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NCOM Biker Newsbytes for July 2022

By General Posts

Silver Spoke Winners 2022

Industry & Legislative Motorcycle News from USA and the world
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

  • NCOM Convention Rocks Nashville
  • New Motorcycle Organizations join NCOM
  • Fuel Transperancy
  • Tennessee waives Registration Fees for One Year
  • Iowa ATV Riders now have greater access to State Roads
  • New York gets tough on Non-Legal Road Bikes
  • No more Licenses required for Three-Wheelers in Utah

CLICK Here to Read this July Newsbytes on Bikernet.com

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services
Visit: www.ON-A-BIKE.com or contact 800-ON-A-BIKE.

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Ultimate Motorcycle Road Trip Packing List

By General Posts

Road tripping on your bike is an excellent way for celebrating your love of riding

Are you planning a motorcycle road trip? Then you’re in for an enjoyable time. Road tripping on your bike is an excellent way to visit scenic locations while celebrating your love for riding.

However, bringing all the necessary supplies on your trip is essential to having the best experience. To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of all of the most critical items you’ll need for your trip. Read on to learn our ultimate motorcycle road trip packing list.

Click Here to Read this short, simple guide on Bikernet.com

Ride Free, Ride Safe ….

If unfortunately, you ever find yourself a motorcycle accident victim, you can call Law Tigers team at 1-888-863-7216 for assistance. Tell them Bikernet.com sent ya.

The “Biker Lives Matter” Organization

By General Posts

Rogue with his son Dale and grandson Reese – a family that rides together.

Click Here to Get Involved – http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Article by Rogue – Founder of Biker Lives Matter, Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame

I have been asked a lot why I and some others started an organization named Biker Lives Matter and why it is important to me. My answer is simple, there is a need for an organization that calls attention to the tragic loss of lives and livelihoods from motorcycle crashes.

In the 1970s, I became involved in motorcycle rights and safety. At the time, motorcycle injury and death rate were high so the government and insurance companies began trying to pass laws that they hoped would help protect motorcyclists when crashes happened.

I have been riding motorcycles for 69 years and both my life and that of the others who ride has always been important to me.

I have seen many people injured and I know too many that have died.

I consider myself one of the lucky ones to still be riding at the age of 83 years old.

CLICK HERE To Read this insightful feature article on Bikernet.com

SUPPORT Biker Lives Matter – Visit website to know more: http://www.bikerlivesmatter.com/

Kanopolis City, Kansas Ordinance for Off-Road Motorcycles

By General Posts

from https://www.indyrepnews.com

(First Published in the Ellsworth County Independent/
Reporter, September 23, 2021)

ORDINANCE NO. 2021-O-02

AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE USE OF OFF-ROAD MOTORCYCLES (ALSO KNOWN AS ‘DIRT BIKES’) ON THE STREETS OF KANOPOLIS, KANSAS, AND PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION OF THE SAME.

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF KANOPOLIS, ELLSWORTH COUNTY, KANSAS:
The purpose of this Ordinance is to protect the health, safety, property and well-being of the citizens of Kanopolis by regulating the use of off-road motorcycles in the city which may endanger the safety of persons driving, bicycling or walking on the roads, the safety of motorists, cyclists or pedestrians, the safety of its operators, and which may disturb the use and enjoyment of land. This section shall apply throughout the city, both on and off streets and highways and on all public and private land.

• Sec. 1. – Definition.
The following words, terms and phrases, when used in this section, shall have the meanings ascribed to them in this section, except where the context clearly indicates a different meaning:
Off-road motorcycle or dirt bike means any motorized nonhighway vehicle traveling on two tires, and having a seat designed to be straddled by the operator, and/or any motorcycle licensed for highway travel being utilized off of a street, roadway or improved surface.

• Sec. 2. – Unsafe use of off-road motorcycles prohibited.
The following practices constitute unsafe use of off-road motorcycles in the city:
(1) Use of an off-road motorcycle one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise without headlights and rear lights installed and illuminated.
(2) Use of an off-road motorcycle without a rearview mirror.
(3) Use of an off-road motorcycle without a warning device such as a horn.
(4) Use of an off-road motorcycle with more than one person on the seat, unless the seat has been specifically designed by the manufacturer to hold more than one person. In no case shall there be more passengers than the off-road motorcycle is designed to carry.
(5) Use of an off-road motorcycle without the driver and passengers wearing protective headgear. The headgear must conform with minimum standards of construction and performance as proscribed by the National Standards Institute specification Z90.1 or by the federal motor vehicle safety standard no. 218.
(6) Use of an off-road motorcycle by a driver under the age of 14.
(7) Operating an off-road motorcycle that is not equipped at all times with an effective and suitable muffling device on its engine to effectively deaden or muffle the noise of the exhaust. Each off-road motorcycle must meet noise emission standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and in no case exceed 82 decibels of sound pressure level at 50 feet on the “A” scale as measured by the SAE standards.
(8) Operating an off-road motorcycle that is not equipped at all times with a working spark arrester.
(9) Operation of off-road motorcycle at speeds greater than reasonable and prudent for the existing conditions.
(10) Operating an off-road motorcycle in violation of ordinances or regulations applicable to motor vehicles, except as expressively permitted by the article, or in reckless manner in such a way as to recklessly create a substantial risk of serious bodily injury to another person.
(11) Operating an off-road motorcycle in a manner so as to endanger any person or property.
(12) Operating an off-road motorcycle in such a manner as to create an excessive amount or introduction into the air of dust, dirt or other particulate or substance.
(13) Operating an off-road motorcycle in any manner that would harass game or domestic animals.
(14) The operation of an off-road motorcycle by a child under the age of 18 without the immediate and visual supervision of an adult.

• Sec. 3. – Restricted operation of off-road motorcycles.
Except as this Ordinance specifically permits and authorizes, no person shall operate a dirt bike or other off-road motorcycle vehicle within the city limits:
(1) On the portion of any right-of-way of any public highway, street, road, trail or alley used for motor vehicle travel, unless the motorcycle is fully licensed for highway use.
(2) On a public sidewalk provided for pedestrian travel.
(3) On private property of another without the specific expressed permission of the owner or person in control of the property.
(4) On any property owned by the City of Kanopolis or on any other public property, including parks and recreational areas, except by special event issued permit.
(5) Within 100 feet of any school, park, pedestrian, utility work, or construction area where the operation would conflict with use or endanger other persons or property.
(6). In or on a railroad right-of-way

• Sec. 4. – Responsibilities of parents and landowners.
(a) Parents and responsible adults. It shall be a violation of this division for any parent, guardian, or adult with supervisory responsibility to permit a child less than 18 years of age to operate an off-road motorcycle in a manner prohibited by this Ordinance.
(b) Landowners. It shall be a violation of this division for any landowner or rightful possessor of real property to suffer or permit the operation of off-road motorcycles on property that they own or possess as prohibited or in a manner prohibited by this ordinance.

• Sec. 5. – Violations and penalties.
(a) Upon a first conviction for a violation of sections 2 and 3, the court shall assess a fine of no less than $50.00. Upon a second conviction, the court shall issue a fine of no less than $200.00. Upon a third or subsequent conviction, the court shall issue a fine of no less than $350.00. No prior conviction shall be considered in determining the penalty to be assessed if 24 months have elapsed between the date of the violation and the date of the conviction next immediately preceding the sentencing date.
(b) No person shall be eligible for a parole, suspension or reduction of any part of a fine except that portion of any fine or combination of fines that exceeds $200.00 assessed from the same set of operative facts may be suspended for 12 months on the condition the violator have no further violations of the ordinance during that period.
(c) Each occurrence of a violation constitutes a separate offense and shall be punishable as such hereunder.

• Sec. 6. Standard Traffic Ordinance. A person operating an off-road motorcycle within the corporate limits of the City shall be required to follow all rules and regulations as set forth in the “Standard Traffic Ordinance for Kansas Cities” as prepared and published in book form by the League of Kansas Municipalities, Topeka, Kansas, as adopted by the governing body.

• Sec. 7. – Enforcement.
This division shall be enforced by the city police department.

ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the Governing Body, this 14th day of September, 2021.

CITY OF KANOPOLIS

By: Edward A. Hopkins, Mayor

(SEAL)

ATTEST:

Deborah Kralik, City Clerk

1t 9/23

D.C.’s Lone Girl Motorcyclist Stormed Loudly To Get Permit

By General Posts

Pictured: Sally Robinson in front of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

On September 11, 1937 from American Motorcycle History.

The Washington Post reported that after nearly a decade of operating motorcycles illegally, Sally Robinson decided it was time to get a permit.

Click Here to Read this Article on Bikernet.com

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Own the road and rent the ride with some Harley cool

By General Posts

by Felicity Donohoe from https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk

From https://maps.harley-davidson.com/

From https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/content/rent-a-bike.html

If you’re looking for a road trip with a difference, then Harley Davidson may have the answer – and you don’t need to own a Hog to make it happen.

Seen in iconic movies such as Easy Rider – ridden by Peter Fonda – and even Arnie in Terminator 2: Judgment Day – nothing says cool like a Harley Davidson motorcycle, and if the highway has been calling you, this might be the way to get up close and personal with the American outdoors.

Motorcycling is an option to beat weekend traffic and find a different kind of freedom for your staycation – and you don’t need to fork out a fortune and own one of the bikes. In fact, you can rent one for a holiday with affordable cruising daily prices or touring per week rates, choosing from a wide range of models such as Heritage Classic bike or Ultra Limited.

And taking it a step further, Harley Davidson has an online ride planner that includes top trips around the States. Simply type in your start and finish, with customisable options such as preferred stops and overnight accommodation, if needed. The interactive planner works out your route and can generate on-road and – if you’re feeling brave – off-road routes for the adventurous rider.

There is 10% discounts for HOG (Harley Owners’ Group) members.

Ensure you have your motorcycle licence and equipment, including helmet, when hiring.

For the interactive ride planner go to maps.harley-davidson.com by clicking here.

What motorcycles can I rent?
A variety of new models are available at hundreds of convenient locations all around the world. Browse and enquire on-line or check your local Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer for more information. Have a look at the current models to see which one appeals to you.

Where can I rent a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle?
There are hundreds of convenient locations all around the world where you can rent a bike for your holiday, extended test ride, or while your bike is being serviced.

How do I sign up?
Find a location on the rental locator and click “book online” or for locations in the USA book directly on www.eaglerider.com.

What happens after I inquire online?
You will receive a confirmation email. Outside the USA you will be contacted by the Harley-Davidson® Authorized Rental Dealer you selected to discuss your rental requirements.

When you pick up your rental motorcycle, ensure you bring your full driver’s license with the valid motorcycle endorsement, along with your major credit card and your sense of adventure.

What do I need to hire a bike?

  • A full and valid driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement
  • A major credit card
  • The minimum age to hire varies globally, In the USA you must be 21.

What gear do I need?
You will need a helmet and the right gear to ensure you are comfortable and protected on your ride.

  • USA: DOT-approved helmets are required. All rentals include the free loan of DOT-approved half-shell helmets for riders and passengers. Many locations also loan 3/4 or full-face helmets free of charge, subject to availability at the time of pick-up.
  • Outside the USA: CE approved gear are required – helmet, pants, jacket, boots and gloves.

Your dealership may have gear you can hire or there is an extensive range in their showroom to buy.

BMW Vision AMBY showcases excellence against H-D Serial 1 e-bikes

By General Posts

SOURCE: https://www.autoevolution.com/

SOURCE: https://www.financialexpress.com/

BMW unveils Vision AMBY electric bikes: 300+ km range, 60 km/h top speed!
BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY Breaks the Norm With Striking Design and Advanced Tech

Of BMW’s 2021 IAA display, a very interesting one is the BMW i Vision AMBY, a peddle electric bicycle that boasts three speed ratings – 25 km/h for cycle tracks, 45 km/h for the city and 60 km/h for multi-lane roads (although, higher speeds would require a licence as well).

The i Vision AMBY also gets the rest of fancy EV features like geofencing which can be used for automatically adjusting its speed. It is one of five different concept vehicles with which the BMW Group is presenting at the IAA Mobility event.

While users of the BMW i Vision AMBY have to constantly pedal in order to benefit from the assistance of the electric drive system, BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY accelerates via a throttle grip

One of the five concept vehicles showcased by BMW at IAA Mobility 2021 is truly innovative – neither a bike or a motorcycle, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY blends the best of each category with advanced connectivity and geofencing technology.

BMW unveiled two electric vehicles with two wheels under the “Adaptive Mobility” (AMBY) concept. Both of them come with three speed levels for different types of road, and require an adequate driving license, insurance license plates, and a helmet for riding at maximum speed. Compared to the BMW i Vision AMBY that requires constant pedaling, the Motorrad Vision uses the throttle grip and features footrests instead of pedals, like a motorcycle.

According to BMW, while it resembles a bicycle, the new Motorrad Vision flaunts the features of a powerful motorbike, including an 830 mm-tall (32.6”) seat, a large bicycle fork, a small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature, and the fact that it’s accelerated from the handlebars. However, at 65 kg (143 lbs), it’s lighter than typical motorbikes, which makes it more agile and manageable.

Instead of manually selecting the riding mode – 25 kph (15.5 mph) on cycle paths, 45 kph on inner-city roads (27.9 mph), 60 kph (37.2 mph) on multi-lane roads and out of town, geofencing technology and the HERE map service could be enough for automatically adjusting speed levels.

This way, the vehicle could determine the type of road and adjust the speed accordingly, without any intervention. Plus, the license plate would act as an innovative display, where the operating mode would be visible for the other road users.

The problem is that, at the moment, there’s no legal basis for this “modular speed concept”. This is where the Motorrad AMBY becomes a true pioneer, because it’s precisely intended to help bring out the legislation that will regulate this concept in the near future.

No future driving or riding experience can be envisioned without connectivity, and the BMW specially developed app allows the rider to activate the motorbike, while providing access to basic functions and status data.

While additional features such as an optimized ABS system or a tire pressure monitoring system could make the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY even safer and more efficient, this concept motorbike already reflects a truly innovative spirit that redefines the boundaries between bikes and motorcycles.

PRESS RELEASE: 6 SEPTEMBER 2021

As a completely new concept between bicycle and motorbike, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY taps into fresh possibilities for the innovative, urban mobility of the future. It is one of five different concept vehicles that the BMW Group will use at the IAA Mobility 2021 in Munich to showcase its vision of individual mobility in and around the urban setting.

Under the common umbrella of electric mobility, digitalisation and sustainability, these five pioneering concepts form a versatile and sustainably conceived mobility mix on two and four wheels that comprehensively addresses a highly diverse range of mobility needs.

BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and BMW i Vision AMBY.

AMBY stands for “Adaptive Mobility”. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and the BMW i Vision AMBY (see BMW i Vision AMBY press release) interpret the fundamental idea of adaptive urban mobility on two wheels based on differing facets. Both vehicles are electrically powered with three speed levels for different types of road. The drive allows up to 25 km/h on cycle paths, up to 45 km/h on inner-city roads and up to a top speed of 60 km/h on multi-lane roads and out of town. A helmet, insurance licence plates and the relevant driving licence are required to be able to travel at higher speeds, however. While the BMW i Vision AMBY as a high-speed pedelec requires constant pedalling in order to gain assistance from the electric drive, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated using the throttle grip and has footrests instead of pedals, as is typical of a motorcycle.

The modes available to the rider are stored in the app on the smartphone that connects to the respective AMBY vision vehicle.

Manual selection of the speed level is conceivable, as is detection of the road by means of geofencing technology, thereby allowing automatic adjustment of the top speed. As there is currently no legal basis for such a vehicle with a modular speed concept, the idea behind the AMBY vision vehicles is to prompt legislation that will enable this kind of set-up. In this way, the BMW Group is demonstrating that it will continue to be involved in providing mobility options in big cities in the future and offers innovative solutions.

New stimuli for emotional mobility on two wheels.

“The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY takes us into new territory. For us, the focus is on user behaviour – the question is: how will customers want to get around in the future? What will they expect their vehicle to be capable of? This was precisely the starting point of our deliberations. Our aim was to develop an extremely emotional vehicle for smart mobility in and around the city that offered maximum freedom. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY really does enable our customers to experience urban life in a whole new way, cover distances more flexibly and “break free” of the city from time to time, too. At the same time, BMW Motorrad is consistently pursuing its electromobility strategy for urban conurbations. It’s a fascinating introduction to the world of BMW Motorrad that also promises maximum riding pleasure,” explains Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design BMW Motorrad.

The design – the DNA of BMW Motorrad.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY defies all existing categories: visually akin to the world of bicycles, it is a motorbike at heart. Its slender proportions promise ruggedness and adventure, while its design suggests clear echoes of the expressive style and layout of an BMW Enduro motorbike. With chunky treads on both the 26-inch front wheel, which has a thinner tyre, and the 24-inch rear wheel with its more rounded tyre, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY clearly shows that it is both willing and able to go anywhere. The firmly integrated seat with a height of 830 mm is just as typical a motorbike feature as the fixed footrests.

The seat also acts as a design element over the flat, rising upper frame section, creating a striking flyline. This produces a completely new, fresh look for BMW Motorrad – a link between the e-bike and motorbike world.
The large energy storage unit and drive unit form a dark graphic block at the centre of the frame.

The large-dimensioned bicycle fork on the front wheel features protectors and gives the entire front section a more massive, powerful look. A small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature is a clear reference to the roots of the concept, as is the double LED element as a tail light. Another BMW Motorrad feature is that the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated from the handlebars, as is customary on a motorbike.
With a total weight of just 65 kg, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is significantly lighter than other motorbikes, ensuring it offers excellent manoeuvrability and agility.

Colour and material concept featuring depth and unexpected details.

As compared to a conventional combustion engine, the concept of the electric drive in the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY means there is little in the way of visible mechanics.
For this reason, its technical heart is deliberately disguised and showcased in a striking machine-like style. This accentuates the highly elaborated colour and material concept, which goes well beyond the traditional dark underlying colour scheme and use of white highlights.

In its use of materials, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY cross-references two other concept vehicles that will also see their world premiere at the IAA Mobility 2021: The BMW i Vision Circular and the BMW i Vision AMBY. The trim material used on the energy storage unit – known as “floating grey polymers” – is also used in the bumper of the BMW i Vision Circular. It consists of recycled plastic and can itself be fed back into the material cycle at the end of the product lifecycle. Meanwhile the material used for the seat is also to be found in the saddle of the BMW i Vision AMBY and in the tyres of the BMW i Vision Circular. Based on recycled plastic granulate and sporting a fascinating terrazzo look, it demonstrates how several materials can be given a second life with a new form and function.

Asymmetrical design of the sides of the vehicle.

In keeping with the unexpected, self-assured character of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, its two sides have deliberately been designed distinctively. On both sides, the white “AMBY” lettering catches the eye above the light-coloured drive unit, making a striking statement as a stylised graphic on the trim of the energy storage unit. While the lettering on the left gains additional visual depth from a colourfully shimmering, iridescent drop shadow, the inscription on the right appears deliberately without a drop shadow. Below the energy storage unit there are two iridescent elements that add a further accentuation.

On the right-hand side of the vehicle, three small turquoise blue tubes visibly emerge from the silhouette, clearly alluding to the electric heart of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY. Next to this is a quote by Markus Schramm, Head of BMW Motorrad: „Electro-mobility will be very significant for the future of motorcycling. We foresee a slew of upcoming products with a focus on electric propulsion, particularly in the field of urban mobility. And I’m not only thinking of classic scooters here, but also of alternative modern, emotional products. Electro-mobility on two wheels needs to be really fun and adventurous and BMW is committed to developing corresponding products.”

On closer inspection, the interplay between the technoid pixel font with the classic serif font reflects a great attention to detail at several points: together these bridge the gap between the past and the future – just like the vision vehicle itself. The coordinates on the right are a reference to the BMW Motorrad Design Studio in Munich, where the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY came into being. On the opposite side, the letters “AMBY” also appear in Morse code, but with dashes visualising the dots. In their perfect interplay, all these carefully conceived details create a unique graphic and a highly contemporary sense of style.

The smartphone as the key.

The specially developed app enables the user to activate the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY for riding, read in their stored driving licence classes and make use of the appropriate insurance cover on an on-demand basis as required. In this way, the app performs the classic key function while also making use of the customary identification options provided by the smartphone such as Face ID. Basic functions and status queries (e.g. current charge status) are available as in the BMW App. Further developments and adjustments to the software can be provided to customers at any time via over-the-air updates.
The smartphone shown in the vision vehicle charges inductively on the magnetic holder in the rider’s lower field of vision. These connectivity options would also allow anti-theft protection and the freely programmable immobiliser to be offered as basic functions.
And the answer to the question “Where is my BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY?” would be just a click away on the smartphone, too.

Geofencing as a key technology.

Instead of choosing the riding mode yourself, geofencing technology combined with the detailed HERE map service could provide the required parameters for automatically adjusting speed levels (25/45/60 km/h) and the matching insurance cover. This technology enables the vehicle to detect the type of road, cycle path or slow-traffic area currently being used so that the maximum permitted speed can be automatically adjusted. In this way, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY would transform from a vehicle similar to an S-pedelec to something that is more motorcycle-inspired. The user cannot override the mode. The required licence plate takes the form of an innovative display surface, so the mode selected at any given time can be easily recognised and read by other road users.

Additional technological innovations are conceivable for the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, too: an optimised ABS system could further increase safety, as could an automatic high beam or brake light assistant, as well as daytime running lights. A tyre pressure monitoring system such as the one already available as an optional extra in BMW Group motorcycles is also conceivable. Finally, potential safety features could also include a distance radar with a range of up to 140 m to provide a visual and acoustic warning in the app when there is a vehicle approaching from behind.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY shows one possible manifestation of what the modern, urban mobility of tomorrow might look like. It is intended as a blueprint to drive forward conversations about future-oriented travel in cities.

Figures of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY.

Battery: not specified

Output: not specified

Vmod1: up to 25 km/h

Vmod2: up to 45 km/h

Vmodmax: up to 60 km/h

Range: approx. 110 km (combined according to WMTC)

Wheels: Studded spoke wheels with 26-inch front and 24-inch rear

Seat height: 830 mm

Unladen weight: approx. 65 kg

Kirk Taylor’s 2018 Strider Custom is back

By General Posts

by Marilyn Stemp

Kirk Taylor’s L’il Cha Cha was among the very first class of Tiny Strider Customs, a program of the Flying Piston Benefit that supports All Kids Bike – an organization that’s on a mission to teach every kid how to ride a bike as part of kindergarten PE class.

Custom creations are unveiled at the Flying Piston breakfast in August at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip then auctioned at the Mecum motorcycle event in Las Vegas the following January. Proceeds fund bike-riding programs for elementary schools.

Click Here to Read this Photo Feature Article on Bikernet.com

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Fact or Fiction – Helmet Use

By General Posts

from Motorcycle Riders Foundation at http://mrf.org/

On a nearly annual basis the media in this country is inspired to report stories about motorcycle fatalities on our nation’s roadways. Invariably, these stories paint motorcycle rider deaths as a product of irresponsible riders who live in states that have some level of helmet choice. Frequently they report statistics that prove their narrative but fail to paint a full and complete picture. The lens with which these stories are reported often takes the naïve view that crashes can be made “safer” if only bikers somehow followed government helmet mandates.

The only true solution to motorcycle safety and reducing fatalities are proactive measures, which prevent a collision from occurring at all, rather than reactive steps that may or may not offer some level of injury mitigation only after a crash has already taken place. Rider education, which prepares motorcyclists to interact with other roadway users by learning and practicing the skills necessary for hazard avoidance and developing a strategy to deal with real world traffic, is the primary component of a comprehensive motorcycle safety plan. Additionally, educating all motor vehicle operators to be alert and free of impairment as they share the road with others is critical in deterring crashes caused by inattention.

When coming across these stories keep in mind some facts that are omitted from their reports.

Fact: Over the last decade motorcycle related deaths have varied between years but for the most part remain flat. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data from 2019 shows 5,014 deaths, a decrease from the 2008 5,307 deaths NTSHA recorded. In that same time period registered motorcycles increased from 7.7 million in 2008 to 8.7 million ten years later. In other words, there are a million more bikes on the road and there were 300 less deaths.

Fact: Twenty-nine percent of motorcycle riders involved in fatal crashes in 2017 were riding without proper licensure at the time of the collision. A valid motorcycle license includes a rider having a valid driver’s license with a motorcycle endorsement or possessing a motorcycle only license. Proper training and licensing are fundamental parts of motorcycle safety, taking unqualified riders off the road is a commonsense solution to lowering motorcycle fatalities.

Fact: The lack of a helmet mandate in the 31 states who have allowed freedom of choice does not prohibit someone from choosing to wear a helmet. In fact, a 2019 U.S. Department of Transportation audit showed that states without mandatory helmet laws still saw 56.5% of riders choose to wear a helmet.

Fact: A 2019 U.S. Department of Transportation Fatality Analysis Reporting System report showed that in crash study data, where helmet use was known, 36% of motorcyclists killed were not wearing a helmet. Conversely 61% of motorcycle fatalities involved a rider wearing a helmet. The remaining 3% had unknown usage. These numbers closely mirror NHTSA data on overall helmet usage which shows 64% of riders wearing helmets.

Fact: Despite the constant drum beat from safety advocates, the media and Washington D.C. bureaucrats about the ills of helmetless riders, state legislatures continue to trust the judgment of bikers. Just last year Missouri passed a modified helmet law allowing the choice to ride without a helmet to those who are qualified. In at least three other states, West Virginia, Maryland, and Nebraska there are active campaigns to change their helmet mandates and let those who ride decide.

Ride With The Leaders ™ by joining the Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) at http://mrf.org/ or call (202) 546-0983

Traveling but can’t bring your motorcycle? Here are a few solutions

By General Posts

from https://www.traveldailynews.com

One of the primary reasons why people travel is to get away from their day-to-day hard-knock lives and relax on an island away from all the noise. Although leaving the noisy city to a remote location brings a high level of calmness and serenity, many people still like to be very active while on vacation. One major group of people in this category are bikers.

Whether they are in Cancun or Fiji Islands, bikers love to have their motorcycles with them and don’t like to go too long without riding. If you are in this category of vacationers, then not being able to travel with your motorcycle must be such a bummer. The good news is that there are many solutions that bikers can try to ensure they can ride when they travel. Ranging from shipping your motorcycle to your location to renting a different motorcycle, these tips will surely help you do what you love, even in a different location. So, here are a few solutions that will keep you active when you cannot take your motorcycle along on trips.

1. Renting a motorcycle
Renting service has been the most thought-after solution when going on traveling. Since you can’t travel with your motorcycle in tow, being able to rent it at your destination should be the next solution in mind. You might be worried about whether or not you will find a motorcycle rental service in your destination country, especially if you are going to a remote island. You should note that some brands allow tourists to rent a motorcycle from any part of the globe, and they can see the available countries in this URL or BRANDED website. This way, you can be sure a motorcycle will be waiting for you when you arrive. Also, ensure you have an idea of the type of motorcycle the rental company provides if it is durable for your activities.

When renting, try to check the details like the insurance, breakdown maintenance, and other required services covering the motorcycle. Most significantly, insurance is a focal point in renting a motorcycle. Due to unexpected events that can occur anytime with the bike, try and know the insurance policy. For instance, you rent a motorcycle for your trip, you got robbed, and it was taken away from you. With a good insurance policy, there will be some coverage for such an event.

Lastly, safety is always the primary concern for anyone when using a motorcycle. So it is always essential for you to make inquiries about the safety and maintenance carried out on the motorcycles. If it is from a trusted maintenance company that keeps to high standards, then feel less disturbed about your safety. It is vital to know how long such a motorcycle has been in function. Also, if possible, get to keep a snapshot of the bike before using it as a means of evidence in case any matter arises.

2. Purchase and sell
This type of solution is often hardly considered because of the cost and loss experienced when selling the motorcycle. In a situation where you will stay for a long time while on your trip, considering this solution will be a brilliant idea. However, if you can afford it, it will be the best for you. For instance, you can either purchase a new motorcycle that might be less expensive or a used one placed for sale. After traveling has lapsed, you can decide to sell it off and make back some of your money spent on getting the motorcycle. The recorded loss might be a little different between the purchasing price and the selling price.

3. Get the necessary document
Every intending destination you want to go to might request some document before anything can be used on their road or cross its border. First of all, making inquiries about a particular place you want to travel so can save you some expenses for your motorcycle. Second, if you are going to a place where documentation will be required for a motorcycle, try and ensure you get those necessary documents available. Some of these documents can be a valid passport, travel document, international driving permit, and visa.

For instance, you are traveling to a country where an international driving permit is required before taking a motorcycle into such country. Upon presenting the required document, you will be allowed to bring in and use your bike in that country without been stopped. After you are over with the duration of your stay, you can take your motorcycle along with you.

4. Ship your motorcycle
You can also consider shipping it when you cannot bring your motorcycle while traveling to the exact destination, either through local services or international services. It may seem to be quite expensive and takes a lot of work to process, but the safe delivery of your motorcycle is highly guaranteed. To avoid delaying your bike at the checkpoint, you must ensure all paperwork, physical and online registration is complete.

Lastly, due to the increasing shipping services globally, it is highly advisable to use a well-known company with good significant reviews in delivering goods and cargos to that specific destination. You can do your research about brands that suit you well.

With these few tips, you can easily travel to any location and not worry about not having your motorcycle. You can still do what you love in a new and exciting location!