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Cross Country Chase Stage 6

By | General Posts

The city of Chattanooga sits in a valley between two small mountains, Lookout Mountain and Signal Mountain, and this day of exceptional riding started out with Chase riders climbing out of the valley up above the clouds that engulfed the city below for a breath-taking view as they set out for there 258-mile day. >From the “Rock City” point they rode past, it’s said that seven U.S. states could be seen: Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, but there was no time for dawdling since weather was an issue again as the heat index started to climb early.

Riders ended their day at the very welcoming Harley-Davidson of Macon, Georgia. The family owned dealership celebrated Grover Sassaman’s 98th birthday earlier this year but you’d never have guessed he was closing in on the century mark. As founder of the company, Sassaman first attended Harley-Davidson® Factory School in 1939, establishing a life-long relationship with the Motor Company, and he was happy to share the particulars of how he came to be the longest owned independent dealership in the world. Quick and witty, Grover talks motorcycles with the best of them, sharing dates, details and tidbits that held the group in rapture.

Grover cruised the property on his scooter greeting the CCC group and offered great advice to riders, including rider #35. Jon Dobbs had his 1939 HD EL in the service bay due to coil problems and Mr. Sassaman offered tips on what could be causing the trouble since the EL has consumed 4 coils since the start of the run. Dobbs later started the bike and rode it out of the dealership, so we’re betting the problems are solved.

Grover rolled through the Chase bikes outside and was particularly smitten with the 1939 HD EL owned by rider #61, Bob Zeolla, because he considered it to be one of the most original of machine on the run. Tomorrow’s route will take riders 249-miles down the road to end at Harley-Davidson of Tallahassee with bikes being on display between 4:30-6:00 pm. Come join us, you never know who you might get to meet!

REMEMBERING 9/11

By | General Posts

Today, we join Americans across the country in remembering the lives lost on September 11, 2001.

On this day of remembrance, we also honor the brave men and women who stood up and enlisted after the attacks on that fateful day. As Americans, we will never take for granted the freedoms we enjoy because of those who serve and protect our country … because of veterans like you.

Thank you for standing with us today in remembrance — and for standing with your fellow veterans every day.

Stephen “Butch” Whitehead
DAV National Commander

Keith “Bandit” Ball

Publisher

Bikernet.com(TM)

Cross Country Chase Stage 5

By | General Posts

Stage 5 means we’ve hit the half-way mark for the Cross Country Chase, leaving just 5 more days of competition. Today’s tour started off with incredible narrow roads through the gently rolling hills of Kentucky where the wheels of time seemingly stand still before riding deeper into the lush thickets of Tennessee’s backwoods. As the shortest day of the course, riders enjoyed the dense scenery as well as the interactions with locals.

The entire day’s route was mesmerizingly beautiful, but it was also pushing 100-degrees out and the intense temperatures, coupled with oppressive humidity, took its toll on both the jockeys and their machines. A nice grilled lunch was offered by Bumpus Harley-Davidson before riders set off to tackle the twisties and make their way on to Coker Tires in Chattanooga, Tennessee for a hosted dinner. The group then scooted over to the iconic Choo Choo Hotel where they found a thousand things to do and see around the historic train station-turned-hotel. The terminal was originally built in 1908, remodeled into the current hotel setting in 1973, and riders were delighted by both the history and the ambience of the cool old property. The sight of the ornate, historic station surrounded by smoking, wheezing antique motorcycles that are in the process of making modern day history just seemed to add another layer of cool to the experience.

By the end of the day, the sweep truck was filled to capacity with broken machines and made for a long day for both staff and riders. Tomorrow’s temps are predicted to be much the same. The top four places are taken by riders from all three classes and, as we have witnessed, it could all change in a day. Check out the scores below and…Stay tuned!

Weekend Round-Up for September 10th, 2019

By | General Posts

More Twists and Turns, Projects and Priorities
By Bandit with photos by Wrench, Barry Green and Gene Thomason

The new Salt Torpedo body scoops came in, and Jeremiah figured out where they should be placed. I started to work on the body brackets this weekend, but I need another set of hands in the shop to drop the lid into place. I started to collect brackets.

READ THE ROUND-UP EXCLUSIVELY IN THE CANTINA – SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Hunter Sills Racing Earns Four World Records and One U.S. National Record at the AMA

By | General Posts

Hunter Sills Racing Earns Four World Records and One U.S. National Record at the AMA and FIM-Sanctioned Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials With Their BMW S 1000 RR Motorcycle

Associated Press | WENDOVER, Utah – September 10, 2019 – ( Newswire.com )

Hunter Sills Racing captured five records with its BMW S 1000 RR at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Wendover, Utah, during the Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials event held Aug. 24–29, 2019. The team also earned Top Time of the Meet and Fastest Naturally Aspirated Motorcycle and increased the speed of their world’s fastest BMW motorcycle to 238.398 mph. Both riders, Erin Sills and Trev Richter of Hunter Sills Racing, earned 1000cc FIM records aboard a nitrous-powered BMW bike affectionately known as “Snoopy.”

With improving track conditions over the week, the team was able to set records early, then progressively improve them over the event. Ultimately, Sills piloted the Alpine Performance Centre-built BMW S 1000 RR to 237.287 mph to earn the FIM kilometer record in the faired, naturally aspirated 1000cc class; a record that was previously set in 2014 by her late husband Andy Sills, also of Hunter Sills Racing, at 221.863 mph. Erin was later able to improve her own FIM mile record set in 2018 on the Uyuni Salt Flats in Bolivia at 229.265 mph, making the new mark 236.889 mph.

“After the poor track conditions presented by Mother Nature during Speedweek, we were looking forward to seeing how our bike would perform on a better course,” said Sills, rider and owner of Hunter Sills Racing. “Shane Kinderis of Alpine Performance Centre put together an incredible motor which performed beautifully with the Wizards of NoS nitrous system. I also found the AirTech fairing to be incredibly stable and grounded at speed.”

“Our senior race technician Curtice Thom worked alongside Shane Kinderis again, a pairing that has proven to be very successful over the years. They did an excellent job of keeping the bike in peak performance, and I’m very pleased with our results. As always, we owe a great amount of success with this project to our many technical partners,” added Gary Orr, owner of San Diego BMW Motorcycles and Hunter Sills Racing team member.

Richter, known previously for his “Race For Relief” charity effort World’s Fastest BMW GS (http://huntersillsracing.com/race-for-relief-2018/), also saw much success in his first event racing the BMW S 1000 RR, winning back a record the team lost in Bolivia in 2017 to Nick Genet. Richter increased the FIM and AMA 1000cc naturally aspirated un-faired (“naked”) mile record to 195.674 mph and the FIM kilometer record to 196.206 mph.

“Riding the over 275 horsepower motorcycle without a fairing presents a unique physical challenge, but the team gave me a bike and suspension set-up that enabled me to reach my goal of earning World and National records in my first event,” said Richter.

Hunter Sills Racing is also proud of its contributions to the Bonneville Motorcycle Speed Trials racing community during the week. With the express permission of the Bureau of Land Management, the team built and donated a mock “Bonneville Salt Flats” sign which was installed at the entrance of the Salt Flats for the week-long event. Following the event, HSR auctioned the sign, earning $4,000 to benefit a fallen rider who needed help with medical bills. Erin Sills also continued her Shemoto Scholarship, awarding $2,000 to the Buell Sisters team of Ashley Woodford.

The next event for Hunter Sills Racing will be in support of the Women Riders World Relay, a year-long around-the-world journey of over 10,000 female motorcyclists. Erin Sills will participate in the WRWR’s United States relay Oct. 2-12, 2019.

The team would like to thank their sponsors who make all of this possible: Top 1 Oil, San Diego BMW Motorcycles, Alpine Performance Centre, Colorado ADVmoto, WomenRidersNow.com, BMW Motorrad USA, Helite Airbags, JBA Speed Shop, Motochic, Moto-Skiveez, Ohlins USA, PitBull Motorcycle Stands, Racer Gloves USA, Remus Exhaust, Schuberth Helmets, Sprint Filter, Wizards of NoS, Worldwide Bearings, and Wunderlich.

About Hunter Sills Racing:

Hunter Sills Racing is a female-owned professional land speed racing team including motor builder Shane Kinderis of Alpine Performance Centre, Gary Orr of San Diego BMW Motorcycles, race technician Curtice Thom, and riders Erin Sills and Trev Richter. The team races in memory of the late Andy Sills. Together, the team has earned over 40 World and National records, two Guinness World Book records, Mojave Mile 200 MPH Club membership, Mojave Magnum 200 MPH Club membership, BUB 201 MPH Club membership, Bonneville SCTA 200 MPH Club membership, El Mirage SCTA 200 MPH Club membership, top average mile speed to-date of 238 MPH, and title of World’s Fastest BMW. When not racing the Salt Flats, Richter and Sills both serve as off-road adventure motorcycle riding coaches. Erin Sills has been named 2013 Advertising Age Woman To Watch, 2014 American Motorcyclist Association Female Athlete of the Year, 2014 University of Cincinnati Lindner College of Business Distinguished Alumni and is a retired executive with Facebook, Inc. A frequent speaker on behalf of the sport of motorcycling, Sills also serves on the board of directors for the American Motorcyclist Association Hall of Fame Foundation, the FIM Women’s Commission, WomenRidersNow.com and is the founder of the Shemoto Scholarship for females in the sport.

SRC offering motorcycle safety classes

By | General Posts

Free motorcycle safety courses are again being offered at Spoon River College this fall.

It’s open to anyone 16 years or older with a valid car license. Motorcycles and helmets are provided.

Call the Spoon River College – Driver Training Office at 647-2794 for more information.

Cross Country Chase Stage 4

By | General Posts

Chase riders kicked their day off with a nice ride and a pop quiz in the middle of a cornfield, with several of the riders never even getting off their motorcycles to answer the 10-point test. The al fresco classroom experience was then followed closely by a pulse-quickening trip across a famous haunted bridge.

The old Wabash Cannonball Bridge, located on the Illinois and Indiana borders, was built as a railroad bridge back in 1897 and is believed by some to be bad luck to cross. Chase riders, however, found it to be a rite of passage as they wrangled their antiques over the warped, off camber and riveted ancient planks. The tense but successful crossing certainly gave the group something to talk about as they gathered for lunch hosted by the friendly folks at Bud’s Harley-Davidson in nearby Evansville, Indiana.

The long miles and the heat of the day spent crossing three states taxed both men, women and machines. By the time riders rolled into Harley-Davidson of Bowling Green, Kentucky, one rider’s saddlebag had caught fire and another’s engine shot flames as he tried to kick start the tired machine. It was easily extinguished and Matt Miller, #46, rode his 1947 HD U off for a night’s rest.

With only 6 days left in the race, there are 45 of the remaining 65 competitors who have ridden every mile, but the scores are vastly different. Based on the complicated scoring system that includes handicaps for age of both riders and machines,the size of the engine and scores on the daily tests, things change daily. Consequentially, it is still anybody game. Check out the scores, go to the website to read about the riders and be sure to get yourself out to a stop near you so see this rolling museum!

You can catch the riders at Bumpus Harley-Davidson, Murfreesboro, Tennessee tomorrow at 11:00 or at Coker Tires in Chattanooga, Tennessee from 5:00 to 6:15.

Utah Police Admit They Profile MC Members

By | General Posts

 

By Dave “Irish” Dohrmann

Motorcycle profiling is an issue that knows no state bounds. From coast to coast, police and other governmental agencies are violating the constitutional rights of Motorcycle Club members. Typical of this trend, six members of a motorcycle club in Utah were recently stopped on three separate occasions, all within an hour, simply for associating with what one sheriff supervisor referred to as a threat group. No traffic infractions were issued.

 

This incident is is just the most recent in the undeniable pattern of evidence.  Motorcycle profiling is proliferating nationally. The best hope of combating this epidemic is cost free legislation at the state and federal level that prohibits the practice and provides a mechanism of relief for victims.

 

Start of the Night

 

Just after midnight on August 18, 2019, members of the Undefined Limits Motorcycle Club decided to go on a ride in beautiful Utah summer weather.  Meeting at a Maverick gas station to pick a destination, MC members noticed two Utah police cars, carrying four officers, parked off in the distance. Member Buster, believing that a traffic stop was inevitable, waved the other members of the group to the front. At the first stop sign, a complete stop was made, and both feet were on the ground.  Regardless, Buster and a hang-around of the club were pulled over for a stop sign violation.

 

First Stop

 

Buster and the hang- around were pulled for a stop sign violation. The two sheriffs approached the riders with their hands on their firearms, and demanded identification. After providing their drivers licenses, for his and his brother’s safety, Buster informed the sheriffs that he was carrying a firearm, and had a legal CCW, even though no law in Utah dictates that holders are required to do so. The two riders were told to keep their hands on the handlebars, and keep their kickstands up, while one officer wrote the citation, and the other kept watch on the two riders. Thirty minutes into the stop, member Big Rig came back to the scene to check on the safety of his brothers. The sheriff demanded his identification since he “was on the scene.” No citation was given to Big Rig. The total time for the simple traffic stop of the two individuals, took a total of forty-five minutes, a clear violation of his civil liberties, as outlined in Rodriguez v. United States.

 

Second Stop

 

After twenty minutes of waiting, several riders decided to head back in the direction of the Maverick Gas station. While pulling onto I-89, member Clash noticed a Utah police car sitting in the darkness with all of the lights off. Once the group passed the parked patrol car, the officer immediately pulled out and approached the group.  Quickly the officer pulled over the rear rider, Clash, for an alleged turn signal violation. Clash was given a citation for an expired drivers license, and a warning for the turn signal violation. During the stop, the sheriff mentioned that the department had just “broken up” a party being held by another Motorcycle Club, and the sheriffs assumed the riders were coming from said party.

 

The Real Reason for the Stops

 

Club members Tech and R2 pull into the Maverick gas station and are immediately pulled over by one sheriff for yet another alleged turn signal violation. Member Tech asks to speak with a supervisor. Tech questioned the supervisor as the real reason for the stops, since six members were stopped in the previous forty-five to sixty minutes.  The supervisor responds, “ Why do   you think? Why do you think? “ Tech responds, “because we have this on?!” , referring to his vest. A Utah Police Supervisor responds, “You are documented, ok. The (club name) are a documented threat group, that’s how it is. So that’s why we’re doing this. That’s why we’re pulling people over,” showing a clear bias and prejudice towards Motorcycle Club members. Neither rider  was issued a citation, though both were given written warnings.

 

None of the six Club members had any registration or insurance verified by the Davis County Sheriffs, nor were any inspections stickers verified. This is one of the reasons the MPP believes this was nothing more than a intelligence gathering expedition.

 

Legislative Relief

 

The above events are just one more reason why legislative relief is needed in Utah, and across the country. The intrusions on individuals civil liberties, simply for expressing their 1st Amendment right to freely associate needs to stop. And as the MPP has demonstrated, Motorcycle Profiling bills are the correct avenue to take.

–From the Motorcycle Profiling Project

COBRA MOTO ANNOUNCES 2019 PARTNERSHIP

By | General Posts

Center Hill, Florida: August 21, 2019 – Cobra Moto slides right into the newly formed AMA amateur flat track series Flat Track Futures with a contingency support program for the 2019 October Florida Fall Classic and November Winter Olympics events. With strong efforts towards growing flat track from the ground up, Flat Track Futures’ main goal from the beginning has been to start with the youth classes and work its way up to gain industry support for the riders and families invested into amateur flat track racing.

With support from Cobra Moto, Flat Track Futures announces its first OEM contingency program totaling $2400 for the 50cc and 65cc classes. Cobra Moto will provide a 2019 contingency program for the Florida Fall Classic single day race event in the 50cc 4-6, 50cc 7-8 and 65cc 7-11 classes – totaling $875 payout. The Winter Olympics 3-day event will feature an overall contingency program for 5 classes including the 50cc 4-6, 50cc 7-8, 50cc Pee Wee 4-8, 65 MOD and 65 DTX – totaling $1525 payout.

“This is exactly why I started Flat Track Futures, for years there hasn’t been any type of contingency programs from OEMs in the amateur ranks, and my goal was to change that. Teaming up with Cobra Moto for these first two events and already planning our 2020 program is a huge achievement for me personally. We are literally starting from the ground up with support towards our youth classes, and it’s exciting.”

– Johnny Lewis.

For riders that are racing Cobra 50cc and/or 65cc CX models at the Flat Track Futures Florida Fall Classic and the Winter Olympics, payout will be awarded directly through Cobra Moto, LLC. To claim contingency you must create an account and register your Cobra motorcycle on the “Snake Pit” customer portal at my.cobramoto.com. Following the events, Flat Track Futures will report results to Cobra Moto LLC and payout will be awarded. Payout has no cash value, and is only usable towards parts, chemicals, clothing, accessories, and tools (cannot be used for shipping/freight charges).

 

Sign-up for the Florida Fall Classic opens September 1st for all classes. Be sure to get all updated information by signing up for the Flat Track Futures newsletters at www.flattrackfutures.com

About Cobra MOTO — Cobra MOTO produces premium race-ready mini motocross bikes for youth riders that are serious about competing. Our three models offer the most competitive performance in the mini category, with Cobras claiming more than 300 national titles since the company was founded in 1993. Cobra Motorcycles is the only producer of competition off-road motorcycles that are truly “Made in the U.S.A.” (www.cobramoto.com)

 

Florida Fall Classic Contingency

$875 available

50cc 7-8

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

50cc 4-6

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

65cc 7-11

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

Flat Track Winter Olympics Contingency

$1525 available

50cc 4-6

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

50cc Pee Wee 4-8

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

65cc Stock

o 1st – $200
o 2nd – $150
o 3rd – $75

50cc 7-8

o 1st – $100
o 2nd – $75
o 3rd – $50

65cc Mod

o 1st – $200
o 2nd – $150
o 3rd – $75