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MyMedicTM And Veterans Charity Ride Deliver Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) To Sturgis, South Dakota First Responders

By | General Posts

When: Friday, August 7th, 2020, 5:00 pm
Where: Indian Motorcycle Sturgis. 2130 Main St. Sturgis, SD 57785

All press and media invited to attend

When facing challenging times, Americans seek out ways to help one another. They rally together and support those in need. That is precisely what MyMedicTM and Veterans Charity Ride are doing on Friday, August 7th 2020, when they deliver a supply of personal protection equipment (PPE) to first responders in Sturgis, South Dakota. Due to a lack of funding and access needed to purchase and maintain proper PPE, first responders are showing up to emergency calls inadequately protected from exposure to COVID-19.

First responders will be receiving MyMedicTM Pandemic MedicTM Personal Protection Kits.

Veterans Charity Ride is a veteran operated non-profit organization that uses “motorcycle therapy” to help fellow veterans adjust to post-war life. Veterans (nominated through the VCR website) enjoy the therapeutic effects of motorcycle riding on an all-expense-paid cross-country adventure of a lifetime. The VCR motorcycle ride will begin in Moab, Utah, July, 28th and arrive in Sturgis, SD, on Friday, August 7th, 2020.
This year VCR is taking things a step further with its “service before self” initiative. This effort will directly offer support and appreciation for our nation’s first responders and professional medical workers, who have been working the frontlines during the COVID-19 pandemic.

ABOUT VETERANS CHARITY RIDE

Veterans Charity Ride (VCR), started by veterans for veterans, is a non-profit organization that delivers Motorcycle Therapy and additional life changing, life-saving holistic programs specifically designed to assist wounded and amputee combat veterans with their needs and the issues they deal with on a daily basis. Helping our fellow veterans through outreach, action, activities, education and follow-up is what drives our organization. The end result of our program is a healthier and happier, more capable individual, who is now living life in a much better physical and mental condition, and able to help and support other veterans to do the same.

Visit veteranscharityride.org to learn more and support this worthy cause.

About MyMedicTM

A family-operated First Aid Kits, Supplies, and Training company based on the objective to save lives, and is driven by a goal to prepare everyone with equipment and training for the unexpected emergency. Based out of Salt Lake City, Utah, MyMedicTM believes everyone should have instant access to a life-saving First Aid Kit. Visit MyMedicTM to learn more and follow

–Sara liberte

5-Ball Leathers’ Flat Out Vest and more

By | General Posts

5-BALL LEATHERS’ FLAT OUT VEST

$225.00$228.00

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW https://shop.bikernet.com/

The Flat Out Vest is the Leatherman Multi-Tool of Mens Motorcycle Leather vest

Our cleanest vest has now become our finest classic vest with no collar, but it does have the classic waist band. The front fist pockets are hidden. The chest pockets are classic western cut. They have killer storage with two deep gun pockets on the inside and our exclusive media pocket in the back for your latest issue of Cycle Source or divorce papers. These puppies are too cool and made with just the right leather grade, not too heavy and not too light.

100 Percentage- Flat Out VestEXTERIOR FEATURES:

  • (2) chest pockets
  • (2) waist pockets
  • (1) Sunglasses pocket

INTERIOR FEATURES:

  • (2) carry pockets with quick snaps
  • (1) Media Pocket
  • 100% cotton black/white plaid lining

JAK SHIRT 5/8th SLEEVE

$234.00$251.40

5-Ball Leathers Jak Shirt 5/8th

JAK SHIRT 5/8th SLEEVE CLUB – 5 Ball Leathers’ (8 Pocket). Features snap front closure with extended shirt-style tail that provides length in the trunk and delivers a slender look. All around one of the best fits.

The Jak Shirt Sleeveless Club is made from strong milled Buffalo leather, a top-grain quality leather (the most common type used in high-end leather products). It’s constructed at 0.9mm, a middle weight leather.

EXTERIOR FEATURES:

  • 2 chest pockets
  • 2 waist pockets
  • 1 Sunglasses pocket

100% Jak Shirt 5/8thINTERIOR FEATURES:

  • 2 carry pockets with quick snaps
  • 100% cotton black/white plaid lining
  • 1 Media Pocket

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW https://shop.bikernet.com/

WE HAVE MANY BIKER BOOKS IN THE SHOP – PICK YOUR CHOICE

SAM “CHOPPER” ORWELL – BOOK

$13.44

Fast-action fiction on two wheels! What does the future hold for rough and ready bikers? Discover how society eliminates motorcycles. Hold on as Sam “Chopper” Orwell fights to find freedom for the last remaining riders!

Discover How Society Eliminates Motorcycles. Hold on, as Sam “Chopper” Orwell fights to find freedom for the last remaining riders.

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW https://shop.bikernet.com/

Indian Motorcycle 2020 Sturgis Update

By | General Posts

Indian Motorcycle will be at the 80th Sturgis Rally. Due to the current circumstances, there will be no official owners ride or event. If you are planning to attend Sturgis, here are some additional details:

Sturgis patch will be available at the dealership

Demos will be available at the dealership and on Lazelle Street

VIP Demos for owners will be at the dealership

Owners that sign up for Elite Status at the dealership during Sturgis will get a special gift while supplies last

Ride safe & we hope to see you at the Sturgis owners event in 2021!

This year at the 80th Sturgis Rally, Indian Motorcycle has a VIP Demo Experience that is only for our owners. You have to sign up online before the event to reserve your spot.

An invite-only VIP demo experience for Indian Motorcycle Owners.

About this Event – August 7 to 15.

Because you’re an Indian Motorcycle Owner, you’ve been invited to an exclusive VIP Demo Experience hosted by Indian Motorcycle at the Sturgis Rally.

With this invite you get:

– A thorough walk around of whatever model you choose to ride

– A self-guided, one-hour demo ride

– A special gift

Date: VIP Demos are available almost every morning of the Sturgis Rally from 7:30 – 8:30am. *Please arrive early.

Where: The Indian Motorcycle Sturgis dealership, 2130 Main St, Sturgis, SD 57785

To sign up for the VIP Demo Experience, click the green register button above to sign up for a motorcycle to demo (while they last).

There is limited availability, so please RSVP quickly!

When: Arrive 15 minutes early. Kickstands up at 7:30 am and return at 8:30 am.

Bikes that are available to reserve:

3 – Indian Challengers

2 – Indian Chieftains

2 – FTR 1200s

1 – Indian Roadmaster

1 – Indian Springfield

1- Scout Bobber

Please arrive 15 minutes before your scheduled VIP Demo and make sure to bring proper riding gear: closed-toed shoes, long pants, and eye protection.

We will NOT HAVE helmets you can borrow.

This is an owner opportunity only.

Always wear a helmet, eye protection, protective clothing, and obey the speed limit. Never ride under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Sign up today. Spaces are limited and must be reserved before the rally starts. CLICK HERE

Location

Indian Motorcycle of Sturgis

2130 Main St

Sturgis, SD 57785

United States

Sturgis 2020, The History Behind the Badlands

By | General Posts

Worldwide circumstances have conspired to ensure that this year’s 80th anniversary Sturgis Rally won’t be the stellar celebration once planned

By Marilyn Stemp

That said, once August 7th rolls around, the eight-decade occasion will most certainly be marked, if with less fanfare.

As bike riders, we appreciate the significance of an 80-year milestone in motorcycling, especially one celebrated in western South Dakota where the aura of wild west rebellion and revelry so synergistically dovetails with biking.

CLICK HERE TO READ THIS ARTICLE ON BIKERNET

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St. Louis Maniac Gets Straight Razor Shave and Haircut While Riding a Harley

By | General Posts

by Daniel Hill from https://www.riverfronttimes.com

For many, the inability to get a proper haircut has been one of the more frustrating parts of the coronavirus crisis so far.

But one local man(iac) has a creative solution for the anxiety that comes with a simple trim nowadays: Get a shave and a haircut while riding a motorcycle.

It makes some sense: Why would one bother worrying about a virus when you’re one pothole away from getting your head cut off?

Steve Jones, a rider with the local Streetfighterz motorcycle outfit, is the subject of a video the group posted to YouTube this week wherein he gets a shave and a haircut from stylist Kurtiss Allen while riding a Harley through the streets of St. Louis.

The twelve-minute long video sees the pair rolling through the streets downtown while Allen uses scissors and a trimmer to cut and shape Jones’ hair and beard. Onlookers at stoplights frequently stop to gawk as the men playfully banter with them, with Jones telling a pedestrian at one point that Allen could shape his hair for him too if he wants.

Then, at about the 8:48 mark, things get truly wild as Allen pulls out the straight razor and starts working on Jones’ beard while the pair ride down Gravois. At about the 9:04 point, with a razor sharp blade to his face, Jones even appears to hit a small bump in the road. It’s enough to make a viewer — this viewer — cringe in terror, but Jones just keeps riding.

In all, the plan seems to go off without a hitch, turning what Jones describes at the top of the video as “this nasty mess that you guys have been seeing for the last few weeks” into a well-styled situation with surprisingly no bleeding wounds.

Watch the video for yourself below, and maybe don’t try this one at home:

 

Seattle’s motorcycle clubs ride free (but socially distanced)

By | General Posts

Nick “Double Tap” Ziehe of Cretin Motorcycle Club stands for a portrait at the crew’s clubhouse in Seattle’s Interbay neighborhood, April 20, 2020.

by Agueda Pacheco Flores from https://crosscut.com

Coronavirus has scooter, moped and motorcycle enthusiasts rolling with caution.

Long before he was president of the Cretins Motorcycle Club, Nick Ziehe was just a kid growing up in Renton, fascinated by his dad doing a complete overhaul of a Honda CB350.

The bike was a vintage racer, but one his father heavily modified. Ziehe recalls his dad plopping him on the seat of this “odd” looking bike for short rides on backroads around Lake Washington. In high school, when his friends were getting their first cars, Ziehe got his first bike, which he rebuilt with his dad.

Today, Ziehe, 48, works at Boeing as a manufacturing engineer, and for the past five years has led the Ballard-based Cretins Motorcycle Club (aka Cretins MC Seattle), which he joined 10 years ago. Among members, Ziehe is known as “Double Tap.” The club’s preferred bikes are vintage cafe racers, with an aesthetic hearkening to 1960s London.

The glue that holds the Cretins together is the love of riding. Spring usually marks the beginning of the riding season, when members take group rides and share the feeling of the road rolling out under their feet. But this spring is different.

The global coronavirus pandemic put the group’s planned March 28 spring opener ride on hold. The annual Taco Dash (a fundraiser involving minibikes, silly games and homemade tacos) scheduled for May 2, is up in the air. And the customary, rain or shine, Thursday night dive bar meet-ups (Cretin Nights) have gone virtual, from vroom-vroom to Zoom.

Washington is home to an abundance of motorcycle, moped and scooter clubs. In addition to the Cretins there are dozens of groups, including Jewish riding club The Tribe, the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, Los Gatos Gordos and women-only riding groups. According to the Washington Traffic Safety Commision, as of last year there were 237,976 registered motorcycles (this includes mopeds and scooters) in Washington, accounting for 3% of all vehicles registered in the state. Additionally, there are 429,238 people licensed to drive motorcycles.

For many, the longer, warmer days of spring signal a return to the road. Bikers start rolling motorcycles out of garages, and groups convene for scenic rides along highways lined with pines and miles of ocean coast. But Gov. Jay Inslee did not include motorcycle rides on the list of acceptable public activities during the coronavirus stay-at-home order.

“It’s not legally prohibited, but it’s a terrible idea at the moment,” Mike Faulk, Inslee’s press secretary, says by email. “People should limit travel to limit exposure and transmission. This is a legitimate crisis. Adventure can wait.”

Despite the rebellious reputation of motorcycle riders, the Cretins aren’t rule breakers.

“The motorcycle thing is obviously kind of a sticking point for us because we can’t go and ride together,” Ziehe says. “At the same time it’s the human aspect…. I want to make sure that my buddy is good and everything is copacetic. But I can do that online.”

While group rides are off the table, for now, Ziehe and other members still go out for solo rides along desolate stretches of roads to avoid people and practice social distancing as much as they can. A bonus: With traffic significantly down, the roads are more wide open than ever.

“It’s easy for me to hit a backroad and just get lost,” says Ziehe, who now lives in Maple Valley. “Riding a motorcycle is so therapeutic — it’s not like driving a car.”

For bikers, going on rides offers a kind of solitude that people who are socially distancing might not be able to achieve while visiting a park and working hard to stay 6 feet away from the dozens of other people trying to grab their own bit of sunshine.

“You got the wind blowing across you, and you can relax and take everything in,” Ziehe says. “It’s a good way to de-stress from everything that’s going on around you.”

But some bikers are rebels with a cause.

Last week, Doug Davis, president of local Jewish motorcycle club, The Tribe, rode with a small caravan of eight people from Bellevue to Anacortes.

“The truth of the matter is because everybody is homebound and we have a lot of retired and semiretired people, we are riding much more,” says Davis, 66. “If you ask most of us what the number one thing they want to be doing, it’s usually going to be motorcycle riding. You’re out on the road — just you and nature.”

Not all members of The Tribe have chosen to go on rides. But a subgroup of the Bellevue-based posse of mostly 60-somethings have gone out at least twice a week for the past five weeks. And while the group of riders, who primarily own Harley Davidsons, are in an age group that’s considered more vulnerable to coronavirus, Davis says they’re doing everything they can to stay safe.

By Washington state law, motorcyclists are required to wear helmets, which can range from half helmets to full head coverage. Some helmets have face shields; riders in The Tribe who don’t have a face shield wear cloth face masks. (As is customary in biker culture, they also wear leather gloves.) They stay 6 feet apart while on their feet and when out on the road at upwards of 60 miles per hour, they keep two bike lengths between them.

And The Tribe isn’t the only local group that’s taking their chances on the newly empty roads.

Alex Sokolowski owns Magic Touch Mopeds, a full service garage in Seattle specifically for mopeds. He says his business currently has a steady influx of customers, but it’s not nearly as busy as it usually is around this time of year. And when customers do call in for an appointment, some get cold feet when the time comes to drop off their bike.

“We’ve definitely taken a hit because mopeds are generally a social thing,” Sokolowski explains. “Even if you don’t have any problems, the first thing you would want to do when you get your bike running is go visit the moped shop to show it off.”

Sokolowski is also the president of the Moped Army’s Seattle branch, which has 25 active members. As of now, official club business is indefinitely postponed. But some in the moped community, including Sokolowski, meet up for “social distance rides” on Sundays and “moped Mondays.”

“We’ll ride out and then disband at the end of the ride,” Sokolowski says. “Which is different from the way we usually do moped Monday.”

Because the moped’s engines are smaller than those in motorcycles, riders go for shorter distances. And especially now, they are avoiding winding roads.

“It’s obviously not the time you would want to have any sort of incident and visit the ER,” Sokolowski says. Additionally, he says, no one in the club who’s gone out for a ride has exhibited symptoms of the virus. (The CDC cautions that even asymptomatic people can spread the coronavirus.)

“Everybody that I know has been taking the quarantine pretty seriously, and has put a lot of thought into making the decision to go out and socially distance with our moped rides,” he says.

One event still in question is the annual “Mods and Rockers” ride, a June tradition that nods to the historic rivalry between Mods (scooter riders) and Rockers (motorcyclists). Legend has it the two subcultures battled it out on the beaches of Brighton, U.K., in 1964, in a fight that lasted two days. But these days the event is cause for friendly celebration of the two-wheeled lifestyle.

“The Cretins are great. I’ve partied with them many times,” Sokolowski says of the “rocker” club. “They’ve opened their clubhouse to us before and we’ve hosted parties there in the past.”

More than 80 riders on scooters, motorcycles and mopeds usually gather for Mods and Rockers — the mods starting their engines on one side of town, the rockers on the other. After meeting in the middle, the squads join forces and ride to a bar and afterparty.

Ziehe hopes the stay-at-home order isn’t extended into June, so that the Mods and Rockers can take to the road for the commemorative ride.

“We’re just holding out to make that decision to pull the plug on all of our events,” he says. “We’re not the only ones waiting and getting antsy.”

Regardless of the rules, Ziehe expects there will probably still be some riders who say, “I’m going to put on my leathers,” and do a solo ride on June 1 to honor the clash of cultures. But it isn’t the same.

“It’s such a group dynamic; that’s what makes it — that belonging,” Ziehe adds. “You’re never going to get the feeling [elsewhere] like when you’re actually at an event or riding with your fellow riders. You can’t replace it.”

BMW F900 XR review

By | General Posts

by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Same engine, frame and brakes as the F900R, but a very different bike

Small changes can make a huge different to a machine and the adventure version of this middleweight Beemer proves it by being much better than the naked roadster version, says Geoff

Sometimes small is big.

And before you think I’ve come over all Zen and am sitting on the stone floor of a hut halfway up Mount Fuji contemplating my hara and coming up with koan riddles, I mean that even small changes to a motorbike can alter its character completely.

This can be a good thing, such as when Triumph moved the bars back on the Rocket III, and the pegs back and down very slightly, to create the Roadster.

It was only a matter of an inch or two, but it made for a much sportier ride.

It can also be a bad thing, like when Ducati moved the footpegs forward on the Diavel to create the XDiavel, effectively emasculating a brilliantly macho machine.

Which leads me, naturally, to the BMW F900 XR. I’d just got off its stablemate the F900 R, which was good but not memorable, and although the XR has the same engine, frame and brakes, it feels like a completely different bike.

Whereas the F900 R is a naked roadster, the XR is an adventure tourer and it feels like it from the moment you sit on it, with wider bars, and a more upright and neutral position, which not only means all-day riding comfort, but better visibility all round, including a better view in the mirrors.

The TFT screen is the same simple but effective model as on the R.

Riding off, it feels right from the start, with perfect low speed balance which on the road translates into sweet and neutral handling, with less of a nudge needed on those wide bars to get it tilting into corners with aplomb than on the R version.

Whereas I’d ridden the top-of-the-range SE version of the R, with quickshifter and four riding modes – Rain, Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro – this was the base model of the XR, leaving me with the unbearable hardship of using the clutch to snick through the slick six-speed gearbox.

It also had only two riding modes, Rain and Road, and after a good seven seconds of Rain, I got bored and switched to Road, which changed progress to sporty without being too aggressive, with a nicely linear power delivery for effortless cruising, but a satisfying rush at the top end of the power band for some happy hustling through some twisties.

If you want even more excitement, go for the top-of-the-range TE model, with Dynamic and Dynamic Pro riding modes, and semi-active Electronic Suspension Adjustment which, at the touch of a button, changes the suspension from plush Road mode to more sporty Dynamic.

The heated grips are just as good as on the R, to the extent that even on a freezing day I had to turn them down from 3 to 2, and with a bigger tank than the R, the range is about 200 miles compared to the 130 or so of the R.

There’s also an A2-compliant version for newbies who want a big bike but are limited to 47bhp.

So although it’s over a grand more than the R, for me, it’s no contest. The XR is a much more enjoyable machine.

Bike supplied by BMW Motorrad Belfast charleshurstgroup.co.uk/bmw

Organizers cancel Memorial Day motorcycle ride in Washington

By | General Posts

By NIKKI WENTLING from https://www.stripes.com

WASHINGTON – A motorcycle rally in the nation’s capital, designed to replace the popular Rolling Thunder event, won’t happen on Memorial Day weekend because of the coronavirus pandemic, organizers announced Tuesday night.

AMVETS took over plans for a motorcycle ride through Washington after Rolling Thunder organizers announced that 2019 would be their last event. Rolling Thunder, a 32-year-old tradition, attracted hundreds of thousands of participants every Memorial Day weekend.

AMVETS planned a similar event, Rolling to Remember, for the weekend of May 23.

“As always, the health and safety of our riders and the veteran community is our top priority,” AMVETS said in a statement. “Due to the federal and state restrictions on public gathers and the guidance of the public health officials amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the Rolling to Remember motorcycle demonstration will not take place in Washington, D.C.”

The goal of the three-day event was to focus on raising awareness for prisoners of war and troops still missing in action, as well as the issue of veterans suicide.

Instead of the in-person ride and rally, AMVETS asked motorcyclists to ride 22 miles on May 24 in their local communities, while following social distancing guidelines. The 22 miles recognizes an often-cited statistic that 22 veterans die by suicide every day. Participants can download a phone app titled “REVER” to track and share their ride.

The weekend Rolling to Remember activities were expected to kick off May 22 with “Blessing of the Bikes” at the Washington National Cathedral. AMVETS was working with the National Park Service to have a stage on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with speakers and other programming. Then, on May 24, motorcyclists were scheduled to ride past the White House, the Capitol Building, around the National Mall and stop at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.

The estimated cost of the weekend event, which was free for participants, was $400,000.

AMVETS said they would continue planning an event in Washington for 2021.

“We appreciate your support and flexibility during an unprecedented time in our nation’s history,” AMVETS said. “We look forward to coming together, even stronger than before, to continue this important tradition in person in 2021.”

Riding Triumph’s Rocket 3

By | General Posts

by Dries Van der Walt from https://www.wheels24.co.za

As promised during the local launch of the new Triumph Rocket 3, Triumph South Africa allowed me to ride the beast on Wednesday, March 25, beating the national coronavirus lockdown by just two days.

It was a bitter-sweet experience because while riding the open (and already noticeably quieter) roads in the Hekpoort area of Gauteng, I was keenly aware of the fact that this would be my last leisure ride on a bike for quite a while.

I was joined on the trip by Triumph South Africa CEO Bruce Allen and a colleague from another publication, and the conversation over brunch was predictably dominated by our shared concern about the effects that the looming lockdown, as undeniably necessary as it was, would have on the country’s already brittle economy.

But all of that did nothing to distract from the experience of riding the world’s biggest-capacity production bike. At 2500cm³, the Rocket 3’s engine capacity exceeds that of most cars – almost double that of the popular B-segment hatchbacks that are ubiquitous on South African roads. Housing an engine of that size dictates the design approach, and the Rocket 3 presents a squat motorcycle that is not likely to be mistaken for anything else.

Intimidating at first

Despite being not very tall, the sheer bulk of the bike is somewhat intimidating at first sight. This feeling is not dispelled once you swing a leg over, because that’s when you realise how wide the frame actually is. That said, as soon as the wheels start rolling and your feet are on the pegs, the intimidation factor dissipates with the realisation that, despite its bulk, the Rocket is really well-balanced.

It carries its weight low in the frame, and the size seems to melt away as speed picks up, so that by the time you reach the first traffic light, you’ve forgotten that you are sitting astride a machine of decidedly unusual proportions.

Sandton’s streets are not the place to explore the limits of the Rocket’s prodigious torque, but it did allow me to develop an appreciation for the remarkably smooth quick-shifter. Working both up and down, shifts are immediate and jerk-free, even at lower revs. With a bike that can be ridden in top gear most of the time, a quick-shifter may seem unnecessary, but this one worked so well that I found myself running up and down through the ratios for the sheer fun of it.

We soon hit the highway, and with the relative lack of traffic, I could start playing with the throttle. The torque was everything I expected, and then some. Twist the throttle wide open in any gear, and the Rocket takes off like the proverbial scalded cat leaving your body caught between the twin sensations of your arms being wrenched from their sockets and your hands strained to their utmost to maintain a grip on the handlebar.

Zooming past

On the other hand, if you give the twist grip the respect it demands, the torque is exhilarating but manageable. Overtaking becomes a non-event – you edge up to whatever is in front of you, wait for a brief gap in the oncoming traffic, twist the throttle and zoom past it in the blink of an eye.

Highway gave way to some twisty backroads, and I found that the Rocket is not averse to brisk cornering. At this point on the route, I was on the Rocket 3 R, the “sporty” naked version with footpegs almost directly underneath your hips. This gave me the opportunity to adopt the usual weight-forward riding position, and I could attack the curves with confidence.

While no sportbike, the Rocket remains stable through the twisties, making it once again easy to forget how big and heavy it actually is.

After brunch, I switched to the GT. On this version, you get a welcome windscreen, and footpegs set more forward for a relaxed riding position. I’m not a cruiser person, but to my great surprise I found that I preferred the GT to the R. The small screen was remarkably helpful in preventing my body from acting as a drag chute, and the footpegs weren’t so far forward that I was forced into the dreaded C-shaped riding position.

Ideal for long distance

Although these slight changes to the identical frame shared by the two variants made the GT feel like a different bike altogether, it retained the sure-footed handling of the R, leaving me to enjoy the twisties on the way back as much as on its sibling.

The new Rocket 3, aimed mostly at the US market where long, straight roads and low-speed limits are at the order of the day, is without a doubt a niche bike. As such it is unlikely to appeal to a broad audience locally, but one thing is for sure: if I were offered one for a trip down to Cape Town, I would grab it with nary a second thought.

SPECIFICATIONS:

ENGINE & TRANSMISSION 
Type: In-line three-cylinder, water-cooled, DOHC
Capacity: 2458 cm³
Max Power: 123kW @ 6000r/min
Max Torque: 221Nm @ 4000r/min
Final Drive: Shaft, bevel box
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate hydraulically operated, torque assist
Gearbox: six-speed

CHASSIS 

Frame: Full aluminium frame
Swingarm: Single-sided, cast aluminium
Front Wheel: 17 x 3.5in cast aluminium
Rear Wheel: 16 x 7.5in cast aluminium
Front Tyre: 150/80 R17 VRear Tyre: 240/50 R16 V
Front Suspension: Showa 47mm upside-down 1 1 cartridge front forks, compression and rebound adjuster. 120mm travel
Rear Suspension: Fully adjustable Showa piggyback reservoir RSU with remote hydraulic preload adjuster, 107mm rear wheel travel
Front Brakes: Dual 320mm discs, Brembo M4.30 Stylema 4-piston radial monobloc callipers, Cornering ABS
Rear Brakes: Single 300mm disc, Brembo M4.32 4-piston monobloc calliper, Cornering ABS
Instrument Display: TFT multi-functional

DIMENSIONS & WEIGHTS 

Width (handlebars): 889mm
(w/out mirror): 1065mm
Seat Height: 773mm
Wheelbase: 1677mm
Dry Weight: 291kg
Tank Capacity: 18L
Fuel Consumption: 6.82-l/100km (claimed)