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Chopper Chronicles : The Sundance Meeting

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K.Randall Ball kicks off the first chapter of Stolen Motorcycle Files – Exclusively on Bikernet.com

READ Episode One now !!!

The Sundance Meeting
by K.Randall Ball

Three brothers rode into Sundance, Wyoming on their way to Sturgis in late July, hell bent to make their 20th run to the Badlands.

The small town, population just over a grand, was a mere 52 flying miles from the Rally. They rode long and hard for almost 400 miles, and this could be the final watering hole stop before the last blast on interstate 90 into Sturgis, South Dakota.

Sundance located in the bare open plains of Wyoming was named after the Sun Dance ceremony practiced by several American Indian tribes.

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Dave Currier, aged 68, on Winning Cannonball riding his 1911 Harley-Davidson

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by Kevin Wallevand from https://www.inforum.com

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

  • Dave Currier turned 68 years of age on the road while racing in the Motorcycle Cannonball
  • Earlier, Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson
  • His father sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo and also raced them
  • Dave Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on his 1911 H-D

“To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.” – Dave Currier

Fargo man wins Motorcycle Cannonball with 1911 Harley Davidson

A Fargo man has just won a cross country motorcycle run called The Motorcycle Cannonball.

Dave Currier is finally getting some feeling back in his rear-end. He is back in Fargo after competing in the most difficult, antique endurance race in the world: The Motorcycle Cannonball.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said. “It is a real grind, I had about eight hours in the saddle every day.”

Riding his 1911 belt-driven Harley Davidson, Currier and 88 competitors crossed 11 states over 16-days straight. From Michigan to South Padre Island, Texas, they racked up just over 3,700 miles.

“The bike is tall. I have short legs, so my feet don’t touch the ground,” Currier said. “To start it, you have to pedal to start it, it is a belt drive. To move it forward, you have a lever which tensions the belt and the bike moves forward.”

But Currier, who had a team planning and tweaking this bike, not only competed; he won.

“I had a police escort, it was an absolute incredible deal,” Currier said. “They closed the roads off.”

He crossed the finish line with this checkered flag, bringing home the trophy.

“Before the finish, they handed me the checkered flag, and I rode in with the checkered flag,” Currier said. “It was incredible. (It’s) still hard to talk about it.”

Currier credits John Rouland of Northern Crankshaft in Thief River Falls for doing a lot of the technical and engine work on the 1911 Harley.

He said his local sponsors; Milwaukee Tool, Acme Tools, Dakota Fence, and TechLine Coatings all played a role in the win.

Currier, who turned 68 during the race, thinks he had a little help from angels above. His dad, Dick Currier, sold Indian and Harley motorcycles in the 1940s and 50s in Fargo. He raced them as well, and Currier believes his dad would be pretty proud.

“He was a big part of my life,” Currier said. “That’s why I called it, ‘The Last Ride.'”

For more info on the Motorcycle Cannonball visit their website by clicking here.

Earlier Dave Currier had been a runner-up in 2018 Motorcycle Cannonball riding a 1915 Harley-Davidson

From September 2018.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime. Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65.”

‘Trip of a lifetime’: Fargo resident named runner-up in world’s hardest antique motorcycle run

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

by Emma Vatnsdal from https://bismarcktribune.com

PORTLAND, Ore. — Enjoying a sunny 48-degree morning in The Dalles, Ore., Dave Currier and his entourage were getting ready late last week to point themselves east and head back home to Fargo.

While many go west to escape the cold of winter or spend time with family and friends, Currier had a different motivation — and to end up in Portland, he had to start in Portland, Maine.

In 2010, one man set out to become the first person to take a group of 45 like-minded antique motorcycle riders across the U.S. from Kitty Hawk, N.C., to Santa Monica, Calif. Sixteen days later, 10 of the original 45 riders rolled their roughly century-old bikes onto the Santa Monica Pier, completing the inaugural Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run.

Now in its fifth running, the 2018 installment of the run saw more than 100 people ride from Maine to Oregon, giving participants a chance to see much of the U.S. in a whole new way.

Three classes of motorcycles — single cylinder, twin cylinders with two-speed rear ends and bikes with three-speed transmissions — set out, racing to navigate the roads to each day’s checkpoint before 5 p.m. Taking only the “back roads” across the whole country, Currier and the rest of the crew averaged around six hours of riding per day beginning at 7:30 a.m.

In true-to-history fashion, modern navigation systems like a GPS device were not allowed. Instead, riders were given maps each morning 30 minutes before they set out with directions consisting instructions like “drive north 3.2 miles, turn left at the blue house and head west.”

Currier said it was a voyage to remember.

“It was incredible,” Currier said. “It was a fantastic trip kind of re-enacting what the old-time people did when they had the opportunity to go across the U.S. What was really kind of special was I had my birthday (during the trip). Going over the mountain in Kalispell, Montana, that’s when I turned 65. It was kind of a monumental trip in many ways for me.”

Lifelong passion
There are few requirements about which motorcycles qualify for this cross-country road trip, but there are standards that must be met. For the 2018 run, all motorcycles had to be manufactured in 1928 or earlier, and must still appear original in nature.

While period-correct modifications were accepted, no modern replica bikes could be entered.

Electrical charging systems, auxiliary fuel tanks and modern wheels were OK, though GPS systems were specifically banned.

Currier says his bike, a 1915 Harley-Davidson twin-cylinder boasting an 11-horsepower engine, took him two years to restore.

“I started with the basic frame and completely refurbished it from the ground up,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed the motorcycles since I was 7 years old when I first rode one. Restoring this was pretty special.”

Safety is the No. 1 concern during this race, especially because the bikes are sometimes older than riders’ grandparents. Upon arriving in Portland, Maine, riders completed a half-day of safety classes consisting of rules of the road and safety features.

Each Cannonball rider is also allowed a support team to help them along the way. Currier chose his wife, Kay, two friends from Alaska and a co-worker to assist him with any repairs after each day was done.

“When you get done with the day and you check out, you can do any service work you want on your bike,” he said. “You can change motors, you can overhaul it, whatever you can between 5 at night and 7 in the morning. The support team can’t have anything to do with you during the day.”

Even with the small issues he faced — losing bolts, tough winds and unsoldered ground wires — Currier says he wouldn’t have placed runner-up in his class without the support of his wife and family.

“They’ve always been incredibly good,” he said. “I couldn’t have done this without them.”

The Motorcycle Cannonball Endurance Run happens every two years, and Currier said he’s started planning for 2020.

“I’ve already been doing a lot of thinking. Six to seven hours a day, you got plenty of time to think about a lot of stuff,” Currier said, chuckling. “I have done the twin cylinder. The next challenge for me would be to take a single cylinder and make it across the U.S. But this was a trip of a lifetime.”

Motorcycle Cannonball Run finishes at South Padre Island

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by Gaige Davila from https://www.sbnewspaper.com

The 10th annual Motorcycle Cannonball Run ended on South Padre Island this past weekend, with nearly a hundred riders cruising their 100-year-old machines through the Queen Isabella Causeway to victory.

Starting in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, on the Canadian border, 88 riders, some dressed in early 1900s garb, departed to Texas in a 17-day, 3,389-mile journey, all on motorcycles made in 1929 or earlier.

The group made two stops in the Rio Grande Valley before cruising to SPI: San Benito, at Mad Boar Harley-Davidson, and McAllen, at Desperado Harley-Davison, in their last 99-mile leg of the run.

When the riders got to South Padre Island, specifically to the South Padre Island Convention Centre, they were welcomed by their teams and motorcycle enthusiasts.

Dave Currier, #64, from Fargo, North Dakota, was the first to arrive, on his 1911 Harley-Davidson 7A. His first place finish is impressive: the Harley-Davidson 7A is a single-belt drive, four horsepower machine, closer to a bicycle than a motorcycle.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said on Motorcycle Cannonball’s live stream of the finish line. “We’ve been through torrential rains, all kinds of wind, difficulties, (but) the bike ran superb.”

Check Out the Details and Final Scores at https://motorcyclecannonball.com/

Next Week: 40th annual Tomahawk Veterans Fall Ride

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by Jalen Maki from https://www.tomahawkleader.com

40 years of Fall Ride: Annual motorcycle rally returns to Tomahawk, Wisconsin next week

Tomahawk will once again feel the thunder as the 40th annual Tomahawk Veterans Fall Ride rumbles into the city next week.

Even after four decades, the annual motorcycle rally continues to draw thousands of visitors to Tomahawk, where rid­ers can take in the scenic sights of the Northwoods and enjoy everything the area has to offer. This year, a slate of events is set to take place from Thursday, Sept. 16 through Saturday, Sept. 18.

If you’re looking to kick off Fall Ride with a bit of tradition, look no further than the Tomahawk Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Bonfire and Brat Fry.

The event, featuring brats, cold beverages and live music by Brian McLaughin, is set to take place at SARA Park on Thursday, Sept. 16, from 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.

For more information, contact the Chamber at 715-453-5334.

All riders are invited to take part in the Thunder Parade on Friday night. Lineup for the parade starts at the Tomahawk School District complex at 5 p.m., with departure at 6 p.m. Riders will wind their way along area backroads before returning to downtown Tomahawk, where W. Wisconsin Ave. will be lined with spectators watching the parade roar through town.

Tomahawk Main Street, Inc., is taking the helm for this year’s downtown festivities.

Vendors will be set up on 2nd and 3rd Streets, and live music can be found downtown throughout the rally.

Mike McAbee will be performing by the food and beer tents on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Friday Night Street Dance on the east end of Wisconsin Ave. will feature Killing Rapunzel, who will take the stage after the Thunder Parade on Friday, Sept. 17.

Live music by the food and beer tents on Saturday, Sept. 18 will be provided by Marty Frei, who is set to perform from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Bryan Anderson and Older Budwiser will perform at the east end of Wisconsin Ave. from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by KIST, a KISS tribute band, taking the stage for the Saturday Night Street Dance from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

At the west end of W. Wisconsin Ave., Fusion will provide live music for Fall Ride goers to check out. Road Trip will take the stage at 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 17. On Saturday, Sept. 18, Kings of Radio will perform at 7 p.m.

El Jovenaso 2, 4 W. Wisconsin Ave., and Corner Pub, 8 W. Wisconsin Ave., will also each have live music during the rally.

Doug Kroening is set to take the stage at Corner Pub at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 16. The Hucksters will play at Corner Pub on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Influence will fill Corner Pub’s 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. time slot on Saturday, Sept. 18.

Jennifer Reisch Solo Acoustic is slated to perform at El Jovenaso 2 on Friday, Sept. 17, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. The following day, Michael Saint will take the stage at El Jovenaso 2 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Three days’ worth of Fall Ride activites are scheduled to take place at SARA Park, 900 W. Somo Ave.

The events begin at noon on Thursday, Sept. 16, with merchandise vendor displays and sales, featuring leather, clothing, motorcycle products, jewelry, and leather sewing, as well as a variety of other products. Official Fall Ride merchandise will also be available for sale.

On Friday, Sept. 17 and Saturday, Sept. 18, Harley-Davidson will offer demo fleets, providing the opportunity a ride on any one of the 2022 Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Registration will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Merchandise vendors and displays and official Fall Ride merchandise, as well as food vendors and refreshments, will be available at SARA Park throughout the rally.

The 40th annual Fall Ride will once again see one of its staples bring the party to Bubba’s Campground, adjoining Nokomis Community Park.

Bubba’s Big Party will run from Monday, Sept. 13, through Saturday, Sept. 18.

Early Bird parties will be held each day from Monday, Sept. 13 through Thursday, Sept. 16, featuring a bonfire and live music from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. each night. Bernie Thompson will perform on Monday, followed by Brad Emmanuel on Tuesday, Older Budwiser on Wednesday, and the Northwoods Skitchers on Thursday.

Friday, Sept. 17 is free to the public. A pancake breakfast will be served at the Nokomis Fire Department from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. A church service will be held at 9:30 a.m. The vending show kicks off at 10 a.m. and will run until close. The Best ‘80s Outfit Contest will take place at 10 p.m.

Friday will also see numerous live music acts. Mark Wayne will perform from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Levi Ballenger will take the stage from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by Madman’s Diary from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Nightrain from 10:30 p.m. to close.

Admission on Saturday Sept. 18 is $10 for those ages 17 and older, and free for those 16 and under. A pancake breakfast will again be held at the Nokomis Fire Department from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m., and a church service will take place at 9:30 a.m. The auto show, with free registration, will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., while the vending show will again run from 10 a.m. until close. Lawn mower, bar stool, and mud bog races will kick off at noon and end at 5 p.m. A burnout contest will be held at 3 p.m. Later in the evening, the Biker Butt Contest will take place at 11:30 p.m.

A full slate of music is lined up for Saturday, with Mark Wayne performing from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., followed by The Dukes from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Hyde will take the stage from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., with Storm closing out the night, performing from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

A blood drive, co-sponsored by St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church and Tomahawk Community Bank, will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 17, at St. Paul Church, 12 E. Wisconsin Ave., Tomahawk.

The blood drive will be held the mobile bus in the church’s secondary parking lot.

Advance registration is requested. To register, call The Community Blood Center at 800-280-4102 or visit www.communityblood.org/donor. Once on the website, log in, click “Donate Now” and enter sponsor code D137.

The Tomahawk Leader’s Fall Ride Guide is a must-have to be in the know about the rally.

The guide can be found at businesses throughout the Tomahawk area, as well as downtown. Flip through to find info on the history of Fall Ride, live music, events, vendors, and more, and be sure to stop by local businesses that have placed advertisements throughout the Guide.

Wild Bikernet Weekly News for September 2, 2021

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Keep the faith, the bullshit and bullies are losing their grip. Let’s ride free forever!

–Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

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Kirk Taylor’s 2018 Strider Custom is back

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by Marilyn Stemp

Kirk Taylor’s L’il Cha Cha was among the very first class of Tiny Strider Customs, a program of the Flying Piston Benefit that supports All Kids Bike – an organization that’s on a mission to teach every kid how to ride a bike as part of kindergarten PE class.

Custom creations are unveiled at the Flying Piston breakfast in August at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip then auctioned at the Mecum motorcycle event in Las Vegas the following January. Proceeds fund bike-riding programs for elementary schools.

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Ride to Sturgis and back Home

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Photos and text by Rogue

I have been riding to Sturgis for over 30 years. Back when I was with Easyriders, I left after work on Friday, rolled onto the interstate, leaned over into the left lane and hit it. During those days I rode a performance-engine, rigid frame, Harley.

I actually made it to Sturgis from Florida in two days one year, but ended up sleeping the entire next day. I changed it to a three-day ride in the future.

CLICK HERE to Read this Photo Feature of 2021 Sturgis Motorcycle Ride Trip.

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Ride the Ozarks Rally 2021

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Ozark Moonshine Run

Route Distance: 113 miles with 662 curves

Gasoline Locations: Harrison, Jasper, Mt. Judea, Deer, Compton

Time Frame: 2 hours, 52 minutes

The Ozark Moonshine Run is without a doubt the most picturesque route in the Ozarks! The route encompasses parts of Scenic Highway 7 and winds through the deepest parts of the Ozark Mountains. Along the route you can expect to see magnificent views, ancient bluff lines, and the possibility of majestic elk grazing in their natural habitat. Parts of the route make you feel like you have stepped back in time to a slower paced lifestyle. You will see many attractions along the way, so take your time and enjoy the scenery; but be careful of the many curves along this route. Some parts can be tricky and slightly dangerous.

Directions: Depart Harrison on Scenic AR Highway 7 South heading to Jasper. Travel through Jasper on AR Highway 7 to AR Highway 374 East on your left. AR Highway 374 will join AR Highway 123 where you will turn right. Follow AR Highway 123 through Mt. Judea (pronounced Judy) until it intersects with AR Highway 7 North. AR Highway 123 splits, so be careful to follow the route leading to AR Highway 7 North. Follow AR Highway 7 North/Highway 16 to the intersection of AR Highway 16 on your left. Highway 16 will take you through the communities of Deer, Nail and Swain. AR Highway 16 intersects with AR Highway 21, where you will travel north into Boxley Valley. Through the valley, be on the lookout for elk that graze the fields and sometimes cross the highway. Follow AR Highway 21 to the intersection of AR Highway 43 North. AR Highway 43 North winds through Ponca and back to Harrison.

The Weirdest Year Yet: The 2021 Sturgis Buffalo Chip Lost & Found

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by Mary Panerio from https://www.buffalochip.com

That’s a wrap! The 40th anniversary of the Best Party Anywhere® has officially come to a close, and the last camper has rolled off Sturgis Buffalo Chip® property. Now that the dust has settled on nine days of good times during the 2021 Sturgis Rally, the only thing left at the Chip is this question…

WHAT. THE. EFF?

That’s because 140 of the most head-scratching items ever collected have made their way into the venue’s lost and found. Check out all the weird and wild stuff left behind and see if you can help the Chip find its rightful owners.

CLICK HERE to See the Photos of the Lost and Found from Sturgis.

Seventh Annual Riding for Warriors event supporting Veterans

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by Daniel Hamburg from https://www.abc27.com

Motorcycle riders raising money for wounded veterans make stop in Gettysburg. It’s the seventh annual Riding for Warriors event.

The group surpassed its initial goal, raising more than $73,000 to help veterans and their families.

SEE EVENT AT https://support.hopeforthewarriors.org/event/7th-annual-riding-for-warriors/e319457

The 20th anniversary of 9/11 is three weeks away.

To honor those who’ve served, a group of motorcycle riders are making their way from New York City to Washington, D.C. and back.

The first stop Saturday night was at Battlefield Harley Davidson in Gettysburg.

The first 200 miles of their trip is complete, all to benefit Hope for the Warriors, specifically the Warrior’s Wish program, funding requests from wounded veterans.

“It could be as simple as specialty workout gear, bicycle. It could be something like woodworking equipment,” Michael Nehlsen, organizer of Riding for Warriors said.

It’s Nehlsen’s seventh year helping fund those wishes.

“This year, unlike other years, I’ve actually invited some of my friends, colleagues and other veterans to ride with me,” Nehlsen said.

While planning this year’s first stop, he met Sandy Sipe, whose son Lance Corporal Jamie Sipe of Camp Hill died in 2017.

“He was a Marine Corps veteran of the Gulf War era who honorably served five years from 18 until he turned 23 years old,” Nehlsen said.

His family was recognized by the organization, including seven-year-old son Austin, who was gifted a motorized bike and money for a trust account.

“We will never forget this and moving forward we will pay it forward to others and I think it’s something great for our family to feel that someone else is honoring our, my son,” Sipe said.

Honoring those who served and pledging to help veterans in need, Nehlsen says it’s everyone’s duty to give back.

“We’ve made promises to our veterans that we have a nation haven’t kept and there are companies and charities like Hope for the Warriors that fulfill those promises,” Nehlsen said.

And whether they served before or after 9/11, “It’s all about remembering what everybody has given,” Nehlsen said.

The next stop for the riders is the Flight 93 memorial in Somerset County, then they’ll head to the Pentagon memorial and back to New York City for a ceremony at ground zero next week.