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First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

Kawasaki Unveils Gas-Electric Hybrid Prototype Motorcycle

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Kawasaki Lifts Cover On Its Gas-Electric Hybrid Prototype Bike

A peek behind the curtain/fairings.

We’ve been following Kawasaki’s hybrid motorcycle development since the firm filed patents in July, 2019. By November, 2021, Team Green gave us a peek at its progress with a short video laying out the philosophy behind the project. Then, an April, 2021, patent revealed Kawi’s new 48V hybrid battery design. Now, Kawasaki has pulled back the curtain (and the fairings) on its latest hybrid build while committing to a 2025 gas-electric hybrid production models.

Due to the chassis, front headlight configuration, and exhaust system, the prototype looks like it’s based on the Ninja 400. Kawasaki hasn’t officially confirmed our suspicions, but leveraging the entry-level sportbike aligns with current hybrid technology limitations. In automobiles, it’s easier for manufacturers to pair electric and internal combustion powertrains. In motorcycles, however, space is a much more limited resource. As a result, the firm couples its existing small-capacity parallel twin with a compact electric power unit.

From the beginning, Kawasaki has developed its hybrid project with the idea that riders would utilize the powertrains in different environments. The internal combustion engine suits highway riding, while the electric motor works best in urban environments. On a twisty road, both would work in concert to deliver the best of both worlds. It seems like the small-bore Ninja-based prototype would satisfy those requirements while also providing enough room to accommodate the new apparatus.

Of course, with two powertrains, the transmission will have to play nice with both systems, and Kawi’s automated gearshift smooths that transition. The new feature consists of an automated clutch, servo-powered shifter, and push-buttons for the user to operate. With so many European cities introducing zero emissions zones lately (and only more to come), the hybrid technology may be the perfect happy-medium between holding on to the range and convenience of gas-powered motorcycles while adopting cleaner and more efficient running powertrains.

For some, 2025 may be a long time to wait, but it’s encouraging to see Kawasaki’s project progress at such a rapid rate. Hopefully, we can say the same for the gas-electric hybrid’s acceleration when it hits the market in a few years.

Kawasaki Ninja 400 Based Hybrid Electric Motorcycle Prototype Unveiled

by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Kawasaki is working on a wide range of fully electric and hybrid motorcycles for the next few years

Kawasaki has made some major announcements recently which reveals the intentions of the Japanese superbike manufacturer for the future. The bikemaker has revealed that by 2035, all its models would run on electrified powertrains- either fully electric or hybrid electric vehicles, in major international markets.

In regard to this idea, the company is planning to launch ten new fully electric and hybrid motorcycles by 2025. The first of them was recently showcased at a presentation meeting in Japan. The prototype revealed is slated to be the first hybrid electric motorcycle from Kawasaki.

However, this isn’t the first motorcycle with an electric powertrain to be unveiled by the Japanese brand. Earlier in 2019, Kawasaki had revealed the electric Ninja 300 Concept, called EV Endeavor. Later the same year, the company filed patents for a hybrid motorcycle, images of which floated on the internet. The recent prototype unveiled is expected to be based on the same patents.

Kawasaki Ninja 400 Hybrid Prototype – Details
Going by the images, Kawasaki appears to have used Ninja 400 as the base for the exposed prototype of the hybrid bike. It features a parallel-twin engine which is bolted onto a new tubular steel frame with a large electric motor mounted above the transmission. The electric motor derives its energy from a small 48V battery pack located under the seat.

As per Kawasaki, the hybrid powertrain is equipped with a regenerative feature that tops up the battery when low on charge. Another interesting aspect of this hybrid motorcycle is that within city limits, the bike would completely run on battery and electric motor, cutting out power from the combustion engine. This mode will be useful when some cities introduce zero emissions zones in the future.

Automated Transmission
The bikemaker has equipped the prototype with GPS technology that automatically switches to electric power as soon as the bike enters city limits. Outside the city limits, the motorcycle will draw energy from both the combustion engine and electric motor in order to boost its performance. The entire system is paired with an automated transmission system with buttons for gear shifts.

The setup comprises an automated clutch and a servo-operated shifter that enables gear shifts through push button changes. Other details revealed from the images include a pair of telescopic front forks and rear mono-shock supporting the tubular steel frame. Stopping power is provided by single disc brakes on both wheels while being linked to dual-channel ABS.

Although no exact timeline for its launch has been confirmed, we won’t be surprised if this motorcycle reaches production within a span of a year.

Every Angle of the New BMW R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

BMW Shows Every Angle of the New R 18 B and R 18 Transcontinental in Huge Gallery

Enough time has passed since BMW pulled the wraps off the new members of the R 18 family, the B and Transcontinental, so the enthusiasm about them might have gone down a bit. In an attempt to remind people these new two-wheelers are ready to hit the roads, the Bavarians threw online yet another huge gallery showing the motorized beasts.

You can enjoy most of them on BMW Website, and you can top them off with the already large set of pictures BMW released when the bikes were unveiled. Before you get into that though, a quick reminder about what these ones are all about.

The R18 came into existence more than a year ago, as BMW’s return to the cruiser segment. Being such an important model, it was gifted with the most “powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.” Called Big Boxer, it is a piece of 1,802cc in displacement and rated at 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

Before the two new models were introduced, the family comprised the standard cruiser and the Classic. And now there are four.

The B, which is supposed to stand for bagger, comes with a low windshield, slimmer seat, and a large fairing. The Transcontinental on the other hand is fitted with a larger windshield, additional headlights, and a top case at the rear.

Both hold in their frames the same engine we mentioned earlier, not modified in any way, and are gifted with a larger fuel tank, 10.5-inch TFT screen, and even an area with inductive charging for smartphones. Three riding modes, Rain, Roll, and Rock, are on deck to help riders better navigate their way, and each bike is fitted with automatic stability control and drag torque control.

On the U.S. market, the cheapest R 18 is the standard one, which sells for $15,995. The most expensive is the Transcontinental, priced at $24,995, while the B sits somewhere in between, at $21,945.

New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated Regularly

By General Posts

There are New Photo Galleries on Bikernet.com Updated With Every New Event

Check Out the Photos by Jack McIntyre at Cantina Section of Bikernet.com

There’s nothing like the warm Florida sun. Daytona Biketoberfest is a classic example of great riding, weather, and a nonstop 4-day long party. From the super-beautiful beer tub gals to the assortment of motorcycles, events, contests, and bands, it’s simply a stunning Bikefest to attend.

This gallery is only from the first Thursday, 10/14/21. Much more to come as out photographers creep around and shoot everything & everyone, especially the sun-tanned skin of the gals on Main Street.

CLICK HERE To View the Latest Photos from Biketoberfest 2021 on Bikernet.

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Launch of Honda CB750 & Dick Mann at AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

On Twitter by Honda Powersports: Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann, American Honda sends its heartfelt condolences to his family, friends and fans. Mann’s 1970 Daytona 200 win aboard the CR750 (the racing version of the CB750 four-cylinder) was momentous in Honda’s history Thank you, Dick, and godspeed.

The Honda CB750 Changed the Way Motorcycles Were Made, Raced and Sold

Though now highly prized for their potential as re-imagined cafe racer machines, the venerable Honda CB750 was – back in its infancy – the bike that changed the game.

So how did it happen that the Japanese took over the worldwide motorcycle manufacturing industry? To a large extent, it came down to the creation of a single model.

With five consecutive championship titles under their belts, Honda decided to withdraw from the World GP circuit in 1967 with a plan to develop high-performance consumer motorcycles at the forefront of their vision.

While Honda exported more than half of their output back in the mid-’60s, they didn’t make a large-displacement sport bike model which would appeal to the hardcore rider in the U.S.

And it’s not like the honchos at Honda failed to notice that glaring deficiency. Sales of Honda motorcycles in America were flagging in 1966, and the company knew a brand-new worldview was in order. While the company had created the Dream CB450 in 1965, they were still being outgunned by big bikes from other makers. The CB450 sold well, but for the vast majority of American riders, it just didn’t have the requisite zing and bottom-end torque they craved.

What really drove Yoshiro Harada, the head of Honda product development at the time, was hearing the news that Britain’s Triumph was deep in the development process of a high-performance, 3-cylinder 750 cc engine. With the ante thus upped, Honda laid out plans to compete by creating their own 750 cc engine, which would lay down 67 horsepower to overtake the juice you could get from the 66-horsepower Harley-Davidson’s 1300 and the proposed Triumph Triple.

Though Honda was already the industry’s leading maker of motorcycles (due in no small part to the success of the most popular motorcycle in history, the Super Cub), the introduction of the CB750 sought to become the world’s top manufacturer of quality motorcycles as well. They were up against some formidable competition as comparable models from Triumph, BMW, and Harley were already on the road.

So what were the targets? Honda wanted to make a long-range, high-speed touring machine, so they turned to science for answers in the form of a newly-minted paradigm dubbed “ergonomics.”

Those targets included: Stability at highway cruising speeds, a reliable and cooled braking system that would handle frequent rapid decelerations from high speed, minimal vibration, and noise to fight rider fatigue on long hauls with a rider position which complimented the smoother power plant, lights and instruments which were large, gauges which were easy to read, easy maintenance and servicing for all the various modules of the bike and the use of top-quality materials and production techniques.

Perhaps the most significant innovation for Honda’s showpiece bike? The adoption of disc brakes. While that design decision proved costly and time-consuming, it was also a stroke of brilliance and one which made the CB750 a favorite of the serious riding set.

Released to the U.S. public in January 1969, the announcement of the new bike’s retail price, $1,495, was met with stunned silence at a dealer meeting in Nevada. The other shoe had officially dropped. Large-displacement bikes were selling at that time for between $2,800 and $4,000, and the 2,000 dealers on hand for the announcement exploded into applause when they recovered their wits.

And they had good cause for their optimism. The CB750 immediately commanded a premium sales price in dealer showrooms of between $1,800 and $2,000 to get one out the door.

Featuring an integrated crankshaft and metal bearing to replace the split-type, press-fit crankshaft with a needle bearing used in previous Honda motors, the CB750 was a great leap forward in design as well as price.

As great as this new machine was, the company initially had a serious problem. They could only manage to make something like five bikes a day, and that was clearly not enough to meet the demand for what had become a major hit with the market. Production was pushed to 25 units per day and then to 100 units, but that still left an enormous pile of backorders building up under and an entirely expected sales landslide.

It became clear that the production of the original sand-molded crankcases would never meet the rate requirements of mass production, so the factory switched over to producing crankcases of a metal, die-cast construction. The bikes were such a hit with the riding public that the production of engines and chassis was moved to a Suzuki factory in mid-1971. The “sandcast” CB750 models are now fetching enormous prices from collectors of up to ten and fifteen times higher than their new-off-the-line premium price back in the day.

But what really made the bikes a smash hit with the public?

Performance. Pure and dependable performance.

The factory racing team at Honda R&D took the new machines to compete at a 10-Hour Endurance Race in August 1969 to coincide with the commercial launch of the big bike, and Honda dominated, notching one-two finishes with the teams of Morio Sumiya and Tetsuya Hishiki taking first place and Yoichi Oguma and Minoru Sato pulling in a close second.

The deal was done when rider Dick Mann blew away the field on his CR750 during the AMA Daytona 200-Mile Race run during March 1970. The field was now wide open for large-displacement Japanese bikes, and in 1972, Kawasaki launched the 900cc ZI to compete on the big-bike stage…and the rest is, as they say, history.

Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro & Urban Motard Launched

By General Posts

by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro And Urban Motard Make Their Debut

A Scrambler for every style.

No one loves an anniversary more than motorcycle OEMs. Take Ducati, for example. You and I might just think of the year we’re living in as 2021, but to our friends in Bologna, it’s also an important anniversary. Back in 1971, Ducati first launched an air-cooled twin-cylinder machine out into the world, laying the foundation of the Scrambler legend.

To celebrate this important 50th anniversary occasion, Ducati also drew upon a few other historic design touchstones to bring us the new Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro. It’s resurrected its iconic Giugiaro-penned Ducati logo, which is used extensively in this design. If that’s not enough retro-modern glory for you, perhaps that historic Giallo Ocra color scheme will do the trick.

To be honest, it’s a combination of styling elements that almost makes you slap your head and go “why didn’t they do this sooner?” Then again, if you’re Ducati, why wouldn’t you wait for a suitable anniversary to launch such a perfectly executed retro style bomb out into the world?

That’s not all that’s new in the Land of Joy, though. At the complete opposite end of the stylistic spectrum, Ducati also announced its new Urban Motard Scrambler 800 variant in mid-October, 2021. Where the Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro is all about the heritage, the Urban Motard is all about living in the moment. Its new livery combines Star White Silk with Ducati GP ‘19 Red and black graphics on the tank, inspired by graffiti.

It’s also equipped with a flat seat, low handlebars, side number plates that give it a sort of industrial look, a bright red high mudguard up front, and 17-inch spoked wheels wrapped in Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires.

Both of Ducati’s new Scrambler entries offer new looks, but no real changes in the engine bay on either. Additionally, A2 license holders can get either of the two newest members of the Scrambler family in 35kW versions. Here in the U.S., the Urban Motard starts at $11,695 and the Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro starts at $13,995.

2022 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro Is a Trip Down Nostalgia Lane

Ducati is adding another model to the Scrambler 1100 family for 2022. It’s been five decades since the air-cooled twin-cylinder engine was introduced on a Ducati. For the occasion, the Italian bike maker has decided to pay homage to the heritage of this legendary engine by introducing a special model: the 1100 Tribute Pro.

by Florina Spînu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The new Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro was designed for lovers of modern-classic bikes and for fans of motorcycle history. The model celebrates the history of the Borgo Panigale company through its distinctive Giallo Ocra livery, a color that was used on the twin-cylinder 450 Desmo Mono and 750 Sport of 1972.

This ocher paint, along with the Ducati logo of the time and the spoked wheels (now painted black), will make any classic bike enthusiast take a trip down nostalgia lane. The circular rear-view mirrors, which were very fashionable in the sweet-old ‘70s, are another noticeable stylistic detail of the new 1100 Tribute Pro. And we cannot miss the brown seat with a dedicated cover that contrasts nicely with the Giallo Ocra livery.

Tech-wise, the bike shares its heart with the Ducati Scrambler 1100 Pro. The machine is powered by a 1,079cc L-Twin engine with desmodromic distribution that delivers 86 hp at 7,500 rpm and a 88 Nm (65 lb-ft) peak torque at 4,750 rpm.

The engine comes standard with three riding modes. Depending on the option selected, the rider will receive more or less power, as well as different levels of mid-corner acceleration performance.

Other features include cornering traction control and ABS. Another detail that stands out is the front headlight with an LED light guide, which ensures that the bike is always visible and recognizable in all weather conditions.

The new Ducati Scrambler 1100 Tribute Pro will be available at Ducati dealerships in November 2021, with a starting price of $13,995. For A2 license holders, the bike maker is also offering a 35-kW version of the model.

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

By General Posts

Champions Strut at the XDA Season Finale

XDA’s fourth season has been another success with the 29th annual DME Racing Fall Nationals, crowning twelve champions at Maryland International Raceway (MDIR). 

The season featured top-tier motorcycle drag racing action that can’t be seen anywhere else. And while the on-track action was hot, the racers’ payouts were hotter, with over $560,000 for the year and $131,000 in contingency offerings.

The 2021 season also saw records broken and performance barriers pushed to new levels. And because of the loyal XDA racers and fans, the series continued to grow and thrive during a time that is unpredictable month to month. XDA is looking forward to another successful season next year with their racing family.

The 2022 XDA season will begin where 2021 ended, at the world-renown Maryland International Raceway on April 22-24 for the Platinum Fleet Repair Spring Nationals. Mark your 2022 calendars now to race with the quickest and fastest sanction in the country!

April 22-24 / PFR Spring Nationals / MDIR
May 20-22 / MTC Engineering Summer Nationals / VMP
June 17-19 / FuelTech Superbike Showdown / MDIR
July 22-24 / WPGC Bike Fest / MDIR
August 26-28 / Bike Bash / VMP
September 23-25 / DME Racing Fall Nationals / MDIR

Orient Express Racing Pro Street
Winner – Rodney Williford / Runner-up – Jordan Haase
Champion – Rodney Williford

The Orient Express Pro Street class is the most exciting class to watch in all of motorcycle drag racing. With no wheelie bars, these 6-second, 230+mph motorcycles are launching like missiles as their riders fight to keep them straight through the quarter mile. This past weekend delivered numerous personal improvements among the class.

Rodney Williford came into the DME Racing Fall Nationals with the championship title already locked down. He went right to work taking the number one qualifying spot with a 6.482, followed by Greg Wallace’s personal best ET of 6.484. This makes Wallace the eleventh rider to enter the forties in Pro Street.

Curtis Brown, who is in his rookie season, ran a 6.760 in qualifying to make a big move down the Pro Street GOAT list. Midwest racer Jamie Hendricks also improved to a 7.136. And Jason Dunigan ran the top speed of the event in qualifying at 230.29 mph.

Rudy Sanzoterra with Quicktime Motorsports has been making big moves this season in his program and made the trip to his first XDA race of the season. Despite losing in round one, he ran his personal best of 6.688 to make him the twenty-fifth rider ever to enter the sixties in Pro Street. The XDA looks forward to seeing his team back next season.

In round one, Caleb Holt ran the quickest of the session at 6.499 to take a win over Curtis Brown. Like Sanzoterra, Brown also ran his personal best on a losing round at 6.735.

James Waugh would also improve his personal best in round one, winning against Ryan Bonitatis with a 6.562 making him the eighteenth rider to enter the fifties.

Problems for Greg Wallace in round one caused an upset as the fifteenth qualifier, Brad Christian, took the win over him, running a 7.202.

Also taking wins in the round were Williford 6.638, Ryan Hable 6.704, Justin Shakir 6.583, Jordan Haase 6.643, and Jason Dunigan 6.617.

In round two, the performance continued as Williford 6.503, Holt 6.542, Haase 7.103, and Dunigan 6.587 all took wins.

In the semi-final, Jordan Haase made a solo pass when Dunigan’s cam sensor broke, and he could not get the bike to fire in the water box. This sent Haase to his first final round appearance this season. Williford also took a win with a 6.488 over Holt’s 6.582.

If Jordan Haase is in the final, Williford is always in the other lane. With John Gover tuning, Haase was ready to lay down his best number of the weekend and finally get a win over Williford. Haase got the starting line advantage with a .032 reaction time to Williford’s .079. Haase gave his best effort with a 6.644, but it was no match for the run that everyone had been waiting for Williford to run all season, a 6.383 at 229.66 mph. With this pass, Williford won the race and became the third rider to enter the thirties, and the first person to ever run thirties on a Hayabusa.

With the XDA season complete, the top ten XDA Pro Street racers will focus on their $5,000 bonus race. The 25th annual Haltech World Cup Finals presented by Wiseco on November 3-7 will host the fourth annual Pro Street Shootout sponsored by Platinum General Services.

This will be the largest event that Pro Street has ever raced at, competing in front of 40,000+ fans. Ten racers will show up, but only eight will make it to the show on Sunday! The ten racers that will strive to qualify for the eight-bike field are Rodney Williford, Justin Shakir, Jason Dunigan, Greg Wallace, Jordan Haase, Ryan Hable, Kenny Brewer, Curtis Brown, Ryan Bonitatis, and Darion Payne.

DME Racing Real Street
Winner – Trevor Schnitz / Runner-up – Mark Hylton
Champion – Mark Hylton

On Friday, you could feel the steam from the DME Racing Real Street pressure cooker as both David Stewart and Mark Hylton waited to start qualifying. With only a round of points separating them from a championship, the pressure was written all over their faces.

In qualifying Spencer Claycomb took the top spot with a 7.572, followed by Hylton’s 7.591. Stewart qualified seventh with a 7.693 at the bottom half of the field, putting him at a disadvantage for round one.

In round one, Ralphie Navarro would run a 7.613 to take out David Stewart’s 7.770 pass and end his hopes of a championship. Mark Hylton would win over Bud Harrod to cement his 2021 title. You could see the relief on Hylton’s team as they were able to switch gears and happily focus on an event win. Rickey Gadson won over Chad Sosnowski 7.751 to 7.724, and Trevor Schnitz won over Jovi Barnes.

In round two, Navarro and Schnitz gave us some action with a side-by-side nail biter. Schnitz had the starting line advantage with a.042 reaction time to Navarro’s .108. Schnitz was quickly in front of Navarro, but Navarro kept gaining, and by the eighth mile, they were side-by-side. Even from the top of the grandstands, you could not tell who was crossing the finish line first; they were that close. When the boards lit up, it was a 7.668 to a 7.669 in favor of Schnitz. Gadson and Hylton also took wins that round on solo passes.

Schnitz’s round two win earned him a bye to the final. The new champ, Mark Hylton, took an easy victory against Gadson, who broke on the starting line.

Headed to the final, this would be Schnitz’s second final round appearance this season and the second time facing Hylton. Schnitz once again took a slight starting line advantage with a .042 to Hylton’s .046. Both riders took off side-by-side until about the eighth mile when Hylton’s Hayabusa lost power, and Schnitz pulled away from him. When Schnitz’s win light came on, it made the sixteen-year-old the youngest winner in XDA history. It must be in the genes.

Real Street will return for the 2022 motorcycle drag racing season. If you are looking to enter the Pro ranks, now is the time to start preparing for next year.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme
Winner – John Collins / Runner-up – Chris Garner-Jones
Champion – Chris Garner-Jones

Chris Garner-Jones clinched the 2021 MaxxECU Pro Xtreme championship with a 159 point lead over the class. Jones also set the ET record earlier this season to an astounding 3.897.

Garner-Jones qualified number one with a 3.949 followed by his rival John Collins with a 3.95. At the DME Racing Fall Nationals, these two riders would find themselves in the opposing lanes for the fourth final this season. Collins is the only rider Garner-Jones has lost to all season.

In round one, Bobby Lovingood was broke, giving Garner-Jones an easy pass to the next round. Collins bested Chris Cutsinger with a 4.011 to a 4.103. And Rob Garcia ran the only three-second pass of eliminations with a 3.984 to win over Travis Davis.

Garner-Jones broke the beams in the semi-final with an earned bye, and Garcia went red with a -.024 against Collins.

Garner-Jones’ bike jumped out of gear during qualifying, slamming him into the tank hard, giving him some pain around his ribs. This happened again during round one of eliminations. Also, during a pass, he went to push down on the left foot peg when his foot slipped, slamming it to the pavement at about 170mph. The team later found the reason the bike was being so difficult; the wheelie bars had broken.

When the final round came around, he was still in pain and was concerned about safely riding the bike. And add to that, the PDRA race this weekend was coming up, and he would need to heal up if he wanted a shot at their championship. He ultimately decided to forfeit the round, giving Collins his second win this season.

MaxxECU Pro Xtreme is presented by Ace Mechanical, Billy Vose Racing, Dallas Flat Glass, Dunigan Racing, DME Racing, Grothus Dragbikes, Harley Haul, Rob Bush Motorsports, Robinson Industries, Schnitz Racing, Timblin Chassis, and Worldwide Bearings.

HTP Performance Super Stock
Winner – David Fondon / Runner-up – Mike Davis
2021 Champion – David Fondon

The HTP Performance Super Stock season finished just as it started. David Fondon clinched the championship mid-season and finished with a staggering 591 point lead over the class. Fondon won every event this season except for the WPGC Bike Fest that Jeremey Teasley claimed.

Insert image: 2021_1014_xda_ss_david_fondon.jpg

This past weekend Fondon took the number one qualifying position with an 8.808, followed by rival Mike Davis with an 8.861. Fondon and Davis found each other in the finals at the season opening PFR Spring Nationals, where Fondon took a win over Davis.

This past weekend their Kawasaki ZX-14’s found each other in opposing lanes for the final round once again. Fondon had the starting line advantage with a .098 reaction to Davis’ .132. Davis gave Fondon a fight to the finish line, but he didn’t have enough to overpower the quicker 8.833 of Fondon to his 8.946.

This makes two championships in a row for David Fondon. For 2022, will he be back in Super Stock again, or will he move up to Real Street or Pro Street to compete with the Big Dogs?

Vance & Hines 4.60
Winner – Michael Thyen / Runner-up – Tyler Cammock
2021 Champion – Ronald Procopio

The 2020 Vance & Hines 4.60 Champion continues his reign with back-to-back championships. Without taking a win this season, Ronald Procopio accumulated enough points from rounds won over the seven-race series to be the first consecutive champion in the class. This is also Procopio’s third Vance & Hines 4.60 career championship.

Procopio qualified number one at the DME Racing Fall Nationals with a perfect 4.600 over thirty-five competitors. He was taken out in round two by the two-time class champion Tyler Cammock. Cammock then went on to win two more rounds against Mac McAdams and Wes Hawkins before reaching the final round.

The competition was on point in Vance & Hines 4.60 that in all five rounds of competition, there was only one red light. Michael Thyen has only entered the class three times this season, but three times was the charm as he took wins against Curtis Griggs, Eran Pielert, Michael Stewart, and Chase Van Sant on his way to the final round against Cammock.

Thyen cut his best light of the day in the final with a .004 for the starting line advantage over Cammock’s .031. The light would earn him a hole shot win as Cammock ran a 4.611 to Thyen’s 4.622 pass.

The Vance & Hines 4.60 class continues to grow each year; mark your 2022 calendars now and race with the best competitors in the country.

HTP Performance Grudge
HTP Performance Grudge racers filled the lanes Saturday night with an impressive ninety-six ‘No Time’ motorcycles. Chris Moore returned with Melania looking for action in Boosted Bulls against the latest DME Racing entry piloted by multi-time record holder Frankie Stotz. The DME team had their money on the table, and they were ready to play. But once again, when it came time to do the deed, Melania was unable to make the call.

APE Nitrous Bulls
Winner – Ray Lee / Lil Ugly
Runner-up – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks
2021 Champion – Russell Dennison / Jimmy Hendricks

The APE Nitrous Bulls championship was locked in before the DME Racing Fall Nationals, with Russell Dennison on ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ claiming his first Bulls title.

In round one, Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ couldn’t be touched by Matt Dozier on ‘Kill shot’ as he flew past him. While fast, Alex Williams on ‘Master Blaster’ didn’t need to be, as Billy Vose on ‘Red Bull’ lost his wings right off the starting line. The Champ, Dennison, had an earned bye.

In the semi-final, Dennison executed another flawless pass as Williams struggled to keep his power on the track as it attempted to take flight off the starting line. And Lee had an earned bye to the final.

It got a little ugly in the final round when ‘Jimmy Hendricks’ lost his tune and let Ray Lee on ‘Lil Ugly’ get his first XDA win.

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls
Winner – Michael Thyen / The Prisoner
Runner-up – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets
2021 Champion – David Page / Pickin’ Pockets

3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls was an action-packed night as it came down to the wire to determine the championship. 2020 class champion David Page had a three-point lead, but those three points would not be a lot of help when it comes to round wins. David Martin was on his heels and wanted the title just as much as Page.

In round one, both riders dominated their competition for wins. Page won against ‘Tick Toc’ to earn a bye to the final. In the semi-final Martin on ‘Unknown’ faced Michael Thyen on ‘The Prisoner.’ Martin left the starting line with ample power but was fighting to keep the front wheel down as ‘The Prisoner’ crept past him for the win.

With Martin out and Page going to the final, he would officially secure the 2021 3 Sixty 5 Monster Bulls championship despite the outcome of the final round.

The final was a slugfest between these two monsters, but Thyen got the drop on the pocket picker to secure a win and spot in the top five in the championship points. Page was still smiling with a 2x Monster Bulls Champion title to his name despite taking an event loss.

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls
2021 Champion – Cody Lowe / Codeine

Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls was cut short on Saturday night when rain moved in before the final round at Midnight. Despite not crowning a winner, the Bulls still put on action-packed show with thirteen grudge racers vying for a win.

Duane Jackson was leading the points coming in the finals with Geoff Godfrey and Cody Lowe on his tail as they were both in contention for the title as well. Godfrey lost to Kyron Drake on ‘Drive By,’ taking him out of the running in round one. Lowe on ‘Codeine’ snatched a win light from Jordan McDougald’s ‘Quick Money’ to stay alive for another round.

In round two, Lowe would face Jackson on ‘Miss Behavin’ for a race that would determine Jackson’s championship fate. The two literbikes rolled into the beams, and when the yellow bulbs flashed, both bikes shot out like rockets side-by-side. Lowe was on a nonstop flight to the finish line while Jackson’s bike wouldn’t behave, forcing him to abort the pass as it quickly headed toward the wall. When Lowe’s win light came on, he was officially declared the Tommie’s Motorsports DMV Bulls champion.

Lowe would take out Drake in the semi-final while Deshon Jones on ‘Mae Jean’ drove past Matt Dozier on ‘Tucci’ for a win. After the semi-round, the rain came, and the pot was split with no winner declared.

1 Stop Speed 5.60
Winner – Rico Brown / Runner-up – Jeff Stahl
2021 Champion – Dustin Lee

Dustin Lee secured the 1 Stop Speed 5.60 Championship title for a second time before he even rolled into MDIR last week. With the championship on lock, Lee was able to focus on win lights all weekend.

Kenny Webster earned the top qualifying spot on Saturday with a 5.603. Webster earned a first-round bye. However, he lost in the second round after breaking out with a 5.587 against Dustin Davis.

Jeff Stahl qualified with a 5.682 and turned on five win lights before getting to the final. Stahl’s average light of the weekend in 1 Stop Speed 5.60 was .330, making him a contender in the final.

On the other side of the ladder Rico Brown, who took a runner-up finish at the Bike Brawl, was on a mission to get to the winner’s circle. He was running consistently and turning on win lights every round.

As he turned the win light on against Duane Jackson in round four, Brown’s bike washed out from underneath him, sending him to the asphalt as his 2008 Hayabusa slid down the track. Brown was right up and walking around like it was just another tackle on the football field. His bike did not suffer any significant damage, and he was right back in the lanes for the semi-final, where another win light would send him to face Stahl.

In the final, Brown cut his best light of day with a .015 to Stahl’s .098, Brown had the starting line advantage, but Stahl would be too eager for the finish line and break out with a 5.553; sending Brown to his first 1 Stop Speed 5.60 win! And that’s what we call a comeback.

Mickey Thompson Tires Top Sportsman
Winner – John James / Runner-up – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Bobby Holland

In Mickey Thompson Top Tires Sportsman, only thirty-two riders would qualify for the quickest bracket class in XDA. Bill Maturo Jr. would take the top qualifying spot with a 7.531, while Ohio racer Kevin Adams would round out the field in the thirty-second position with an 8.190 ET.

In round one of competition, points leader Jeffrey Santin lost with a -.001 red light to Michael Daddio, thus taking him out of championship contention. The top points leaders in contention also took first-round losses, except for the number two in points, Bobby Holland. Holland’s first-round win was enough to earn the 2021 Championship.

Philadelphia racer John James would win four rounds to face Pablo Gonzalez in the final. James had the better reaction time average than Gonzalez in the previous four rounds of competition. In the final, James would cut a .057 light to Gonzalez’s .073. The two racers barreled down the MDIR quarter-mile with eyes on each other as they approached the finish line side-by-side. Gonzalez misjudged his speed by a margin of two inches and broke out with a 7.547 on a 7.55 dial. James, with the win, ran an 8.014 on an 8.00 dial; this run is the definition of a photo finish.

MPS Racing Pro ET
Winner – Pablo Gonzalez
2021 Champion – Jeffrey Santin

The XDA staging lanes were brimming with MPS Racing Pro ET bikes as 189 of the best bracket racers on the east coast were looking for green lights. It took nine rounds of competition to get down to the final race of the weekend.

Jeffrey Santin came into the event with a slim lead on the class, and when he took a fourth-round loss, the potential of losing the championship became real. Dustin Lee, who was number two in points, went on to win the next two rounds. And with each win light, the drama ramped up; you could feel the seriousness of the situation in the air.

In round seven, Lee faced Pablo Gonzalez, and the winner of that round would have a bye to the final. And if Dustin Lee made it into the final and won, it would be Game Over for Santin. But Gonzalez put an end to the drama taking out Lee to secure Santin’s first XDA championship.

The season’s final race featured a stout $10K payout to the winner with the allowance of double entries, thus giving racers with multiple bikes two chances to win. And with this, for the first time in XDA’s history, one rider would have to face himself in the final. Gonzalez took his pair of Hayabusa’s to a ninth-round final and chose his 2005 Hayabusa to make the final lap down the track for the 2021 XDA season.

Brock’s Performance Street ET
Winner – Bubba Driscoll / Runner-up – Barry Purnell
2021 Champion – Derrick Milbourne

Going into the DME Racing Fall Nationals, 2020 class champion Derrick Milbourne had a healthy points lead in Brock’s Performance Street ET. His most significant threat to the championship, Mark Blake, took a first-round loss; and that sealed it for Milbourne to secure back-to-back championships.

Bubba Driscoll and Barry Purnell both won six rounds of competition to make it to the final. However, both racers opted not to race each other. With a rain delay holding up action on the track, Driscoll and Purnell decided they didn’t want to wait and flipped a coin in the lanes to determine a winner. Driscoll got the right side of the coin.

VooDoo Components Bracket Bash
Winner – Dustin Lee / Runner-up – Chris Sulkowski

On Saturday, 137 racers entered the VooDoo Components Bracket Bash for a chance at the $4,500 class payout. XDA multi-champion Dustin Lee made it look easy as he chopped the tree round after round. Lee not only had a perfect reaction time one round, his average reaction time over eight rounds was .024. In the final, Lee met Chris Sulkowski. Sulkowski took a first-round loss and bought back in, winning six more rounds to earn a lane in the final against Lee. However, luck would not go his way as a mechanical problem would make him a no-show for the final, sending Lee to another winner circle.

Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s Race
Winner – Boyd Mathis / Runner-up – Mike Schulz

The Friday night Hard Times Parts & Service Gambler’s race was at capacity with sixty-four sportsman competitors looking to start the weekend with a $4,000 payout. Boyd Mathias on his 2008 Suzuki Hayabusa was an intimidating competitor as four of his six competitors went red against him. He faced Mike Schulz, who cut a better light for a starting line advantage in the final. But Schulz would lose power as Mathis powered by him for his sixth win light of the night and first payout of the weekend.

Once again, congratulations to all our race winners, record breakers, champions, and every single racer as well as all the family and friends that came out to support this season’s events. We look forward to your support in 2022 as the series continues to evolve.

Don’t miss a weekend of racing with the quickest and fastest motorcycle drag racing sanction in the country; put XDA on your 2022 calendar now!

Visit www.xdaracing.com for event information, class rules, schedule, and more.

About XDA Racing
The Xtreme Dragbike Association (XDA) is an east coast motorcycle drag racing series with 700+ motorcycle racers competing at each event. Every XDA event hosts professional classes, sportsman classes, grudge racing and a vendor midway. Lifestyle activities such as bike shows, bikini contests, DJ and live bands are also held at select events.

For more information on the XDA, please visit www.xdaracing.com or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube @xdaracing

Political Agendas on Electrical Vehicles Charge Up Emotions

By General Posts

by Colby Martin from SEMA Action Network (SAN) at https://www.semasan.com

GROUNDING THE “EV” BUZZ

Political Agendas Surrounding Automobiles Charge Up Strong Emotions

The impending arrival of electric cars and trucks has caused quite a stir. Sure, everyone shares the well-intentioned notion of a healthier environment. But constant announcements about the potential phasing out of new gas-powered vehicles have enthusiasts worried about the future of the hobby. Thanks in part to a 24-hour news-cycle, the automotive-minded are forced to ponder this great unknown with greater frequency. With the topic weighing heavier on many minds, the question arises: what’s to become of the tailpipe—and when? Clearly there are crossed wires needing to be untangled.

Acronym Soup

First, we must understand the common lingo used in automotive discussions. The gasoline-sipping internal combustion engine (ICE) has long been the motivator of choice. However, the low- and zero-emissions vehicles (ZEVs) categories have emerged and made significant improvements in recent years. There are several different models of these cars and trucks such as electric vehicles (EVs), plug-in hybrids, and those running on hydrogen fuel-cells. With such competition, it may seem like traditional rides could have a tougher existence in a yet-uncertain future of alternative powerplants.

Government Directives

The latest update in the automotive world came from the nation’s top office: the Biden Administration. President Joe Biden signed the “Executive Order on Strengthening American Leadership in Clean Cars and Trucks” in August. In short, the measure calls for 50% of all sales of new cars and light trucks in the US be ZEV by the year 2030. “It is the policy of my Administration to advance these objectives in order to improve our economy and public health, boost energy security, secure consumer savings, advance environmental justice, and address the climate crisis,” said President Biden.

Biden’s action was preceded by California Governor Gavin Newsom’s controversial notice last year. That order instructed the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to draft regulations requiring that all new cars and passenger trucks sold in the state be zero-emissions by 2035. Once drafted, CARB’s proposed regulations will be subject to a lengthy regulatory process, including legal, economic, and environmental analyses, public comment, and hearings. The Governor’s order is also expected to face numerous legal challenges from opponents.

Cause for Concern?

The concern surrounding EVs is understandable, but premature. Many of the proposed rules and legal mandates are far more symbolic in nature. For example, President Biden’s actions were merely issued as an Executive Order, meaning it is not a federal law and has no binding authority. In fact, the following disclaimer is included at the end of the Order:

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Directives like President Biden’s also tend to be highly aspirational with ambitious time frames for implementation. For example, many of the President’s proposed benchmarks extend beyond his time in office, giving him little say on the final product.

Realities: Supply vs. Demand

Perhaps the most direct impact to personal transportation will come from the automakers themselves. The evolving market is already experiencing highs and lows. While seeking to boost ZEV sales, major brands have been subject to factors beyond their control. Supply chain shortages and logistical issues have impeded production schedules, causing delays, and price surges. Additionally, massive investment of resources will be required for materials and retooling throughout the entire manufacturing process.

Many fundamental issues need to be resolved before any major shift to “clean” vehicles is feasible. Most importantly, more than 281 million rides share US roads—a small fraction of which are EVs. Such a massive fleet won’t be replaced anytime soon. Of course, the lion’s share are newer vehicles, which often have a life spanning a decade or longer. Also, the urge to trade-in for an electric model decreases without widespread options for “refueling.” Charging woes include long recharging time, charger availability, and standardization of hardware between brand offerings. Additionally, the U.S. electrical grid can hardly handle its current strain—let alone an entire nation needing to recharge at home or on-the-go. At this point, clear solutions appear far from sight.

Informed & Involved

Although the future of EV adoption remains to be seen, the SEMA Action Network (SAN) believes a balance can be achieved and has made this fight a top priority. Our community’s rich history of innovation should be celebrated as it continues evolving with emerging technologies. As always, the SAN opposes proposed efforts to ban the ICE and other such mandates impacting vehicles of all kinds—vintage collectibles and their fuel supply included.

With the ever-growing voice of advocates from our hobby, politicians are increasingly aware of how many passionate voters are paying attention to their actions. SAN contacts like you will receive details direct to inboxes as opportunities to act arise—stay tuned for further updates.

Meantime, please spread the word to get others involved in the good fight: CLICK semaSAN.com/Join

–IGNITED WE STAND!

About SAN: https://www.semasan.com/about

EDITOR’s NOTE:
“Here’s the wildest truth. Climate Alarmism or Climate Doom IS misinformation. Oops.” –Bandit

Royal Enfield to lead motorcycle expedition to the South pole

By General Posts

by Shakti Nath Jha from https://www.financialexpress.com

Royal Enfield to lead motorcycle expedition to the South pole as a tribute to its 120 years journey

Royal Enfield has announced that the company will lead a first-of-its-kind motorcycle expedition that will attempt to reach the South pole. The expedition is being undertaken as a tribute to the 120 years journey of Royal Enfield.

Royal Enfield is the world’s oldest motorcycle brand in continuous production since 1901. For 120 years, Royal Enfield has remained the preserver of the legacy of building simple, authentic classic motorcycles that are engaging and fun to ride. Riding through time and tough terrain, the company has emerged victorious in rides that have tested the endurance of man and machine, while remaining relevant and desirable through the ages.

Now, to commemorate 120 years of building the pure motorcycling culture, Royal Enfield will mark 2021 with an ambitious attempt to push the boundaries of motorcycling possibilities.

The company will undertake a motorcycling expedition on the Royal Enfield Himalayan, to attempt to reach the geographic South Pole, from the Ross Ice Shelf via the Leverett Glacier. 90-degree South – Quest for the Pole is conceptualized as a tribute to the brand’s commitment to pure motorcycling, and to the courage and resilience of innumerable riders and explorers who have made history with their motorcycling journeys.

The 90-degree South will be an ambitious attempt of Royal Enfield to go where no motorcycle has ever gone before.

This unique expedition will begin from Cape Town, South Africa, on 26 November 2021, and will attempt to reach the geographic South Pole, from the Ross Ice Shelf, via the Leverett Glacier, to the Amundsen-Scott Pole station. Two Royal Enfield riders, namely Santhosh Vijay Kumar, Lead – Rides & Community, Royal Enfield, and Dean Coxson, Senior Engineer- Product Development, Royal Enfield, will take part in this 39-day expedition traversing Antarctica on a 770 km ride from Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole. It will be conducted in close partnership with Arctic Trucks and on two purpose-built Royal Enfield Himalayans.

For this expedition, two Royal Enfield Himalayans have been modified in-house, with functional upgrades to be able to navigate snow and ice to ably function under extreme conditions in Antarctica. For greater torque at the rear wheel, the main drive sprocket of the Himalayan has been changed from a 15-teeth unit to a 13-teeth unit. Also, the motorcycle gets a tubeless wheel setup with studded tyres that allows the tyres to run at very low pressures, and to increase floatation on soft snow, while also providing adequate traction on hard ice.

The Himalayan was tested for this arduous and treacherous journey at the Langjokull glacier in Iceland, with an intention to mirror the conditions in Antarctica.

Speaking about the milestone year for Royal Enfield and the expedition attempt, Siddhartha Lal, Managing Director of Eicher Motors Ltd, said, “120 years is a long legacy for the brand, and we are very happy to have made it count. Over these years, we have created and nurtured a thriving culture of riding and exploration around the world. This pursuit of exploration has been a quintessential part of our DNA, and 90° South is another chapter in our series of extraordinary, epic motorcycling rides. In the past, rides like Himalayan Odyssey have paved the way for motorcycling adventure in the Himalayas and an epic expedition like this to the South Pole will further inspire people to become adventurers again. A test of endurance and perseverance for man and machine, this expedition is the first of its kind attempt to traverse the 770km long route to the South Pole on a motorcycle.”