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“Proposed California Fee Increases Threatens Motorcycle Industry”

By | General Posts

 

Empowered by changes to state law, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has begun the process of increasing certification fees for original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket manufacturers. The CARB certification is required to sell motorcycles and parts in the state of California and has ripple effects throughout the nation. The stated goal of the increases is to help offset the cost to California for enforcement and operations of its clean air policies.

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) is concerned that grossly inflated certification fees will further hamper the aftermarket parts industry’s ability to remain viable. In these trying economic times, increasing fees on the manufacturing industry will no doubt have wide ranging effects.

MRF President Kirk “Hardtail” Willard stated, “Putting additional financial strain on aftermarket parts manufacturers will without question impact the average consumer. Motorcycle shops, dealers, manufacturers and distributors are all key components of the motorcycle ecosystem. Anything that impacts the motorcycle industry eventually impacts the motorcycle consumer. The state of California should not destroy the motorcycle industry in an attempt to balance its budget.”

The California government and CARB is anxiously awaiting the time when they can ban motorcycles, and then all fossil fuel vehicles. It’s all about control, and that’s why we all need to go to Climate Depot and watch Climate Hustle II, quick before it’s too late. There is another side to this story!–Bandit

Curtiss on Twitter!

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For those of you who use Twitter, or any other preferred social media platform, be sure to give us a follow below.

Curtiss 1 is nearing production and we are keeping all of our followers up-to-date daily. Continue following along and don’t be afraid to share your thoughts with us.

More news to come!

Proposed California Fee Increases Threatens Motorcycle Industry

By | General Posts

September 17, 2020

For Immediate Release

“Proposed California Fee Increases Threatens Motorcycle Industry”

Empowered by changes to state law, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has begun the process of increasing certification fees for original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket manufacturers. The CARB certification is required to sell motorcycles and parts in the state of California and has ripple effects throughout the nation. The stated goal of the increases is to help offset the cost to California for enforcement and operations of its clean air policies.

The Motorcycle Riders Foundation (MRF) is concerned that grossly inflated certification fees will further hamper the aftermarket parts industry’s ability to remain viable. In these trying economic times, increasing fees on the manufacturing industry will no doubt have wide ranging effects.

MRF President Kirk “Hardtail” Willard stated, “Putting additional financial strain on aftermarket parts manufacturers will without question impact the average consumer. Motorcycle shops, dealers, manufacturers and distributors are all key components of the motorcycle ecosystem. Anything that impacts the motorcycle industry eventually impacts the motorcycle consumer. The state of California should not destroy the motorcycle industry in an attempt to balance its budget.”

Scrambled Bikernet Weekly News for September 17, 2020

By | General Posts

We’re Headed in Lots of Directions

Hey,

It’s a quirky day. I’ve got deals and wheels stuff happening all around me. A brother’s house burnt down in the northern California fires. Another brother, Bill Dodge, is in the hospital fighting motorcycle injuries (you’ll see the report in the news).

I’m scrambling to save and make more money in trying times and I would like to head back to Deadwood. On the active front, I have most of the pieces to finish the fender mounts on the Salt Torpedo. I started to write the 90th Episode of the Cantina Series and sorta like it. I’m playing with the Covid, homelessness and much of the bullshit society is struggling with right now.

Sam Burns sent me more encouraging photos of bikes and girls. Maybe it’s a hint to write more about the story line of my life. I’m still struggling with it. And I’m about to start another chapter of the third Chance Hogan books. Plus, Gary Mraz stopped by and stayed for a week. He is writing a series of books about the Midnight Rider or the Midnight Writer or Zac or Zachary, he can’t decide.

So, what does all of this tell you? I told Bob Bitchin that he’s about to start a new adventure after his beautiful Berry Creek mansion burnt down. I like to think motorcycles and freedom are at the heart of everything I do. And finally, there are so many wonderful things in life to do. Just smile and go after them. But do it with grace and style, compassion and benevolence. Let’s hit the news.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE WEEKLY NEWS ON BIKERNET

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Peugeot Plans To Introduce A 300cc Motorcycle

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

From cars to scooter to bikes.

When we say the name Peugeot, we usually think of cars and scooters—that’s what the French brand is most famous for. The brand also produced a handful of motorcycles through the years, but mainly built its reputation on its four-wheel and step-through products.

In October, 2019, Indian giant Mahindra— the same people behind the Jawa revival and Royal Enfield—bought Peugeot’s entire motorcycle division with the intention to introduce seven new two-wheel models between 2021 and 2023. The first model in the pipeline could be a small-displacement motorcycle based on the P2X Concept.

Italian outlet Motociclismo had a chat with GAM Distribution president Mario Minella. The distributor is in charge of importing Peugeot Motorcycles products to Italy and Minella was able to provide some insight into the French brand’s plans for the future.

Minella explained that despite the pandemic, the plan to reposition Peugeot Motorcycles on the global market thanks to a new branding and a new design remains on track. The company plans to adopt a younger, more aggressive image. The plan also includes the introduction of a GT model armed with a 300-400cc engine and the implementation of higher building standards (scooter, we’re assuming, since the journalist asked about “traditional products”).

What about motorcycles? Minella answered that from an enthusiast standpoint, he sincerely hopes there will be one introduced soon. He explained that the motorcycle concept (P2X) introduced at the 2019 Mondial de la Moto was very well received. The maker developed a 300cc motorcycle platform that could eventually also be turned into 125 and 500 models based on the concept introduced last year. While the focus will be on the Asian market for small and mid-size bikes, he added that that new platform will be developed for all the markets.

While Minella didn’t discuss any timeline, but the brand’s intention to change its image, we could expect a new Peugeot motorcycle to surface sooner rather than later.

Zero Miles Harley-Davidson VRXSE Destroyer Is a Speed Junkie’s Dream Ride

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

So, a decade and some change ago, the world’s favorite motorcycle builder, Harley-Davidson, decided to do something crazy: come up with a factory-build dragster that would shred the hell out of the competition on the strip.

This is how the VRXSE Destroyer was born, a CVO-handled monster of a two-wheeler powered by a chunky Screaming Eagle engine. 1,300cc in displacement, the powerplant churns out 165 hp and, aided by things like stroker crankshaft, high compression pistons, a racing transmission with a multi-stage lock-up clutch, and two-stage launch control, it had enough punch to shoot the missile to the end of the quarter-mile distance in under 10 seconds.

Initially, Harley planned to make at most 300 units of the thing, but the impact it had it was (naturally) immense, and before you knew it, the production run doubled in size to 600 units.

The motorcycle had such an appeal that not everybody bought one to race it. In fact, there are quite a few people who paid the little over $30,000 asking price just to have sit around in a garage somewhere, as a museum piece.

This is what happened to this here Destroyer. Now available for sale at the hands of Porsche specialist Canepa, it shows “no miles, no driving, no wear, nothing,” as its description says.

The bike was purchased new and sat for a very long time in a larger collection of dragsters, in the select company of a Kent Fuller nitromethane dragster and the likes. It then ended up over at Canepa, who is selling it for an undisclosed price.

Now, don’t go thinking this is the only Destroyer on the market. There are others, of course, but most of them, if not all, have been put to some use in the past, and are not quite as pristine as this one.

We only hope whoever buys it chooses to enjoy it the way it was meant to, not only visually.

Tarus 2X2 Is the Collapsible Motorcycle That Can Go Absolutely Anywhere

By | General Posts

by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Russia, the land of all possibilities in terms of all-terrain-capable vehicles, regardless of size. Russia is also the home of what has been described as the toughest motorcycle that ever was: Tarus.

Tarus first made headlines way back in 2013, when videos showing a rather crudely made prototype started making the rounds. In just a short while, the videos had reached the farthest corners of the world and, with them, the excellent news that the company behind the Tarus prototype was looking into bringing it to production.

This happened only some six years later, in 2019. Tarus is now officially called Tarus 2X2 and remains the toughest-looking and apparently the virtually unstoppable motorcycle. It’s also relatively dirt cheap, at just $1,700. The bad news (because there has to be a piece of bad news, you just knew it) is that Tarus doesn’t ship outside of Russia.

There is a silver lining, though, and it makes up the reason for this coverstory: according to the makers, there are plans to start shipping these 2X2 bikes to Europe and maybe even the U.S. Of course, when and if that happens, the price won’t remain as low and the makers can’t offer an estimate on how much it would increase.

The Tarus is a fat-tire motorcycle that stops virtually at nothing. It’s so powerful and capable that it’s often described as a two-wheeled ATV, with the mention that even some four-wheeled ATV have had trouble making it through the terrain where this one handled itself brilliantly.

The two videos at the bottom of the page should offer you an idea of just exactly it can do. The first one is a proper review by a Russian publication of the production model, while the second is of the prototype being shown for the first time.

Tarus is incredibly light, weighing only 93 kg (205 pounds) when it’s fueled and ready to go. It sits on massive 25E12-9 KingTyre tires with very low pressure, which offer excellent grip and offset the lack of suspension. Indeed, there’s no suspension on either end, which means riding on this thing in the wilderness for more than two or three hours can become quite a pain. You do get spring suspension in your seat, though.

Luckily, you will have run out of gas by then: there’s a 4-liter (1.05-gallon) tank for gas that’s good for two to three hours of fun. The fuel tank is made of plastic, to further help with keeping the overall weight down.

Tarus is full-wheel drive, thanks to a front wheel chain drive that connects to a shaft-drive system hidden under the frame. The full-wheel drive, in combination with the low weight and low tire pressure in the massive tires, makes Tarus capable of tackling every obstacle with ease, whether it’s tree trunks, ankle-deep mud, ice and snow, or even entire flights of stairs.

Tarus can also float on water because of its weight and tires. In fact, the makers recommend washing it by dipping it into the pond and using the throttle to spin the wheels.

The seat is lower to the ground, allowing the rider to stretch out his legs and reach the ground for balance in this type of situation. Power comes from a Honda’s 210cc four-stroke GX-210 engine, while the prototype was powered by an Ural chainsaw engine, for which reason it only weighed some 50 kg (110 pounds).

That said, with just 7 hp and three-speed transmission, this motorcycle doesn’t go any faster than 35 kph (21.7 mph). It will get you wherever you want to be, alright, but it won’t do it in a particularly fast manner.

Not that all of the above isn’t impressive enough, but the highlight of this motorcycle is the fact that it’s collapsible. You can take the Tarus apart in a matter of 5 minutes, removing one bolt in order to start taking out parts. At the end of it, you can also deflate the tires and pack the whole thing neatly in a carrier bag, just perfect for the trunk of your small city car. Even if you leave the tires as they are, you can still fit it into the trunk of an SUV.

Made in Kaluga, Russia, the Tarus is not road-legal, but it is the ideal vehicle for off-roading, hunting, fishing or whatever other activity you prefer in the wild. It goes perfectly with your Sherp, too.

 

Preparing for Biketoberfest

By | General Posts

by Jarleene Almenas from https://www.ormondbeachobserver.com

Preparing for Biketoberfest: Destination Daytona is confident in its itinerant vending plans

The 150-acre property is one of the largest venues in Volusia County.

Come Biketoberfest, Destination Daytona in Ormond Beach believes it can host itinerant vendors and outdoor events in a way that adheres to COVID-19 safety measures.

In its permit application to the city, Dean Pepe, general counsel for Destination Daytona, stated that motorcycle rally events “are critical to the survival of our businesses here at Destination Daytona, our hundreds of employees and also to our entire community.” Some of the measures Destination Daytona will implement include one-way lanes inside stores, spacing outdoor tables apart to promote social distancing and requiring all vendors to wear masks. Bikers frequenting businesses inside the 150-acre event venue will also be asked to wear masks indoors.

“We’ve developed our own message, which is ‘Protect and respect our city, mask up and distance,'” Pepe said. “That’s going to be our message to everybody that comes here.”

When the City Commission in mid-August decided to hold off until September on making a decision to allow event permits for the motorcycle rally, Pepe said they were disappointed, but that they understood the reasoning.

“There was an understanding there that these people were trying to make a good decision,” Pepe said. “The thought of not having it with our normal setup would’ve been disappointing, but we would’ve had to roll with it and come up with an alternate plan.”

They also knew that if the commission reached a decision on Sept. 9, they had time to gather vendors and make preparations for Biketoberfest, even if they had to scramble a bit, Pepe said.

“We were very, very excited and pleased to hear that the city staff and representatives helped this decision,” said Shelly Rossmeyer Pepe, general manager at Bruce Rossmeyer’s Harley-Davidson in Destination Daytona.

‘We want to do right by the community’

Itinerant vendor revenue is one of the largest components for the year at Destination Daytona, said Pepe, which is why it’s important to hold these events twice a year for Bike Week and Biketoberfest, respectively.

While Pepe acknowledged that COVID-19 hasn’t gone away, he also expressed that “livelihoods are important too.” In addition to their own staff, another 30 people or so will be hired to help with the event. In previous years, that number has been higher, but due to the pandemic, Destination Daytona is not expecting the typical large crowds.

What they are anticipating is an increase of vendors, as the city of Daytona Beach has opted against issuing permits. Destination Daytona is also not planning any large concerts to keep crowds manageable, Pepe said.

Rossmeyer Pepe said they’ve traditionally been a daytime venue anyways, as most vendors wrap up in the early evening. Daytime traffic may go up a bit because of the lack of outdoor events in Daytona Beach, but she expects their nighttime traffic will not. She said it’s important for them to “do right” by both the community and the visitors.

“We’re going to do everything to try to maintain a very positive reputation, so they’ll come back,” she said. “We feel good and confident that our customers and our visitors are going to respect the situation we’re all in.”

If the situation was like it was in March, Pepe said perhaps Destination Daytona may not have had enough information to be able to hold events safely, as he is confident they are able to do now.

As a business, they need to be open, he said.

“You have to at some point,” Pepe said. “We can’t not operate our businesses forever hoping that this goes away completely.”

Artist David Uhl – New Release-24 Hour Flash Sale

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David Uhl has worked with Billy Lane (Choppers, Inc) on a few different projects in the past couple of years. He completed two watercolor paintings of Billy, one of which is him racing (Sons of Speed in Florida).

David is now offering prints of both images via a 24-hour Flash Sale.

Signed, numbered prints are now available on watercolor paper at incredible prices. But, they will only be available for 24 hours. At 11:00 am (Mountain Time) tomorrow, Thursday September 17th, we will close the edition.

Print edition specifics for either piece:

** Image size appx 11 x 15, $95.00 unframed

** Image size appx 15 x 20, $295.00 unframed

NOTE: Framing is available for $250 on either size

The original watercolor paintings are available as well. For anyone wanting to own a beautiful David Uhl original at a very reasonable price, this is your chance. Serious inquiries only.

We anticipate shipping all of the prints will take a few weeks – – edition (print) numbers will be assigned and prints will be shipped according to when orders are placed, so we encourage you to move quickly if you want this one!

Prints will come hand-signed by David and numbered, along with Certificate of Authenticity.

You can place your order by return email, or by calling me at 303-913-4840. Email greg@uhlstudios.com

Uhl Studios

15801 W. Colfax Avenue

Golden, CO 80401

303-913-4840

Uhl Studios Website