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Dream E-Type: Early days of the Honda 4-Stroke

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from https://www.thesundaily.my

Mr Honda’s disdain for two-stroke engines fuelled the relentless pursuit of perfection for his little four-strokers.

It was March 1951 when Soichiro Honda summoned engineer Kiyoshi Kawashima from Hamamatsu.

“‘Kawashima, would you mind coming over for a moment?’ It was the beginning of a two-month stint in the capital as I worked on the design of the E-Type 4-stroke engine in a corner of the Tokyo Plant,” recalls Kawashima. “When the plans were at last ready the Old Man dashed in to see it, bringing Fujisawa, with him.” (Takeo Fujisawa was Honda Motor Co Ltd’s co-founder.)

Kawashima can remember clearly that day in May 1951. “As he showed the plans to Fujisawa, Mr. Honda gave us an enthusiastic commentary: ‘Ah, I see. You have this kind of valve and the cam goes like that. This is what I call an engine, it isn’t just a two-stroke machine that looks as though it’s been cut from a bamboo tube with holes drilled. This will sell. Honda will do well with this!’ Mr. Fujisawa didn’t have any understanding of the plans, he didn’t know anything about mechanical things at all, so he just said things like ‘Hm, yes, that’s great,’” said Kawashima, laughing.

The now-legendary test crossing of the Hakone Pass took place on July 15. In those days the Hakone Pass was considered the ultimate test for a motor vehicle. Even lorries could only get over it if they stopped for a rest every now and then. So it was certainly a challenge for a small 150cc motorcycle. Kawashima acted as both the engine designer and on that occasion, as test rider.

“Actually we’d been using the Hakone Pass as a test track for quite some time by then. I was sure we could climb it, but I was pretty nervous because the Old Man and Mr. Fujisawa were coming along as well.

“If the engine had overheated or something and conked out right in front of Mr. Fujisawa, the Old Man would have suffered a terrible loss of face. That day a typhoon was approaching but history relates that the engine was completely untroubled in the torrential rain and raced up the hill in top gear.

“I joked to myself that it was lucky there was so much rain and spray, because it meant that the air-cooling worked liked water-cooling and helped keep the temperature down. Although I say that I went up in top gear, there were only two gears, which was just as well,” he said, laughing. “Looking back on it, I think that was a good, plucky little engine.”

The story goes that the motorcycle overtook the Buick that Honda and Fujisawa were riding in. Kawashima went over first and the three men were reunited at the summit of the pass, where they hugged each other with delight.

The Dream E-Type was Honda’s first four-stroke machine. The Japanese motorcycle industry had become more competitive about a year before and bikes with four-stroke engines were produced for the first time. The market started to show preference for four-stroke rather than two-stroke bikes.

Later, Honda came to be known as “Four-Stroke Honda” although in fact it was rather slow in switching to the new type of engine. But at this time a lot of four-stroke engines were fitted with side-valves for reasons of economy and ease of manufacture, while Honda opted for the overhead valve system.

Another difference was that Honda’s bikes, both two- and four-stroke, were much more powerful than other Japanese machines with 150cc engines.

“The Old Man probably wanted to make proper four-stroke bikes from the very beginning. In those days people’s ideas about two-stroke engines were rather hazy and since they burn up lubricating oil, which isn’t meant to be burnt, the Old Man probably only tolerated them as a kind of stop-gap at a time when he had no money and inadequate facility,” said Kawashima.

“For two decades after the launch in the following year of Cub F-Type (a two-stroker), Honda made only four-stroke bikes. The E-Type was the first bike the Old Man really enjoyed making.”

The E-Type’s frame, like that of the D-Type’s, was of channel-frame construction, but because there had been so much trouble with the failure of the wet-cone clutch on the D-Type, the E-Type was fitted instead with a dry-type multiple disc clutch. The clutch control was also changed to the more conventional left-hand lever system.

Kawashima recalls: “On reflection, we realised we had made a mistake in being too unique and we decided to make our bikes more conventional. But since it’s not Honda’s way to revert to old designs, we decided that the point of difference should be the quality of the engine. These were extraordinary bikes in the best sense. They sold well and brought pleasure to both customers and dealers.”

The E-Type went on sale in October 1951. Compared to the D-Type, which had shipped 160 units per month at its peak, 500 units of the E-Type were being shipped out a month only half a year after its launch and a year later, when it was fitted with a third gear, that rose to 2,000; three years later annual production reached 32,000 units.

Now that Honda had overcome the critical problems of its early years, the company would, as Honda himself had predicted, start to expand thanks to the success of the E-Type and seize the opportunity for rapid future development.

Kawashima riding a Dream E-Type at the Suzuka Circuit on April 1, 1992.

Dunlop Motorcycle Tires Launches the All-New GT503 Tire for H-D Sportster

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With the announcement of Harley-Davidson’s new Sportster S, Dunlop is releasing the all-new GT503.

With the announcement of Harley-Davidson’s new Sportster S, Dunlop is releasing the all-new GT503. The GT503 was designed specifically for the aggressive look and high performance of H-D’s new motorcycle. Developed to meet the high standards of Harley-Davidson, the GT503 combines construction, compound, and tread design to provide the ultimate in tire performance for the new H-D Sportster S. Riders will experience the kind of performance only Dunlop delivers.

Features and Benefits
• Aggressive tread pattern maximizes the land-to-sea ratio to offer superior dry-grip while also utilizing tread grooves that are long in length to enhance wet-weather performance
• Radial construction featuring Steel Jointless Belt (JLB) technology delivers more responsive and consistent handling while also providing a more compliant ride
• New compound has been formulated to provide excellent grip and mileage
• Sidewall design proudly features the Harley-Davidson name and updated styling
• New “wide” front tire size (160/70R17) provides a custom fat tire look, while still offering light and responsive handling
• Available exclusively through Harley-Davidson dealers

All-New GT503 Tire
Front
• Size – 160/70R17
• Load/Speed – 73V
• TL/TT – TL
• Sidewall – BL
• Part Number – 45244727

Rear
• Size – 180/70R16
• Load/Speed – 77V
• TL/TT – TL
• Sidewall – BL
• Part Number – 45244726

About Dunlop Motorcycle Tires
Dunlop is the largest supplier of original equipment and replacement motorcycle tires in the U.S.A.

For more information, visit https://www.dunlopmotorcycletires.com/

Honda CB200 Modified Into An Electric Motorcycle

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

The electric powertrain of the modified Honda CB200 has fitted onto a stylish aluminum enclosure

Manufacturing EVs from scratch is an uphill task in itself but it is a whole new level of challenge when one has to convert a vehicle already fitted with an IC engine. We have earlier witnessed such projects being undertaken in four-wheelers such as Land Rovers and VW Beetles but this time an electric powertrain has been fitted into a motorcycle.

An aftermarket workshop named Omega Motors, based out of San Francisco in USA, has converted a 1975 Honda CB200 into an electric motorcycle. The donor model back in 1970s and 80s was a hot-selling retro-style motorcycle with a cafe racer design. The makers of this modified prototype haven’t tried to alter the design of the motorcycle in any way.

Updated Styling
Rechristened as Omega EV200, it still retains a part-scrambler and part-cafe racer design with round headlamps, single-piece ripped seat and wire-spoke wheels lending it a retro appeal. The electric CB200 gets refurbished front forks, wheels and brakes while retaining the cable-actuated front brake and rear drum brake.

Subtle modifications have been made to the chassis in order to incorporate a battery and electric motor setup. The frame has been shortened and the welded-in rear fender has been chopped off.

The pillion footpegs have also been removed while a small part of its spine has also been cut in order to weld a mounting plate for the controller. Interestingly, the motor mounts from the original bike have been left intact while the new battery pack and electric motor are attached via a set of custom mounting plates.

Specs & Features
Speaking of specifications, the motorcycle has been fitted with an electric motor sourced from Golden Motor and raed to produce 5kW (6.7 bhp) of continuous supply and peak power of 10kW (13.4 bhp). This motor feeds energy of a 1.6 kWh battery pack specifically designed and built for Omega EV200. Omega has also added a Kelly Controls controller which has been packaged neatly under the modified fuel tank and seat.

Coming to its performance, numbers are fairly modest with a top speed of 60mph (96.5 kmph). However, the electric bike weighs only 111 kilos which is 22 percent lighter than the stock CB200. The motorcycle offers a riding range of only 48 km on a single charge while charging the battery takes five to eight hours.

There isn’t much to offer in terms of features but Omega has got the stock analogue speedometer and switches working. Most importantly the clutch lever has been repurposed to work as an analogue regenerative braking control. The most attractive addition is a small digital display to reveal battery-related information which has been covered with the same piece of leather as the custom seat.

Yamaha updates its iconic YZ125 for the First Time in 15 Years

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by Cristina Mircea from https://www.autoevolution.com

For so long now it looked like Yamaha had given up on its legendary YZ125 two-stroke, but the company finally decided to fully update its motocross bike with the launch of the new, reimagined 2022 version.

Even the Japanese manufacturer admits that this is the first full update the 2022 YZ125 receives in over 15 years, but with its new features, the motorcycle now jumps to the top of the 125cc two-stroke class. It is now more powerful, more ergonomic, and with a more aggressive look.

So, what’s new? Well, for starters, the overall design and graphic scheme of the new YZ125, which looks rougher, with the new appearance better highlighting the racing capabilities of the bike. It has a new front and rear fender design and the body panels and radiator shrouds are slimmer. The seat is flatter and the fuel tank narrower, offering an improved riding experience, making it easier to shift body weight and maintain good control of the motorcycle.

Yamaha completely redesigned the liquid-cooled 125cc engine, which is more powerful than the one in the 2021 model. All the parts in it are new, including its cylinder body, piston, crankcase, expansion chamber, etc.

Moving on to the braking system, that too has also been updated to be lighter and offer a better feel. It has larger front pistons, a redesigned 270mm (10.6 in) front rotor with a 30 percent increase in pad contact area and higher friction pad material. The rear rotor is smaller, with a diameter of 240mm (9.4 in), although it keeps the same braking power.

The manufacturer also boasts the revised suspension and improved fueling, thanks to the new, high-precision Hitachi Astemo Keihin PWK38S carburetor with throttle position sensor and 3D-map-controlled CDI unit, for precise ignition timing.

Yamaha says the new 2022 YZ125 motorcycle will be available in dealerships starting this October, for a price of $6,899.

Luxury E-Motorcycle from Curtiss

By General Posts

by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Forget about any other electric motorcycle you’ve seen. Curtiss Motorcycles tosses all preconceived notions aside, to bring the slimmest, most balanced and unique luxury e-motorcycle out there. If you were still waiting for the One, this could be it.

Known for its exquisite designs, Curtiss is teasing a new model that breaks a lot of taboos when it comes to electric motorcycles. Tantalizingly-named The opposite of death (a literary reference pointing to this new model being the object of desire), the teaser shows a uniquely-looking bike that seems to float effortlessly, while also exuding maximum confidence.

What is the one? Something that is a perfect fit for you and something that becomes one with you. With a 20% lower center-of-gravity and a width that is reduced by 45%, this incredibly slim bike is truly ergonomic, easy-to-mount and comfortable, making you feel integrated with it. The lower seat and increased ground clearance keep you perfectly balanced on the road.

Puristic reductionism is not an abstract notion here, but the very core of this bike’s design. The One is completely stripped – no transmission, no shifting, no clutch. Power is sent straight from the engine to the rear wheel via the belt drive, and you are directly connected to the bike.

As Curtiss designer JT Nesbitt puts it, the space in your mind that was previously focused on managing the combustion engine, and overpowered by the noise and the heat of it, is now free to enjoy everything else. No more noise, no more overheating, just pure control and precision.

And, speaking of purity, you gotta love these guys’ boldness – in an era where everybody is pushing the connectivity button, Curtiss just tosses digitalization away, calling it a distraction from the riding experience. That’s right – forget about the screen and focus on the One.

In order to obtain the slimmest and lightest chassis possible (it only weighs 425 lbs/193 kg), the One combines an aircraft-inspired TLP monocoque with several other proprietary technologies, including a liquid-cooled Power Pak battery and a unique power train. Add to that race-proven front and rear suspension, premium Beringer disc brakes, and you’ve got a powerful bike that can deliver a peak output of 120 HP and 199 Nm of torque.

No official launch date is yet confirmed for the One, but be ready to pay $90,000 for it. The perfect match doesn’t come cheap.

Rare Ducati MH900e at auction costs more than 2021 Monster 1200 S

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by Silvian Secara from https://www.autoevolution.com

Turn your garage into a museum with a timeless piece of Bologna’s two-wheeled artwork.

Rare Ducati MH900e Rolls to Auction, Is Pricier Than a 2021 Monster 1200 S

The Ducati MH900e was designed by Pierre Terblanche to honor Mike Hailwood’s victory at the 1978 Isle of Man TT race. This gorgeous machine saw a limited production run of only 2,000 copies at the dawn of the 21st century, making it an extremely desirable rarity for any diehard Ducatista out there.

To be fair, the MH900e has to be among the sexiest machines ever conceived by the illustrious South African designer. The way its front fairing merges with the gas tank to form a single unit is downright perfect, causing several motorcycle customization enterprises to replicate this feature on their bespoke ventures.

As for the Duc’s technical specifications, its steel trellis framework embraces an air-cooled 904cc L-twin powerplant, with two desmodromic valves per cylinder and a compression ratio of 9.2:1. The mill is capable of generating up to 75 stallions at around 8,000 spins per minute, along with 56 pound-feet (76 Nm) of torque lower down the rpm range.

In order to reach the rear 17-inch wheel, the oomph travels via a six-speed transmission and a chain final drive. This whole ordeal translates to a solid quarter-mile time of 11.9 seconds, while top speed is generously rated at 133 mph (215 kph).

On the other hand, stopping power comes from dual 320 mm (12.6 inches) brake discs and four-piston calipers up front, accompanied by a single 220 mm (8.7 inches) rotor and a twin-piston caliper at the rear. The bike’s front end sits on 43 mm (1.7 inches) inverted telescopic forks, coupled with a Sachs monoshock at the back.

Right, you get the idea, so let’s cut to the chase. This article’s photo gallery reveals an unblemished Ducati MH900e produced back in 2002, and the creature is making its way to the auction block at this very moment! You may Click Here to submit your bid for this Italian wonder on Bring A Trailer until July 3, but we do hope your wallet is well-nourished, as you’ll need over $20k to overtake the top bidder.

The 3D Printer Market Is Being Driven By 3D Printed Products In Automotive Industry

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The Business Research Company’s 3D Printer Global Market Report 2021: COVID-19 Growth And Change To 2030

The growth in the use of 3D printed products in the automotive industry is a key factor driving the growth of the 3D printer manufacturing market. The manufacture of lightweight vehicle components is possible with the aid of 3D printing that reduces vehicle weight, boosts car performance, and increases fuel economy, and greater productivity can be achieved in injection molding equipment manufacturing using 3D printing technology.

For instance, in 2019, General Motors collaborated with Autodesk to produce 3D printed lower cost and lighter vehicle parts. Therefore, the growth in demand for 3D printed products in the automotive industry drives the demand for manufacturing 3D printers and contributes to the growth of the 3D printer manufacturing market.

The 3D printer manufacturing market consists of sales of 3D printers that are used in automotive, healthcare, industrial, consumer electronics, aerospace and defense industries. 3D printing is the method of creating three-dimensional objects by transferring consecutive material layers through a 3D printer.

The global 3D printer market is expected grow from $8.62 billion in 2020 to $11.1 billion in 2021 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 28.8%. The growth is mainly due to the companies resuming their operations and adapting to the new normal while recovering from the COVID-19 impact, which had earlier led to restrictive containment measures involving social distancing, remote working, and the closure of commercial activities that resulted in operational challenges. The 3D printing market size is expected to reach $25.26 billion in 2025 at a CAGR of 23%.

TBRC’s 3D printers market report is segmented by printer type into desktop 3d printer, industrial 3d printer, by technology into stereolithography (SLA), fused deposition modeling (FDM), selective laser sintering (SLS), direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), polyjet/multijet printing (MJP), inkjet printing, electron beam melting (EBM), laser metal deposition (LMD), direct light projection (DLP), others and by end-use industry into automotive, aerospace & defense, healthcare, food, construction & architecture, others.

The major players covered in the global 3d printing industry are Stratasys, GE Additive, SLM Solutions, Voxeljet, Arcam AB, Hoganas AB, Groupe Gorgé, Renishaw PLC., Markforged Inc., Made In Space, Proto Labs Inc., and Tiertime.

3D Printer Global Market Report 2021: COVID-19 Growth And Change To 2030 is one of a series of new reports from The Business Research Company that provides 3D printer market overview, forecast 3D printer market size and growth for the whole market, 3D printer market segments, and geographies, 3D printer market trends, 3D printer market drivers, restraints, leading competitors’ revenues, profiles, and market shares.

Horwin’s EK3 Crushes Electric Competition With Motorcycle Infused EV

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

Electric mobility is officially a booming business. With such a growth, we’re bound to witness all sorts of EVs aimed at relieving overcrowded cities of traffic. One company, Horwin, hit the market with their Red Dot Design Award winning moped, the EK3.

Now, the way I ran across this company may surprise you. I was walking around my neighborhood and strolled past a building with a sign saying SmartBalance. As I walked by, I started to understand what the shop was all about, EVs. I could see a few vehicles inside, but one in particular, which I later found out was the EK3, winked at me from the corner of the showroom.

My research into this vehicle led me to find out about Horwin. This rather fresh team of motorcycle enthusiast, industrial experts, and even professional racers, ranging from Germany, China, and Austria, hit the market with the CR6 and CR6 Pro (L3e class / 125 ccm) light electric motorcycles. The “CR” stands for Café Racer. With a range of 150 km (93.2 mi), top speed of 105 kph (65 mph) and acceleration from 0 to 60 kph (37 mph) in just six seconds, these babies paved the way for Horwin’s triumph.

As it stands the 2020 EK3 comes in with a length of 1900 mm (74.8 in), width of 690 mm (27.1 in), height of 1130 mm (44.4 in), and a minimum ground clearance of 125 mm (4.9 in). With the seat height at 780 mm (30.7 in), you’ll be positioned quite upright as you ride. The wheelbase is of 1320 mm (51.9 in).

What makes the EK3 so attractive is its speed and acceleration. With a max power output of 6.2 kW (8.3 hp) at 95 kph (59 mph), and max torque of 195 Nm (143.8 lb-ft), you’ll hit 60 kph (37.2 mi) in six seconds. How is this made possible?

One thing I noticed upon seeing the EK3 was that it uses a chain-driven, center mounted motor, just like you find on motorcycles. With all torque available the moment you twist the throttle, you may feel the “motorcycle enthusiast” bit at play.

However, the bigger the motor an EV uses, the larger and smarter does the battery and management system need to be. The EK3 uses a 72-volt, 10.44 Wh battery from Samsung, which can easily be removed for charging off site. The SOC monitoring system ensure battery management is optimal, while also running within safe parameters, protecting against overcharge, discharge, surges, and even monitors battery temperature. If you feel one battery isn’t enough, throw on another and double your range to 200 km (124 mi). Once drained, each battery will take up to four hours to recharge.

Brakes utilize hydraulic CBS technology, distributing brake force between the front and rear disk brakes, meaning you’ll stop as quickly and as safely as possible. As for suspension, four shock absorbers take care of any vibrations and bumps you’ll encounter.

Created as a vehicle made for city commuting, the EK3 includes a few other features meant to make it both stylish and functional. The inclusion of LED headlights, taillights, and turn signals, anti-theft alarm system, and a nifty USB port to recharge your device, shows you why this vehicle got the Red Dot.

A large display makes everything easy to read and shows the rider information such as battery level, speed, gear, range, and trip length. Oh, there’s also a feature that allows you to start the motor just by sliding your finger over the bottom of the display.

So how much is this beast going to cost you? Well, that all depends on the dealership you use to get one. SmartBalance has them available for 21,619 RON ($5,207 at current exchange rates). However, I bet you can sweet talk someone into giving you a better deal. If you feel like adding any accessories like a windshield, smartphone mount, or motor case, bring an extra buck.

One thing is for sure, with a near $5,000 price tag, speed and torque to satisfy any urban commuter, and sleek, modern looks, the EK3 is one EV that you should consider if you’re looking to leave old ICEs behind.

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for June 2021

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by Bill Bish from The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM)

Ban Deadlines, Covid Obstructions, Infrastructure Guidelines, Checkpoint Funding, Motorcycle Advisory Council, Lane Splitting and more

  • SYNTHETIC FUEL COULD SAVE MOTORCYCLES FROM ELECTROCUTION
  • MOTORCYCLE MANUFACTURERS STRUGGLE TO DELIVER NEW BIKES
  • INITIAL HIGHWAY BILL CONTAINS MOTORCYCLE-FRIENDLY PROVISIONS
  • MOTO INDUSTRY REPORTS MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AT AN ALL-TIME LOW
  • SEATBELTS FOR MOTORCYCLES
  • A THIRD OF MOTORCYCLISTS WOULD STOP RIDING IF ELECTRIC REPLACES GAS
  • OREGON GOVERNOR VETOES LANE-SPLITTING BILL
  • FINAL PREPARATIONS FOR NCOM CONVENTION IN DES MOINES

Click Here to Read the NCOM News on Bikernet.

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today.

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Highsider Custom Motorcycle Components Now Available in the USA

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Paaschburg & Wunderlich USA, LLC, 16315 Monterey Rd., Ste. 100 Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Contact: Holger Mohr, Holger.Mohr@pwonline.us

HIGHSIDER(TM) Custom Motorcycle Components Now Available in the USA
German Engineered – For whatever you ride!

(Morgan Hill, CA, June 4, 2021) — Paaschburg & Wunderlich USA, LLC, the North American subsidiary of the leading European distributor, announces the launch of its premium Highsider brand for the North American market.

Featuring modern styling, efficient technology, and superior quality, the initial product launch includes mirrors, headlights, turn signals, taillights, and related accessories such as handlebar weights, handlebar grips and load equalizers. High functionality, innovative design, and value for price paid are the brand’s hallmarks. Most Highsider components are TUV or EC-Approved, a certification not necessary in the U.S. but an indication of Highsider‘s rigorous testing and quality stance.

Founded in 2008 by Paaschburg & Wunderlich GmbH, Highsider is Europe’s market leader for innovative lighting technology and high-quality motorcycle accessories. According to company Co-owner and CEO, Dr. Oliver Moosmayer, this expansion across the pond follows the company philosophy of “Progress Instead of Stagnation.”

“We are extremely proud and happy to announce the creation of our U.S. organization and the official launch of the Highsider brand in North America. It has always been part of our plan to bring our innovative products to the U.S. market with local inventory and pricing in U.S. dollars to make it very convenient to shop for our products,” said Moosmayer.

Paaschburg and Wunderlich teamed up for the strategic planning and execution of this new venture with industry executive veteran Holger Mohr, who will lead the day-to-day operations as President. “I am extremely excited to lead the efforts in bringing this distinctive brand and product line to riders in the States,” said Mohr. “Nothing gets me more fired up than cool, inventive motorcycle parts, and Highsider is just that.”

“Highsider products are fully stocked and ready to ship from the company warehouse in California. B2B and B2C websites are fully operational. “Our dealers will benefit from the parent company’s proven SAP Business One e-commerce platform, offering efficient interactions and timely communications,”

Mohr added “We have teamed up with WPS and Tucker Powersports for U.S. distribution and are ready to educate dealers about the line.”

For more information about Highsider and the U.S. product portfolio visit www.highsider-us.com Dealers can order online at www.pwonline.us or via phone at 408-465-4555.