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Women and Growth in Gun Ownership & Firearms Industry

By General Posts

Contributions American women make to the firearm and ammunition industry – past, present and future

by Larry Keane from www.TheTruthAboutGuns.com

March is Women’s History Month and there’s no better opportunity to celebrate the contributions American women make to the firearm and ammunition industry – past, present and future.

Women have accounted for 40 percent of firearm sales over the past two years.

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Alt-Rock Cruisers: BMW targets American brand’s market

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by Jack Baruth from Hagerty.com

BMW R18 meets Indian Challenger and Harley Heritage Classic

The slightly ridiculous 1800cc, two-cylinder, leather-saddlebag, CHiPs-windshielded cruiser I’m trying to force through six stopped lanes of Los Angeles traffic can’t be taken as anything but an admission on the part of the Bayerische Motoren Werke that Harley-Davidson knows

a) what boys like;
b) what men want …

in America, anyway.

CLICK HERE To Read a comprehensive Road Test & Review of the cruiser models from the 3 motorcycle brands.

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Back-to-Back Wins for Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Jason Anderson

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February 19, 2022 | U.S. Bank Stadium | Minneapolis, Minnesota

Foothill Ranch, Calif. (January 20, 2022) – Round 7 of the Monster Energy AMA Supercross Championship turned a cold shoulder to the sunny skies of the California coast as race fans were met with snowy air and subzero temperatures in Minneapolis, where Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Jason Anderson earned the 450SX Class victory, making him the first three-time winner in the class this season. The 250SX Eastern Regional Championship kicked off with Team Green™ flanking the podium with Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki riders Austin Forkner and Cameron McAdoo finishing in second and third place, respectively. Fellow Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki rider Jett Reynolds sustained a wrist injury prior to the race that will postpone his pro debut indefinitely.

With veteran understanding of the unique Minnesota dirt, Anderson started his day with a clear intention of letting the track come to him. While the riders’ morning track walk daunted many as they recognized peakier jump faces and softer dirt than have been faced so far in 2022, Anderson expressed to the team his game plan of patiently allowing the track to develop and the transitions to wear in before pushing to race pace. The qualifying sessions went according to plan as Anderson tactfully waited until the final laps of the final session to jump to the top of the leader board. When qualifying concluded, Anderson’s 47.94 lap time earned him third position heading into the race program.

When the second 450SX heat race got underway, Anderson emerged from the first turn in 10th position. The Monster Energy Kawasaki KX™450SR rider had his work cut out for him as the track proved to have few viable passing areas during the short heat races lasting only eight minutes plus one lap. On par with what has come to be expected of him, Anderson paired fast laps with quick passes to set the best lap time of the race (48.69) to charge his way up the running order. When the checkered flag flew, Anderson crossed the finish within a bike length of third position, securing a fourth-place result and a direct transfer to the Main Event.

The start of the 450SX Main Event saw Anderson jockey for position at the front of the pack, settling into third place by the time the green flag waved. The No.21 Monster Energy Kawasaki pilot matched the pace of the leaders while enduring pressure from behind and allowing the race to unfold around him. On Lap 10, Anderson made a pass through the flat corner neighboring the mechanic’s area to take control of second place. For the latter half of the race, Anderson held close in tow of the lead as the two riders ran at a speed that would separate them from the field. With only two laps remaining, Anderson’s tactful measure proved key when the leader crashed, and he took control of the lead. Anderson went on to claim his third win of the 2022 Monster Energy Supercross Championship and now stands only three points shy of the championship lead.

“The track broke down a lot by the Main Event tonight but, that’s something we kind of expect with some of the East Coast tracks. I’ve been doing my best to prepare for it while practicing in California by riding with the Pro Circuit team every Thursday to sort of simulate race conditions. That helped tonight but, this was still a tough track for pushing the pace, and you kind of just had to let the race come to you. It’s awesome to have three wins already in the season but, we will keep taking it one race at a time as we go forward from here.”
– Jason Anderson

After much anticipation, Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki riders Forkner and McAdoo were eager to prove their place among the title contenders in the opening round of the 250SX Eastern Regional Championship. From the start of first practice, the Team Green duo quickly mastered the track and began fighting for the top qualification spots. At the end of the timed sessions, Forkner claimed the first pole position of the year with a fast time of 48.56, while McAdoo’s 48.81 lap time was quick enough to qualify him in sixth position.

In the first 250SX heat race, McAdoo found himself held up in the middle of the pack before coming through the first rhythm lane in 10th place. With his sights set forward, the No.48 KX™250 rider began quickly picking off the competition in the opening laps. Strong whoop speed and a readiness to alter his line choices lap-by-lap helped McAdoo make his way to sixth place by the end of the short qualification race.

In 250SX Heat 2, Forkner started the race in fourth place. Attempting to push his way to the front, Forkner made a few mistakes in the opening laps that shuffled him back several positions. The Missouri native was quick to regain his composure by the mid-point, however, and began to move forward once again. Matching his intensity with a respect for the technicality of an already deteriorating race track, Forkner secured fourth position when the heat race concluded.

The 250SX Main Event once again hosted green at the front with Forkner launching his KX250 out to the holeshot and leading the pack through the green flag lap, while McAdoo followed close behind in third. The No.33 of Forkner was overtaken on Lap 2 but held close in second place. The Team Green duo of Forkner and McAdoo proved themselves to be among the class of the field running in podium positions throughout the race. McAdoo fended off the pressure of several top contenders as he pressed forward, keeping Forkner in close company. In the late stages of the race, the distance between the top five grew even closer but, the front three never shifted position. The Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki mounted Forkner secured second place and his teammate McAdoo was right on his tail in third, making it a double podium result for Team Green.

“A podium finish is always a nice way to start the season. I was the fastest qualifier in the timed sessions and had a decent heat race. I grabbed the holeshot in the Main Event, I’ve been focused on making sure my starts are on point this year, so I was happy with that, and I just tried to focus on putting together clean laps. There weren’t many obstacles to separate the front guys on this track, so it came down to minimizing mistakes. My laps were consistent and I’m glad to have come away with a second, we are still right there in the points.”
– Austin Forkner

“With the short lap times, we had to do a lot of laps on a technical track tonight, so I did my best to lock-in. When competing against a class as stacked as this 250SX East championship, it was important for me to just focus on hitting my marks and execute each lap. I’m happy to get through the opening round with a podium and I feel confident heading into Arlington next weekend.”
– Cameron McAdoo

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Monster Energy® Kawasaki and Jason Anderson excel at Anaheim

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Monster Energy® Kawasaki and Jason Anderson Perfect in Anaheim

February 12, 2022 | Angel Stadium of Anaheim | Anaheim, California

Foothill Ranch, Calif. (February 13, 2022) – Round 6 of Monster Energy Supercross returned to Angel Stadium of Anaheim for the final time this season where Monster Energy Kawasaki rider Jason Anderson claimed a decisive win over the the 450SX field leading start to finish. In the 250SX Class, Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Jo Shimoda qualified second and was battling for the win in Heat 1 when an untimely crash forced a premature end to his night. Shimoda will receive further medical evaluation and additional updates will follow.

The third stop in Anaheim, California presented a new set of challenges for Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Anderson and his competition, as the venue hosted several notably demanding obstacles. While the extended section of sand moguls served as the most readily detectable challenge on the track, the real separator was sure to be the peaky set of 14 whoops that headed toward home plate. From the outset of practice, Anderson capitalized on his prowess in the whoops by quickly mastering the section and jockeying for position at the top of the leaderboard. Building in intensity as the track wore in, Anderson rivaled for the fastest lap each time he took to the track. When the 450SX qualification sessions concluded, Anderson earned Pole Position with a fastest lap time of 56.700.

In 450SX Heat 2, Anderson placed his KX™450SR out front right from the drop of the gate. Leading into the first turn and through the green flag lap, Anderson took control of the six minute plus one lap race from the front. Anderson eluded pressure from the competition by setting the fastest times of the race in the opening laps and quickly established a comfortable lead. With clear track ahead, the No.21 Kawasaki rider extended his gap to five seconds over the competition and secured a commanding heat race victory, his second of the season.

The start of the 450SX Main Event was a carbon copy of his heat race with Anderson grabbing the holeshot and out to an early lead with the current championship point leader in close pursuit. The battle for the lead position drew roars from the fans in Anaheim as an exceptionally high pace met with a particularly challenging racecourse. As the track deteriorated and the front two racers separated themselves from the rest of the field, Anderson proved his mettle with each progressing lap. The New Mexico native overcame the trying conditions to steadily stretch the distance between him and his closest competitors.

In the latter half of the race, faced with arguably the most treacherous whoop section so far in the 2022 Monster Energy Supercross season, Anderson built his lead to over five seconds. Anderson blitzed across the whoops nearly every lap on his KX450SR and displayed his ability to charge forward with precision through the technical rhythm lanes. When the checkered flag flew, Anderson relished the heat from the Monster Energy fire cannons, having claimed a decisive win in the 450SX Main Event. Anderson’s win at Anaheim 3 marks his second win of the season and moves him to second in the overall point standings.

“From the fastest qualifying time to leading every lap of the heat race and the Main Event, we had a great day. In the Main, I grabbed my second holeshot of the night and immediately had pressure from Eli [Tomac]. The track was demanding and our speed was fast so I knew it would be a tough race but, my KX450SR took everything I threw at it and battles like that are what supercross is all about. While it was tough for us on the track, I had a blast fighting for the win and it sounded like the fans were absolutely loving the race. All things considered; I think that was one of my best main events ever.” – Jason Anderson

Ashes To Asphalt: Eric Stahl & King of the Baggers

By General Posts

by Kali Kotoski and Ron Brefka

After Eric Stahl’s King of the Baggers race bike was destroyed in a fire – there was a new race to try and compete by building a new bike to continue for the racing season.

The outpouring of support was, “one hell of an experience.”

“From Eric’s rig burning while driving from California to actually competing…it has just been an amazing journey,” the Crew Chief said.

Family. It’s a big part of what makes motorcycling so special. Because, really, in that larger sense, we are One Big One.

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First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

By General Posts

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

XDA’s fourth season has been another success with the 29th annual DME Racing Fall Nationals, crowning twelve champions at Maryland International Raceway (MDIR). 

The season featured top-tier motorcycle drag racing action that can’t be seen anywhere else. And while the on-track action was hot, the racers’ payouts were hotter, with over $560,000 for the year and $131,000 in contingency offerings.

The 2021 season also saw records broken and performance barriers pushed to new levels. And because of the loyal XDA racers and fans, the series continued to grow and thrive during a time that is unpredictable month to month. XDA is looking forward to another successful season next year with their racing family.

The 2022 XDA season will begin where 2021 ended, at the world-renown Maryland International Raceway on April 22-24 for the Platinum Fleet Repair Spring Nationals. Mark your 2022 calendars now to race with the quickest and fastest sanction in the country!

April 22-24 / PFR Spring Nationals / MDIR
May 20-22 / MTC Engineering Summer Nationals / VMP
June 17-19 / FuelTech Superbike Showdown / MDIR
July 22-24 / WPGC Bike Fest / MDIR
August 26-28 / Bike Bash / VMP
September 23-25 / DME Racing Fall Nationals / MDIR

Orient Express Racing Pro Street
Winner – Rodney Williford / Runner-up – Jordan Haase
Champion – Rodney Williford

The Orient Express Pro Street class is the most exciting class to watch in all of motorcycle drag racing. With no wheelie bars, these 6-second, 230+mph motorcycles are launching like missiles as their riders fight to keep them straight through the quarter mile. This past weekend delivered numerous personal improvements among the class.

Rodney Williford came into the DME Racing Fall Nationals with the championship title already locked down. He went right to work taking the number one qualifying spot with a 6.482, followed by Greg Wallace’s personal best ET of 6.484. This makes Wallace the eleventh rider to enter the forties in Pro Street.

Curtis Brown, who is in his rookie season, ran a 6.760 in qualifying to make a big move down the Pro Street GOAT list. Midwest racer Jamie Hendricks also improved to a 7.136. And Jason Dunigan ran the top speed of the event in qualifying at 230.29 mph.

Rudy Sanzoterra with Quicktime Motorsports has been making big moves this season in his program and made the trip to his first XDA race of the season. Despite losing in round one, he ran his personal best of 6.688 to make him the twenty-fifth rider ever to enter the sixties in Pro Street. The XDA looks forward to seeing his team back next season.

In round one, Caleb Holt ran the quickest of the session at 6.499 to take a win over Curtis Brown. Like Sanzoterra, Brown also ran his personal best on a losing round at 6.735.

James Waugh would also improve his personal best in round one, winning against Ryan Bonitatis with a 6.562 making him the eighteenth rider to enter the fifties.

Problems for Greg Wallace in round one caused an upset as the fifteenth qualifier, Brad Christian, took the win over him, running a 7.202.

Also taking wins in the round were Williford 6.638, Ryan Hable 6.704, Justin Shakir 6.583, Jordan Haase 6.643, and Jason Dunigan 6.617.

In round two, the performance continued as Williford 6.503, Holt 6.542, Haase 7.103, and Dunigan 6.587 all took wins.

In the semi-final, Jordan Haase made a solo pass when Dunigan’s cam sensor broke, and he could not get the bike to fire in the water box. This sent Haase to his first final round appearance this season. Williford also took a win with a 6.488 over Holt’s 6.582.

If Jordan Haase is in the final, Williford is always in the other lane. With John Gover tuning, Haase was ready to lay down his best number of the weekend and finally get a win over Williford. Haase got the starting line advantage with a .032 reaction time to Williford’s .079. Haase gave his best effort with a 6.644, but it was no match for the run that everyone had been waiting for Williford to run all season, a 6.383 at 229.66 mph. With this pass, Williford won the race and became the third rider to enter the thirties, and the first person to ever run thirties on a Hayabusa.

With the XDA season complete, the top ten XDA Pro Street racers will focus on their $5,000 bonus race. The 25th annual Haltech World Cup Finals presented by Wiseco on November 3-7 will host the fourth annual Pro Street Shootout sponsored by Platinum General Services.

This will be the largest event that Pro Street has ever raced at, competing in front of 40,000+ fans. Ten racers will show up, but only eight will make it to the show on Sunday! The ten racers that will strive to qualify for the eight-bike field are Rodney Williford, Justin Shakir, Jason Dunigan, Greg Wallace, Jordan Haase, Ryan Hable, Kenny Brewer, Curtis Brown, Ryan Bonitatis, and Darion Payne.

DME Racing Real Street
Winner – Trevor Schnitz / Runner-up – Mark Hylton
Champion – Mark Hylton

On Friday, you could feel the steam from the DME Racing Real Street pressure cooker as both David Stewart and Mark Hylton waited to start qualifying. With only a round of points separating them from a championship, the pressure was written all over their faces.

In qualifying Spencer Claycomb took the top spot with a 7.572, followed by Hylton’s 7.591. Stewart qualified seventh with a 7.693 at the bottom half of the field, putting him at a disadvantage for round one.

In round one, Ralphie Navarro would run a 7.613 to take out David Stewart’s 7.770 pass and end his hopes of a championship. Mark Hylton would win over Bud Harrod to cement his 2021 title. You could see the relief on Hylton’s team as they were able to switch gears and happily focus on an event win. Rickey Gadson won over Chad Sosnowski 7.751 to 7.724, and Trevor Schnitz won over Jovi Barnes.

In round two, Navarro and Schnitz gave us some action with a side-by-side nail biter. Schnitz had the starting line advantage with a.042 reaction time to Navarro’s .108. Schnitz was quickly in front of Navarro, but Navarro kept gaining, and by the eighth mile, they were side-by-side. Even from the top of the grandstands, you could not tell who was crossing the finish line first; they were that close. When the boards lit up, it was a 7.668 to a 7.669 in favor of Schnitz. Gadson and Hylton also took wins that round on solo passes.

Schnitz’s round two win earned him a bye to the final. The new champ, Mark Hylton, took an easy victory against Gadson, who broke on the starting line.

Headed to the final, this would be Schnitz’s second final round appearance this season and the second time facing Hylton. Schnitz once again took a slight starting line advantage with a .042 to Hylton’s .046. Both riders took off side-by-side until about the eighth mile when Hylton’s Hayabusa lost power, and Schnitz pulled away from him. When Schnitz’s win light came on, it made the sixteen-year-old the youngest winner in XDA history. It must be in the genes.

Real Street will return for the 2022 motorcycle drag racing season. If you are looking to enter the Pro ranks, now is the time to start preparing for next year.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme
Winner – John Collins / Runner-up – Chris Garner-Jones
Champion – Chris Garner-Jones

Chris Garner-Jones clinched the 2021 MaxxECU Pro Xtreme championship with a 159 point lead over the class. Jones also set the ET record earlier this season to an astounding 3.897.

Garner-Jones qualified number one with a 3.949 followed by his rival John Collins with a 3.95. At the DME Racing Fall Nationals, these two riders would find themselves in the opposing lanes for the fourth final this season. Collins is the only rider Garner-Jones has lost to all season.

In round one, Bobby Lovingood was broke, giving Garner-Jones an easy pass to the next round. Collins bested Chris Cutsinger with a 4.011 to a 4.103. And Rob Garcia ran the only three-second pass of eliminations with a 3.984 to win over Travis Davis.

Garner-Jones broke the beams in the semi-final with an earned bye, and Garcia went red with a -.024 against Collins.

Garner-Jones’ bike jumped out of gear during qualifying, slamming him into the tank hard, giving him some pain around his ribs. This happened again during round one of eliminations. Also, during a pass, he went to push down on the left foot peg when his foot slipped, slamming it to the pavement at about 170mph. The team later found the reason the bike was being so difficult; the wheelie bars had broken.

When the final round came around, he was still in pain and was concerned about safely riding the bike. And add to that, the PDRA race this weekend was coming up, and he would need to heal up if he wanted a shot at their championship. He ultimately decided to forfeit the round, giving Collins his second win this season.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme is presented by Ace Mechanical, Billy Vose Racing, Dallas Flat Glass, Dunigan Racing, DME Racing, Grothus Dragbikes, Harley Haul, Rob Bush Motorsports, Robinson Industries, Schnitz Racing, Timblin Chassis, and Worldwide Bearings.

HTP Performance Super Stock
Winner – David Fondon / Runner-up – Mike Davis
2021 Champion – David Fondon

The HTP Performance Super Stock season finished just as it started. David Fondon clinched the championship mid-season and finished with a staggering 591 point lead over the class. Fondon won every event this season except for the WPGC Bike Fest that Jeremey Teasley claimed.

Insert image: 2021_1014_xda_ss_david_fondon.jpg

This past weekend Fondon took the number one qualifying position with an 8.808, followed by rival Mike Davis with an 8.861. Fondon and Davis found each other in the finals at the season opening PFR Spring Nationals, where Fondon took a win over Davis.

This past weekend their Kawasaki ZX-14’s found each other in opposing lanes for the final round once again. Fondon had the starting line advantage with a .098 reaction to Davis’ .132. Davis gave Fondon a fight to the finish line, but he didn’t have enough to overpower the quicker 8.833 of Fondon to his 8.946.

This makes two championships in a row for David Fondon. For 2022, will he be back in Super Stock again, or will he move up to Real Street or Pro Street to compete with the Big Dogs?

Vance & Hines 4.60
Winner – Michael Thyen / Runner-up – Tyler Cammock
2021 Champion – Ronald Procopio

The 2020 Vance & Hines 4.60 Champion continues his reign with back-to-back championships. Without taking a win this season, Ronald Procopio accumulated enough points from rounds won over the seven-race series to be the first consecutive champion in the class. This is also Procopio’s third Vance & Hines 4.60 career championship.

Procopio qualified number one at the DME Racing Fall Nationals with a perfect 4.600 over thirty-five competitors. He was taken out in round two by the two-time class champion Tyler Cammock. Cammock then went on to win two more rounds against Mac McAdams and Wes Hawkins before reaching the final round.

The competition was on point in Vance & Hines 4.60 that in all five rounds of competition, there was only one red light. Michael Thyen has only entered the class three times this season, but three times was the charm as he took wins against Curtis Griggs, Eran Pielert, Michael Stewart, and Chase Van Sant on his way to the final round against Cammock.

Thyen cut his best light of the day in the final with a .004 for the starting line advantage over Cammock’s .031. The light would earn him a hole shot win as Cammock ran a 4.611 to Thyen’s 4.622 pass.

The Vance & Hines 4.60 class continues to grow each year; mark your 2022 calendars now and race with the best competitors in the country.

HTP Performance Grudge
HTP Performance Grudge racers filled the lanes Saturday night with an impressive ninety-six ‘No Time’ motorcycles. Chris Moore returned with Melania looking for action in Boosted Bulls against the latest DME Racing entry piloted by multi-time record holder Frankie Stotz. The DME team had their money on the table, and they were ready to play. But once again, when it came time to do the deed, Melania was unable to make the call.

APE Nitrous Bulls
Winner – Ray Lee / Lil Ugly
Runner-up – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks
2021 Champion – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks

The APE Nitrous Bulls championship was locked in before the DME Racing Fall Nationals, with Russell Dennison on ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ claiming his first Bulls title.

In round one, Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ couldn’t be touched by Matt Dozier on ‘Kill shot’ as he flew past him. While fast, Alex Williams on ‘Master Blaster’ didn’t need to be, as Billy Vose on ‘Red Bull’ lost his wings right off the starting line. The Champ, Dennison, had an earned bye.

In the semi-final, Dennison executed another flawless pass as Williams struggled to keep his power on the track as it attempted to take flight off the starting line. And Lee had an earned bye to the final.

It got a little ugly in the final round when ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ lost his tune and let Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ get his first XDA win.

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls
Winner – Michael Thyen / The Prisoner
Runner-up – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets
2021 Champion – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls was an action-packed night as it came down to the wire to determine the championship. 2020 class champion David Page had a three-point lead, but those three points would not be a lot of help when it comes to round wins. David Martin was on his heels and wanted the title just as much as Page.

In round one, both riders dominated their competition for wins. Page won against ‘Tick Toc’ to earn a bye to the final. In the semi-final Martin on ‘Unknown’ faced Michael Thyen on ‘The Prisoner.’ Martin left the starting line with ample power but was fighting to keep the front wheel down as ‘The Prisoner’ crept past him for the win.

With Martin out and Page going to the final, he would officially secure the 2021 3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls championship despite the outcome of the final round.

The final was a slugfest between these two monsters, but Thyen got the drop on the pocket picker to secure a win and spot in the top five in the championship points. Page was still smiling with a 2x Monster Bulls Champion title to his name despite taking an event loss.

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls
2021 Champion – Cody Lowe / Codeine

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls was cut short on Saturday night when rain moved in before the final round at Midnight. Despite not crowning a winner, the Bulls still put on action-packed show with thirteen grudge racers vying for a win.

Duane Jackson was leading the points coming in the finals with Geoff Godfrey and Cody Lowe on his tail as they were both in contention for the title as well. Godfrey lost to Kyron Drake on ‘Drive By,’ taking him out of the running in round one. Lowe on ‘Codeine’ snatched a win light from Jordan McDougald’s ‘Quick Money’ to stay alive for another round.

In round two, Lowe would face Jackson on ‘Miss Behavin’ for a race that would determine Jackson’s championship fate. The two literbikes rolled into the beams, and when the yellow bulbs flashed, both bikes shot out like rockets side-by-side. Lowe was on a nonstop flight to the finish line while Jackson’s bike wouldn’t behave, forcing him to abort the pass as it quickly headed toward the wall. When Lowe’s win light came on, he was officially declared the Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls champion.

Lowe would take out Drake in the semi-final while Deshon Jones on ‘Mae Jean’ drove past Matt Dozier on ‘Tucci’ for a win. After the semi-round, the rain came, and the pot was split with no winner declared.

1 Stop Speed 5.60
Winner – Rico Brown / Runner-up – Jeff Stahl
2021 Champion – Dustin Lee

Dustin Lee secured the 1 Stop Speed 5.60 Championship title for a second time before he even rolled into MDIR last week. With the championship on lock, Lee was able to focus on win lights all weekend.

Kenny Webster earned the top qualifying spot on Saturday with a 5.603. Webster earned a first-round bye. However, he lost in the second round after breaking out with a 5.587 against Dustin Davis.

Jeff Stahl qualified with a 5.682 and turned on five win lights before getting to the final. Stahl’s average light of the weekend in 1 Stop Speed 5.60 was .330, making him a contender in the final.

On the other side of the ladder Rico Brown, who took a runner-up finish at the Bike Brawl, was on a mission to get to the winner’s circle. He was running consistently and turning on win lights every round.

As he turned the win light on against Duane Jackson in round four, Brown’s bike washed out from underneath him, sending him to the asphalt as his 2008 Hayabusa slid down the track. Brown was right up and walking around like it was just another tackle on the football field. His bike did not suffer any significant damage, and he was right back in the lanes for the semi-final, where another win light would send him to face Stahl.

In the final, Brown cut his best light of day with a .015 to Stahl’s .098, Brown had the starting line advantage, but Stahl would be too eager for the finish line and break out with a 5.553; sending Brown to his first 1 Stop Speed 5.60 win! And that’s what we call a comeback.

Mickey Thompson Tires Top Sportsman
Winner – John James / Runner-up – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Bobby Holland

In Mickey Thompson Top Tires Sportsman, only thirty-two riders would qualify for the quickest bracket class in XDA. Bill Maturo Jr. would take the top qualifying spot with a 7.531, while Ohio racer Kevin Adams would round out the field in the thirty-second position with an 8.190 ET.

In round one of competition, points leader Jeffrey Santin lost with a -.001 red light to Michael Daddio, thus taking him out of championship contention. The top points leaders in contention also took first-round losses, except for the number two in points, Bobby Holland. Holland’s first-round win was enough to earn the 2021 Championship.

Philadelphia racer John James would win four rounds to face Pablo Gonzalez in the final. James had the better reaction time average than Gonzalez in the previous four rounds of competition. In the final, James would cut a .057 light to Gonzalez’s .073. The two racers barreled down the MDIR quarter-mile with eyes on each other as they approached the finish line side-by-side. Gonzalez misjudged his speed by a margin of two inches and broke out with a 7.547 on a 7.55 dial. James, with the win, ran an 8.014 on an 8.00 dial; this run is the definition of a photo finish.

MPS Racing Pro ET
Winner – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Jeffrey Santin

The XDA staging lanes were brimming with MPS Racing Pro ET bikes as 189 of the best bracket racers on the east coast were looking for green lights. It took nine rounds of competition to get down to the final race of the weekend.

Jeffrey Santin came into the event with a slim lead on the class, and when he took a fourth-round loss, the potential of losing the championship became real. Dustin Lee, who was number two in points, went on to win the next two rounds. And with each win light, the drama ramped up; you could feel the seriousness of the situation in the air.

In round seven, Lee faced Pablo Gonzalez, and the winner of that round would have a bye to the final. And if Dustin Lee made it into the final and won, it would be Game Over for Santin. But Gonzalez put an end to the drama taking out Lee to secure Santin’s first XDA championship.

The season’s final race featured a stout $10K payout to the winner with the allowance of double entries, thus giving racers with multiple bikes two chances to win. And with this, for the first time in XDA’s history, one rider would have to face himself in the final. Gonzalez took his pair of Hayabusa’s to a ninth-round final and chose his 2005 Hayabusa to make the final lap down the track for the 2021 XDA season.

Brock’s Performance Street ET
Winner – Bubba Driscoll / Runner-up – Barry Purnell
2021 Champion – Derrick Milbourne

Going into the DME Racing Fall Nationals, 2020 class champion Derrick Milbourne had a healthy points lead in Brock’s Performance Street ET. His most significant threat to the championship, Mark Blake, took a first-round loss; and that sealed it for Milbourne to secure back-to-back championships.

Bubba Driscoll and Barry Purnell both won six rounds of competition to make it to the final. However, both racers opted not to race each other. With a rain delay holding up action on the track, Driscoll and Purnell decided they didn’t want to wait and flipped a coin in the lanes to determine a winner. Driscoll got the right side of the coin.

VooDoo Components Bracket Bash
Winner – Dustin Lee / Runner-up – Chris Sulkowski

On Saturday, 137 racers entered the VooDoo Components Bracket Bash for a chance at the $4,500 class payout. XDA multi-champion Dustin Lee made it look easy as he chopped the tree round after round. Lee not only had a perfect reaction time one round, his average reaction time over eight rounds was .024. In the final, Lee met Chris Sulkowski. Sulkowski took a first-round loss and bought back in, winning six more rounds to earn a lane in the final against Lee. However, luck would not go his way as a mechanical problem would make him a no-show for the final, sending Lee to another winner circle.

Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s Race
Winner – Boyd Mathis / Runner-up – Mike Schulz

The Friday night Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s race was at capacity with sixty-four sportsman competitors looking to start the weekend with a $4,000 payout. Boyd Mathias on his 2008 Suzuki Hayabusa was an intimidating competitor as four of his six competitors went red against him. He faced Mike Schulz, who cut a better light for a starting line advantage in the final. But Schulz would lose power as Mathis powered by him for his sixth win light of the night and first payout of the weekend.

Once again, congratulations to all our race winners, record breakers, champions, and every single racer as well as all the family and friends that came out to support this season’s events. We look forward to your support in 2022 as the series continues to evolve.

Don’t miss a weekend of racing with the quickest and fastest motorcycle drag racing sanction in the country; put XDA on your 2022 calendar now!

Visit www.xdaracing.com for event information, class rules, schedule, and more.

About XDA Racing
The Xtreme Dragbike Association (XDA) is an east coast motorcycle drag racing series with 700+ motorcycle racers competing at each event. Every XDA event hosts professional classes, sportsman classes, grudge racing and a vendor midway. Lifestyle activities such as bike shows, bikini contests, DJ and live bands are also held at select events.

For more information on the XDA, please visit www.xdaracing.com or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube @xdaracing

Bonhams announces its first motorcycle auction in Italy

By General Posts

Bonhams Motorcycles Says Buongiorno Italia with Debut Sale at Moto Dei Miti

FIRST MOTORCYCLE SALE IN ITALY 1-3 APRIL 2022 AT WORLD-RENOWNED MUSEUM OF GENESIO BEVILACQUA

2011 ALTHEA WORLD SUPERBIKE AND SUPERSTOCK CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING MOTORCYCLES ARE EARLY HIGHLIGHTS

Bonhams is proud to announce its first motorcycle sale in Italy – in the world-renowned Moto dei Miti museum, created by paddock great Genesio Bevilacqua, founder of the Althea Racing team, which will be staged on 1-3 April 2022.

The weekend sale is the result of a new partnership with Genesio, which will see his museum, located in Civita Castellana (on the outskirts of Rome) provide a fitting venue for the 100-plus collectors’ motorcycles to be offered.

Telling the story of the evolution of motorcycle racing over the past 50 years, the museum represents Genesio’s own racing experience – as amateur rider and professional team manager – and his passion for two-wheeled sport and culture, featuring some of the most important sports and competition motorcycles of the modern era.

Genesio became General Manager in 2007 of the start-up Althea Racing Team, which picked up trophies in the World Superbike and Supersport series, winning both world championship titles in 2011, with Carlos Checa and Davide Giugliano respectively riding to victory. In 2016, with BMW as partner, Althea again won the World Superstock Championship, with Raffaele Da Rosa in the saddle.

The ex-Carlos Checa, 2011 World Superbike Championship-winning Ducati 1198 F11 estimate for sale is €110,000 – 130,000

Genesio will offer 27 machines from his collection for sale in the debut auction, including the two 2011 World Champion motorcycles: Carlos Checa’s Ducati 1198 RS and Davide Giugliano’s Ducati 1198 F12 and one of Raffaele De Rosa’s victorious BMW S 1000 RRs from 2016.

All motorcycles in the collection are ‘on the button’ and ready to race, having been maintained in the museum’s dedicated workshop, by technicians with years of experience in the paddock, and have recently ridden by Genesio and other riders.

Ben Walker, Global Head of Bonhams Motorcycles, said: “We are really excited to be hosting our debut sale in Italy – arguably THE land of motorcycles – and to have the ‘man who defeated giants’ as our new partner.

“”Genesio’s spectacular private museum will provide a stunning backdrop for the sale, and we are delighted that it will be open to the public for the preview and the auction itself.”

Genesio Bevilacqua, General Manager Althea Racing Team, said: “I am happy and proud to partner with Bonhams to bring to Italy their first auction dedicated to motorcycles and to the history of motorcycles, in which Italy has always played a vital role.

“Moto dei Miti is, without a doubt, the best location to hold this great event. Bonhams’ heritage and professionalism will attract the attention of international collectors and will play an important part in growing the collectors’ market for the motorcycles of the last 50 years”.

Further important collectors’ motorcycles and collections are currently being invited for consignment to this new sale.

Contact: ukmotorcycles@bonhams.com for further details.

Harley-Davidson 9 hp Scooter up for Auction

By General Posts

from https://www.financialexpress.com

The Harley-Davidson scooter was considered ‘highly maneuverable and well balanced’ and definitely looks nice with its identifiable aesthetic from the early 1960s. Now, more than a vehicle, it is a piece of art.

Imagine you’re minding your business selling V-twin motorcycles from Milwaukee and then you see a manufacturer from Japan selling nippy compact imported bikes and little scooters in a market you’d been very popular in. What do you do? Simple, build a scooter yourself. And so Harley-Davidson did when in the late 1950s, Honda surfaced as a competitor.

Harley’s answer was called the Topper.

The Topper remained in production for only five years with production estimates in a four-digit figure, Jalopnik writes in a report. Barring the electric concepts Harley now has, the Topper was the only scooter the manufacturer ever built and also mass-produced. One of these has been found and is now heading for auction at Mecum’s Las Vegas Motorcycles 2022 auction.

Unlike the big V-twin that power H-D motorcycles, the Harley-Davison Topper was powered by a two-stroke single-cylinder that delivered between 5 to 9 hp. It came in three models. It is not known which one of them is heading to Mecum.

All that power was sent to its wheels through a continuously variable transmission. American Motorcyclist magazine from November 1959 mentions a pull start cord hidden in the chrome instrument cluster.

The Topper was considered ‘highly maneuverable and well balanced’ by the same magazine and definitely looks nice with its identifiable aesthetic from the early 1960s. Now, more than a vehicle, it is a piece of art.

Imagine being able to say you own a Harley-Davidson scooter today. And if you want to, you could. Mecum’s auction is set to begin on 25 January 2022 until the 29th of the month. Interested? Look for the Harley-Davidson Heritage Collection.