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First Ride Review of 2022 BMW R 18 B

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

A Tour(ing) De Force – Conquering California’s coast with a Bavarian bagger.

BMW made no bones about moving in on the Harley-dominated cruiser market when it launched the R 18 in April, 2020. Drawing from the Motor Company’s Softail Slim, the Bavarians literally took a page out of Harley’s book to attract buyers. BMW then returned to the well in October, 2020, introducing the R 18 Classic. Equipped with leather bags and a large windshield, the variant shared more than a moniker with Harley’s Heritage Classic.

That first offensive wasn’t BMW’s endgame, however. To truly hit the Harley where it hurts, the company went after the Bar and Shield’s bread and butter: the grand touring segment. Released in July, 2021, the R 18 B added long-distance comfort and convenience to the platform’s repertoire. BMW did more than just slap on a full-size fairing and hard bags though. The House of Munich re-engineered the chassis to suit the cruiser’s new touring ambitions as well.

A 19-inch front wheel steps in for the R18’s 16-incher, the rake tightens to 27.3 degrees, and the wheelbase shrinks to 66.7 inches. That revised double-loop frame not only accommodates two-up touring but also lightened the standard model’s heavy steering. BMW addressed another common R 18 complaint when it increased the bagger’s rear suspension travel to 4.7 inches while adding position-dependent damping and hydraulically adjustable ride height.

The advanced technology doesn’t stop at the tail end though. The new front fairing houses the IMAX of all motorcycle displays, a 10.25-inch-wide, HD resolution (1920 x 720) TFT dash. On the left switchgear, BMW’s trademark WonderWheel makes its R 18 debut, allowing riders to scroll through the bike’s diagnostics, settings, and available navigation. The Marshall stereo system encourages users to jam out to local radio stations or Bluetooth-connected media while the optional radar-assisted adaptive cruise control outfits the R 18 B for the long haul.

Improved geometry and cutting-edge tech may lead BMW’s latest charge, but the Beemer still has to stand up to the class benchmark: the Harley-Davidson Street Glide. With that gold standard in mind, we set out for a 1,100-mile trip up the California coast to test whether the new BMW R 18 B is a checkmate in a brewing battle of the baggers.

On Tour
Despite all the changes that went into the R 18 B, the big-bore boxer remains unchanged. The air/liquid-cooled, 1,802cc opposed twin still produces 116 ft-lb of torque (at 3,000 rpm) and 91 horsepower (at 4,750 rpm). For that reason, the Beemer shines between 3,000 rpm and 4,000 rpm. Within that range, the bagger pulls like a freight train, but as the torque curve dives, the R 18 B’s direct throttle response trails off as well. Beyond the 4,000-rpm mark, the burly boxer still chugs up to its 5,500-rpm redline, but without all the gusto found in the mid-range.

Though the R 18 B idles at around 1,000 rpm, riders have to coax the 1.8-liter engine up to 2,000 rpm, or else it stutters and bogs away from the line. Lean fueling (due to modern emissions standards) may be the root of the issue, but riders can manage takeoffs with a conservative clutch hand and a liberal right wrist.

The narrow powerband may be a limiting factor, but the mid-range also dampens the boxer’s raucous vibrations. In the lower gears, the vibes are most prominent, buzzing through the bars and mini-floorboards. At highway speeds, however, the sensation is much more tolerable.

At 70 mph in sixth gear, the R 18 B lumbers along at a steady pace, though throttle pick up slightly lags. As a result, I regularly cruised at highway speeds in fifth gear to stay within the 3,000-4,000-rpm sweet spot, which yields the best passing power for emergency situations. While the power pulses and delivery presented challenges, the optional adaptive cruise control (ACC) smoothed out all the rough edges.

The Bosch-developed system operates similar to standard cruise control, but with a following distance button at the right switchgear, the rider remains in control of the semi-automated functions. Even in the closest setting, the three-second buffer between the BMW and the vehicle ahead leaves enough time for the evasive maneuvers. If that following distance is too close for comfort, two additional settings enable users to extend that cushion to a more cautious gap.

On the open road, ACC proved invaluable. Those familiar with motorcycle cruise control systems know that the technology not only covers ground in the most efficient manner but also provides much-needed rest for the rider’s right wrist. With ACC, on the other hand, the user is even freer to set it and forget it. Gliding down the road at 75 mph, I regularly let the system take me along for the ride while I added intermittent steering inputs. Even when a car cut into my lane, the R 18 B throttled down to a comfortable 65 mph in a matter of seconds to maintain my buffer zone.

In those situations, ACC kicked in immediately but not abruptly. I never felt like I (or the system) was out of control. Of course, pulling in the clutch or brake lever disengages the cruise control, but users can also override the system with extra throttle if they need to escape a hairy situation. The ACC is also quite intuitive, slowing to the set speed after a throttle burst or ramping up once the vehicle ahead switches lanes.

The system not only accurately distinguishes between cars in neighboring lanes, but if the fairing-integrated radar detects a vehicle ahead picking up speed, it proportionately adds throttle as well. In its category, BMW’s R 18 B is the first to adopt the Bosch-developed ACC and that gives the Bavarian bagger a definite edge in technology. However, there’s more to touring than gizmos and gadgets, and the R 18 B brings its own bag of tricks to the party.

Every Twist And Turn
While the standard R 18 favored a stance and style perfect for bar-hopping, BMW had to outfit the touring variant for cross-country travels. To make the handling more responsive, the firm steepened the bagger’s rake by more than five degrees. The 19-inch wheel may seem counterintuitive to those goals, but the R 18 B changes direction with the slightest input at the handlebars.

Shod in Bridgestone Battlecruise H50 tires, the larger front wheel and 49mm fork did a commendable job of communicating the differing road surfaces. From super slab interstates to gravel-strewn backroads to tar-snaked twisties, I always understood the bagger’s available grip. At lean, the front end was just as accurate, providing predictable feedback and response. However, it’s hard to shower the rear suspension with similar praise.

The R 18 B’s updated monoshock certainly improves on the standard model’s harsh rear end. With just 3.5 inches of travel, the original shock sent each bump and pothole straight through the rider’s back. To atone for that oversight, BMW jacked up the bagger’s back end to 4.7 inches of travel, delivering an ultra-plush ride. The Beemer practically negates all road irregularities as a result, smoothing out even the hardest hits. Unfortunately, the soft rear end and direct front fork don’t always get along.

At tip-in, the R 18 B is planted and predictable. Conversely, if the rider deviates from the original line or encounters mid-corner bumps, the rear wallows with a slight undulating action. As a result, the feel out back becomes vague and disconnected. If you select and stick to a line throughout the curve, the bike plows right through without so much as a wobble. Unfortunately, unforeseen adjustments quickly expose the buoyant back end. Of course, we don’t expect a bagger to hustle around corners, but a manually adjustable monoshock could go a long way to addressing the issue.

It’s a similar story with the brakes. The dual four-piston calipers and twin 300mm front discs provide enough stopping power in the end, but they don’t provide much in the way of initial bite or feel. For those that favor the front brake, BMW’s system distributes a portion of braking power to the single four-piston caliper and 300mm rotor out back as well. The linked brakes help shed speed more efficiently, but you can also feel the system borrowing braking power at the lever. That’s a disconcerting sensation when you’re descending a steep hill. Luckily, the rider aid only intrudes in select situations and heavy braking zones.

Comfy Confines
Even if the R 18 B’s bag of tricks is a mixed bag, the infotainment system draws from BMW’s industry-leading interface. Unlike the R 18’s stripped-down controls and throwback circular speedometer, BMW throws the kitchen sink at the bagger’s new fairing. Four analog gauges report remaining fuel, speed, rpm, and voltage while the 10.25-inch TFT boasts enough room for a dual-pane layout. Using’s BMW’s intuitive Wonder Wheel and menu button, the user can access trip data, local radio stations, smartphone media, navigation, and bike settings.

While the system puts endless options at the rider’s fingertips, navigating those options with the Wonder Wheel and menu button can become cumbersome. Accessing certain submenus requires punching the menu button while others involve a lateral press on the Wonder Wheel. With practice, your left thumb develops the muscle memory necessary for jumping through the folders quickly, but a simplified interface would also speed up the process. Additionally, the turn Wonder Wheel is located next to the turn signal switch, and I embarrassingly pushed the wrong control during many a left-lane change.

As for the infotainment system’s performance, the Marshall speakers deliver crisp, clear audio. With two fairing-mounted speakers and optional subwoofers in each bag, the sound literally envelopes the rider. During testing, the system worked seamlessly with Apple iOS devices but frequently encountered connectivity issues with Android smartphones. Upon connecting, the interface offered full operation of the phone’s media, but functionality would suffer after a second startup. Disconnecting and reconnecting the device restored full control to the rider, but I eventually switched to the radio to avoid the hassle.

The rest of the R 18 B’s cockpit prioritized comfort and convenience as well. With wide buckhorn bars sweeping back to the rider, the upright position suits long-distance road trips. The broad fork-mounted fairing mitigated buffeting but the short windshield left turbulent air dancing on the top of my helmet. A taller windscreen from BMW’s catalog will easily remedy that situation for taller riders, but anyone under five foot, eight inches will be just fine with the stock shield.

Further back, BMW raised the seat 1.1 inches over the standard model’s saddle to relax the bend at the rider’s knees and the adjustment worked. Due to the massive outboard cylinders, the bagger’s legroom hasn’t increased over the R 18, but the taller seat does help relieve stiff knees during long journeys. On the other hand, extra padding on the touring seat would have gone a long way as well, but my bony back end typically endured the 225 miles between fill-ups.

The features that I can’t praise enough are the heated seat and hand grips. During my travels, I hit spots of rain and heavy winds. The chill temperatures eventually receded by the afternoon, but the five-level heated accessories allowed me to maintain my mileage quota in relative comfort. The premium features made the long stints in the saddle more enjoyable than ever, but they all come at a price.

Bringing It Home
Starting at $21,495, the 2022 BMW R 18 B slightly undercuts the 2021 Harley-Davidson Street Glide’s MSRP ($21,999). However, BMW’s Premium Light Package (hill start assist, adaptive headlight, reverse assist, and Marshall subwoofers) tacks on $2,300. The Select Package (alarm system, locking fuel cap, heated seat, tire pressure monitor, and electric bag locks) adds another $1,275 to the price tag. Throw in Roland Sand Designs milled cylinder covers, an engine housing cover, a two-tone black wheelset, and Vance & Hines slip-ons, and the asking price swiftly approaches $30,000.

Many riders will opt for the base package, but a fair share will also order the works, and for good reason. Features such as the tire pressure monitor system, heated seat, and Marshall Gold Series Audio amplify the R 18 B’s touring chops. However, it’s a solid package in stock trim. No, the new Beemer isn’t a death blow to Harley-Davidson, but it’s a worthy competitor. At 877 pounds, it has 22 pounds on its main rival, but it’s also the only bike in the category to offer adaptive cruise control and a 10.25-inch TFT display. The R 18 B may not be BMW’s endgame either, but it definitely changes the game for bagger customers.

Dave Currier, aged 68, on Winning Cannonball riding his 1911 Harley-Davidson

By General Posts

by Kevin Wallevand from https://www.inforum.com

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

  • Dave Currier turned 68 years of age on the road while racing in the Motorcycle Cannonball
  • Earlier, Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson
  • His father sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo and also raced them
  • Dave Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on his 1911 H-D

“To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.” – Dave Currier

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

A Fargo man has just won a cross country motorcycle run called The Motorcycle Cannonball.

Dave Currier is finally getting some feeling back in his rear-end. He is back in Fargo after competing in the most difficult, antique endurance race in the world: The Motorcycle Cannonball.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said. “It is a real grind, I had about eight hours in the saddle every day.”

Riding his 1911 belt-driven Harley Davidson, Currier and 88 competitors crossed 11 states over 16-days straight. From Michigan to South Padre Island, Texas, they racked up just over 3,700 miles.

“The bike is tall. I have short legs, so my feet don’t touch the ground,” Currier said. “To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.”

But Currier, who had a team planning and tweaking this bike, not only competed; he won.

“I had a police escort, it was an absolute incredible deal,” Currier said. “They closed the roads off.”

He crossed the finish line with this checkered flag, bringing home the trophy.

“Before the finish, they handed me the checkered flag, and I rode in with the checkered flag,” Currier said. “It was incredible. (It’s) still hard to talk about it.”

Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on the 1911 Harley.

He said his local sponsors; Milwaukee Tool, Acme Tools, Dakota Fence, and TechLine Coatings all played a role in the win.

Currier, who turned 68 during the race, thinks he had a little help from angels above. His dad, Dick Currier, sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo. He raced them as well, and Currier believes his dad would be pretty proud.

“He was a big part of my life,” Currier said. “That’s why I called it, ‘The Last Ride.'”

For more info on the Motorcycle Cannonball visit their website by clicking here.

Earlier Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson

From September 2018.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime. Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65.”

‘Trip of a lifetime’: Fargo resident named runner-up in world’s hardest antique motorcycle run

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

by Emma Vatnsdal from https://bismarcktribune.com

PORTLAND, Ore. — Enjoying a sunny 48-degree morning in The Dalles, Ore., Dave Currier and his entourage were getting ready late last week to point themselves east and head back home to Fargo.

While many go west to escape the cold of winter or spend time with family and friends, Currier had a different motivation — and to end up in Portland, he had to start in Portland, Maine.

In 2010, one man set out to become the first person to take a group of 45 like-minded antique motorcycle riders across the U.S. from Kitty Hawk, N.C., to Santa Monica, Calif. Sixteen days later, 10 of the original 45 riders rolled their roughly century-old bikes onto the Santa Monica Pier, completing the inaugural Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run.

Now in its fifth running, the 2018 installment of the run saw more than 100 people ride from Maine to Oregon, giving participants a chance to see much of the U.S. in a whole new way.

Three classes of motorcycles — single cylinder, twin cylinders with two-speed rear ends and bikes with three-speed transmissions — set out, racing to navigate the roads to each day’s checkpoint before 5 p.m. Taking only the “back roads” across the whole country, Currier and the rest of the crew averaged around six hours of riding per day beginning at 7:30 a.m.

In true-to-history fashion, modern navigation systems like a GPS device were not allowed. Instead, riders were given maps each morning 30 minutes before they set out with directions consisting instructions like “drive north 3.2 miles, turn left at the blue house and head west.”

Currier said it was a voyage to remember.

“It was incredible,” Currier said. “It was a fantastic trip kind of re-enacting what the old-time people did when they had the opportunity to go across the U.S. What was really kind of special was I had my birthday (during the trip). Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65. It was kind of a monumental trip in many ways for me.”

Lifelong passion
There are few requirements about which motorcycles qualify for this cross-country road trip, but there are standards that must be met. For the 2018 run, all motorcycles had to be manufactured in 1928 or earlier, and must still appear original in nature.

While period-correct modifications were accepted, no modern replica bikes could be entered.

Electrical charging systems, auxiliary fuel tanks and modern wheels were OK, though GPS systems were specifically banned.

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

“I started with the basic frame and completely refurbished it from the ground up,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed the motorcycles since I was 7 years old when I first rode one. Restoring this was pretty special.”

Safety is the No. 1 concern during this race, especially because the bikes are sometimes older than riders’ grandparents. Upon arriving in Portland, Maine, riders completed a half-day of safety classes consisting of rules of the road and safety features.

Each Cannonball rider is also allowed a support team to help them along the way. Currier chose his wife, Kay, two friends from Alaska and a co-worker to assist him with any repairs after each day was done.

“When you get done with the day and you check out, you can do any service work you want on your bike,” he said. “You can change motors, you can overhaul it, whatever you can between 5 at night and 7 in the morning. The support team can’t have anything to do with you during the day.”

Even with the small issues he faced — losing bolts, tough winds and unsoldered ground wires — Currier says he wouldn’t have placed runner-up in his class without the support of his wife and family.

“They’ve always been incredibly good,” he said. “I couldn’t have done this without them.”

The Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run happens every two years, and Currier said he’s started planning for 2020.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking. Six to seven hours a day, you got plenty of time to think about a lot of stuff,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime.”

Spec Showdown: Harley-Davidson Sportster S Vs. Indian Scout

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

An American middleweight melee.

For decades, the Harley-Davidson Sportster dominated the American middleweight V-twin class, mostly by dint of being the only American middleweight V-twin. Without a top contender to challenge its reign, the Motor Company only issued modest upgrades since 1986. However, that all changed when the Indian Scout burst onto the scene in 2015.

Heavily based on the Victory Octane, the revived Scout paired Indian’s rich heritage with thoroughly modern equipment. The liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,133cc V-twin was the antithesis of Harley’s ancient air-cooled Evo engine. Compared to the Sportster’s signature teardrop tank and engine cooling fins, the Scout’s low-slung stance and neo-bobber aesthetic presented a viable alternative to Harley’s aging platform.

Facing a formidable foe and new emissions regulations, the Bar and Shield telegraphed its counterpunch when it revealed the Custom 1250 in July, 2018. Nearly three years later, that haymaker finally landed when Harley officially announced the 2021 Sportster S.

Complete with a liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252cc V-twin, the new Sportster’s spec sheet now stands toe-to-toe with the Scout. Of course, we won’t know who wins the battle in the showroom until the Sportster S arrives at dealerships. For now, however, the tale of the tape tells a fascinating story.

Overview
2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S – Vs – 2021 Indian Scout

Middleweight Might
Featuring Harley’s shiny new Revolution Max 1250T, the 2021 Sportster now produces 121 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque. While the Scout previously set performance benchmarks for the category with 100 horsepower and 72 lb-ft of torque, Indian’s entry cruiser now looks outgunned. Of course, the Revolution Max V-twin touts a larger displacement, which helps the Sportster S steal that performance feather from Indian’s cap.

On top of that power deficit, the Scout lugs around 59 extra pounds, weighing in at 561 pounds compared to the Sportster’s 502-pound wet weight. Straightline acceleration and top speed define a motorcycle not, but agility goes to the Hog as well. With a 59.8-inch wheelbase, fully adjustable USD fork, and a linkage-equipped monoshock, the Sportster S outmaneuvers the Scout’s 62-inch wheelbase, conventional front end, and dual rear shocks.

Indian does outfit the Scout with a 16-inch wheelset shod in sticky Pirelli Night Dragon rubber while Harley opts for a 16-inch rear and 17-inch front. We could surmise that the smaller wheelset gives the Scout a handling edge if it weren’t for the Sportster’s specially-developed Dunlop GT503 tires. Thanks to an aggressive profile and sticky compound, the Dunlops compensate for the Sportster’s larger front wheel, helping to deliver a 34-degree lean angle compared to the Scout’s 29 degrees.

Novice-Friendly
Though Indian no longer holds the performance edge, the Scout still has a fighting chance. At 29.6 inches, the 2021 Sportster’s perch is a full four inches about the Scout’s 25.6-inch seat height. Most riders won’t have an issue with the Sporty’s seat height, which sags to 28.9-inches in the saddle, but even less will have problems with Indian’s low-slung seat. Of course, novice and inseam-challenged riders benefit most from a low seat height and the Scout is good option for that reason.

Conversely, Indian only offers optional ABS on the Scout while the Harley flaunts rider aids like traction control, cornering ABS, ride modes, and engine braking settings. On top of the full electronics suite, the Motor Company’s new round, four-inch TFT display also outshines the Scout’s analog speedometer and digital tachometer combo. Of course, you could reason the Scout’s spartan accommodations help beginners learn the ropes with a less cumbersome system, but it’s usually better to have rider aids and not need them as opposed to the other way around.

If we’re going to make any case for beginner-appropriate features, however, it should start with the brakes, and the Sportster delivers yet again. Championing a full Brembo braking system with a radially mounted four-piston front caliper, floating single-pot rear binder, and master cylinder, the Sportster S stops surprisingly well. On the other hand, the Scout’s single two-piston caliper up front and single-piston clamper in the rear don’t deliver as much stopping power as its counterpart.

The Final Decision:
Though the 2021 Harley-Davidson Sportster S walks away with nearly every round in its pocket, we still have to consider one very important detail: price. At $14,999, the souped-up Sporty is $3,000 over the Scout’s MSRP. Coupled with a 121-horsepower V-twin, Harley’s asking price could easily put the Sportster S out of most beginner’s grasp. When price is taken into account, the two cruisers stack up much more evenly, and may even cater to different customers/budgets.

With that said, we can’t wait to see how the Sportster and Scout duke it out in the future. Will Indian fight back with an even punchier V-twin? Will Harley offer a cheaper Sportster option without diluting too much performance? The middleweight cruiser class is a much more competitive environment these days, and we can’t wait to see Sportster and Scout continue to battle it out in the future.

5 Best Motorcycle Routes to See Fall

By General Posts

One of the best parts about owning a motorcycle is having a front-row view to all things nature. There’s nothing standing in between you and all the colors of the natural world. Fall is one of the best times to go cruising through the wilderness. Leaf peepers are known for chasing bright yellows, reds, and oranges all over the country as autumn sets in. Chances are there’s a great leaf-oriented stretch of road near you.

Get Your Bike Ready for the Trip

Before you head out on your trip, make sure you have everything you need to explore the open road. Some of these routes can be quite remote, so you need to have a plan in case things take a turn for the worst.

Above all else, use helmet communication to keep in touch with your loved ones on your trip, especially if you stray far from home. You should be able to call for help or check your GPS without taking your eyes off the road. You drove all this way to look at the leaves, after all.

Looking down at your phone can be a recipe for disaster. You also need to keep your hands on the handlebars at all times to stay in control. Use a Bluetooth motorcycle helmet to use your electronic devices hands-free for more peace of mind behind the wheel.

Find a Bluetooth motorcycle helmet with speakers that produces clear audio. You need to balance the sound of your music, call, or GPS with the sounds of the road in case another driver needs to get your attention.

Your phone may not be there to rescue if you get lost or get into a wreck. Consider bringing along paper maps of your destination and a backup communication system, such as two-way radio, in case you don’t have access to cell service.

Inspect your motorcycle to make sure it’s ready for the trip at hand. Add air to the tires, if needed. You should know the approximate distance of your trip. Check the mileage and consider visiting your local mechanic if it’s been over a year or 6,000 miles since your last tune-up.

Tunnel of Trees – Michigan

The country’s “third coast” is known for its rich forestry and sprawling coastlines and Michigan’s Tunnel of Trees is perhaps the best example of both. The branches of the trees extend over the road, creating what looks like a tunnel.

Most of the action takes place on M-119. You can catch it at the north end of Petosky. The tunnel official starts in Harbor Springs. Follow the route for another 20 miles around the edge of Lake Michigan. The bluff, which runs around 140 feet above sea level, keeps you up high for a panoramic view of the coast. Be sure to slow down or stop when taking in the sights. The state road narrows at several points, including the infamous Devil’s Ridge. Lots of drivers will probably have their eyes on the trees, so don’t be surprised if they make a mistake.

Coastal Route One – Maine

Route One has a reputation across the East Coast. It makes for a stunning drive, whether you’re coming from Key West, Florida or New York City. We suggest taking it all the way north to Maine, where you’ll see some of the most picturesque roads of your life. New England is full of many charms, including open farmland, quaint towns full of history, and weaving coastlines, and Route One lets you see the best of everything.

You’ll need to take I-95 about 90 minutes north of Boston to the Maine border. From there, hop on Route One to cruise through small towns like towns as Kennebunkport and Ogunquit, both of which are teeming with lush forestry. The road takes you along the coast, which gives you the chance to explore the area’s many islands, nooks, and peninsulas. You’re bound to pass a lighthouse or three.

There’s a certain humble charm to the remote towns of Northern Vermont. Turn down the noise of your engine to enjoy the peace and quiet as the water laps against the rocky shore. Wildlife can get pretty bold in the more rural parts of the state. Don’t be surprised if you run into a moose as soon as you get out of the city.

San Juan Mountain Skyway – Colorado

If you love the mountains, head out west to Colorado to experience the thrill of the San Juan Mountain Skyway. The road gets its name for its steep incline and sharp turns. The road goes from 6,200 feet above sea level near the city of Cortez to over 11,000 feet near what’s known as the Red Mountain Pass.

It gives you the ultimate mountain experience, complete with expansive river valleys, peaks over 14,000 feet tall, and trees that feel larger than life. The arching road gives you a cascading view of the trees during the fall. You can see several miles into the distance in some parts.

The road starts in Durango, CO, the largest city on the path. This is the time to stock up on supplies. Your choices start to thin out from here. Follow the road north via U.S. 160 to Mancos. Consider stopping by Rocky Mountain National Park and Mesa Verde National Park while you’re in the area if you feel like seeing more of what this iconic state has to offer. It continues for a total 235 miles, or 7 hours, going all the way up to Telluride and Silverton.

It’s best to start your trip in the early fall, as some roads turn icy early in the season. The mountains have a climate all their own, so be prepared to encounter some snow along the way. Bring along a few extra layers to stay warm on your motorcycle as temperatures fluctuate.

Nothing beats the gorgeous palette of fall foliage. Chart a course for one of these autumn destinations to enjoy the ride of your life.

Cool Choppers by South Side MC member Patrick

By General Posts

Chopper builder Patrick, a Member of South Side MC.

A follow-up to our article on Long Fork Run. Southside MC Est 88 Sweden member Patrick’s cool choppers are featured here.

Patrick: “When I built Suicide Machine, I was introduced to stainless which has become a material that I prefer to build my parts as much as possible. So on the white chopper I have made oil tank, flatfender, tripple Trees, barney legs, sissybar, controls, exhaust and lots of smaller details in stainless steel.”

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Blue Knights III motorcycle club to hold a remembrance ride on Sunday

By General Posts

by Mary Klingler from https://www.wbir.com

Motorcycle group to hit the road for remembrance ride, in honor of victims of 9/11
A motorcycle club mostly made up of former law enforcement officers will hold a remembrance ride on Sunday to honor victims of Sept. 11.

KNOXVILLE, Tenn — A group of bikers will head to the streets Sunday to remember and honor the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The “Blue Knights III” is a part of an international motorcycle club comprised of active and retired police officers. The Knoxville chapter of riders is holding a remembrance ride on Sunday at Bootlegger’s Harley Davidson, in West Knoxville.

Nearly 3,000 people died in the terrorist attacks, and 400 were emergency workers. In the motorcycle club, 8 members were New York Police Department officers at the time and more of these riders rushed in to help.

Robert McCaffery is a member of the Blue Knights III. For 20 years, he has carried a terrifying memory.

“It was just a horrendous scene. There was smoke and there was fire. It smelled,” he said.

A former captain for the Morris County Sheriff’s Office in New Jersey, Mccaffery like many other first responders volunteered to help search for victims after the attack on the World Trade Center.

“There was grey dust everywhere. There were people everywhere. It was all quite disorganized. There was nobody in charge. Nobody in command. You just kind of pick up your spot on the pile and you started picking things up and handing it back,” Mccaffery said.

He said that he met up with an NYPD officer in Staten Island before taking a ferry into the city, where much of the devastation was. He said that stepping off the ferry was like stepping onto a movie set, with grey dust and destruction all around.

After the attacks, he said nothing else mattered. Like many of his fellow officers, he just wanted to help.

“It’s the greatest city in the world and I just felt I had to do something and going in to help was the best thing I could do,” he said. “We have guys over there day after day breaking their backs to save people, and then later to recover as much of a body as possible so the family could have as much of a closure as possible.”

To this day, some of the motorcycle club members can’t talk about what they witnessed. But some said that the events of Sept. 11 bonded them forever.

Anyone can join the remembrance ride on Sunday with the group. The Knox County Sheriff’s Office will escort riders starting at the Bootlegger Harley Davidson in West Knoxville at 10 a.m.

Visit Website For Details at: https://www.blueknightstn3.com/

Next Week: 40th annual Tomahawk Veterans Fall Ride

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by Jalen Maki from https://www.tomahawkleader.com

40 years of Fall Ride: Annual motorcycle rally returns to Tomahawk, Wisconsin next week

Tomahawk will once again feel the thunder as the 40th annual Tomahawk Veterans Fall Ride rumbles into the city next week.

Even after four decades, the annual motorcycle rally continues to draw thousands of visitors to Tomahawk, where rid­ers can take in the scenic sights of the Northwoods and enjoy everything the area has to offer. This year, a slate of events is set to take place from Thursday, Sept. 16 through Saturday, Sept. 18.

If you’re looking to kick off Fall Ride with a bit of tradition, look no further than the Tomahawk Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Bonfire and Brat Fry.

The event, featuring brats, cold beverages and live music by Brian McLaughin, is set to take place at SARA Park on Thursday, Sept. 16, from 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.

For more information, contact the Chamber at 715-453-5334.

All riders are invited to take part in the Thunder Parade on Friday night. Lineup for the parade starts at the Tomahawk School District complex at 5 p.m., with departure at 6 p.m. Riders will wind their way along area backroads before returning to downtown Tomahawk, where W. Wisconsin Ave. will be lined with spectators watching the parade roar through town.

Tomahawk Main Street, Inc., is taking the helm for this year’s downtown festivities.

Vendors will be set up on 2nd and 3rd Streets, and live music can be found downtown throughout the rally.

Mike McAbee will be performing by the food and beer tents on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Friday Night Street Dance on the east end of Wisconsin Ave. will feature Killing Rapunzel, who will take the stage after the Thunder Parade on Friday, Sept. 17.

Live music by the food and beer tents on Saturday, Sept. 18 will be provided by Marty Frei, who is set to perform from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Bryan Anderson and Older Budwiser will perform at the east end of Wisconsin Ave. from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by KIST, a KISS tribute band, taking the stage for the Saturday Night Street Dance from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

At the west end of W. Wisconsin Ave., Fusion will provide live music for Fall Ride goers to check out. Road Trip will take the stage at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 17. On Saturday, Sept. 18, Kings of Radio will perform at 7 p.m.

El Jovenaso 2, 4 W. Wisconsin Ave., and Corner Pub, 8 W. Wisconsin Ave., will also each have live music during the rally.

Doug Kroening is set to take the stage at Corner Pub at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 16. The Hucksters will play at Corner Pub on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Influence will fill Corner Pub’s 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. time slot on Saturday, Sept. 18.

Jennifer Reisch Solo Acoustic is slated to perform at El Jovenaso 2 on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The following day, Michael Saint will take the stage at El Jovenaso 2 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Three days’ worth of Fall Ride activites are scheduled to take place at SARA Park, 900 W. Somo Ave.

The events begin at noon on Thursday, Sept. 16, with merchandise vendor displays and sales, featuring leather, clothing, motorcycle products, jewelry, and leather sewing, as well as a variety of other products. Official Fall Ride merchandise will also be available for sale.

On Friday, Sept. 17 and Saturday, Sept. 18, Harley-Davidson will offer demo fleets, providing the opportunity a ride on any one of the 2022 Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Registration will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Merchandise vendors and displays and official Fall Ride merchandise, as well as food vendors and refreshments, will be available at SARA Park throughout the rally.

The 40th annual Fall Ride will once again see one of its staples bring the party to Bubba’s Campground, adjoining Nokomis Community Park.

Bubba’s Big Party will run from Monday, Sept. 13, through Saturday, Sept. 18.

Early Bird parties will be held each day from Monday, Sept. 13 through Thursday, Sept. 16, featuring a bonfire and live music from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. each night. Bernie Thompson will perform on Monday, followed by Brad Emmanuel on Tuesday, Older Budwiser on Wednesday, and the Northwoods Skitchers on Thursday.

Friday, Sept. 17 is free to the public. A pancake breakfast will be served at the Nokomis Fire Department from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. A church service will be held at 9:30 a.m. The vending show kicks off at 10 a.m. and will run until close. The Best ‘80s Outfit Contest will take place at 10 p.m.

Friday will also see numerous live music acts. Mark Wayne will perform from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Levi Ballenger will take the stage from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by Madman’s Diary from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Nightrain from 10:30 p.m. to close.

Admission on Saturday Sept. 18 is $10 for those ages 17 and older, and free for those 16 and under. A pancake breakfast will again be held at the Nokomis Fire Department from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m., and a church service will take place at 9:30 a.m. The auto show, with free registration, will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., while the vending show will again run from 10 a.m. until close. Lawn mower, bar stool, and mud bog races will kick off at noon and end at 5 p.m. A burnout contest will be held at 3 p.m. Later in the evening, the Biker Butt Contest will take place at 11:30 p.m.

A full slate of music is lined up for Saturday, with Mark Wayne performing from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., followed by The Dukes from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Hyde will take the stage from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., with Storm closing out the night, performing from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

A blood drive, co-sponsored by St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church and Tomahawk Community Bank, will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 17, at St. Paul Church, 12 E. Wisconsin Ave., Tomahawk.

The blood drive will be held the mobile bus in the church’s secondary parking lot.

Advance registration is requested. To register, call The Community Blood Center at 800-280-4102 or visit www.communityblood.org/donor. Once on the website, log in, click “Donate Now” and enter sponsor code D137.

The Tomahawk Leader’s Fall Ride Guide is a must-have to be in the know about the rally.

The guide can be found at businesses throughout the Tomahawk area, as well as downtown. Flip through to find info on the history of Fall Ride, live music, events, vendors, and more, and be sure to stop by local businesses that have placed advertisements throughout the Guide.

Long Fork Run at Sweden

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Second summer with Corona, Southside MC Est 88 Sweden had to be flexible once more with their gathering of long forks. Instead of a hotspot for the show, they made it mobile.

Saturday 21st of Aug, 100+ bikes, choppers and pre 84 were welcomed for the ride. However anyone was invited at the clubhouse noon to 3PM, for burgers and a beer.

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Wild Bikernet Weekly News for September 2, 2021

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Keep the faith, the bullshit and bullies are losing their grip. Let’s ride free forever!

–Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

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