has given us the chance to bring our own unique views on how beauty and engineering can combine to create a highly emotive piece of vehicle design,” Reichman said of the project in a statement.

Aston Martin has continuously expanded its reach, and the upcoming motorcycle is the latest branch sprung from the British automaker. The company has plans for not one, but three mid-engine supercars in the near future, and a resurrected Lagonda brand will handle luxury electric vehicles. A DBX luxury SUV will also launch in the coming months.

We’ll see the limited-edition motorcycle in a couple of weeks and I expected it to be nothing but a grand piece of transportation.

Aston Martin and historic British motorcycle manufacturer Brough Superior will unveil a new motorcycle this November

Aston Martin has announced a new partnership with the iconic British motorcycle manufacturer Brough Superior, which will see the pair produce a limited edition two-wheeled project for this year’s EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show. The finished article will be unveiled on 5 November.

Details on the British brands’ collaborative project remain sparse but, given Brough Superior’s heritage, we expect the finished bike will be powered by a V-Twin engine. Judging by the sole teaser image released so far, it should also adopt a more contemporary design than Brough Superior’s current range of motorcycles.

Aston Martin and Brough Superior’s limited edition motorcycle will probably feature fairings for handlebars and engine, rather than the naked design employed by the latter brand’s current Pendine Sand Racer and Super Sports 100 models. The project will also mark the first time Aston Martin’s badge will appear on a motorcycle.

Aston Martin’s Executive Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, Marek Reichman, said: “The opportunity to collaborate with Brough Superior has given us the chance to bring our own unique views on how beauty and engineering can combine to create a highly emotive piece of vehicle design. We’re excited about the end result and can’t wait to see the reaction the motorcycle receives when it is revealed.”

Brough Superior was established in Nottingham in 1919, by George Brough. Throughout the early 20th Century, the brand produced the world’s fastest and most expensive performance motorcycles – such as the 1924 SS100, which was comfortably capable of reaching 100mph and cost the equivalent of £10,000 in today’s money.

Harley-Davidson Resumes LiveWire Production, Says Charging Problem Was Confined To Just One Bike

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by Bill Roberson from https://www.forbes.com

Harley-Davidson has resumed production of the LiveWire electric motorcycle after assembly was stopped earlier this week when a charging issue cropped up and was spotted during quality checks.

A Harley-Davidson Motor Company representative told Forbes Friday morning that production was temporarily suspended “to confirm that the non-standard condition identified on one motorcycle was a singular occurrence. We take pride in our rigorous quality assurance measures and our drive to deliver the world’s best motorcycles.”

They added that customers who already had the bikes could resume charging “through all methods,” including using the 120-volt (Level 1) on-board chargers that essentially let users plug the bikes into a wall outlet. Following the production halt, Harley had advised riders to only use the high-speed Level III Fast DC chargers at dealerships until the issue with the 120-volt charger was resolved. “Our quality assurances are working as they were designed, and we’ve reaffirmed the strength of the LiveWire product design, no product changes are needed and we’re moving forward,” the spokesperson told Forbes.

The issue marked a hiccup in Harley-Davidson’s rollout of the LiveWire motorcycles, which are a radical departure from the Motor Company’s usual slate of iconic gas-powered V-Twin machines. Harley is betting that the future of transportation – including motorcycles – will include more electric vehicles and they are the first major legacy motorcycle maker to put an all-electric bike into serial production.

The LiveWire features a 105-horsepower electric motor, 15.5kWh battery pack and can go zero to 60mph in three seconds.

Harley has said more electric models – including possibly electric bicycles – are on the way following the rollout of the $29,700 LiveWire. Indeed, there are Harley electric balance bikes for kids on sale at this time.

Harley Davidson: The Road Only Goes Downhill

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Harley-Davidson delays its first $30,000 electric motorcycle after unexpected findings during final quality checks

  • The company delayed the motorcycle after ‘non-standard conditions’ were discvoered during final quality checks
  • Dealers had begun selling pre-orders of the bike in January
  • Harley-Davidson had forecast shipping 1,600 bikes

Harley-Davidson has delayed production on its first electric motorcycle, called LiveWire.

In an email sent to dealers last week, the company announced it had found a ‘non-standard condition’ in its final quality checks but didn’t elaborate further.

The LiveWire was officially announced for commercial release last fall with a planned price of $29,799.

‘We recently discovered a non-standard condition during a final quality check; stopped production and deliveries; and began additional testing and analysis, which is progressing well,’ the company said in a statement.

The Wall Street Journal reported that the decision came after a problem with the vehicle’s battery charging was discovered. The manufacturer did not say when they planned to resume production.

The company had already begun delivering models of LiveWire to dealers in September.

The company had expected to ship around 1,600 bikes, or an estimated 1 percent of the company’s total big shipments.

The LiveWire is said to go from 0-60 mph in three seconds and reach top speeds of 110 mph.

Harley-Davidson recommends users go to dealers to charge the vehicle rather than trying to use standard electrical outlets in their homes.

It is powered by a 15.5 kWh battery and has a 105 horsepower magnetic engine and a range of 146 miles city driving on a single charge.

Harley-Davidson had told potential customers to charge the bike only at registered dealers and not in their homes.

The bike was first shown in The Avengers: Age of Ultron as a sleek prototype ridden by Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow character.

The LiveWire promised a slew of advanced technical features, including what PR Manager Paul James descried as ‘twist-and-go.’

‘Because it’s all-electric, it’s twist-and-go,’ Paul James, PR Manager at Harley-Davidson, told Dailymail.com at the Las Vegas Convention Center earlier this year.

The LiveWire’s battery is said to have a range of 146 miles of city driving.

‘There’s no transmission, there are no shifters, no clutch – it’s very easy to ride.’

LiveWire is equipped with a full suite of electronic lateral aids, with a slew of sensors and programmable touch controls.

It also has cellular connectivity, making it the first mass market motorcycle in North America with the capability.

This means it can alert the owner if the bike has been tampered with or moved. It also has built-in GPS for location tracking.

As for the sound, Harley says its electric powertrain will produce a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

The ‘twist-and-go’ bike ditches the traditional shifters and chirps out a turbine-like whir in lieu of the characteristic rumble. The company is hoping this will usher in a ‘new signature Harley-Davidson sound,’ with minimal vibration, heat, and noise.

LiveWire will also launch in Canada and most of Europe later this year, Harley-Davidson says.

  • Harley Davidson sales have been on a decline the past five years hurting the company’s bottom line. The company has introduced new initiatives to buck this trend.
  • Despite the new strategy Harley Davidson will have a hard time attracting millennial customers and will face stiff competition in Asia.
  • Harley Davidson is highly levered and not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

Harley Davidson (HOG) has been having a rough last couple of years, with its current stock price nearly half of where it was in 2018 as it fell from around $50 per share to its current price of about $35 per share. The company is an American icon, with the Milwaukee-based motorcycle maker being founded more than 100 years ago, and conjures up a certain type of imagery – that of big bikes, loud engines and groups of somewhat older riders riding together in large groups.

This level of brand loyalty and, dare I say, cult following has been a cornerstone of Harley Davidson’s strategy for years. However, Harley Davidson’s sales have begun to slump in recent years after reaching a high in 2014 with this trend set to continue in 2019. In Q2 2019, the company delivered nearly 69,000 bikes for the quarter, down 5% compared to the same period a year earlier and overall sales fell 6% to $1.4 billion.

The brand loyalty that Harley Davidson has cultivated has become its weakness as its core demographic of rider’s ages the company struggles to attract the new millennial rider and re-align its brand messaging to match what that segment is looking for.

UBS conducted a survey of more than 2,000 people between the age of 21 and 34 in an attempt to figure out why Harley-Davidson stock has fallen 32% in the past 12 months. While their findings are bad news for big expensive cruisers and touring bikes, they are actually good for other parts of the industry. Unlike older buyers who considered a bike “as a hobby” or because “motorcycles are cool” Millennial responders want them for “ease of transportation.” Young buyers are interested in practical and affordable bikes, for now, partially because many of them don’t have a lot of money. There is no telling if hooking Millennial customers now with affordable and practical might lead to selling them a big touring bike when they are older and have more time and money. Among the young target demographic, the second most common reason listed for buying a bike was “it goes with their self image” so the important thing might be to not try to sell them their dad’s motorcycle.

Harley will have difficulty attracting the millennial audience

I struggle to see how 10 years from now a millennial who would have values such as being more frugal, more minimalistic and more environmentally conscious would not opt for a sleek, sporty high-tech Ducati and go for a big, loud, chrome-plated Harley Davidson. Therefore, it makes sense that Harley Davidson would try to shift its brand away from this older image and embrace something more modern. And the fact is, the company is well aware of that. On July 30, 2018, the Company disclosed its “More Roads to Harley-Davidson” plan to accelerate the Company’s strategy to build the next generation of riders globally. Under the plan, the Company intends to introduce new products including electric motorcycles, a new middle-weight platform of motorcycles that includes adventure touring, custom and streetfighter models with engine displacements ranging from 500cc’s to 1250cc’s; and smaller displacement motorcycles for emerging markets. The Company plans to introduce these new motorcycles between 2019 and 2022, starting with a new electric motorcycle, LiveWire, in the second half of 2019.

These plans are hitting a bit of a snag, as the company is seeing soft demand for its Livewire electric vehicles. These electric motorcycles, which are aimed at millennial customers and billed as a way to attract a new generation of riders, come with a sticker price of $30,000 nearly as much as a Tesla model 3. It’s as if the company ignored the main necessary selling points (i.e. “practical” and “affordable”) for this demographic. Harley Davidson does make some decent, affordable bikes in their Street lineup. But they still have that stigma, of being expensive toys. In the sub-$10,000 motorcycle market, Harley can’t compete in terms of bang-for-the-buck with the likes of Triumph, Ducati, and the Japanese big four that’s been cashing in on cheap Harley alternatives since the 1980s.

Harley to face stiff competition in the emerging markets

Harley Davidson’s other area for potential growth is through expanding in emerging markets, particularly China and India. The company announced a collaboration with Qianjiang Motorcycle Company Limited (“Qianjiang”) to launch a smaller, more accessible Harley-Davidson motorcycle for sale in Harley-Davidson dealerships in China by the end of 2020. Motorcycles have been a presence in Asia for years with brands like Honda and Yamaha, along with local country-specific brands, dominating the sale of smaller vehicles.

There is a difference in motorcycle riding philosophy between the US and Asia. In many Asian countries, a motorcycle is considered a legitimate transportation option. A motorcycle is easier to park in the densely packed cities, can squeeze right through traffic, and is far more affordable than a car. Fuel in many Asian countries is also more expensive, and the taxes and permit fees for motorcycles are much lower too.

Given these considerations, in my view for Asian customers the main selling point of these motorcycles would be affordability and reliability as the next “tier” in terms of status symbols would be purchasing a car. The way I see it, Harley Davidson’s Asian motorcycles will slot in a premium category as is typical with other Harley products. The question then becomes for the Asian customer who may not be as familiar with the Harley brand and who do not view motorcycle riding as a “hobby” is that will they be willing to pay for that premium.

Harley Davidson is highly leveraged

Looking over at the financials, the company is trading at a low forward GAAP P/E of about 13. This is justified though as the company’s revenue has declined by 8.21% from 2014 to 2018 and its Net income has declined at an even faster rate of 37% in the same timeframe. The company is not trading at a cheap valuation.

Even more worryingly, the company is highly leveraged at 82 percent of total liabilities to total assets and with a debt to equity ratio of 4.62. Furthermore, a large portion of the company’s assets (nearly 70%) are finance receivables i.e. amounts owed by customers who have bought Harley Davidson motorcycles on finance. As we have seen in the experience of Kraft Heinz (KHC), a large amount of leverage would limit the flexibility of the company to make the necessary changes to its strategy. Given the headwinds the company faces due to declining sales and the need to change its strategy, I am quite bearish on Harley Davidson. The company is not trading at a large enough discount to warrant an investment.

NEWS SOURCE:
https://seekingalpha.com
https://www.dailymail.co.uk
https://www.wheels24.co.za

Harley-Davidson halts electric motorcycle production

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Oct 14 (Reuters) – Harley-Davidson Inc said on Monday it has stopped production of its first electric motorcycle after discovering a glitch in the final quality checks.

The motorcycle maker said it does not have a timeline as to when the production will resume.

Harley-Davidson’s stock turns down after WSJ report halting production of electric motorcycle

Shares of Harley-Davidson Inc. HOG, +0.31% swung to a loss Monday, after The Wall Street Journal reported that the company had to halt production and delivery of its first electric motorcycle after finding a problem related to charging equipment. The stock was down 1.1% in afternoon trading, after being up as much as 0.7% earlier in the session.

The electric motorcycle, the LiveWire, was part of the company’s plan to inspire the next generation of riders. The company is scheduled to report third-quarter results on Oct. 22 before the opening bell. Harley’s stock has lost 5.2% over the past three months, while the S&P 500 SPX, -0.14% has slipped 1.6%.

Harley struggles to fire up new generation of riders with electric bike debut

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by Rajesh Kumar Singh from https://www.reuters.com/

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Harley-Davidson Inc (HOG.N) is betting on electric motorcycles to attract the next generation of younger and more environmentally conscious riders to reverse declining U.S. sales.

But as Harley ships its first “LiveWire” bikes – priced at $29,799 – to dealers, there is little evidence the 116-year-old brand is catching on with new young customers.

The problem lies mostly with this “super-premium” product’s price. The bike costs nearly as much as a Tesla Model 3, and aims for a market that does not really exist: young, “green” and affluent first-time motorcyclists.

The sleek sport bike has been available for preorder in the United States since January. However, the bulk of the orders are coming in from existing and old riders, according to interviews with 40 of the 150 dealerships nationwide that are carrying the bike this year.

The dealers Reuters spoke with account for little over a quarter of LiveWire dealerships and are spread across Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, California, Nevada, New Jersey and New York.

Harley has for years failed to increase sales in the United States, its top market accounting for more than half of its motorcycles sold. As its tattooed, baby-boomer base ages, the Milwaukee-based company is finding it challenging to woo new customers.

In 2018, Harley posted the steepest sales decline in four years in the United States. U.S. sales are tipped to fall again this year.

Harley Davidson’s U.S. Retail Sales

Grappling with an ageing customer base and the waning charm for its big bikes, Harley has failed to post sales growth in the United States – its biggest market – in the past four years.

The heavyweight motorcycle maker’s stock price has declined by 42% in the past five years. By comparison, the S&P 500 Index .SPX has gained 47%.

Price Barrier
When Chief Executive Officer Matt Levatich announced LiveWire’s launch last year, his hope was the ease of riding motorcycles with no gears or clutch would help attract young and environmentally conscious urban riders.

In an interview with Reuters in February 2018, Levatich said the bike would help address Harley’s demographic problem.

“It is more about the next century than the last century,” he said at the time.

The preorders, thus far, have belied those hopes, according to the dealers.

“It is appealing to a demographic that is already riding,” said Gennaro Sepe, a sales manager at a Harley dealership in Chicago. His store has received four preorders for the bike. All of them are from existing riders.

Harley declined to comment on LiveWire preorders.

The motorcycle maker is not the only company investing in battery-powered transportation.

Tougher emissions rules in Europe, China and the United States are forcing auto companies to switch to electrified models. A survey of U.S. millennial motorcyclists, published in February by the Motorcycle Industry Council, found 69% of the riders interested in electric motorcycles.

Harley’s dealers said they are getting inquiries from young customers, but are struggling to translate them into sales. A key reason: LiveWire’s retail price.

“Interest is very high,” said a sales manager at a New Jersey-based dealership, who declined to be named because he was not authorized to speak to media. “But once you get to pricing, interest is thrown out of the window.”

Over half of young college graduates in America, whom Harley is courting with battery-powered bikes, are saddled with student loans that entail average repayment of $200 to $300 per month.

Harley is not offering any discount or incentives to push the sales, either, the dealers said.

In an interview with CNBC television in May, Levatich called LiveWire “one of the best engineered products on the market” and said it was worth its price.

Gary Jon Prough, general sales manager at a dealership in Countryside, Illinois, said the vast majority of millennials cannot afford the bike as LiveWire is targeted at young and affluent customers with incomes above $100,000 a year.

Tesla’s Way

To drive up sales, Prough and other dealers expect Harley to go Tesla Inc’s (TSLA.O) way: launch more affordable battery-powered vehicles after creating a buzz with the premium model.

Tesla’s first electric car cost over $100,000, but prices came down with subsequent models. Its Model 3 now comes with a base price of $35,000 and was instrumental in lifting its vehicle deliveries to a record level in the latest quarter.

Traditional Harley Davidson entry-level bikes cost about $6,900.

The motorcycle maker has plans to bring out four more electrified models in the mid-power, low-power, e-bicycles and kids’ two-wheeler segments by 2022.

But unlike Tesla, Harley does not enjoy the true first mover’s advantage.

California-based Zero Motorcycles is already selling electric bikes in the United States with retail prices ranging from $8,500 to $21,000. Its top-end bike – SR/F – is similar to LiveWire, but costs nearly $9,000 less.

Still, Bob Clark, a dealer for Zero’s bikes in Chicago, says he has not yet sold one SR/F to riders under the age of 35. All three electric bikes he sold to young riders this year were in the $10,000 price range.

“Young riders are environmentally conscious, but are also very price-sensitive,” Clark said.

It is not just pricing. LiveWire’s limited range is also hampering its sales.

The bike can travel 146 miles (235 km) in the city or 95 miles in combined city and highway riding per charge. An ordinary household outlet can provide an overnight charge, while Level 3 direct current fast chargers stationed at Harley dealers will fully charge the bike in 60 minutes.

This renders LiveWire less effective for longer-distance rides, limiting its appeal among rural riders who prefer touring bikes.

Seven Harley dealerships told Reuters they have not even bothered ordering the bike, which would require investing in a Level 3 charging station and training staff.

An Ohio-based dealer, who had initially signed up for LiveWire, said he pulled out at the last minute as he was not sure of the bike’s demand in his area.

Delayed Arrival

A delay in LiveWire’s arrival in stores has left the dealers in the Midwest and the East Coast with hardly a month to aggressively push the bike before the snow season sets in. Winter generally means a lull for motorcycle sales.

When dealers began taking preorders, the delivery was expected in August, but was later shifted to September. On Sept. 30, the dealers Reuters spoke with were still waiting for the first bike.

In a Twitter post on Oct. 2, Harley said the bikes are starting to arrive at authorized dealers. The tweet also carried a picture of the first LiveWire that was “rolled off the line” at its York, Pennsylvania, facility in late September.

With the demand rather limited, the dealers said, Harley has decided to keep the supplies tight in order to protect the bike’s brand value and prevent any price-discounting pressure. The dealers said they are all expecting to receive less than 10 LiveWires this year.

James Hardiman, an analyst at Wedbush Securities, reckons Harley would sell between 400 and 1,600 LiveWires in the first year. That is not even 1% of the 228,051 bikes it sold worldwide last year.

“This is going to be largely a rounding error certainly this year and even next,” Hardiman said.