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Honda RC213V-S Breaks Auction World Record

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An as-new example of Honda’s RC213V-S has just broken a new world record, becoming the most expensive Japanese motorcycle ever sold at auction.

Hosted by specialist automotive marketplace Collecting Cars, the ‘MotoGP bike for the road’ sold for a remarkable total sales price of £182,500.

The rare superbike has never been ridden and remains in its original flight case, with just one mile on the odometer. Having never left its shipping crate, the bike is totally pristine with absolutely no damage or wear.

Created with a focus on light weight and agility, the RC213V-S is a road-legal MotoGP bike, built around a hand-fabricated aluminium frame with carbon-fibre body panels and titanium fasteners, resulting in a dry weight of just 170kg.

Powered by a 999cc four-stroke V4 engine, this 2016 model also features the full HRC Race Kit, which comprises a recalibrated ECU, a titanium exhaust system, a front ram duct, a race-pattern quickshifter, a data logger and a remote control cable for the front brake lever. These upgrades reduce the bike’s total weight by 10kg and increase power output from 157hp to 215hp.

Also fitted are some of the highest quality components available, including Ohlins TTX front forks, powerful Brembo brakes and forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels.

Edward Lovett, founder of Collecting Cars, said:

“Honda’s RC213V-S is a thrilling, exquisitely crafted machine, and this example attracted global attention and extremely competitive bidding on Collecting Cars. We are proud to have achieved yet another world-record sales price – this time for an incredible road-legal MotoGP that will be a jewel in the new owner’s collection.”

To find out more information on this lot, visit Collecting Cars.
https://collectingcars.com/for-sale/2016-honda-rc213v-s-1

Compared to traditional car auctions, Collecting Cars offers significantly better value for sellers and buyers alike. For sellers, the detailed photographic presentation and professional descriptions mean their car is showcased in the best possible way, and is marketed to a huge captive audience of passionate enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no listing fee, and they receive 100% of the hammer price.

For buyers, the premium on auction lots is levied at just 5% + VAT – substantially lower than traditional auction houses, which typically charge 12% or more – and is capped at £6,000. On hammer prices above £100,000 this means that the buyer’s premium is even less than 6%.

About Collecting Cars:
Collecting Cars is an online auction platform that curates consignments from around the world and markets them to a global audience.

The streamlined and transparent process makes buying and selling cars, motorbikes, and automobilia via its online auctions one of the most effective and hassle-free ways of transacting.

To date, the Collecting Cars platform has sold more than 5,300 lots, and total sales value generated for sellers exceeds £191 million. The multi-national auction company has headquarters in London, and offices in Munich, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

More than 90% of sales since launch have happened without a physical viewing, underscoring the significant trust that Collecting Cars has earned among its customers.

Visit Website at: https://collectingcars.com/

Darryn Binder joins Yamaha in MotoGP next season

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from https://www.businesslive.co.za

Darryn follows brother Brad to the premier motorcycle racing division, and takes over from the legendary Valentino Rossi

SA motorcycle racer Darryn Binder has signed for Yamaha’s rebranded RNF MotoGP team for the 2022 season, with an option to stay on for 2023.

He will team up with the experienced Andrea Dovizioso and takes the place of the legendary Valentino Rossi, who retires at the end of this season.

Darryn, younger brother of KTM MotoGP rider Brad, is only the second rider since Jack Miller to jump from Moto3 to the premier MotoGP class.

Darryn has competed in the Moto3 class since 2015 and became a well-known name after Brad won the 2016 Moto3 championship.

However, Darryn has since long proven that he is an exceptional racing talent in his own right. Known for his hard racing and making use of any and every available gap during a race, the 23-year-old has ridden to six Moto3 podiums, including a win at the 2020 Catalan GP.

He is sixth in this year’s Moto3 world championship with two podiums.

“I want to give a warm welcome to Darryn. We are delighted that he is joining the Yamaha line-up next year,” said Lin Jarvis, MD of Yamaha Motor Company.

“We’ve had many conversations about who would be a good match for the new RNF MotoGP Team. It’s a fresh start for the Yamaha satellite team and that makes it all the more fitting to have a young and eager rider like Darryn join them.”

Jarvis said the primary mission of Yamaha’s satellite team is developing MotoGP talents.

“Darryn has already shown on numerous occasions what he’s made of in the Moto3 class,” he said. “We know he is a fast and determined rider who has got what it takes to battle at the front of the pack. Obviously, the step up to MotoGP is significant and will take some adjusting, but we feel that he’s ready.”

Binder said: “I’m extremely grateful for this opportunity, as it has been a lifelong dream to race in the MotoGP category. I definitely didn’t expect to make the jump straight from Moto3 to the highest class, but I do believe I’m up for the challenge, and I’m ready to put in all the hard work for 2022.”

Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup

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From Ducati Racing Museum – Troy Bayliss

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati to Make Electric Motorcycle for MotoE World Cup, Road Machines to Follow.

To date, despite the advances electric mobility is making in the world of motorcycles, there is only one major bike maker that has embraced electric drivetrains: Harley-Davidson, with its LiveWire. But soon, there will be more, and Ducati seems to be keen on becoming the next one.

The Italian company announced this week it is officially entering the electric motorcycle segment, but it will not be doing so with a bike that can be sold to the general public. Instead, the Borgo Panigale manufacturer will become the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship, the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup.

The deal between Ducati and the organizers of the competition, Dorna Sports, will come into effect in 2023 and will run through 2026. That means we’ll probably have to wait some more before we get to see official details and images of the electric bike, but Ducati tried to give us a glimpse of that by releasing a teaser rendering of the two-wheeler (main pic of this piece).

What’s more important is that Ducati promises the MotoE bike will influence “the evolution of the product range,” hinting the electric drive is something now under consideration for the general public.

“The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts,” the Italians promised.

MotoE came into existence in 2019 and is presently using Energica Ego Corsa motorcycles. Sadly, the series became famous not for the achievements of these electric machines, but on account of a fire back in 2019 that destroyed all the motorcycles before racing could get going at Jerez.

Ducati promises to share the story of this new bike’s development throughout 2022, through means that are yet to be announced.

PRESS RELEASE FROM DUCATI

21 OCTOBER 2021
Ducati is thrilled to announce the beginning of its electric era: starting from the 2023 season it will be the sole official supplier of motorcycles for the FIM Enel MotoE™ World Cup, the electric class of the MotoGP™ World Championship.

The agreement signed with Dorna Sports, organizer and promoter of the most important international two-wheel racing championships, lasts until 2026 and will therefore cover four editions of the MotoE World Cup.

This is a historic step for the Borgo Panigale motorcycle manufacturer which, following its custom of using racing competition as a laboratory for technologies and solutions that then become reality for all motorcyclists, enters the world of electric bikes starting from the sportiest sector, that of the electric class of the MotoGP World Championship.

The goal is to develop expertise and technologies in a constantly evolving world such as the electric one, through an experience familiar to the company like that of racing competition. This has been a consolidated tradition for the Borgo Panigale company starting from the Ducati 851, which inaugurated the trend of Ducati road sports bikes by revolutionizing the concept with its innovative two-cylinder water-cooled engine, electronic fuel injection and the new twin-shaft, four-valve heads, deriving from the Ducati 748 IE bike that made its debut in endurance races at Le Castellet in 1986.

Since then, this endless transfer of expertise has always taken place from the Superbike World Championships, in which Ducati has participated since the first edition in 1988, and from MotoGP, in which Ducati is the only non-Japanese motorcycle manufacturer to have won a World Championship.

The crossover is also evident in the most recent and prestigious products of the Borgo Panigale manufacturer: the V4 engine of the Panigale is in fact strictly derived in its entire construction philosophy – from the bore and stroke measurements to the counter-rotating crankshaft – from the engine that debuted on the Desmosedici GP in 2015. The V4 Granturismo that equips the new Multistrada V4 was then derived from the Panigale engine. All the vehicle control software is also directly derived from those developed in the racing world. Not to mention the field of aerodynamics.

The technological solutions developed in the world of racing, transferred to the products that make up the range, allow Ducati to offer its enthusiasts extremely high-performance and fun-to-ride motorcycles. The FIM Enel MotoE Championship will also be no exception in this regard and will allow the Company to develop the best technologies and test methodologies applied to sporty, light and powerful electric motorcycles.

At the same time, the fact that Ducati forms part of the Volkswagen Group, which has made electric mobility an essential element of its 2030 “New Auto” strategy, represents the best prerequisite for an extraordinary exchange of expertise in the field of electric powertrains.

The announcement of the agreement was made during a joint press conference in the press room of the Misano World Circuit ‘Marco Simoncelli’ on the eve of the Made in Italy and Emilia-Romagna Grand Prix, the third to last round of the 2021 MotoGP World Championship. Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports, and Claudio Domenicali, CEO Ducati Motor Holding, were both present.

Claudio Domenicali, CEO of Ducati Motor Holding: “We are proud of this agreement because, like all the first times, it represents a historic moment for our company. Ducati is always projected towards the future and every time it enters a new world, it does so to create the best performing product possible. This agreement comes at the right time for Ducati, which has been studying the situation of electric powertrains for years, because it will allow us to experiment in a well-known and controlled field like that of racing competition. We will work to make available to all participants of the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup electric bikes that are high-performance and characterized by lightness. It is precisely on weight, a fundamental element of sports bikes, that the greatest challenge will be played out. Lightness has always been in Ducati’s DNA and thanks to the technology and chemistry of the batteries that are evolving rapidly we are convinced that we can obtain an excellent result. We test our innovations and our futuristic technological solutions on circuits all over the world and then make exciting and desirable products available to Ducatisti. I am convinced that once again we will build on the experiences we have had in the world of racing competition to transfer them and apply them also on production bikes.”

Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO Dorna Sports: “We are very proud to announce Ducati as the new, single manufacturer for the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup. With their incredible racing history, it is an honour to welcome this commitment from one of the best-known manufacturers in the paddock and to take on this new challenge together. We are eager to see what the future has in store and continue to watch this technology develop and grow, with the MotoGP paddock and MotoE continuing to drive innovation and evolution in the motorcycling industry – at the same time as creating an incredible on-track spectacle.”

This first step of Ducati in the world of electric bikes will also have an influence on the evolution of the product range. Now, the most important challenges in this field remain those of the size, weight, autonomy of the batteries and the availability of charging networks. Ducati’s experience in the FIM Enel MotoE World Cup will be a fundamental support for product R&D, together with the physiological evolution of technology and chemistry. The goal is to study how to produce, as soon as the technology allows, a Ducati electric vehicle that is sporty, light, thrilling and able to satisfy all enthusiasts.

A new chapter of the FIM Enel MotoE Word Cup is closer than ever. And that of Ducati too.

During 2022, various events and collective moments will allow all fans to discover the development of the project step by step.

Yamaha withdraw rider Maverick Vinales from Austrian GP

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from https://www.bbc.com

Yamaha have suspended rider Maverick Vinales from Sunday’s Austrian MotoGP.

The team cited the 26-year-old’s “irregular operation of the motorcycle” at last weekend’s Styrian MotoGP as the reason for his withdrawal.

The Spaniard ended the race in the pit lane saying he had multiple electrical issues.

But Yamaha say his actions “potentially caused” damage to the bike and claimed he had put himself and those around him at risk.

He will not be replaced by another rider for this weekend’s race at the Red Bull Ring.

The team added that a decision on his participation at future races would be made after further discussions with the rider and a more detailed analysis of the situation.

At his own request, Vinales, a nine-time MotoGP race winner, will be released a year early from his Yamaha contract, due to expire in 2022.

Vinales is currently sixth in the 2021 rider standings

Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Races its Superbike Counterpart

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by Sebastian Toma from https://www.autoevolution.com

Honda has pitted the new CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP against its racing version on a track to prove how fast it can be in the right hands. With slick tires, the sport bike is as close to a street-legal MotoGP racer as possible.

The resemblance between the two is normal, as British Superbike rules mandate that the race bike must be developed from the homologated production motorcycle. Therefore, the chassis and the engine are identical, but the race bike has a few tweaks within regulations to allow it to be even faster.

According to the rulebook, the Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP’s racing version must have a spec ECU, which allows it to rev even higher than its street-legal brother. The gearing can also be changed according to various necessities, depending on the track and rider preference, along with a minimum weight of 168 kg (370.37 lbs.).

To prove just how fast the street-legal version of this bike can be, Honda Racing UK British Super Bike racer Glen Irwin took both bikes on the same day at Oulton Park International Circuit. We are talking about a 2.69-mile (4.33 km) track in the UK and identical riding conditions. Honda even fitted both bikes with the Pirelli Diablo Racing slicks (SC0 compound) to allow a direct comparison between the two bikes.

The street bike was still fitted with the stock mirrors, standard toolkit, and everything else one gets when buying a new Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP. The slick tires were the only change from the stock condition, and the team did not alter any settings on the bike.

Glenn Irwin rode each bike for six laps, and he managed to set a time of 1’39.054 on the production CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, which is just 2.872 seconds more than what he did with his British Superbike Fireblade.

Trap speed was 210.5 km/h (130 mph) on the street-spec bike, which is just 6.8 km/h (4.2 mph) slower than the race model, which goes to show how far have sport bikes gone in past years. The only thing left is for their riders to improve their skills on the track before thinking about changing anything on a stock super sport motorcycle.

Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP new features announced

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati Hypermotard 950 SP Goes for MotoGP Look, Cuts Back on Emissions.

It seems to have been a busy week for motorcycle makers, as a number of them have released versions of some of their most sought-after products revised for the 2022 model year. The latest name to join the party is Ducati, which has just announced some changes for the Hypermotard line.

These changes are not all that extensive. First of all, the family continues to have three members, namely the 950, 950 RVE, and 950 SP. All continue to be powered by the same 937cc Ducati Testastretta 11° twin-cylinder engine as before, rated at 114 hp. All three models in the range now comply with the Euro 5 emissions standard, without that change taking its toll on output levels.

The difference is how the engine is worked through a revised gearbox that allows for easier shifts to neutral when the bikes are standing still. Ducati says the solution chosen for the gearbox is the same one already deployed on the Monster and SuperSport 950.

Just one member of the small family received a more comprehensive upgrade. Already at the head of the Hypermotard table, the SP is now gifted with a special livery meant to be reminiscent of the Italian bike maker’s involvement in MotoGP.

The elements that set it apart from the other two, Öhlins suspension with increased travel, Marchesini forged wheels and standard Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Up and Down EVO, continue to be offered for the SP.

As for the other two, the 950 RVE continues to be offered in Graffiti livery, while the 950 comes in the usual Ducati Red.

Ducati says it has already begun producing the new Hypermotard motorcycles, and they should hit dealerships’ shelves next month. Pricing for the new models has not been announced yet.

A 17-year-old is taking the motorcycle racing world by storm

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by James Warren from https://www.theolivepress.es

SPAIN has often been called the mecca for motorcycle racing, with world champions being cultivated from the moment they can sit on a bike.

Household names like Marc Marquez, Aleix Espargaro and current champ Joan Mir all started riding and racing while they were at school, making use of Spain’s love of two wheels to develop their talents unhindered.

As these riders fight to earn their latest victories in 2021, they all have one eye on one name that is causing waves in the Moto3 World Championship.

And that name is Pedro Acosta, a young 17-year-old from Mazarron, Murcia.

So far in 2021, the young man has taken three victories and one podium in the first four races, shattering records for the 250cc class and leaving experts to hail him as a ‘future legend’.

But how has this teenager become one of the most exciting prospects since Marc Marquez arrived on the scene back in 2008.

The answer can be found at the Circuito de Cartagena, a race track six kilometres northwest of the popular resort.

The circuit is popular with trackday riders, people who own motorcycles who rent sessions on the track to hone their skills.

Acosta’s father, also Pedro, was one such rider, with a love for American legend Kevin Schwanz, and eager for his son to inherit his love for two wheels.

“Dad had a Suzuki like Schwantz’s and I grew up looking at the photos and videos of him.” said Acosta in an interview with Spanish publication Marca.

Acosta’s father, keen to see his son carry on the mantle, give him a €150 Chinese Motina bike at the age of five, and brought him to track days at the Cartagena circuit to watch his father ride.

“At first he was not interested, spending more time playing rather than watching, but he soon began to become intrigued to what I was doing.” said his father.

Acosta enrolled into a youth development program at the track ran by early mentor Francisco Marmol, a name that would become an integral part in Acosta’s rise to stardom.

“He would always be at the track with his father, and after a few years we enrolled him in our program, like an after-school club for riders.” said Marmol.

“He developed a taste for it very quickly, and grew a strong bond with me, he listened very intently and it became apparent that he had no fear.”

“He was open to experiment and try new things that I suggested. Some people say they can see a natural talent in children this age but it is not true, it is too early. But Acosta was always ready to learn, and enjoyed every moment, and that was the key.”

The son of a modest fisherman and a mother Mercedes, who didn’t care for racing, Acosta, with the help of Marmol and the KSB Federation, entered numerous national championships as soon as he was old enough, and won the Pre Moto3 championship in 2017.

As a result, Acosta entered the Spanish Junior Moto3 category (CEV), finishing 33rd after racing in just five races, but more importantly giving him his first proper taste of 250cc machinery.

His stint in the CEV gave him the confidence to apply for the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, the official starter class for the MotoGP championship and a place where teams scalp for potential talents.

Acosta made the cut, and in 2019 he began his first foray into international racing.

He impressed, taking three victories and five podiums on the way to a second place finish after 12 races.

In 2020, Acosta remained in the Rookie’s Cup and claimed an unprecedented six straight victories and a further three podiums to take the championship n his second attempt.

His performance got teams talking, and for 2021 Acosta joined the Austrian Red Bull Ajo KTM team on the factory KTM RC250, colours that would propel him into the eyes of the world.

The current crop of riders are already heaping praise on the Spanish youngster, but are concerned that his rapid rise to stardom could be his downfall.

“It is clear that he can become a champion, he has the talent, but he has to surround himself with the right people.” said 2020 champion Joan Mir.

This is a sentiment that is echoed amongst the other riders, with Franco Morbidelli and Marquez all offering words of wisdom to the 17-year-old.

“He must be left alone to enjoy his time on the bike, to concentrate on his development and not be forced to advance to quickly.” said Marquez.

Marquez is referring to rumors that Acosta is already being touted for MotoGP ride, skipping the intermediate Moto2 category altogether, a move that has concerned many.

“Moto2 is a valuable stepping stone, you learn a lot from 675cc racing machinery that you can’t pick up from Moto3, or even training on larger bikes.” said Mir.

“As Pecco (Bagnaia, current Ducati rider) said, two years in each category is sensible, it is important not to rush. It is clear he is something special but he must do what is best for him not what is best for the teams or promotions.”

What Acosta does next year is uncertain, but from humble beginnings he has gained admiration from not only his childhood heroes, but also racing fans across the globe.

American racing champion Dick Mann passes away

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from https://www.roadracingworld.com

Racing Legend Dick Mann passes away – from a press release issued By American Motorcyclist Association

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and Racing Legend Dick Mann Passes

Mann, a two-time AMA Grand National Champion, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Dick “Bugsy” Mann, one of the most versatile racers to ever throw a leg over a motorcycle, passed away on April 26 at the age of 86.

Mr. Mann, born June 13, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah, was a two-time AMA Grand National Champion (1963 and 1971), and became best known for being the first person to achieve a motorcycle racing Grand Slam, which involved winning across all five types of circuits included in the Grand National Championship: road racing, TT, short track, half-mile and mile. When he retired from racing in 1974, Mann had 24 national victories, which — at the time — placed him second in all-time wins within the AMA Grand National Series.

While Mann got his racing start in scrambles, he soon got hooked on turning left on dirt ovals, and after some time learning his trade, headed to the professional racing circuit in 1954, turning expert in 1955. He achieved his first national win at the Peoria TT in 1959, quickly establishing himself as an elite racer in the series.

Mann also helped pioneer the sport of motocross in the U.S., competing in several of the early AMA professional motocross races in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Perhaps Mann’s most fulfilling national win was his victory in the 1970 Daytona 200 aboard the then-new Honda CB750. He’d been racing the Daytona 200 for 15 years and finished second three times, and in 1970 finally got to the top step of the podium, holding off rising stars and future Hall of Famers Gary Nixon and Gene Romero, as well as former world champion and Hall of Famer Mike Hailwood. That win wasn’t just Mann’s first victory at the 200, but the first time a Honda had won an AMA national.

Despite retiring from professional racing in 1974, Mann returned to his trail-riding roots in 1975, qualifying for the United States International Six Days Trial team, competed for the U.S. on the Isle of Man, and brought home a bronze medal.

Beyond being a legendary racer, Mann’s mentorship of the next generation of American racers and future Hall of Famers like Dave Aldana, Mert Lawwill and Kenny Roberts, was just as important.

In 1995, Mr. Mann was presented with the AMA Dud Perkins Lifetime Achievement Award, recognizing his significant contributions to the sport. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Honoring Motorcycle Racing Legend Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Flat Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (April 28, 2021) – AMA Pro Racing joins the motorcycle community in mourning the loss of the great Dick Mann. Mann passed Monday at 86 years of age.

The winner of two Grand National Championships, Mann was touted as one of the greatest to ever compete in various motorcycle racing disciplines. Mann is best known for being the first person to ever win all five types of circuit included in the AMA Grand National Championship: short track, TT, half-mile, mile and road race.

Mann continued to contribute to the legacy of motorcycle racing by influencing some of the greatest names in flat track including Gene Romero, Gary Nixon, Mert Lawwill, Kenny Roberts and Dave Aldana.

Mann was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993 and the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Progressive American Flat Track will observe a moment of silence in Mann’s honor during its opening ceremonies at Saturday’s event at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Statement of Condolence on Passing of Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Honda

Hall of Famer earned Honda’s first big motorcycle-race win in the U.S.

April 28, 2021 — TORRANCE, Calif.

Following Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann at the age of 86, American Honda today honored the versatile racer.

A true Renaissance man, Mann was noted for his adaptability as a rider, and for the longevity of his professional motorcycle-racing career, which included charter membership in the exclusive Grand Slam Club (for riders who earned Grand National wins in road racing, short track, TT, half-mile and mile competition), two AMA Grand National Championships and a bronze medal for Team USA in the 1975 International Six Days Trial. According to Racer X Illustrated, Mann even scored a win at the first AMA-sanctioned professional motocross race. Those successes came with a variety of brands, but the Utah native’s primary tie with Honda centered on a single race—the 1970 Daytona 200.

It was Honda’s first factory effort in the legendary endurance event, with a four-rider project aboard CR750 machinery (the racing version of the now-iconic CB750 four-cylinder, which had started production just a year earlier). Conversely, Mann (then 35) had a long and relatively successful history at the race, though victory had eluded him to that point.

After launching from the front row of an all-star starting grid, Mann eventually secured the lead, then preserved the bike in the race’s latter stages to score a 10-second win over Gene Romero, with Don Castro third. In the process, Mann ran a record average race speed of 102.697 mph. It was Honda’s first AMA National Championship race win, and it established the CB750 at the top of the performance hierarchy. (Over four decades later, Motorcyclist magazine would name it the Bike of the Century.) As such, the victory was significant not only for Honda, but for its American subsidiary.

“For a Japanese company with its first, completely unproven big bike, it was hard to top that,” Bob Hansen, then American Honda’s National Service Manager, is quoted as saying in Aaron P. Frank’s book Honda Motorcycles.

“Hansen prepared the machine, and I rode it as best I could, just as I was contracted to do. That was it,” said the humble Mann in the same book.

Mann, who would back up the Daytona 200 win the following year aboard a BSA, was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 1993, and he is a charter member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

“Everyone at American Honda sends their heartfelt condolences to Dick Mann’s family, friends and fans,” said Bill Savino, Senior Manager of Customer Engagement at American Honda. “Dick tallied a number of accomplishments over the course of his long career, but he’ll always hold a special spot in our hearts for the role he played in proving that Honda motorcycles could perform with the very best.”

Dick Mann at Daytona in 1971 on his BSA road racer.

Mourning the first Honda US champion / MotoAmerica Superbike
by Eileen Curry from https://www.thewestonforum.com

The American motorsport world lost one of its first great champions. American Dick Mann died on Monday at the age of 86; He was an iconic character in the early Honda years.

Dick Mann was seen as a versatile racing driver who was quick to adapt to new conditions. His long career contained countless seasons in various categories of motorsport, all of which were easy to handle. Mann was a founding member of the exclusive “Grand Slam Club” in the USA, an organization that welcomed national winners in the fields of road, short track, tourist prize and drag races over the half-mile plus the full mile.

In 1975 he won a bronze medal with Team USA in a six-day international trial, and Mann won the AMA National Championship twice. Especially impressive: In AMA’s first-ever motocross race, the race driver emerged from Salt Lake City victorious.

The American competed for Honda at the Daytona 200 at the Daytona International Speedway in 1970 on the four-cylinder CB750. The 35-year-old surprisingly won his first Japanese factory outing in Daytona. Day to day, it made Honda a legend in American motorbike racing, and the manufacturer had never before been represented at an AMA event. Because he defeated GP star Mike Hailwood in that race, this success had an important place in his resume.

In 1971 he repeated the victory of Daytona over the Bosnian Serb Army. In total, Mann handled 240 AMA races, of which he won 24. At the age of 40, he ended his road racing career and returned to his trial roots. Until the 1990s, Mann regularly competed in races, and in 2006 he opened an exhibition in his honor entitled “Superman” in the American MotoGP Hall of Fame. During his career as a racing driver, he built motorcycle tires and other parts for off-road motorcycles.

Mann passed away on April 26, 2021 at the age of 86.

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Limited Edition

By General Posts

by Dragos Chitulescu from https://www.autoevolution.com

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Costs as Much as a Ferrari, Comes With Zero Miles.

When Honda first announced the RC213V-S a few years ago, quite a few people were hoping that they would at least get a chance to see this bike with their own eyes. After Honda took Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez to the RedBull Ring to test it, pointing out that this is the closest you could ever get to a MotoGP motorcycle, levels of excitement continued soaring.

Not long ago, we showed you a very spectacular Ducati 1299 Superleggera, which was already a very fast and very expensive motorcycle, and it looks like it still hasn’t been sold. But the fact that this RC213V-S just popped up is even more impressive. Because it’s nearly three times more expensive than the aforementioned Ducati, and it’s also much rarer.

Honda initially planned to release just 250 units of this bike, but rumors have pointed out that a smaller number has made it to production stages. It is a hand-built motorcycle in a dedicated factory in Japan, and the bike that is for sale here is unit number 007, which gives it an extra degree of coolness.

Looking over the specs, this particular unit is almost like the MotoGP bike but without the pneumatic valves and the seamless transmission.

Those were changed to provide increased reliability for people using them on public roads. There are also other elements to make it road-legal such as the headlights, taillights, side mirrors, a horn, and a license plate holder. While the “normal” (if you can call it that) version came with just 157 horsepower, this bike also has the optional HRC Sport kit, which should provide you with about 212 horsepower.

The parts included in the kit are just what you need to get the whole racing experience. There are many lightweight materials on this bike, and the way the chassis was built means that you will need a fair share of courage and skills to even acknowledge its potential. Not to mention the fact that just by riding it down the road won’t be enough for you to tell the difference from a tamer, albeit fast 1000cc bike.

All you need to do now is come up with £219,995 ($306,796), which is what you would expect to pay for a brand new Ferrari. But I guess it makes sense considering the odometer reads zero miles. Right now, I’m tempted to say that if I could afford to pay that much for a motorcycle, and if I had considerably more experience with race bikes than I do now, I would probably go all out and on a world tour of all the race tracks where MotoGP is held and see what it can do.

But I guess it’s considerably more likely for someone just to buy this and place it in storage or put it on display for years to come. And in 20 or 30 years from now, when everyone is likely to be riding electric bikes only, people will look at it and probably label it as a slow, outdated motorcycle, but a fascinating piece of history nonetheless.

Sam Lowes wins double in Doha

By General Posts

Lowes holds nerve for brilliant Doha double!

Sam Lowes emerged victorious in a thrilling late duel to win his second Moto2 race in succession while Augusto Fernandez made big strides to score an excellent sixth.

The Losail International Circuit was the scene of a second Moto2 race in as many weeks, and was one where Elf Marc VDS Racing Team riders Sam Lowes and Augusto Fernandez both finished in the top six.

Despite the strong wind, Lowes’ race winning pace was incredible. The Englishman posted a new race record time for the Moto2 class – 39’52.702 – and was over 10 seconds quicker than the race here one week ago.

After making drastic changes to his set-up on Friday, Augusto felt more comfortable in race two. Starting from tenth on the grid, the 23-year old was in the midst of an eight-rider fight for fifth place for the entire race.

He finished the race strongly, and climbed one place on the last lap to finish sixth. To show his improvement over the second weekend of the year, Fernandez’s race time was 11 seconds faster than he managed one week ago.

“I’m getting my confidence back”

“I’m very happy! It seems this set-up direction is the correct one. It has been a really hard two weeks here. We were a bit lost in the test and the first race, changing parts. And we didn’t have so much time to test for the races because of the times of the sessions. It was difficult to turn around the situation. But after a tough start, we got sixth position and sit seventh in the championship. Also, I’m getting my confidence back. The end of the race was so strong. I had good pace and was making 1’59s. I was strong on the brakes and passing a lot of people. We will take all of these positives to Portimao. Step by step we are getting closer.”

Starting from his second pole position of the season, Lowes got a solid start and passed early leader Marco Bezzecchi on the fourth lap of 20.

But this wasn’t straightforward. Lowes faced intense pressure from Remy Gardner through the second half of the race. His lead never exceeded 0.483s but he kept his composure, and posted the fastest time of the race – a 1’58.954 – on the last lap to win by 0.190s.

Lowes’ victory means he is the first rider in Moto2 history to win the opening two races from pole position. What’s more, he becomes the first British rider to win the first two races of the season in the intermediate category since Mike Hailwood did so in 1966!

“I think we saved the best for last”

“We had three weeks here in the desert with very changeable conditions. It was definitely not easy. But I think we saved the best for last! That was really fast race pace – the fastest we’ve had in Qatar in Moto2. I’m really happy with how I approached these two races. I feel I’ve improved in myself and can be more relaxed in the race. I know it’s only the start of the year, but it’s been a really good start. To have somebody behind me all race and not make any mistakes is really important and that will give me a lot of confidence. When I won last year and last week, I had a bigger gap so this was a bit different and I managed fine and felt really comfortable. I’m looking forward to getting to Portugal and being able to ride there with two hands this time! Last year that wasn’t the case. We’ve had a great few weeks, everyone is ready for home and I couldn’t be happier to take 50 points back.”