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Triumph Takes Racing World by Storm With All-New Motocross and Enduro Range

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Triumph is excited to announce that development is well under way on a comprehensive range of all-new competition Motocross and Enduro motorcycles. Joining our class leading and globally renowned motorcycle range this all new competition MX and Enduro family will bring all of Triumph’s engineering expertise to riders and racers worldwide.

This will be accompanied by a landmark moment for Triumph and the MX and Enduro racing world with an all new Triumph factory race programme, and a commitment to top tier championship racing in both Motocross and Enduro series.

Coming hand-in-hand with this commitment, to race and win at the highest level in the sport, Triumph is proud to announce that global Motocross legend Ricky Carmichael and five-times Enduro World Champion Iván Cervantes have joined the Triumph family as active partners in both bike testing and preparation for racing.

An announcement of the timetable for the launch and reveal of the motorcycles, as well as the racing programme and the full story on the product advantages the new Triumph MX and Enduro offer, will follow in the coming months.

“Today’s announcement marks the beginning of a new chapter for the Triumph brand, which everyone at Triumph is incredibly excited to be part of. We are 100% committed to making a long-lasting impact in this highly competitive and demanding world, with a single-minded ambition to deliver a winning motorcycle line-up for a whole new generation of Triumph riders” – Nick Bloor: CEO Triumph Motorcycles Ltd

“I am thrilled to announce that I am joining the Triumph family and even more excited to be a part of their new endeavour into the off-road product category.

This is an incredible opportunity for me to join this historic brand, and I am honoured and humbled to be a part of the development and release of their off-road motorcycles. Building something from the ground up is something that really is intriguing to me at this stage of my career. What is impressive to me is Triumph’s dedication, and passion to develop a top of the class product. Everyone that I have been involved with in this project from the engineers, design groups, R&D dept., etc., have shown extreme passion for what they are doing and that is a recipe for success and something that I love being a part of. We all share that same passion, and that’s to be the best.

If you are familiar with the Triumph brand, you already know the quality of craftsmanship is top shelf, and the off-road models will follow suit to their past!

Not only are these exciting times for me, but it’s an exciting time for the off-road industry to be adding another brand to the mix and the opportunities that lie ahead for all off-road consumers. I can’t wait to see the reactions when these models hit the dealer’s showroom floors.”

– Ricky Carmichael

“I have loved Triumph motorcycles right from being a small kid, seeing them in films and on television.

So to be working with Triumph from the beginning of this project, is an amazing opportunity for me, not just because it is working with one of the world’s greatest motorcycle brands, but also for being part of building something from zero. It is a dream come true for any racer!

Like me, everyone I am working with at Triumph is focused to make the bikes the best they can be. I cannot wait to see the bikes competing at a world level, but I also look forward to when I can stand in a Triumph dealer and know I was part of this very special project.”

– Ivan Cervantes

Good news both for Triumph motorcycles fans and motcross enthusiasts
by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Good news both for Triumph motorcycles fans and motcross enthusiasts: the reputable brand officially announced that it will soon be launching a new range dedicated to e motocross and enduro. And that’s not all, because Triumph is also going for the win – together with the new range, it will make its first steps in the racing world.

Things have been relatively quiet in the motorcycle industry lately, with no groundbreaking changes to keep us on our toes. But there’s something brewing. Triumph, known as the largest motorcycle manufacturer in the UK, is getting ready to unveil a comprehensive range of motocross and enduro motorcycles. This will also mark the beginning of the Triumph factory race program, with the manufacturer set to reach the highest levels in championship races, in both series.

This is a massive change for the British brand that was established in 1983 and has been known ever since for premium models. Unlike other famous brands, Triumph did not dabble in the racing world, until now. And, if this wasn’t enough of a surprise, the company also revealed the fact that 2 famous racing champions joined the project as “active partners”, offering their expertise throughout the testing process and in preparation for racing.

With an extensive career in motocross and multiple titles under his belt, Ricky Carmichael would be the right person to add his know-how into the mix. Expressing his admiration for the brand, Carmichael also made a great point in stating that this new range is a win for the entire off-road industry, and that a new brand coming to the motocross world can only make things even more exciting.

On the other hand, five-times enduro World Champion Iván Cervantes has added his experience with this particular world to the new Triumph range, stating that he considers this to be “one of the world’s greatest motorcycle brands”.

No images of the new motorcycles, or further details about their specifications have been released yet. According to Triumph, we’ll have to wait a few more months until the official reveal of the bikes and of the racing program.

Review of Triumph Thruxton RS 2021: a factory cafe racer

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Everyday café: Triumph’s factory cafe racer offers an engaging ride and killer looks, but is it worth the sky-high asking price?

The Thruxton RS is arguably the crown jewel of Triumph’s Modern Classic lineup of motorcycles. It’s an interesting mashup of modern, high-end components and technology, with a decidedly old-school powertrain. It’s a bike that shouldn’t make sense, but after spending time with it, it’s a bike I can’t get out of my head.

The 2021 Triumph Thruxton RS is powered by a 1,200-cc liquid-cooled 270-degree parallel-twin engine, which produces 103 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 83 pound-feet of torque at just 4,250 rpm. It’s an engine that, thanks to its large displacement and firing order, makes a noise that will get your heart pumping, even if its performance pales in comparison to more conventional naked and sport bikes.

The engine delivers its power smoothly, thanks to Triumph’s excellent fueling. The bike routes its power through a smooth six-speed sequential transmission and out a chain final drive. The gearbox offers light, crisp shifts and an easy-to-find neutral. The age of the engine’s design shows, but that’s a good thing, given Triumph’s continued development.

The formerly-range-topping RS is now the only Thruxton model you can get, and so Triumph seems to have spared no expense in kitting it out with the best-possible chassis components. While the Thruxton’s frame is a conventional and old-timey tubular steel affair, the suspension is modern and well considered. The front fork comes from Showa and uses that company’s “Big Piston” design as found on high-end sport bikes. It’s fully adjustable and makes for a controlled and plush ride, even over bumpy pavement.

The rear shocks (that’s right, two — this is a heritage bike, after all) come from Ohlins and are also fully adjustable. Typically, in my experience, twin-shock bikes don’t necessarily offer the best control over broken pavement or on fast roads, but these Ohlins units toss all that out the window. The back end of the Thruxton feels as comfortable and confident as I could hope for. It uses some fairly trick wheels to help with its handling, too. It has 17-inch, 32-spoke wire wheels, but unlike most wire wheels with steel spokes, the Thruxton uses weight-saving aluminum spokes. The wheels are wrapped in sticky Metzeler Racetec tires.

The brakes come from Brembo, and as such, they’re excellent. Having big Brembo brakes on a motorcycle isn’t unlike stopping at a Starbucks on a long road trip. Sure, there are other options, but this way you know exactly what you’re in for. In the case of the Brembos, what you’re in for is an excellent feel from the lever, huge stopping power and almost jewel-like build quality. The twin front rotors on the RS are sized at 310 millimeters and gripped by Brembo M50 four-piston radial-mount calipers. The single rear rotor comes in at 220 millimeters and is clamped by a single, twin-piston Nissin caliper.

The Thruxton has anti-lock brakes, but they’re not lean-sensitive since the bike lacks an inertial measurement unit. On a bike like the Thruxton — one that’s more about looking good and having fun than outright speed — this is totally acceptable. The Thruxton also packs user-selectable ride modes, which include Road, Rain and Sport. I generally find myself leaving the bike in Sport mode all the time because I like the extra responsive throttle. The Thruxton RS features a very handsome analog speedometer and tachometer. Each also packs an LCD display that provides all the pertinent rider information that I want to see — fuel level, gear indicator, trip odometer, etc. It’s a bit old school, but so is the bike.

When it comes to ergonomics, cafe racers aren’t generally what I’d call comfortable for longer rides. They feature a more leaned-forward, sport bike-like stance, which looks great and makes for agile handling, but can be hard on your wrists. The Thruxton somehow manages to pull off the cafe racer look while remaining relatively comfortable. The bike is slightly more upright than it might seem at first glance and a generous rider triangle means that even someone like me at 6 feet, 4 inches doesn’t feel incredibly cramped. Footpeg clearance is good, too, so leaning the bike way over isn’t an issue.

With a seat height of nearly 32 inches, the Thruxton may be a bit of a struggle for some smaller riders when it comes time to get both feet on the ground at a stop. It’s also not especially light, at 434 pounds dry, so that might also be something for smaller riders to consider. The Triumph Speed Twin might be better, in that case.

The Thruxton is a bike that somehow manages to ride as good as it looks, which is saying something. It’s easy to putter around town on, thanks to its compliant ride and torquey, under-stressed engine. It’s also a riot on a curvy road, thanks to its sticky tires and aggressive-ish riding position, and there are few pleasures greater than hearing the Thruxton’s big twin-cylinder engine echo off of canyon walls at 7,500 rpm.

The Thruxton RS is a fantastic machine, but of course, it should be, given its price tag. All of the motorcycle jewelry that Triumph bestows on the RS means that it’s packing a hefty asking price of $16,200. There is an almost limitless number of other motorcycles that can offer more performance or utility than the Thruxton for that money (or less). Still, I struggle to think of one that can offer performance with as much style.

Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride global success this year

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by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

DGR’s Lucky Winner to Take Home the Special Edition DGR x Triumph Thruxton RS

Triumph marked another year of its long-time support for the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride (DGR), making this year’s event even more memorable thanks to the special edition DGR x Triumph Thruxton RS that will be awarded to the lucky winner.

DGR is a one-of-a-kind event in many ways, but mostly because it blends 2 unique features. On one hand, it gives motorcycle lovers the chance to dress up and ride in amazing classic and retro-styled outfits, and on the other hand, it’s a charitable event that raises awareness and funds for prostate cancer research and men’s mental health.

This year, the DGR celebrated 10 years since it’s been inspiring like-minded people from all-over the world to take their bike out for a noble and stylish ride. The main event took place on May 23rd and the fundraiser was closed on June 6. Over $4 million were raised, plus an $113,000 contribution from Triumph Team that added almost 300 riders to the event.

An impressive number of 65,000 motorcycle riders participated at this year’s DGR, from more than 900 cities throughout the world. Whether it was because people were eager to be outside again, or because 3 separate ride formats replaced last year’s single format, what’s certain is that men and women all around the globe really came through for the event’s special anniversary.

And so did Triumph, who announced a month ago that it would be presenting a one-off Thruxton RS during the event. This special edition bike is now displayed at the Triumph Factory Visitor Experience and the lucky winner of the ride’s famous Gentlefolk competition will get to take it home. Not many details were revealed about this celebratory model, but it’s sure to combine the British brand’s elegant design with custom elements for the occasion.

And this won’t be the only treat, as Triumph is also awarding 3 other classic motorcycles to each of the 3 best fundraisers.

Auction of Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Edition

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Steve McQueen was an alumni of non-profit organisation Boys Republic and this motorcycle has the unique serial number matching from his bike.

Triumph Scrambler 1200 Steve McQueen Selling for Charity with Unique Perks

In April 2021, British bike maker Triumph announced the launch of the “highest specification Scrambler 1200 produced to date.” We’re talking about the limited edition Steve McQueen version, scheduled to hit the market this month.

One of them is being auctioned off by Triumph, via the Mecum sale in Monterey in August, to benefit a non-profit dedicated to troubled youngsters. The California-based organization is called Boys Republic, and Steve McQueen himself was a 1946 alumnus of the group.

The bike to be sold is serial number 0278, a number that matches the number plate McQueen used on his bike in the 1964 International Six Days Trial. Moreover, it is being sold with a unique certificate of authenticity with the signatures of Steve’s son, Chad, and Triumph CEO Nick Bloor.

As an extra perk, the buyer of the motorcycle will also receive an invitation to the annual dinner of the Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show.

Other than that, the bike is just like the other 999 slotted for production. It was designed to be reminiscent of the Triumph TR used in the 1963 movie The Great Escape, and comes powered by a 1200cc Bonneville twin engine.

The two-wheeler comes painted in Competition Green, like all others of its breed, but also boasts gold lining and heritage Triumph logos. Engine protection dresser bars, pressed aluminum radiator guard with laser etched Triumph branding, and a brown bench seat with stitched ribbing are also part of the deal.

Unlike the bike it is inspired by though, this one comes with a few modern-day appointments, including LED lighting, the My Triumph connectivity system, keyless ignition, and single-button cruise control.

There is no estimate on how much the motorcycle is expected to fetch during the auction, but it will probably be more than the $16,400 the bike maker is asking for the rest of the bikes in the series.

GTM museum finally welcomes the dream machine Triumph Hurricane

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by Felicity Donohoe from https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk

Grampian Transport Museum (GTM) finally welcomes the dream machine Triumph Hurricane to the floor as Mike Ward finishes up his final year as curator.

After 37 years at the helm of GTM, motorcycle lover Mike Ward made sure to see out his last season before retirement with a rare Triumph Hurricane gracing the display alongside the other classic bikes – including an even rarer Triumph Bandit.

Mike said: “With 2021 being my last season at GTM, I was determined to have a Hurricane in this year’s exhibition.

“They are extremely rare, very valuable and much sought-after, but they’re not being used on the roads and to find one was difficult.”

The Hurricane will sit with the dedicated British Motorcycle Charitable Trust (BMCT) display for just this season.

GTM is open Thursday-Tuesday with plans to resume seven day weeks in summer, tel: 01975 562292. To book tickets go to gtm.org.uk

Mike employed the help of the Triumph Owners Motor Cycle Club, before Scottish-based club member David Currie, from Irvine, rode to the rescue and offered to loan his rare motorcycle to the museum.

Mike’s love affair with Triumph motorcycles began in the early 70s when he was at Lincoln College of Art studying museum conservatorship. As an 18-year-old student, he was the proud owner of a 350cc Triumph 3TA “café racer” complete with clip-on handlebars.

BSA / Triumph had just swept to success with their 750cc triple production bikes, the Triumph Trident and BSA Rocket 3, with the most famous Trident, “Slippery Sam” – so called after springing major oil leaks in an early race – winning five consecutive production 750cc class TT races at the Isle of Man from 1971-75.

The Triumph Trident and BSA Rocket 3 was made by Triumph Engineering and BSA (both part of the Birmingham Small Arms Company) from 1968-75. The high-performance bike was technically advanced, bringing a fresh face to street bikes and marking the start of the superbikes era.

Mike said: “That was the golden era of the Triumph Triple just ahead of the Japanese multi-cylinder tsunami which swept the British motorcycle industry aside. Every young enthusiast coveted one, and as soon as I graduated and found employment in 1976, I remember rushing out with my first pay cheque and buying one of the last Triumph Trident T160’s – a dream come true!”

However, with Japanese superbikes hot on their heels, BSA decided a revamp was on the cards. The company sent one of their Rockets over to American fairing creator Craig Vetter to boost the showroom appeal of their Triples.

Vetter employed a sweeping fibreglass combined fuel tank/seat and extended front forks giving it the now-vintage “Easy Rider” look. With its stunning paint job and outlandish triple exhaust, the bike stood head and shoulders above the standard BSA range and, winning popular public appeal, the X75 Hurricane was badged as a Triumph motorcycle.

Norton Villiers Triumph (1973-78) was liquidated in 1978 and in the end only 1,172 Hurricanes were built. Since then, the Hurricane has remained a rarity and one of Britain’s most exciting motorcycles of the 1970’s.

“The Triumph Hurricane has such an amazing story attached to it, said Mike. “It’s a really colourful and cheerful machine – and everyone needs cheering up just now, don’t they?”

 

Triumph Speed Twin for 2021 offers all-round improvements

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

2021 Triumph Speed Twin Gains Horsepower, New and Better Hardware All Around

It’s Speed Twin time for Triumph motorcycle lovers, as they’ve finally got the news they have been waiting for: five months into 2021, the range is getting upgraded for the new model year, and we’re talking about some serious changes, at least from place to place.

The “Modern Classic performance roadster,” as Triumph likes to call the range, was launched in 2018, and the three years that have passed since then call for an overhaul of the motorcycle. And that’s exactly what the British bike maker just announced.

First up, power levels. Although the engine remains the same (the 1200cc High Power Bonneville twin), it has been massaged into delivering more power and torque, faster and better than before.

The engine’s output increased by 3 hp, bringing the total to 100 hp at 7,250 rpm, while the maximum torque of 112 Nm (82 lb-ft) is now reached at 4,250 rpm. The riding modes for the powerplant (there are three, namely Road, Rain and Sport) have been upgraded too.

As far as hardware improvements go, the Speed Twin gets several higher specification parts. They include new Marzocchi USD forks with cartridge damping, Brembo M50 radial monobloc calipers, Metzeler Racetec RR tires, and new 17-inch aluminum wheels in a 12-spoke design. All of these modifications should allow for improved handling of the two-wheeler, the bike maker says.

Visually, the Speed Twin brings brushed aluminum front and rear mudguards, anodized headlamp mounts, and three color schemes. Over 50 accessories designed for the motorcycle are also thrown into the mix for the revised version.

The new interpretation of the bike is already listed on the bike maker’s website, showing a retail price of $12,500.

You can have a detailed look at what’s new for the Speed Twin.

Triumph Motorcycles Getting Dedicated Beeline Navigation Solution

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Carmakers have long learned that if they plan to be successful in our age and time, they must now also cater to their customers’ connectivity and navigation needs. That is why present-day cars are more gadgets on wheels than anything else.

Not the same can be said about motorcycles, though. Sure, bike makers are trying to satisfy those needs too, but the limits of two-wheeled vehicles will never allow for the same level of technology as on cars to be deployed. But, again, bike makers are trying.

The latest development to result from these efforts comes from Triumph, which just announced it partnered with specialist Beeline to create a dedicated navigation solution in a “Triumph-branded package.”

The solution was envisioned as a minimalist proposition. The system’s case is IP67 waterproof and shockproof, can be quickly mounted on any motorcycle, not only Triumphs, and features laser-etched Triumph branding.

The bike maker says the system is a perfect fit for the bikes it makes, more specifically for the Bonneville. Once installed on the two-wheeler, it needs to be paired with the Beeline app to work.

The Triumph Beeline, as it’s called, comes with a back-lit display and provides two navigation modes, the turn-by-turn Route and the more adventurous Compass, which uses a compass to give directions.

The display shows a speedometer, clock and trip computer, route tracking, metric and imperial information options, and GPX route import option. It can do so for up to 30 hours, after which it needs to be plugged in to charge its battery via a USB cable.

According to the Brits, the system can be used on bikes riding in the UK, Europe, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan. In the home market, the thing is priced at £199 ($282) and will go on sale at the end of this week.

One-Off Triumph Thruxton 1200 RS to be given away

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

One-Off Triumph Thruxton 1200 RS Steps Into the Spotlight, to Be Given Away

At the beginning of April, as it once again announced its support for the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride (DGR), British bike maker Triumph said it would be unveiling a one-off Thruxton 1200 RS during the event. The full reveal date is still set for May 23, but the bike maker gave us a preview of the motorcycle this week.

No exact details on the motorcycle were provided, and we do not know to the letter what makes this particular bike special, but a few of the released images with the two-wheeler show the paint scheme that makes this one stand out in its family.

Fully designed by Triumph’s paint shop, the scheme is clean and elegant, with white and black on the fuel tank, the DGR logo featured on the bodywork and the promise of unique customizations.

The bike maker will spill the full beans on the bike on May 23 because it is then when DGR is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The event came to be in Sydney, Australia, and it is meant to “raise funds and awareness of prostate cancer and men’s mental health.” To date, over 300,000 riders took part, and $27.45 million were raised for the cause.

The special Thruxton is meant as an additional perk for those willing to take part, as one of the participants in this year’s event will get to win it. The rides are open to all whose willing to attend and will take place all over the world. All one has to do to get a chance at winning the one-off motorcycle is to register, make a random donation, and raise an additional $250 from other rides.

Full details on rules and regulations for this year’s Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride and the ways of getting a shot at winning the unique bike can be found at this link.

Hollywood bikes are up for grabs through Heritage Auctions

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3 Hollywood-famous bikes that you can add to your motorcycle collection

What do Henry Winkler, Paul Newman, and Peter Fonda have in common—besides the fact that they’re all entertainment icons? Here’s a not-so-obvious answer: motorcycles.

Although the three weren’t all motorcycle enthusiasts—Winkler couldn’t even ride when he scored the part of Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli in Happy Days—they each portrayed a motorcycle-riding character in the movies or on TV. And three of those Hollywood bikes are up for grabs through Heritage Auctions’ Automobilia, Transport History, and Mechanical Models online auction, which ends May 25.

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British bike show is a triumph for organisers

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by Nigel Baudains from https://guernseypress.com

The heyday of the British motorcycle industry was on display at St James yesterday.

People were queuing by the 10am opening to see about 90 machines spanning the period from 1911 to the present day.

Alan Richmond, who organised the show on behalf of the St James Trust, is also chairman of The British Motor Cycle Club Guernsey.

‘I think British motorcycles appeal to the older man who probably had one in his youth,’ he said.

‘Naturally he will say that it was the best and there is a huge brand loyalty.

‘For the practical, you can strip them down to the last nut and bolt, whereas motorcycles today are computer-controlled and you dare not change a spark plug.’

Some of the bikes – nicknamed trailer queens – belonged to people who did not want to get them wet. Half an hour of riding and four hours of cleaning was no fun, he said.

Vaccine centre volunteer Alan Boyd, 66, said visiting the show had reactivated his interest in motorcycles.

‘I had bikes from the age of 15 and I even managed to persuade my wife, Jo, to tour Europe with me on a [Honda] Goldwing,’ he said.

‘I sold it because I thought I was getting too old. I’m a Triumph fan. The early ones leaked oil and the electrics were always packing up. Every time you went out it was an adventure as you never knew whether you’d get back or not.’

Within a few minutes of the show opening, the hall was packed with motorcycle enthusiasts.

Jackson Garage technician Wojtek Krzemien, 39, who came to Guernsey from Poland 13 years ago, was among them.

‘I just love motorbikes and I wanted to bring the boys to show them the story of motorcycling,’ he said.

‘They love motorbikes too and everything here is in such great condition.’

Other makes on show included Norton, BSA, James, Velocette, Sunbeam and Royal Enfield.