Triumph

Tamarit Motorcycles’ Custom Triumph Bonneville Is Ready to Steal the Show

by Silvian Secara from https://www.autoevolution.com This gorgeous thing’s outfit boasts some serious retro vibes. Back in 2015, the motorcycle realm was delighted with the arrival of a new player on the scene. Tamarit Motorcycles debuted with as many as five magnificent projects that served to let everyone know they aren’t messing around. Over the years, the Spanish firm amassed an impressive selection of no less than 52 custom entities. Besides constructing some of the raddest one-off two-wheelers you’ll ever come across, the Elche-based company also prides itself with a delicious inventory that hosts over 170 aftermarket components manufactured in-house. One thing’s for sure; these moto specialists are no amateurs! Their stunning one-off machines guarantee to soothe the soul of even the most pretentious rider out there. In case this stirs your curiosity, Tamarit’s majestic undertakings can all be admired on their social media profiles. But first, let’s take a minute to drool over one such masterpiece, namely a 2008 model in Triumph’s iconic Bonneville lineup that’ll certainly raise your pulse. I’ll have to point out the obvious and say the ‘08 Bonneville is one hell of a donor. It is powered by a vicious DOHC parallel-twin behemoth, with a generous compression ratio of 9.2:1 and a truly humungous displacement of 865cc. At around 7,200 rpm, this fiendish piece of air-cooled machinery is capable of producing up to 66 bhp, along with a feral torque output of 52 pound-feet (70 Nm) at 6,000 revs. A five-speed gearbox transmits the engine’s unholy force to Bonnie’s 17-inch multi-spoked rear wheel by means of a chain final drive. The powertrain is hugged by a tubular steel cradle frame, which rests on a set of 41 mm (1.61 inches) forks at the front, coupled with fully-adjustable dual shock absorbers and a double-sided swingarm on the […]

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A refined monster: Triumph Rocket 3 review

by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk/ It’s powered by an engine that’s bigger than the one in most cars, but Fraser discovers this behemoth oozes class and quality, and rides like a dream The idea of fitting a motorcycle with an engine larger than that found in the average family car may seem bonkers – but thats exactly what Triumph has done in the shape of the Rocket 3. Featuring a whopping 2,500cc capacity, this monster is truly impressive. The bike comes in two versions – a touring-oriented GT and the more sportster-like R. Both look fantastic, the proportions seem almost other-worldly, like something out of a superhero movie. Yet the design and the way it all melds together around that giant engine is a thing of beauty. The quality is superb, from the deep paint finish, to the distinctive twin headlights, the Monza-style fuel cap and the brushed aluminium shields on the triple header exhaust. Internal wiring on the handlebars keeps everything looking clean and neat and the pillion footpegs fold twice so they tuck away into the fairing and seemingly disappear. I really liked the layout on the TFT screen, simple and clear, and easily readable even in bright sunlight. The main difference between the two models is the riding position. The GT has forward mounted (adjustable) footpegs, a lower seat height and wider, higher bars, plus a brushed aluminium, height-adjustable pillion backrest. It also comes with heated grips and a pretty effective flyscreen. The R has a more aggressive stance thanks to the mid-mounted footpegs (also adjustable), higher seat and narrower bars. With the keyless fob in your jacket pocket, fire up the 2458cc, liquid-cooled triple and you’re off. For the largest production engine in the world, the sound is surprisingly muted, but, to my ear, not displeasing.

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Triumph Thruxton 900 Undergoes a Delicious Transformation

by Silvian Secara from https://www.autoevolution.com It packs a perfectly balanced blend of vintage and modern styling that guarantees to leave you speechless. Let’s be frank; when it comes to performance and reliability, the breathtaking Thruxton R tends to completely overshadow its predecessor, Triumph’s 2013 Thruxton 900. Nonetheless, the folks over at Nova Motorcycles went above and beyond to convert this undistinguished two-wheeler into something truly exceptional. To give you a better idea as to how far this project has come, we’ll start by having a look back at what the original machine was made of. It is brought to life by a four-stroke parallel-twin powerplant, with a generous displacement of 865cc. At around 7,400 revs, the air-cooled DOHC is good for up to 68 bhp, along with 51 pound-feet (69 Nm) of torque output at 5,800 rpm. A five-speed gearbox is tasked with transmitting this force to a chain final drive. The whole thing rests on KYB 41 mm (1.6 inches) forks with adjustable preload at the front, accompanied by chrome spring twin shocks and a double-sided swingarm at the rear. Thruxton 900 rolls on a pair of multi-spoked aluminum wheels, with a diameter of 18 inches up front and 17 inches at the back. Stopping power is handled by a single 320 mm (12.6 inches) floating disc and Nissin two-piston floating caliper at the front, joined by a 255 mm (10 inches) rotor and a two-piston caliper on the opposite end. Now, when it comes to impressive custom builds, the Nova Motorcycles crew isn’t messing around! As of 2013, the firm was co-founded by Sayer Anthony and Pete Chilton in Turners Falls, Massachusetts. In our day and age, the team prides itself with a plethora of magnificent projects. As you browse their stunning portfolio, you will come across an

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Triple-Engined Trident Is How the Future of Triumph Motorcycles Looks Like

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com When it comes to the number of modifications made to models year-over-year, the motorcycle industry is by far more dynamic than the auto one. Almost every bike model of any maker suffers changes year-on-year, and that means that regardless of the size and scope of these changes, motorcycles always look fresh. On the other side of the spectrum, the number of new models born into the industry is far lower compared to their four-wheeled counterparts. New bikes come to be at a much slower pace, and that means excitement is very high when they do. Last week the Brits from Triumph got us all hyped as they previewed the future Trident, (a model wearing this name started being made by Triumph back in the 1990s), one that should usher in the new design era over in Hinckley. Show in a pure-white design prototype form at the London Design Museum, the new Trident is supposed to be according to the bike maker “an all new contemporary take on Triumph style & attitude,” featuring a minimalistic form over a proven triple engine, a type of powerplant that powers, among others, the Street Triple. What you see in the gallery above is just a prototype, completed at the end of four years of hard work. The actual production version Trident will surface in early 2021. For now, the bike maker did not go into the technical specifics of the motorcycle, leaving us guessing as to what exactly it will be all about. But even with this complete lack of information (all that’s been said on the Trident can be found in the press release section below), we’re guessing the engineers working in the Japanese motorcycle industry are pretty troubled by this. ‘’The Trident design prototype marks the beginning

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Triumph unveils striking Trident prototype

from https://www.expressandstar.com Triumph has revealed a new design prototype called Trident. Showcased at the London Design Museum, the bike will be an entry point into Triumph’s lineup of Triple motorcycles and is set to arrive in dealers next year. It’s built around a triple engine which, Triumph says, brings ‘the perfect balance of low down torque and top end power’. Incorporating a new chassis, the Trident has been designed to give greater rider accessibility while providing good levels of comfort. Steve Sargent, Triumph Chief Product Officer, said: “The Trident design prototype marks the beginning of an exciting new chapter for Triumph, where the brief was all about fun, from the look to the ride. With its pure minimalist form, clean lines, Triumph design DNA and more than a hint of our Speed Triple’s muscular poise, this gives the first exciting glimpse at the full Trident story to come. “Ultimately our aim was to bring a new take on character and style, alongside the accessible easy handling and quality Triumph is known for – at a price that’s really competitive”. The new bike is set to be A2 compliant, which will allow those who carry an A2 licence to ride the Trident – albeit in restricted power form. There’s no word on how much the Trident will cost when it arrives in dealerships in spring next year, but given it sits underneath Triumph’s current entry point bike – the £8,100 Street Twin – it’s likely that it’ll cost in the region of £7,000.

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Triumph Trekker GT Is the First e-Bike Designed by the Maker of the Rocket 3

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com For years two-wheeled electro mobility has been creeping up toward the light at the end of its tunnel until it finally exploded into our world with dozens of startups throwing all sorts of weird designs at us. And a clear sign electric bikes are here to stay is how attentive established motorcycle makers started being to the segment. Harley-Davidson made no secret of its plans to expand into the e-bike segment ever since the LiveWire was unwrapped and new bikes were announced. But now it’s time for a response from across the ocean, with shots coming from Triumph Motorcycles. The company behind the motorcycle with the largest engine currently available on the market, the Rocket 3, is officially joining the e-mobility party with a brand new e-bike it calls Trekker GT. “In a business originating with bicycles, and world-famous for making motorcycles for 118 years, Triumph is now entering the e-bicycle market with the ‘Trekker GT’: a stunning new bicycle that incorporates Triumph’s everlasting passion for performance and riding fun,” the company said in a statement. “The Trekker GT, the first e-cycle designed by Triumph, combines performance engineering with the latest iteration of Shimano’s battery technology and drive train, offering customers the best in style, comfort, quality and finish.” The bike is light, it’s nimble, and it should make quite an impression. At 2.88 kg (6.3 lbs), it is made of a hydro-formed aluminum frame that integrates the 504Wh battery and the Shimano Steps electric motor. The battery, aided by the pedal-assist system, can help power the bike along for as much as 150 km (93 miles) while making use of the 60 Nm of torque available. Design-wise, there’s nothing really spectacular about the Trekker except perhaps for the Matt Silver Ice and Matt Jet

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1969 Triumph T120R Bonneville La Sal del Diablo Delivers an R-Rated Message

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com In the world of cars and motorcycles alike, the name Bonneville is held in high regard. Often associated with the Salt Flats in Utah, a place where for decades daredevils have gone to challenge speed demons that tormented them, the name also inspired a number of vehicles that were made over the years. The most famous of all vehicles wearing the name Bonneville are the Pontiacs produced with this name from 1958, and the Triumph motorcycle line that was born in 1959. But since this is Two-Wheeler Month at autoevolution, we’re not here to talk about the Pontiac. So we dug up the 1969 Triumph T120R Bonneville in the gallery above on the website of El Solitario MC, a Spanish custom garage we talked quite a bit about over the past few days. The motorcycle that brought us back to the Spanish is a Triumph Bonneville from the early generation of the model. The T120 designation stands for the line manufactured between 1959 and 1975 as the first model of the series, while the R is there to signify this was a model meant for the U.S. market. The customization of the bike that led to the creation of the La Sal del Diablo (that’s the name El Solitario gave the bike) was a collaborative effort between the Spanish and an Anaheim, California-based shop called Hell on Wheels, which handled the rebuilding of the 650 cc engine of the two-wheeler. According to the garage, the end result is a no-expense-spared machine built around a matching numbers Bonneville. It features a new frame, 19- and 21-inch wheels, a customized fuel tank, and as a touch of finesse hand lettering on the body spelling out an R-rated message (check gallery for details). The end result of the

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Coronavirus: Triumph Motorcycles to cut 400 jobs

from https://www.bbc.com The largest British motorcycle manufacturer is to cut 400 jobs due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Triumph Motorcycles, based in Hinckley, Leicestershire, which employs 2,500 people worldwide, said 240 of those redundancies would in the UK. It said sales in some countries have fallen up to 65% in the last three months. Chief Executive Nick Bloor said the crisis has caused “significant damage” to the global motorcycle market. The company said sales in the 500cc plus motorcycle segment in France, Italy, Germany, USA and UK have fallen between 40% and 65% during the peak season. Mr Bloor, said it was a “challenging time” for the company. “These are not easy decisions to make, especially when individuals’ livelihoods are affected. “However, regrettably the scale of impact of Covid-19 necessitates us to restructure now in order to protect the long term health and success of the Triumph brand and business.” The firm said a consultation period would begin with employees. Triumph, which was established in 1902, produces about 60,000 bikes every year. Its motorcycles have featured in movies including Jurassic World, The Great Escape and Mission Impossible II.

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Triumph Introduces New Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com At the end of 2019, the new No Time to Die James Bond movie trailer dropped and showed the famous British secret agent involved in a traditional motorcycle chase in the saddle of a Triumph Scrambler 1200. The House of Hinckley later confirmed its partnership with the franchise, adding that both the Scrambler 1200 and the new Tiger 900 were featured in the upcoming movie. We had a hunch some sort of special edition would ensue but when the movie set to be released in April 2020 was delayed to November due to the pandemic, we thought Triumph would put the model on the backburner and synchronize the launch with the movie’s release. It looks like the company didn’t want to wait that long. We heard whispers of a Bond-inspired Triumph Scrambler 1200 a few weeks ago when our colleagues over at OmniMoto shared leaked pictures of the bike. Though the pictures looked pretty legit, Triumph remained tight-lipped about the collaboration. Until now. The firm has now formally introduced the new Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition, based on the top-of-the-line Scrambler XE. The model features a blacked-out livery (shall we say, tuxedo black?) complete with a slew of “007” and “Bond Edition” badging. The special edition package includes a 007-branded exhaust plate and side covers, a premium leather saddle with “Bond Edition” embroidered on at the back, a model-specific TFT display with special 007 “shutter” startup screen message, black anodized mudguards, grab rail, sump guard, and infills, black powder-coated swingarm and sprocket cover, an Arrow muffler with carbon fiber tips, a stainless steel headlight grilled, and black rear wheel adjusters. As for the engine, the Bond Edition uses the same set up as the Scrambler 1200 with a 1,200cc parallel-twin producing 89 horsepower and 81 lb-ft

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