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Monster Energy Releases ‘The Unknown Ride 2’ Motorcycle Action Film On Youtube Today

By | General Posts

It’s finally here! Once again, Monster Energy teams up with UNKNOWN Industries crew for their second and highly anticipated video feature: ‘The UNKNOWN Ride 2’ follows Nick Leonetti, Buddy Suttle, Kade Gates, Seth Brisson, Wheelie Pig and Arizonan wheelie prodigy Tallboy Tee smashing the streets through the Sonoran Desert of Tucson, Arizona on their iconic Harley’s.

Presented by Monster Energy and produced by Lurk Creative in partnership with UNKNOWN Industries, ‘The UNKNOWN Ride 2’ is live on YouTube as a full-length feature. Follow the link to see the highly anticipated thirteen-minute action video that has the motorcycle world buzzing.

The new release is the official sequel to 2016’s mini action flick ‘The UNKNOWN Ride’ that was shot in Oakland, California, and has garnered over 2.7 million views on YouTube to date. Four years later, the crew is back, upping the ante with a potent blend of high-octane bike action, next level cinematography, scenic Arizona vistas, and a special appearance by the Monster Energy Girls.

“This is probably one of the sickest films we have ever made! I’m so fortunate to be creating high-production content with some of my closest friends like Nick and Buddy. The Unknown crew came through and raised the bar, putting their unique riding skills on full display. Tucson’s year-round sunshine and the scenic desert landscape provided the perfect backdrop for another true classic,” said Ash Hodges aka Dirt Shark, who directed and produced the new film. “The Unknown Ride was a Bay Area classic and I didn’t know how to back that one up. Luckily, the City of Tucson and Pima County gave us the key to the City and let us create another video banger. We really focused on stepping up the production value and cinematography on this one to compete with the original Unknown Ride piece. Helicopters, a dedicated camera vehicle, and raw audio set up on each bike really helped elevate our game. This one really came together!”

Ride along as ‘The UNKNOWN Ride 2’ crew rips through the streets of Tucson and out into the Sonoran Desert in search of missing rider ‘Wheelie Pig.’ See the Unknown riders drift their Harley’s through iconic Tucson locations, including Tallboys Bar, and wheelie down the infamous Miracle Mile. Also watch the crew burn rubber and lurk through the desert landscapes passing spectacular cacti, including the giant saguaro, a symbol of the American Southwest.

Filmed in 4K high-definition, the action cycles through night and day as the UNKNOWN’s crew burn out, slide, and 12 o’clock wheelie over the hot Arizona concrete past the city’s signature neon lights.

The short film premiered last night in a special free-to-attend event presented by Monster Energy at Mystic Theatre in the Unknown’s hometown of Petaluma, California. Those in attendance were treated to a concert with Mickey Avalon, and a special appearance from Monster Energy’s freestyle motocross riders Axell Hodges and Jeremy Stenberg who have cameos in the piece.

The first 200 guests, comprised of both Bay Area and Sonoma County hardcore enthusiasts received a special long sleeve commemorative T-shirt designed for the premiere event by Ash Hodges.

Ready to see what all of the hype’s about? See for yourself as the thirteen-minute-long, ‘The UNKNOWN Ride 2’ is available to watch now, free online on YouTube.

Also make sure to follow the social media hashtag #UnknownRide2 for athlete stories and behind-the-scenes looks at this high-octane video production and launch event.

Media representatives can click on the following link to download video and photo assets surrounding the launch of ‘The UNKNOWN Ride 2’ video presented by Monster Energy and produced by Lurk Creative featuring the UNKNOWN Industries team.

Also visit www.monsterenergy.com and follow Monster Energy on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter for exclusive updates on our team of moto athletes.

Motorcycle clubs come together to offer Vietnam vet one last ride

By | General Posts

by Danielle Avitable from https://www.nbc4i.com

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — A local Vietnam veteran had one last wish while in hospice care, and that was to ride a motorcycle one more time.

On Sunday, a group of riders made his dream possible.

Vietnam veteran Roger L. Smith was wheeled out of the house, surrounded by loved ones and riders.

“I said I want to get on a bike at least one time before I die,” said Smith.

And that’s what he got.

“He requested a last ride and, for us, it’s veterans helping veterans,” said Steve Murray of Combat Veterans Motorcycle Club.

In addition to Combat Veteran, other groups taking part in the ride included Ohio Patriot Bikers and Punishers Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club.

Smith’s health has been declining over the last three weeks.

“He started having issues with Agent Orange affecting his lungs. His lungs are crystalizing. He can’t breathe that well,” said one friend.

Prior to his health issues, friends said he used to solely drive a motorcycle to work, but before Sunday, he hasn’t been on a bike in two years.

“I feel like I lost a part of myself,” Smith said. “I haven’t been on a bike in a couple years because of my lungs. I’m dying from inside out. I had to do this for me.”

Before the group took off, everyone gathered around Smith for a prayer. “We give you thanks for these veterans as they make his wish come true.”

More than two dozen rider then hopped on their bikes, and engines started roaring before they took off for one last ride.

“I kept pulling up beside him and he kept putting his thumbs up,” said Murray. “He was so happy. He was so happy it made my day.”

Murray added a ride like Smith’s is a demonstration of unity not only among veterans, but also motorcycle clubs.

“I think everyone was here for the same purpose and he was the purpose,” said one rider. “That’s pretty much what we do. We stick together and support each other.”

As the group pulled back into the driveway, Smith had a big smile on his face and gave everyone a thumbs up. However, the other riders were also thanking him for this ride.

“It’s truly an honor to do this and we do a lot of rides for charities and events, but when you can do this for a veteran who requested one final ride, it’s a great feeling,” Murray said.

Montreal woman leaves her job, hits the road for solo motorcycle trip across Canada

By | General Posts

Wendy McGean fulfilled her dream — of driving cross-country on a motorcycle — at 55 years old

Suddenly, in her late forties, Wendy McGean started having an unexpected reaction every time she’d spot a motorcycle on the road.

“My head would just pivot and I’d think: ‘I really want to do that!” she told CBC Montreal’s Daybreak.

At the time, she thought it was an odd feeling for a married mother of two teenage daughters with a white collar job.

“It was a very traditional kind of life,” she said.

Before she knew it, McGean was leaving all that behind — her home, her job, even her marriage.

“Some people thought I’d absolutely lost my mind,” McGean said. “I just completely turned my life upside down.”

Just one kick at the can

McGean started to chase her dream of riding a motorcycle at 51 years old, signing herself up for circuit training. She realized that she didn’t feel comfortable on only two wheels and bumped up to a three-wheeled bike.

She said it was “love at first sight,” and suddenly McGean was buying a bike of her own.

“I think it’s the first thing in my life I found that I thought, ‘this is mine,'” she said. “It represents complete and utter freedom.”

Not long after McGean got a taste of that freedom, she suffered a major loss. Her father died.

“[It] made me realize that if there’s something that I want to do in my life, then I better get at it,” she said. “So I made the decision to leave my marriage.”

After 23 years of married life, McGean said she started to feel like a square peg and her life was a round hole. Something just didn’t fit anymore.

“I was lucky enough to have somebody that understood that I needed to explore that,” she said.

After living on her own for a while, McGean saw that her workplace was offering an early retirement package that she qualified for. She took it, moved out of her apartment and put everything she owned in storage, except for a one-person tent.

“I got on my bike and headed north without any reservations or anything,” she said.

Forging connections, old and new

With no plans and no commitments, McGean spent the next five weeks riding west to Tofino, B.C. and back, stopping in different towns and meeting new people.

One man she met at a gas station was intrigued by her motorcycle and struck up a conversation about his own cross-country ride on a bike. Before pulling out of the station, he gave her a hug.

“Stopping and having conversations with people I met along the way was probably the best part of the whole trip,” she said.

McGean also took the opportunity to reconnect with people she hadn’t seen in years — she spent a night with a friend in Ontario she hadn’t seen since high school, and also stopped to visit some cousins in Manitoba.

McGean’s cross-country treks are over, for now, but she said she’s grateful for the experience.

“At some point along the way, I finally realized that I had to live my life for me,” she said. “I had to do things that made me happy.”

She’s not sure what lies ahead for her, but McGean is now looking for a job doing something she loves in the Montreal area because she wants to be near her daughters, who are now in their 20s.

Looking back, she said her adventures really helped her come into her own.

“I’m comfortable in my own skin now. Probably for the first time in my life.”

Three-year-old girl rides her own mini-motorcycle – with training wheels – as she zooms along a trail with her father

By | General Posts

by Raven Saunt from https://www.dailymail.co.uk/

  • The footage was recorded on a helmet-cam by Bob Trabuco in Phelan, California
  • The 39-year-old drives down a sandy track with his daughter, Presley, up ahead
  • Social media users were quick to say that she was too young to be on the track

A three-year-old girl was caught on camera riding her own mini-motorcycle as she zoomed along a trail with her father.

The footage was recorded on a helmet-cam by Bob Trabuco in Phelan, California.

In the video, the 39-year-old can be seen driving down the sandy track on a blue motorbike with expanses of open space up ahead.

His three-year-old daughter Presley, who is wearing a grey t-shirt and pink helmet, has come to a stop on the left-hand side of the screen.

She is straddling her own mini-motorbike with her stabilizers keeping her steady on the ground.

Bob looks toward his daughter and says: ‘This might be the most fun day ever riding motorcycles Presley, do you know that?’

The little girl, who is equipped with her own helmet-cam, turns around to look at him before saying that she is ‘too stuck’.

Bob gives her a helping hand and urges the bike forward with his foot before the pair begin to accelerate around the course.

The pair continue to navigate across the rocky terrain before hesitating outside a tunnel as Presley says: ‘Every time I go through a tunnel its too noisy.’

But her father continues to encourage her to complete the course and the video ends shortly after.

The footage was recorded last month during Presley’s first real outing on a motorcycle.

Marketing manager Bob uploaded the clip to his YouTube Channel, Suburban Delinquent, but was quickly met with criticism by users who said that Presley was too young to be out on a track.

One user, wzrubicon, wrote: ‘Actually, it is too young as a three-year-old’s coordination hasn’t even come close to developing.

‘I know others here are saying how cool and great this is, but it’s really f***** up.

‘This is like saying it’s okay for a three-year-old to climb out on a limb 50 feet up a tree.’

Another, Michael Mulcahey, added: ‘When the kid whines non stop then starts crying it’s definitely too soon and not cute.’

But he reassured the internet that Presley, who had mastered a push bike at the age of two, was perfectly safe.

The father-of-one said: ‘I was the proudest parent ever.

‘Never in my life did I think I would be in a situation like that – I choked up a few times while on that trail.

‘Presley is sharp, caring and a bit of a daredevil – she loves to put herself out there.

‘When we go anywhere she will seek out any other kid no matter what their age is and try to be best friends with them, it’s really fun to watch her navigate in social environments.

‘Since she was an infant she has been exposed to motorcycles in one way or another as I own a few.

‘She took an interest in learning to ride on her own after watching videos on YouTube, she watched another little girl learn and asked if she could also learn to ride.

‘My wife and I felt she was capable of taking direction – Presley is smart, she listens and understands consequences associated with risks.’

He added: ‘Presley absolutely didn’t want to go through the tunnel. I think she thought there might be monsters in there, I’m not sure.

‘I ended up having to ride her bike through it.

‘This is Presley’s second time on a motorcycle, her first experience was on Thanksgiving weekend.

‘I put her on the bike and explained the controls and dangers of operating a motorcycle.

‘She rode in a small circle while I chased after her on foot yelling instructions at her.

‘I was terrified so it only lasted a couple of minutes before the bike was put away.’

Other social media users, however, praised Presley’s fearlessness and Bob’s parenting skills.

One, ParanormalRider1, commented: ‘That’s some wholesome family content right there.

‘Parenting done right.’

Anotehr, 2wheelLove1, wrote: ‘Simultaneously the cutest and most badass thing I’ve ever seen. Lol.’

Bob said he was thrilled with the good feedback after posting the clip online and highlighted that next time Presley will be wearing her gloves.

He said: ‘I do appreciate the concern but I’m confident that we did everything right.

‘I had pretty much everything she needed to keep her safe, I did forget to bring her gloves though – I won’t let that happen again, the internet slayed me for it.

‘The helmet-to-helmet communications kept it safe, it meant I was able to very calmly give her direction and advice.

‘By not yelling stuff over the sounds of the bikes it helped keep emotions to a minimum.

‘Presley understood what she was doing and I knew what to look for, we spoke about everything extensively before the bike was ever started.

‘The day she’s able to pick the bike up on her own and hold it up with at least one foot planted is the day those wheels come off.

‘Besides a few internet trolls, the response to the video has been really positive – with thousands of people from all over the world praising her.

‘It’s really cool to hear strangers share their personal stories of their first time riding or riding with their kids.

‘I can’t believe how many people have been touched through this video, I think it brought back a lot of memories for some.

‘I also think the world is insane at the moment and we all need a “feel-good” video to remind us we are all just humans.’

Presley shows no signs of slowing down with Bob claiming she’s desperate to hit the track again.

He said: ‘I have plans to take Presley out in future as she’s been asking a lot lately.

‘We’ll go again real soon and I’ll make sure to film it and put the video up for everyone to see.

‘It’s really funny, anytime someone new comes over she makes them watch the video – she’s very proud of it and so are we.

‘We haven’t been back out since as I have been looking for a new place without any rocks.

‘The message I would like people to take from this video would be to experience life and do it with those who you love – for me, motorcycling allows me to do that.

‘I hope the video inspires some to get their kids away from the TV or games and try something new.’

Join the Cantina – Subscribe Today

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NEW BIKERNET AND BANDIT’S CANTINA PROGRAMS FOR 2020

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Pink and Carey Hart went on motorcycle ride for 14th anniversary

By | General Posts

from http://www.contactmusic.net/

Pink and Carey Hart celebrated 14 years of marriage with a motorcycle ride in Ojai, California.

Pink and Carey Hart marked their 14th anniversary with a motorcycle ride.

The loved up couple – who married on January 7, 2006 – wanted a low-key celebration to mark the occasion, and they decided to hit the road in California earlier this month to enjoy a trip together.

She told ‘Entertainment Tonight’: We went on a motorcycle ride. We went to Ojai and stayed in an Airstream and it was really fun.”

The pair – who share daughter Willow, eight, and son Jameson, three, together – are grateful for each other and the family they’re raising.

Pink added: ”I mean, it’s fun to have a family and to be able to say, ‘Do you remember?’ or I’ll say something like, ‘I can’t believe my dad said that.’

”And Carey will be like, ‘He said that 10 years ago.’ And I’m like, ‘He did?’ So, it’s good that he reminds me of what happens in my life.”

The two lovebirds both shared romantic posts on Instagram last week to mark their anniversary, with Pink admitting their relationship ”isn’t perfect” but still showering her man with praise.

She wrote: ”We’ve been at this thing a long time, babe. It isn’t perfect, but I’m grateful it’s ours.

”I love our family. Thank you for walking in front of me, beside me, and right behind me at times.”

And Carey described his wife as his ”best friend”, while admitting she doesn’t like it when he says that.

He said: ”14 years married to this amazing woman. I’m so proud of the life that we have built together.

”Both of us came from broken homes, yet we made the choice to work hard at our relationship. And look at us now!

”Two misfits when we met, we have grown together and now have an amazing family. Thank you for being my best friend (I know you don’t like that), and amazing mother to our wild kids. I love you so much.”

Davey Todd and Julien Toniutti appointed to collaborate in TT2 Isle of Man Video Game

By | General Posts

BIGBEN AND KT RACING PARTNER WITH THE BEST IN TT ISLE OF MAN – RIDE ON THE EDGE 2

Lesquin, France, January 14, 2020 – As a new year begins, KT Racing returns with the sequel to the widely acclaimed TT Isle of Man. To provide players with the most realistic simulation possible, the studio turned to one of the best up-and-coming riders, Davey Todd, and the fastest French rider on the Isle of Man circuit, Julien Toniutti.

Davey Todd is a young English rider who specialises in road racing and already has an impressive trophy haul at only 23 years old. In 2018, while preparing for his first Isle of Man TT, Davey decided to practise on his brother’s console for two months so he could perfect his knowledge of the iconic 60km circuit. As a result, he was ranked 2nd in the game’s worldwide leaderboards and became the second fastest newcomer of all time in the real race. In 2019 he proved his riding talents in his second appearance at the TT by finishing in the top 8 in all categories and achieving 6th place in the Senior Race.

2020 represents a new year full of ambition for Davey, who is also the TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 ambassador and the face of the game.

Like Davey Todd, Julien Toniutti collaborated on the game’s production by sharing his experience and impressions with the developers to help them create a strikingly realistic simulation and optimise all aspects of the riding physics.

“Competing in the TT is the ultimate dream of any rider. In TT Isle Of Man – Ride on The Edge 2, the aim is to reproduce the sensation of speed and adrenalin, as well as the concentration and control required for any Tourist Trophy rider, while the player sits comfortably in their chair, risk free,” said Julien.

Julien Toniutti is an experienced rider who has taken part in the TT three times. In 2018 he beat the all-time fastest lap record for a French rider on the Isle of Man circuit and subsequently received the “Fastest French Road Racing Rider” award at the Paris Motorcycle Show.

In the next few weeks, you can experience the fruit of these collaborations and the resulting improvements by picking up a controller.

Created in 1907, the TT is the world’s most famous motorcycle race. The 61km course with 260 bends is the most iconic circuit for road-racing riders. With officially licensed riders, bikes and tracks, TT Isle of Man – Ride on the Edge 2 boasts new physics and a new career mode for players to improve their riding skills.

TT Isle of Man 2 will be available in March 2020 on consoles and PC

Find all the information on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.

About Bigben
Bigben, a leading publisher of video games on PC and consoles, is known for its creativity and innovation. After its acquisition of four development studios (Cyanide, Eko, KT Racing and Spiders), which are all internationally recognised for their expertise in different genres, Bigben is strengthening its position as a developer and publisher of premium games and is aiming to become the world’s leading AA publisher. www.bigben.fr

About Kylotonn
Created in 2006, Kylotonn is one the most important French video game development studios, also known under KT Racing label. Specialized in motorsports and official developer of the WRC FIA World Rally Championship series and Isle of Man Tourist Trophy, the company is internationally recognized for its know-how and for the passion of its teams. With more than 100 employees as of today in Paris and Lyon, Kylotonn has developed more than 25 titles distributed by major publishers. Kylotonn has forged itself a strong technological expertise thanks to the real-time 3D engine KT Engine that the company owns. At the forefront of the video game industry, this technology is also used within R&D partnerships on autonomous vehicle projects in the automotive industry. Since 2018, Bigben Interactive, one of Europe’s leading video game publishers, holds a 100% stake in the company. Kylotonn is member of the French National Developers Federation (Syndicat National du Jeu Vidéo) and Capital Games. The company is supported by BPI, IFCIC and the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation.
For more information, visit Kylotonn’s website: www.kylotonn.com and follow the news on social networks Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and Youtube.

Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

By | General Posts

by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”