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Triumph Trekker GT Is the First e-Bike Designed by the Maker of the Rocket 3

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For years two-wheeled electro mobility has been creeping up toward the light at the end of its tunnel until it finally exploded into our world with dozens of startups throwing all sorts of weird designs at us. And a clear sign electric bikes are here to stay is how attentive established motorcycle makers started being to the segment.

Harley-Davidson made no secret of its plans to expand into the e-bike segment ever since the LiveWire was unwrapped and new bikes were announced. But now it’s time for a response from across the ocean, with shots coming from Triumph Motorcycles.

The company behind the motorcycle with the largest engine currently available on the market, the Rocket 3, is officially joining the e-mobility party with a brand new e-bike it calls Trekker GT.

“In a business originating with bicycles, and world-famous for making motorcycles for 118 years, Triumph is now entering the e-bicycle market with the ‘Trekker GT’: a stunning new bicycle that incorporates Triumph’s everlasting passion for performance and riding fun,” the company said in a statement.

“The Trekker GT, the first e-cycle designed by Triumph, combines performance engineering with the latest iteration of Shimano’s battery technology and drive train, offering customers the best in style, comfort, quality and finish.”

The bike is light, it’s nimble, and it should make quite an impression. At 2.88 kg (6.3 lbs), it is made of a hydro-formed aluminum frame that integrates the 504Wh battery and the Shimano Steps electric motor.

The battery, aided by the pedal-assist system, can help power the bike along for as much as 150 km (93 miles) while making use of the 60 Nm of torque available.

Design-wise, there’s nothing really spectacular about the Trekker except perhaps for the Matt Silver Ice and Matt Jet Black that you usually see deployed on motorcycles. Available equipment includes LED lighting, full length matt-black mudguards, blacked-out pannier rack, side stand and ABUS pro-shield integrated lock.

The British bike maker says the Trekker GT is available “immediately” in the UK, United States and in Europe (with some exception there) but said nothing yet about pricing.

1969 Triumph T120R Bonneville La Sal del Diablo Delivers an R-Rated Message

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In the world of cars and motorcycles alike, the name Bonneville is held in high regard. Often associated with the Salt Flats in Utah, a place where for decades daredevils have gone to challenge speed demons that tormented them, the name also inspired a number of vehicles that were made over the years.

The most famous of all vehicles wearing the name Bonneville are the Pontiacs produced with this name from 1958, and the Triumph motorcycle line that was born in 1959. But since this is Two-Wheeler Month at autoevolution, we’re not here to talk about the Pontiac. So we dug up the 1969 Triumph T120R Bonneville in the gallery above on the website of El Solitario MC, a Spanish custom garage we talked quite a bit about over the past few days.

The motorcycle that brought us back to the Spanish is a Triumph Bonneville from the early generation of the model. The T120 designation stands for the line manufactured between 1959 and 1975 as the first model of the series, while the R is there to signify this was a model meant for the U.S. market.

The customization of the bike that led to the creation of the La Sal del Diablo (that’s the name El Solitario gave the bike) was a collaborative effort between the Spanish and an Anaheim, California-based shop called Hell on Wheels, which handled the rebuilding of the 650 cc engine of the two-wheeler.

According to the garage, the end result is a no-expense-spared machine built around a matching numbers Bonneville. It features a new frame, 19- and 21-inch wheels, a customized fuel tank, and as a touch of finesse hand lettering on the body spelling out an R-rated message (check gallery for details).

The end result of the customization and rebuilding work is a bike that can be ridden “like a mean devil” either on the road or on the track.

Coronavirus: Triumph Motorcycles to cut 400 jobs

By | General Posts

from https://www.bbc.com

The largest British motorcycle manufacturer is to cut 400 jobs due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Triumph Motorcycles, based in Hinckley, Leicestershire, which employs 2,500 people worldwide, said 240 of those redundancies would in the UK.

It said sales in some countries have fallen up to 65% in the last three months.

Chief Executive Nick Bloor said the crisis has caused “significant damage” to the global motorcycle market.

The company said sales in the 500cc plus motorcycle segment in France, Italy, Germany, USA and UK have fallen between 40% and 65% during the peak season.

Mr Bloor, said it was a “challenging time” for the company.

“These are not easy decisions to make, especially when individuals’ livelihoods are affected.

“However, regrettably the scale of impact of Covid-19 necessitates us to restructure now in order to protect the long term health and success of the Triumph brand and business.”

The firm said a consultation period would begin with employees.

Triumph, which was established in 1902, produces about 60,000 bikes every year.

Its motorcycles have featured in movies including Jurassic World, The Great Escape and Mission Impossible II.

Triumph Introduces New Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

At the end of 2019, the new No Time to Die James Bond movie trailer dropped and showed the famous British secret agent involved in a traditional motorcycle chase in the saddle of a Triumph Scrambler 1200. The House of Hinckley later confirmed its partnership with the franchise, adding that both the Scrambler 1200 and the new Tiger 900 were featured in the upcoming movie.

We had a hunch some sort of special edition would ensue but when the movie set to be released in April 2020 was delayed to November due to the pandemic, we thought Triumph would put the model on the backburner and synchronize the launch with the movie’s release. It looks like the company didn’t want to wait that long.

We heard whispers of a Bond-inspired Triumph Scrambler 1200 a few weeks ago when our colleagues over at OmniMoto shared leaked pictures of the bike. Though the pictures looked pretty legit, Triumph remained tight-lipped about the collaboration. Until now.

The firm has now formally introduced the new Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition, based on the top-of-the-line Scrambler XE. The model features a blacked-out livery (shall we say, tuxedo black?) complete with a slew of “007” and “Bond Edition” badging.

The special edition package includes a 007-branded exhaust plate and side covers, a premium leather saddle with “Bond Edition” embroidered on at the back, a model-specific TFT display with special 007 “shutter” startup screen message, black anodized mudguards, grab rail, sump guard, and infills, black powder-coated swingarm and sprocket cover, an Arrow muffler with carbon fiber tips, a stainless steel headlight grilled, and black rear wheel adjusters.

As for the engine, the Bond Edition uses the same set up as the Scrambler 1200 with a 1,200cc parallel-twin producing 89 horsepower and 81 lb-ft of torque.

The new 2020 Triumph Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition retails for $18,500—a $3,100 premium over the Scrambler XE. Only 250 units will be produced and the model is available as of May 21, 2020.

Spec Showdown: Triumph Rocket 3 Vs. Yamaha VMax

By | General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

Power cruisers punch out.

For 2019, Triumph upped the ante on the Rocket 3 with the introduction of an entirely new generation. The upgrades included a new look and also a bigger engine which is no small feat considering the Rocket 3 already rocked the biggest production motorcycle engine on the market. Just like that, a new benchmark was set in the power cruiser segment. 

While the definition of power cruisers is rather broad, there’s only handful of 1,500cc-plusmodels the Rocket 3 can measure up toConsidering the Triumph sits at the top of the category with a higher price tag, we thought we’d take a look at how it compares to one of its more affordable competitors, its Japanese counterpart, theYamaha VMaxLet’s have a look at how the two models compare on paper. 

2020 Triumph Rocket 3R 2020 Yamaha VMax
Engine: 2,458cc, water-cooled, inline-three cylinder 1,679cc, liquid-cooled, 65-degree V4
Bore, Stroke, Compression: 110.2mm x 85.9mm, 10.8:1 90mm x 66mm, 11.3:1
Transmission and Final Drive: gears, shaft 5 gears, shaft
Performance: 165 hp/163 lb-ft -/123 lb-ft
Weight 641.5 pounds (dry) 683 pounds (wet)
Price: $21,900  $17,999

Performance 

Of course, we can’t talk power cruisers without discussing their performance. The Rocket 3 boasts the biggest production motorcycle engine of the industry which gives it an undeniable appeal versus the Yamaha. That being said, though its engine is almost half the size of the Rocket (displacement wise), the VMax can pull its own weight and give the Triumph a run for its money. 

While the Rocket 3 produces more torque than the Vmax (163 versus 143)there’s a possibility that the Japanese power cruiser outperforms its British counterpart on the pony front.  While Yamaha doesn’t disclose any horsepower figures, several sources suggest it produces “over 170 horsepower”, possibly even 200, according to some. That’s easily between 5 to as much as 35 hp more than the Rocket. Because the numbers aren’t from Yamaha, however, we can’t take them into consideration.  

What Yamaha does confirm, however, is that the VMax has a higher compression ratio than the Rocket 3 which means you get more bang (literally) for your buck.  

As for weight, the two companies both showcase different information. Triumph sticks to the dry weight (without the fluids) while Yamaha gives a more reallistic, ready-to-operate weight. Fueled up and ready to go, the Rocket 3 likely weighs about the same as the VMax, give or take a couple of pounds. Based on manufacturer-provided date, this means that the Rocket 3 offers the best power-to-weight ratio (unless Yamaha eventually confirms a horsepower figure.) 

Cruising

Though they like to flex their massive engines and show off their muscles, the Rocket 3 and the VMax are cruisers above all. How well do they perform on that front? Pretty darn well if I may say so.  

Neither Triumph and Yamaha have lost sight of their models’ role in their respective lineups and in the segment they compete in. As good as high-performance ratings look, riders are also interested in the ride itself—or shall we say the “cruise”? For that reason, both companies offer a wide range of elective accessories owners can outfit their cruisers with. The selection in both ranges includes saddle bags, luggage racks, heated grips, taller windscreens, etc. Triumph also offers the Rocket 3 GT which comes fully loaded with a number of additional accessories for a $700 premium over the Rocket 3 R’s starting price.  

Whether you prefer British or Japanese muscle, both offer equally good customization options to help make them more cruising and travel friendly. While creature comfort and equipment weigh heavy in the balance when buying a bike you’d like to travel onthe range is also another factor to consider. This is where the Rocket 3 gets to shine.  

The Triumph is armed with a 4.8-gallon fuel tank and despite the size of its engine, it’s rated at a reasonable 32.43 miles per gallon (mpg). This means that you should be able to get roughly 155 miles out of a single tank. The Yamaha has a smaller, 4-gallon tank. With a fuel economy rating of 27 mpg, this means you should get 108 miles out of a full tank of gas.   

Price 

There’s a healthy $4,000 different between the Yamaha and the Triumph. Interestingly, the despite the price gap, both models have a lot to offer in terms of standard equipment. However, the Rocket 3 does have a leg (or a wheel?) up on its competitor thanks to such standard features as Bluetooth connectivity, navigation, Showa suspension hardware, a beefier engine (of course), and cruise control. Plus, let’s not forget that the Triumph badge tends to come with a small premium anyway.  

While the VMax has quite the striking the design, this generation of the model has been around for over a decade compared and the platform is quite old by the industry’s standards. That being said, though it offers fewer standard features than the Rocket, the VMax manages to stay competitive and relevant thanks to its price also dating from 2009. Launch MSRP was $17,990 11 years ago which at the time was considered premium. A $9 increase in the span of a decade is more than reasonable. 

In Conclusion

The new-generation Triumph Rocket 3 is a beast worthy of its legacy with a bigger, meaner engine and some serious cruising chops. It doesn’t hold a candle to its American competitors. At $21,900, Triumph makes sure that customers get a good deal for their money by loading the bike up with features. Look-wise, from a subjective point of view, it’s also the better-looking bike with a flowing silhouette, dual headlight, and an overall assembly that looks more “finished”.

That being said, while the platform is a bit long in the tooth despite a few recent updates, the Yamaha VMax is just quirky enough to deserve to be on any cruiser lover’s shopping list. Between its massive air ducts and eclectic silhouette, the model stands out, for better or for worst. Plus, the 2.5L inline-three might be the biggest, most powerful engine of the two but the V4 has the most distinct sound.

The Rocket 3 is the power cruiser poster child and the VMax is the weird but endearing cousin.

Other Features

Wheelbase: 66 inches 66.9 inches
Seat Height: 30.4 inches 30.5 inches
Brakes: Dual 320mm discs with Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc calipers front, Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc caliper back, Cornering ABS Dual 320mm wave-type discs6-piston calipers with Brembo master cylinder front,  

298mm wave-type disc, single-piston caliper with Brembo master cylinder back 

Suspension Showa 47-mm inverted fork front, Showa monoshock with reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster 52mm inverted fork front, Single shock with remote reservoir and remote adjustable for preload back.
Features: High-specification Avon Cobra Chrome tires, LED headlight, 2nd generation TFT instruments, Four riding modes, Hill-hold control, Cruise control, Keyless ignition, USB charging port, Free ‘MyTriumph’ app.  slipper clutch, ABS, drag-style instruments, LCD.

Norton will fill the high-end technology deficit for TVS Motor

By | General Posts

by Chanchal Pal Chauhan from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Norton is one of the most iconic British brands, besides Triumph, Royal Enfield and BSA. Incidentally now all of the remaining famed British brands either have Indian owners or strong engineering relationships with local entities.

Another Indian company bags a storied European brand.

This time it’s TVS Motor, the third largest two wheeler maker from the world’s biggest bikes and scooter market, and getting ‘Norton’ under its belt would not just fill the technology deficit, but would also make it a serious contender in the super-bike category, something its rivals are always vying for.

Industry veterans cite it as a major catch for any aspiring Indian company aiming to hit the global circuit in style. “Norton is a major brand in the developed markets of Europe and the US and at Rs 150 crore, it’s a steal. The brand has a major pull and would fill the void for TVS Motors in technology and take it many years ahead of its rivals,” says a two wheeler specialist.

TVS Motor Company has announced the Norton acquisition on Friday. Norton is one of the most iconic British brands, besides Triumph, Royal Enfield and BSA. Incidentally now all of the remaining famed British brands either have Indian owners or strong engineering relationships with local entities.

Typical of the cash-starved British brands, Norton was started in Birmingham in 1898 by James Lansdowne Norton. It has a fantastic global appeal, a strong unique design and British heritage carried for decades. It has always been closely associated with “Motor Racing” and also makes superbikes in various categories across markets.

It is a brand which has a huge opportunity for TVS to scale up and create value. TVS Motors can now focus on these developed markets with a known brand and the hugely expanding recreation biking segment. This classic and unique British design and heritage will be the core for the company looking at building out a future in premium, luxury and classic bikes as well.

TVS has spent about 16-million British Pounds on the acquisition, funded through internal approvals and, it is an asset purchase. The cash savvy Indian companies have been on the prowl with Bajaj Auto acquiring KTM and Husqvarna marquee brands in the past.

Meanwhile, the SUV major, Mahindra&Mahindra through its two wheeler company had also acquired another iconic British motorcycle brand, BSA a few years back. Mahindra also owns 60 percent of Classic Legends Private Limited (CLPL), who had re-introduced the Yezdi brand back into India.

The two wheeler market leader Hero MotoCorp had acquired American superbike maker Erik Buell Racing or EBR, – the East Troy, Wisconsin-based firm, to harvest cutting-edge technology and design to develop future models. However, the deal turned sour and the Indian entity lost a good amount of money.

EBR, a fairly new enterprise, turned bankrupt a few years after the acquisition and the technology it was developing almost got wasted for Hero MotoCorp and failed to harvest any of its investments. Subsequently, it has developed new technology centres at Kukas in Rajasthan and Germany to fill the tech-deficit.

The cash-rich Indian companies have been looking at the global spectrum of motorbiking and Norton gets TVS to that niche level.

Virtually on a bankruptcy mode, Norton had undergone a rough patch in the past two-years, though TVS has not taken any of its past liabilities or the responsibilities. While the Chennai-based entity has committed to meet all customer commitments and will carry on with all the existing employees too. There are about 55-60 of the permanent employees serving Norton at the time of acquisition as per the company website.

Industry insiders say what is the need for TVS to acquire Norton of UK at approximately Rs 150 crore at such an unpleasant hour, amid the coronavirus scare and massive uncertainties, especially when they already have a tie up with BMW Motorrad.

An industry veteran quipped, “BMW tie-up restricts them to 500cc (in terms of engine capacity), whereas with Norton acquisition they can wheel out 650-1800cc of biking. Moreover this opens up the entire Europe and the US markets for them … Norton may not be too popular in the West, but mind you it is strong in technology and engines, which will determine the future of performance biking and motor racing…”

According to Sudarshan Venu, Joint Managing Director, TVS Motor Company, “Norton is an iconic British brand celebrated across the world, and presents us with an immense opportunity to scale globally. We will continue to retain its distinctive identity with dedicated and specific business plans.”

Due to the challenges it (Norton) faced in the last few years, TVS insiders believe in the flipside there’s potential to scale up the company to create massive value in the long-term from the new acquisition to the Indian two wheeler company.

Norton is a brand that always stood for bespoke production, craftsmanship and unparallel motoring luxury along with unique design and innovation, something TVS has been looking for and really seeks to build out. In fact, each bike costs upwards of 25,000 British Pounds and is custom-built for the customer in those markets.

As for the industry gains, TVS would be eyeing huge synergies across supply chain and distribution. These gains would be beyond the product and the company would be looking forward to the new products in the pipeline. TVS has got all the intellectual proprietary and brand rights and is looking forward to resurrecting and scaling it in the future.

TVS Motor Company, a reputed manufacturer of two-wheelers and three-wheelers in the world, has operations across a dozen international markets like Indonesia, Philippines, Yeman, Columbia, Kuwait, Yeman, Honduras etc. The new string; Britain’s iconic sporting motorcycle, Norton will carve out TVS into a storied motorcycle maker of modern times and will reflect its rising prominence in the highly competitive international two-wheeler market.

China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

China-made Brixton 1200 cleared for production: 1200cc modern classic has Bonneville T120 in its sights!

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.”

Brixton 1200 – a 1200cc modern classic has been cleared to enter production as per a report on Bennetts. The modern classic will lock horns against the likes of the Triumph Bonneville T120 in the segment. Showcased as a concept at 2019 EICMA motorcycle show, the said model will be made in China. However, Brixton comes under the KSR Group from Austria that is responsible for importing motorcycles from multiple Chinese manufacturers. The design and engineering part for the Brixton 1200 has been taken care of at KSR’s design center that is located in Krups, Austria. The Brixton will most likely draw power from a 1200cc, parallel-twin engine that will put itself very much in the Bonneville T120 territory. In terms of aesthetics, the Brixton 1200 looks like a proper modern classic with an all-LED rounded headlamp upfront, wired wheels, all-black theme and touches of chrome just at the right places.

About the new 1200cc model, Brixton says that it “shows the way of Brixton Motorcycles into even higher capacity classes and proves the development competence of our brand.” As of now, the exact timeline for the production of Brixton 1200 isn’t clear and the company says that it wants to create a technically mature vehicle without time pressure, a vehicle that meets more than just the high-quality requirements in these cubic capacity classes.

Apart from showcasing the Brixton 1200, the company launched Crossfire 500 and Crossfire 500X last year. The two get power from a 486 cc, parallel-twin motor good for churning out 47 bhp of power. The said models entered production soon after they were showcased as concepts and the same can be expected from the Brixton 1200 as well. More details on the Brixton 1200 expected soon, so stay tuned for all the updates!

Also, will the Brixton 1200 be able to give a tough fight to the Triumph Bonneville 120?

Riding Triumph’s Rocket 3

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by Dries Van der Walt from https://www.wheels24.co.za

As promised during the local launch of the new Triumph Rocket 3, Triumph South Africa allowed me to ride the beast on Wednesday, March 25, beating the national coronavirus lockdown by just two days.

It was a bitter-sweet experience because while riding the open (and already noticeably quieter) roads in the Hekpoort area of Gauteng, I was keenly aware of the fact that this would be my last leisure ride on a bike for quite a while.

I was joined on the trip by Triumph South Africa CEO Bruce Allen and a colleague from another publication, and the conversation over brunch was predictably dominated by our shared concern about the effects that the looming lockdown, as undeniably necessary as it was, would have on the country’s already brittle economy.

But all of that did nothing to distract from the experience of riding the world’s biggest-capacity production bike. At 2500cm³, the Rocket 3’s engine capacity exceeds that of most cars – almost double that of the popular B-segment hatchbacks that are ubiquitous on South African roads. Housing an engine of that size dictates the design approach, and the Rocket 3 presents a squat motorcycle that is not likely to be mistaken for anything else.

Intimidating at first

Despite being not very tall, the sheer bulk of the bike is somewhat intimidating at first sight. This feeling is not dispelled once you swing a leg over, because that’s when you realise how wide the frame actually is. That said, as soon as the wheels start rolling and your feet are on the pegs, the intimidation factor dissipates with the realisation that, despite its bulk, the Rocket is really well-balanced.

It carries its weight low in the frame, and the size seems to melt away as speed picks up, so that by the time you reach the first traffic light, you’ve forgotten that you are sitting astride a machine of decidedly unusual proportions.

Sandton’s streets are not the place to explore the limits of the Rocket’s prodigious torque, but it did allow me to develop an appreciation for the remarkably smooth quick-shifter. Working both up and down, shifts are immediate and jerk-free, even at lower revs. With a bike that can be ridden in top gear most of the time, a quick-shifter may seem unnecessary, but this one worked so well that I found myself running up and down through the ratios for the sheer fun of it.

We soon hit the highway, and with the relative lack of traffic, I could start playing with the throttle. The torque was everything I expected, and then some. Twist the throttle wide open in any gear, and the Rocket takes off like the proverbial scalded cat leaving your body caught between the twin sensations of your arms being wrenched from their sockets and your hands strained to their utmost to maintain a grip on the handlebar.

Zooming past

On the other hand, if you give the twist grip the respect it demands, the torque is exhilarating but manageable. Overtaking becomes a non-event – you edge up to whatever is in front of you, wait for a brief gap in the oncoming traffic, twist the throttle and zoom past it in the blink of an eye.

Highway gave way to some twisty backroads, and I found that the Rocket is not averse to brisk cornering. At this point on the route, I was on the Rocket 3 R, the “sporty” naked version with footpegs almost directly underneath your hips. This gave me the opportunity to adopt the usual weight-forward riding position, and I could attack the curves with confidence.

While no sportbike, the Rocket remains stable through the twisties, making it once again easy to forget how big and heavy it actually is.

After brunch, I switched to the GT. On this version, you get a welcome windscreen, and footpegs set more forward for a relaxed riding position. I’m not a cruiser person, but to my great surprise I found that I preferred the GT to the R. The small screen was remarkably helpful in preventing my body from acting as a drag chute, and the footpegs weren’t so far forward that I was forced into the dreaded C-shaped riding position.

Ideal for long distance

Although these slight changes to the identical frame shared by the two variants made the GT feel like a different bike altogether, it retained the sure-footed handling of the R, leaving me to enjoy the twisties on the way back as much as on its sibling.

The new Rocket 3, aimed mostly at the US market where long, straight roads and low-speed limits are at the order of the day, is without a doubt a niche bike. As such it is unlikely to appeal to a broad audience locally, but one thing is for sure: if I were offered one for a trip down to Cape Town, I would grab it with nary a second thought.

SPECIFICATIONS:

ENGINE & TRANSMISSION 
Type: In-line three-cylinder, water-cooled, DOHC
Capacity: 2458 cm³
Max Power: 123kW @ 6000r/min
Max Torque: 221Nm @ 4000r/min
Final Drive: Shaft, bevel box
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist
Gearbox: six-speed

CHASSIS 

Frame: Full aluminium frame
Swingarm: Single-sided, cast aluminium
Front Wheel: 17 x 3.5in cast aluminium
Rear Wheel: 16 x 7.5in cast aluminium
Front Tyre: 150/80 R17 VRear Tyre: 240/50 R16 V
Front Suspension: Showa 47mm upside-down 1 1 cartridge front forks, compression and rebound adjuster. 120mm travel
Rear Suspension: Fully adjustable Showa piggyback reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster, 107mm rear wheel travel
Front Brakes: Dual 320mm discs, Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc callipers, Cornering ABS
Rear Brakes: Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc calliper, Cornering ABS
Instrument Display: TFT multi-functional

DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS 

Width (handlebars): 889mm
(w/out mirror): 1065mm
Seat Height: 773mm
Wheelbase: 1677mm
Dry Weight: 291kg
Tank Capacity: 18L
Fuel Consumption: 6.82-l/100km (claimed)