Skip to main content
Tag

Triumph Archives — Bikernet Blog - Online Biker Magazine

Tiny Triumph Motorcycle Range in Prototype – targets 200 to 750cc engine market segment

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

Tiny Triumphs and EV Motorcycle Range in Prototype Now With Indian Firm Bajaj

Triumph is now teasing the development of a series of smaller displacement motorcycles that the company plans to build with Indian manufacturing giants Bajaj.

As far back as early 2020, Triumph announced that it reached an agreement with Bajaj – one of the largest motorcycle firms in the world – to develop and build an all-new range of so-called ‘baby’ Triumphs that would fill in the 200 – 750cc engine displacement category.

While the plan called for the companies to roll out the first models in the collaboration in 2022, the project has been pushed back as a consequence of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Now that the pandemic crisis seems to be loosening its grip, both parties say they’re back on track to develop the bikes.

Triumph Head of Brand Management Miles Perkins says prototypes have already been created and plans are back in the offing.

“That’s going great guns, I have seen the development motorcycles – and the prototype for those – it’s all on track,” Perkins says. “We haven’t yet confirmed exactly what the bikes are and exactly when we will launch them but the news is forthcoming soon.”

And fear not, though Triumph hasn’t confirmed exactly which the partnership will create models, it has said the resulting bikes will be sold globally rather be sold only in Asian markets more conducive to sales of cheaper, small capacity motorcycles.

According to Perkins, Triumph found the ideal partner in Bajaj. He says the company’s large market share in India and experience working with KTM and Kawasaki were key to the deal.

“The relationship with Bajaj and conversations I have had with the team over there and the engineering team working with them are very like-minded and passionate individuals, and their focus and commitment are outstanding. They have similar leadership family principles and values,” Perkins says. “The working relationship is strong, the design development is completely Triumph, these are Triumphs and the partnership is building it and selling them around the world. What Bajaj brings is phenomenal in terms of the ability to develop quality in this volume, especially in the lower capacity range.”

Perkins also says the Triumph TE-1 EV prototype has been built and is ready for testing. It represents an electric sports bike model developed in partnership with Williams Advanced Engineering, and Perkins calls it “a blueprint for a future EV Triumph.”

Power for the TE-1 comes from an electric motor that delivers 174 horsepower at peak and 107 horses of continuous power. Triumph chose not to publish additional specifications, but Motorcycle News learned the bike weighs 485 pounds and offers up to 120 miles of range. Quick-charging technology zaps the battery pack with an 80% charge in about 20 minutes. Triumph stressed it aimed to give riders the performance of an internal-combustion-powered bike in an electric package, but what you see isn’t necessarily what will land in showrooms.

Triumph will begin testing the TE-1 prototype in the coming months, but it told Motorcycle News that it still needs to clear the cost hurdle before approving the production model. When it will do that is up in the air.

Triumph calls the TE-1 EV a prototype platform development and not an actual motorcycle available for sale, it’s a project which the company is using for “learning and developing the team’s experience but also developing the partnership of technology with several partners for a full-on electric Triumph platform that will follow in years to come.”

Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

The Flying Wrens: Sisterhood of Motorcycling Heroes

By General Posts

All-Female British dispatch riders of WW-II

Originally, the Women’s Royal Naval Service (WRNS) was formed in 1917, during WW-I.

Riding on narrow British roads in all weather conditions can be a dangerous enough occupation. Doing so around the clock during WW-II with the German Blitz going on around you required steel nerves.

The bikes used were mostly small, single-cylinder affairs, built specifically for military use.

Click Here to Read this Feature Article & Historic Photos on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

Behind the Scenes with Triumph Motorcycles in latest James Bond Adventure

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

As the only motorcycle partner in the latest Bond film, No Time to Die, Triumph got their Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 motorcycles featured in key stunt scenes of the motion picture. Now you can take a closer look at the bikes and how those epic stunts were filmed in this exclusive behind-the-scenes video from Triumph.

While the novelty of the Bond films may be wearing off slightly, they always manage to come up with something fresh and over the top. This time around Triumph Motorcycles took on some amazing terrain and situations while stunt riders pushed their Triumph Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 to their absolute.

Over the years a wide range of Triumph motorcycles has been used by the Bond stunt teams to perform all sorts of daring and outrageous moves. This time around, the British bike maker – long a player in the iconic movie franchise – supplied Tiger 900s and Scrambler 1200s.

Triumph recently announced that the launch of the Tiger 900 Bond Edition, would be limited to just 250 units and go on sale at an undisclosed date. These models feature Matt Sapphire Black paint, special Bond graphics and feature a billet machined handlebar clamp to display a unique limited edition number.

All five 900 models shared core changes for 2020 including those to the engine, chassis, suspension, brakes, and electronics. The DOHC, 4-valve-per-cylinder, Euro 5-spec in-line triple, has been bored out and features a new “T-plane” triple crankshaft – a first in engine design – and a new firing order that bestows the triple with V-twin-like character down low while maintaining top-end power.

The Tiger 1200 Scrambler features the 1,215cc Tiger triple engine which represents the most powerful shaft-driven engine in its class. This time-tested powerplant cranks out 139hp (103.652kw) at 9,350 rpm. Triumph made it happen with a smaller flywheel, a lighter crankshaft, and a magnesium cam cover.

You can see the stunt teams put both bikes through their paces during the filming of No Time to Die in the video below.

New Triumph Tiger 900 Limited Edition Celebrating James Bond

By General Posts

Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition

by Shakti Nath Jha from https://www.financialexpress.com

New Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition Revealed; Limited to just 250 units globally
Triumph Motorcycles has revealed the ultra-exclusive Bond Edition of the Triumph Tiger 900. Only 250 units of the new Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available worldwide.

Triumph Motorcycles has officially revealed the new ultra-exclusive Bond Edition of the Triumph Tiger 900. The company has introduced the Tiger 900 Bond Edition to celebrate the iconic British partnership between James Bond and Triumph. The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition is inspired by the incredible Tiger 900 Rally Pro, which features in amazing stunt sequences in the upcoming 25th ‘007’ James Bond movie, ‘No Time To Die’.

This new limited edition motorcycle from Triumph is based on the top-spec Rally Pro variant of the Tiger 900. Triumph Motorcycles has revealed that only 250 units of the new Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available globally. Each of these limited edition motorcycles will be individually numbered on the handlebar clamp with a signed certificate of authenticity. The Tiger 900 Bond edition will be finished in a unique Matt Sapphire Black paint scheme and it will feature exclusive ‘007’ graphics with blacked-out inserts to make this good-looking ADV even more appealing.

The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition gets exclusive features such as the ‘007’ TFT start-up screen animation, heated rider and pillion seat along with Bond Edition branding on the saddle, a set of high-specification Michelin Anakee wild off-road tyres for advanced off-road capabilities, etc. The new Tiger 900 Bond Edition is the second limited-edition motorcycle from Triumph to be built in collaboration with the Bond franchise.

Last year, this British two-wheeler manufacturer launched the Bond Edition of the Scrambler 1200. However, in terms of mechanicals, the Tiger 900 Bond Edition remains the same as the Tiger 900 Rally Pro.

The new Triumph Tiger 900 Bond Edition is powered by a BS6-compliant 888cc, liquid-cooled, inline 3-cylinder engine. This motor churns out 95 PS of maximum power at 8750 RPM and 87 Nm of peak torque at 7250 RPM. The engine comes mated to a 6-speed manual gearbox and it gets six different riding modes. They are – Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road, Rider-configurable, and Off-Road Pro. As already mentioned before, only 250 units of the Tiger 900 Bond Edition will be available globally.

The Triumph Scrambler 1200 on the set of No Time To Die

Triumph unveils new limited-edition Tiger based on bike that stars in new James Bond film No Time to Die

Two Triumph models star in the latest Bond blockbuster

by Enda Mullen from https://www.coventrytelegraph.net

Triumph Motorcycles has followed in the footsteps of Coventry car maker Jaguar Land Rover by playing a starring role in the latest James Bond film No Time To Die

The Hinckley-based motorcycle maker is an official partner in the James Bond film franchise for the first time, with two models used in stunts in the 25th Bond Blockbuster.

Not only that but the company has created a new limited-edition model inspired by one of the models used in the film.

The Tiger 900 Bond Edition takes direct influence from the Tiger 900 used in a series of action sequences in the new 007 movie.

Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 motorcycles feature in stunt scenes in the film, following a partnership between Triumph Motorcycles and EON Productions announced in December 2019.

No Time To Die was filmed in 2019 in several locations including Jamaica, Norway, Italy and the UK, and Triumph is the only motorcycle partner in the movie.

It joins other 007 vehicle partners including Jaguar Land Rover.

The James Bond stunt team required high performance bikes for some key action sequences.

Lee Morrison with a Triumph Scrambler 1200 on the set of No Time To Die

For months, the Triumph design workshop team collaborated behind closed doors with the stunt team to configure several feature motorcycles for the movie, including special preparations of Tiger 900 and Scrambler 1200 models to handle the extreme and dynamic action sequences – and the film’s stunt riders – demanded.

Lee Morrison, No Time To Die stunt coordinator, said: “First and foremost, as a stunt coordinator I have to be sure that we can achieve the action on that motorcycle.

“Is it agile and powerful enough for the stunt riders to achieve what I want them to? And also, crucially, does it fit the story of the film in a way that’s credible onscreen.”

He added: ““We loved the look of the Scrambler 1200, and we already knew we would use those in No Time To Die, but then Triumph offered us several prototypes of a bike that hadn’t yet been launched at that time, and that was the Tiger 900.

“The whole stunt team realised very quickly that these were amazing bikes.

“We spent a long time on the Tiger and it is so balanced. You can just have great fun with it.

“The Tiger 900 is the most confidence-inspiring bike, it allows you to really push the ride as far as you want, you can take as many liberties as you want; stand up sideways drifting in third gear, slow wheelie it, slide it Supermoto-style. I honestly think it’s one of the best bikes I’ve ever ridden, it’s fantastic.”

Lee is also a big fan of the Scrambler 1200?

“Ah it’s just so much fun, isn’t it,” he said.

“Get on it, and it’s an absolute blast straight off. I’d switch everything off (Off-Road Pro mode) and ride that thing like it was a motocross bike, couldn’t stop grinning.

“For the film we rode the Scrambler 1200 absolutely flat out, I mean as aggressive as you can ride a motorcycle, lighting it up off-road on tough terrain in Scotland, drifting it through really slippery streets in Matera (Italy), hitting steps flat out in third gear, quick direction changes, jumps, everything you could imagine, and that bike performed brilliantly.”

Lee also highlighted one particular stunt scene in which the Tiger 900 performed as the ‘most challenging’ in the new film.

He said: “We were riding them at high speeds and bouncing off the sides of cars during the Norway chase scene.

“It was amazing being able to ride behind and direct my lead stunt rider, constantly telling him to get in there, I want you alongside Bond, hitting the side of his door, cutting behind. There was a point where we jumped the Tiger over a car and under a helicopter.

“To have the confidence in a motorcycle to do all those things, on the move, while directing through an earpiece shows you how good that bike is.”

Limited to just 250 examples – with each individually numbered and accompanied by a signed certificate of authenticity – the Tiger 900 Bond Edition receives a matt black paint scheme and 007 graphics, as well as a billet-machined handlebar clamp.

A blacked-out styling package brings a black finish to the frame, headlight finishers, side panels and sump guard – among other components – giving the bike an understated look.

Each bike gets a unique 007-theme start-up animation on the screen, while the heated rider and pillion seat receive special Bond Edition branding. Prices for the Tiger 900 Bond Edition start from £16,500.

Triumph also created a limited-edition Scrambler 1200 Bond Edition model but it has already sold out.

Daytona 200 with Triumph & Ducati plus King of the Baggers

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

At the 80th Daytona 200 Race – King of the Baggers Goes Oval Racing Next Year, Daytona 200 to Allow Triumph and Ducati.

When one hears the word Daytona, the first thing that comes to mind is the insane racing that goes on there, especially the Daytona 500 event dedicated to cars. But the same name can easily be associated with an equally grueling endurance race for motorcycles.

They call it Daytona 200, and it has been around in some form or another ever since 1937. Next year in March, when the upcoming event is scheduled, people attending will be celebrating the 80th edition of the race. On their end, organizers will do so with new rules and bagger racing as a side dish for the first time ever.

Bagger racing on sanctioned, iconic tracks has not been around for all that long. Or maybe it has, but it only got traction after back in 2020 Harley-Davidsons and Indians went at each other’s throats in a single high-adrenaline race, called King of the Baggers, at the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca.

Then, 2021 came with King of the Baggers as a three-race series (eventually won by Harley’s Kyle Wyman), and we also got the Bagger Racing League’s Drag Specialties Battle of the Baggers for the first time.

Next year in Daytona, most of the bikes that were raced this year, and hopefully, even more, will line up on the starting grid once more. It is there where the next season of King of the Baggers kicks off, marking the first time ever when such motorcycles have been raced “on the high banks of a Superspeedway with speeds expected to exceed 160 mph.”

So far, the organizers of the series, MotoAmerica, did not provide any info on how the race will shape up, so we have no idea how many tri-oval laps riders will have to do before being declared winners.

As said, this year’s three-race series winner is Kyle Wyman, who rode a Road Glide to victory, defeating last year’s single-race series winner, Indian Challenger rider Tyler O’Hara. It’s unclear at this point how the roster for the 2022 season will shape up, and the total number of races is kept under wraps as well.

The opening salvo of the King of the Baggers will, of course, not be part of the Daytona 200 main event, but there are things to discuss here as well, the most important of them all being the fact more motorcycles are now allowed in.

This is due to rule changes that “take into consideration several performance-related items that establish benchmarks for balancing a wide variety of middleweight performance machines.”

Based on the 2022 World Supersport Technical rules, the modifications should allow incredible two-wheelers like the Triumph 765, Ducati Panigale V2, and MV Agusta F3 to be fielded in the race, joining the existing Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R600, and Kawasaki ZX-6R.

Daytona 200 will continue to be an open tire event, meaning each of the teams will be able to choose whatever tire manufacturer they like for the competition.

Back in March this year, the winner of the Daytona 200 was Brandon Paasch, who rode his Suzuki motorcycle to the win in 57 laps, completed in a little over two hours. The fastest lap of the race was actually the last one, and it went to Paasch in 1:49.752. That was enough to put him ahead runner-up Sean Dylan Kelly and his Kawasaki by just 0.30 seconds.

The 2021 Daytona 200 takes place on the weekend of March 10-12. The event is not part of the MotoAmerica Supersport Championship, meaning riders from around the world can take part.

At the time of writing, there is no info on the price for tickets or available packages.

PRESS RELEASE:

16 SEPTEMBER 2021
MotoAmerica, home of AMA Superbike and North America’s premier motorcycle road racing series, is thrilled to announce that it will partner with Daytona International Speedway to host one of the world’s most prestigious races – the DAYTONA 200 – during the weekend of March 10-12, 2022, in Daytona Beach, Florida.

The 2022 DAYTONA 200, set for the green flag on Saturday, March 12, will be the 80th running of the event that began on the Daytona Beach shoreline in 1937 before moving to the World Center of Racing in 1961.

The DAYTONA 200 will feature new rules based off the proposed 2022 World Supersport Technical rules, which take into consideration several performance related items that establish benchmarks for balancing a wide variety of middleweight performance machines. These new rules open the door to motorcycles such as the Triumph 765, Ducati Panigale V2, MV Agusta F3 and others to compete alongside the current Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R600 and Kawasaki ZX-6R. The DAYTONA 200 will also continue to run as an “open tire” event, allowing multiple tire manufacturers to join the competition.

The DAYTONA 200 will not be included as part of the MotoAmerica Supersport Championship, leaving the opportunity open for the best riders from around the world to compete for the minimum $175,000 in purse and contingency that will be offered.

In addition to the DAYTONA 200, the MotoAmerica weekend at Daytona International Speedway will be the opening round of the 2022 MotoAmerica King Of The Baggers Championship, marking the first time Baggers will race on the high banks of a Superspeedway with speeds expected to exceed 160 mph, and also the first round of the Twins Cup Championship.

“The DAYTONA 200 is known worldwide to be one of the most exciting motorcycle races in the world,” said MotoAmerica President Wayne Rainey, who won the DAYTONA 200 in 1987. “We are proud to work with Daytona International Speedway, the AMA and FIM North America organizations to continue to enhance the prominence of the DAYTONA 200. With the new DAYTONA 200 rules in place, we are hopeful that this will open the door to more manufacturers and teams joining us in March. It’ll be a great way to start off the 2022 season. And, wow, Baggers on the high banks! What a spectacle that will be. Obviously, this is MotoAmerica’s first trip to Daytona, and it’s my first trip back to the Speedway since 2008. I’m looking forward to what is going to be a really cool weekend.”

“The tradition of the DAYTONA 200 is unprecedented, and we are thrilled to work with such a reputable group in MotoAmerica to continue the tradition,” said Daytona International Speedway President Frank Kelleher. “Racing two-wheel style has been a staple in Daytona for many years, first on the beach before moving to Bill France Sr.’s incredible creation of the 31-degree banking of Daytona International Speedway and Infield Road Course. There’s nothing like the excitement that the DAYTONA 200 provides, including close finishes that have become the norm.”

“The AMA is pleased that the DAYTONA 200 will now be run and managed by our AMA/FIM North America partner MotoAmerica for 2022,” said AMA President and CEO, and FIM North America President, Rob Dingman. “This has been one of our goals since 2015 when we established our partnership with MotoAmerica and facilitated the return of professional road racing sanctioning rights to the AMA.”

Earlier this year, Brandon Paasch, at only 19 years old, used an old, veteran move common to Daytona, to capture the 2021 DAYTONA 200 in breathtaking fashion. After running second for most of the last portion of the race, Paasch, utilizing the draft, reeled in leader Sean Dylan Kelly and calculated a perfect slingshot move at the entrance of the tri-oval as the duo came to the checkered flag, winning by just .031 of a second, and taking home the traditional Rolex Cosmograph Daytona watch.

Nine World Champions, including seven 500cc/MotoGP World Champions – six Americans (Kenny Roberts, Freddie Spencer, Eddie Lawson, Wayne Rainey, Kevin Schwantz and Nicky Hayden) and one Italian (Giacomo Agostini) – have won the Daytona 200.

The winningest riders in the Daytona 200 are former World and AMA Superbike Champion Scott Russell (1992, ’94, ’95, ’97 and ’98) and 1995 AMA Superbike Champion Miguel Duhamel (’91, ’96, ’99, 2003, 2005). The pair have each won five Daytona 200s.

More information on the 2022 DAYTONA 200 will be announced soon, including additional support classes, final rules, entry instructions, broadcast coverage and ticket opportunities.

The iconic Daytona International Speedway will be the site of a host of motorsports events in 2022, beginning with the Rolex 24 in January, the DAYTONA 500 and Speedweeks Presented by AdventHealth in February, along with the 81st Annual Bike Week At DAYTONA in March, featuring the Monster Energy AMA Supercross and DAYTONA 200.

Fans can stay connected with Daytona International Speedway on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for the latest speedway news. For information on all events, visit www.daytonainternationalspeedway.com or call 1-800-PITSHOP.

Triumph race-tuned 765cc engines to power Moto2 for three more seasons

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

Triumph Motorcycles today announced that it will continue to provide their 765cc triple powerplants as Exclusive Engine Supplier to the FIM Moto2 World Championship for another three seasons, from 2022-2024. Since the start of the 2019 season, Triumph Motorcycles has provided all of the teams with race-tuned 765cc triples, each of which is based on the Street Triple RS engine. The changes made to the race-tuned engine allow it to breathe more freely, rev harder and deliver a peak power output of more than 140 PS (an increase of over 17% on the production engine).

Following Dorna’s intent to bring the Moto2 series closer to MotoGP, the increase in power and torque, combined with a more advanced electronics package, has provided a more relevant training and development ground.

In the last two years, Moto2 graduates have gone on to take podiums and victories in their first seasons in the premier MotoGP class: 2019 Moto2 World Champion Alex Marquez taking a pair of second places in 2020, and title rival Brad Binder with a victory also in 2020 and more recently in Austria 2021.

Jorge Martin took his first Moto2 victory in 2020, followed a year later with his maiden MotoGP win and a further two podiums in 2021. These incredible results go to prove how Moto2 has become the natural springboard for MotoGP that Dorna envisaged.

A total of 14 different race winners since 2019 there have been lap records set at 34 events, including records that have been broken and re-broken year-on-year, and the first-ever 300+ km/h top speed for a Moto2 machine. The record stands at 301.8 km/h at Phillip Island, Australia.

Triumph Tiger 660 First Official Teaser

By General Posts

from https://www.rushlane.com

The Triumph team have been testing the final prototype of a new Tiger that is set to transform the middleweight adventure sports category and deliver a new benchmark in specification, capability, performance and style.

Triumph Tiger Sport 660 will compete against other adventure tourers such as Kawasaki Versys 650 and Suzuki V-Strom 650

Triumph Motorcycles has just confirmed the launch of Tiger 660, officially christened as Tiger Sport 660. Their latest machine is set to become the most affordable adventure sports tourer from the iconic British brand. A full-fledged hardcore Adventure version of the same is also expected to debut at a later stage.

Ahead of the international debut of Trident 660, a leaked image had suggested that the naked streetfighter would get two siblings- an adventure bike and an adventure sports tourer. Triumph has revealed a camouflaged version of the latter by releasing camouflaged images and a video. Triumph states that testing for Tiger Sport 660 is in its final stages.

Tiger Sport series from the British bikemaker is the road-centric range of Triumph’s ADV line-up. It caters to buyers who specifically want a bike for touring purposes and wish to stick to tarmac more often than getting into broken tracks. The bike is set to be officially revealed in a couple of months, most probably during EICMA 2021.

What’s similar to Trident 660?
2022 Triumph Tiger 660 is based on the same architecture as naked streetfighter. It will feature the same 660cc three-cylinder liquid-cooled engine. This motor is tuned to produce a healthy 80 bhp and 64 Nm of peak torque and the same output is expected to be available for the upcoming sports tourer. This unit will be coupled with a six-speed gearbox with a slipper and assist clutch.

Other hardware components such as suspension and braking setup have been straightaway lifted from Trident 660. Suspension duties will be handled by black colour USD forks and a mono-shock from Showa, although it will be interesting to see if they offer more travel or stuff like preload adjustability. Braking will be handled by a twin front disc and a single rear disc setup from Nissin.

What’s dissimilar to Trident 660?
While Tiger Sport 660 rides on the same 17-inch alloy wheels as its naked street racer sibling, the wheels are shod by Michelin Road 5 rubber. Even though the tubular frame underneath has been lifted from Trident 660, the upcoming sports tourer may get a new rear subframe and swingarm. Since both will cater to a different segment of buyers, the latter also gets ergonomic tweaks.

The rider’s seat is longer in the Tiger with an aggressively raked up tail section. The handlebar is taller and wider and the footpegs are placed towards the centre which results in a more comfortable yet commanding riding posture. Optional side panniers enhance its credibility as a tourer.

Tiger-esque Design
As far as its design is concerned, if put simply put, it is a Trident wrapped under the clothes of a Tiger. The motorcycle wears a typical half-faired design along with signature Tiger styling cues such as a tall windscreen, larger front fender and sleek twin LED headlamps. The big fuel tank and sizeable radiator shrouds further scream its ADV heritage. However, unlike other Tiger models, this one gets underbelly exhaust mufflers.

Veterans’ campaigner Simon Weston gets special gift on 60th birthday

By General Posts

by Enda Mullen from https://www.coventrytelegraph.net

Veterans’ campaigner Simon Weston says 60th birthday gift of Triumph trike is dream come true.

It followed a crowdfunding campaign organised by former Meriden Triumph engineer Norman Hyde.

Veterans’ campaigner and Falkland War survivor Simon Weston has been presented with an extra-special gift to mark his 60th birthday in the shape of a Triumph trike.

Simon signed up for the British Army at 15. Aged 20, when serving in the Welsh Guards, he was aboard the logistics ship RFA Sir Galahad – laden with fuels and ammunition – when it was bombed by the Argentine Air Force during the conflict in the South Atlantic.

He suffered horrific injuries and underwent prolonged reconstructive surgery.

At times Simon said he was close to giving in, but courage and determination saw him emerge positively as a strong advocate for troops’ and veterans’ rights.

Along with his many charitable activities he gives inspirational talks on achieving mental wellness. Awarded the OBE in 1992, Simon was made a CBE in 2016.

Veterans’ campaigner and Falkland War survivor Simon Weston has been presented with an extra-special gift to mark his 60th birthday in the shape of a Triumph trike.

The gift was the result of a crowd-funding campaign which had its roots in a chance conversation at a presentation given by Simon two years ago.

Simon revealed to former Meriden Triumph engineer and world speed record holder Norman Hyde that he would really love a trike like the one ridden by Billy Connolly on his TV travel series.

It spurred Norman into action and he decided to embark on a mission to fulfil Simon’s dream.

He said: “Knowing what Simon had given to our country and knowing what good people there are in the bike world, from manufacturers and importers, through dealers to clubs and riders, I immediately said ‘leave it to me, I’ll fix it’.”

Norman organised crowdfunding and the £25,000 project got off to a fabulous start when Triumph Motorcycles, which is based in Hinckley, donated a new 1,200cc Bonneville for conversion.

Trike Design of Caerphilly South Wales (coincidentally Simon’s home town) was chosen to convert the two-wheeler and adapt controls for Simon, who has fingers missing from both hands.

“This is a dream come true,” said Simon of the crowdfunded Triumph trike, which was presented to him a few days before his 60th birthday.

“I can’t thank Norman Hyde and all the people who made this happen enough.”

Donations ranging from £5 to four-figure sums came from individuals and the trade, often accompanied by messages of affection for Simon.

The Triumph Owners MCC (TOMCC) made a substantial contribution as did the Duke of Richmond (the Goodwood Estate) and the Motorcycle Industry Association (MCIA), which is based in Coventry.

Simon’s helmet was donated by LS2 and the Held clothing company are making bespoke gloves.

Hank Hancock of Trike Design (TD), specialists in three-wheeler conversions and adaptation for disabled riders, took on the job with enthusiasm.

The Triumph is fitted with TD’s latest Brookland Sport design, with boot space inside the smooth GRP mouldings.

The 17-inch wheels have independent suspension with an anti-roll bar and the final transmission from the chain to twin shafts is via a differential.

Trike Design’s Robin Davies designed and fitted the specially adapted controls.

Kliktronic press-button electric gear shifting means that Simon can change up with a finger on his right hand and down with his left thumb.

Foot pedals for the throttle, brakes and clutch are similarly arranged to car controls.

“I soon worked out how to ride, and especially how to stop,” said Simon, who hopes to persuade his wife Lucy to travel on the pillion seat.

The presentation was held on Trike Design’s forecourt.

Those in attendance included several representing the TOMCC, including club chairman Ken Talbot and members who rode in from Shropshire, Max Roberts of Triumph Motorcycles, Dave Priddle of LS2 helmets and two motorcycle-mounted officers from the national police-run initiative BikeSafe; PC Richard Gibbs and PC Paul Rees.

Triumph Motorcycles has historic connections to Coventry.

Triumph, in its many guises, was born out of a company founded by Siegfried Bettmann, who had emigrated from Nuremberg, in 1884.

It went on to make bicycles before moving on to motorcycles and later cars.

The motorcycle making side of the business was originally based in Coventry and subsequently in Meriden.

A new company, Triumph Motorcycles, based in Hinckley, gained the name rights of the company in the 1980s and is now one of the world’s major motorcycle manufacturers.