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2021 Enfield Himalayan Unveiled

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Royal Enfield Introduces 2021 Himalayan

Pre-orders for the Himalayan begin September 1, 2020

Milwaukee, Wis August 26, 2020: Royal Enfield, the global leader in the middleweight motorcycle segment, announced today the launch of the 2021 Himalayan with new features adding to the already impressive legacy of the 411cc adventure motorcycle. Since its introduction in 2016, the Himalayan has earned the respect and admiration of discerning motorcyclists and aspiring adventure riders.

Starting September 1, 2020 interested consumers may reserve a 2021 Himalayan at www.RoyalEnfieldNA.com. Quantities are limited and are only available through the website. Once reserved, consumers will present a unique buyer’s code at participating Royal Enfield dealers within seven days of receipt to confirm the reservation.

The 2021 Himalayan retains the original versatility and durability of the motorcycle, with added features to improve the riding experience. New for 2021 is a switchable antilock braking system (ABS) providing riders with more control when navigating challenging off-road conditions. The new Himalayan also features a revamped rear brake mechanism that improves brake engagement and rider feel for decreased stopping distances. Additional features in response to customer feedback also include an improved side-stand design and hazard light switch in case of road or trail side emergencies.

The new Royal Enfield Himalayan will be available in three new colorways, Lake Blue and Rock Red, and Gravel Gray, adding to the existing portfolio of Snow White, Granite Black and Sleet. The motorcycle comes with a three-year warranty and will be available across all Royal Enfield dealerships in North America starting at $4,999.

“The Himalayan continues to be one of the best-selling units in North America,” said Krishnan Ramaswamy, interim Business Head and President of Royal Enfield Americas. “The affordability, versatility and capability of the Himalayan has established it as a must-have adventure bike and with these updates, it’s better than ever before. Simplicity and a great riding experience are the center of who Royal Enfield is as a brand. We’re pleased that the Himalayan continues to deliver that experience to riders across the globe. It’s not only an approachable bike for the young and entry level rider but also a good dual-purpose addition to the stable of an experienced biker.”

The Himalayan includes a wide variety of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories as well, allowing riders the freedom to customize the Himalayan according to their pursuits. To see the full lineup of accessories and apparel, visit www.RoyalEnfieldNA.com/accessories.

The Himalayan, which was launched primarily for the Indian markets, has become one of the best adventure touring motorcycles in its segment globally. It has paved the path for more accessible forms of adventure touring and the new Himalayan will further strengthen this underserved category.

The perfect motorcycle companion for adventure touring and exploration has just gotten even better.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, please visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, https://www.instagram.com/royalenfield_na/ and www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Harley-Davidson Bronx streetfighter delayed until at least 2022

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Harley is delaying the Bronx to focus on its Pan America adventure touring motorcycle.

The Bronx was looking like the sportiest Harley the world had seen since Buell, but now it’s been delayed indefinitely.

Back at the EICMA motorcycle trade show last November, Harley-Davidson surprised everyone by introducing two motorcycles that were dramatically different from anything it offered at that time or previously.

These bikes were called the Pan America and the Bronx, with the former being a large-displacement adventure touring motorcycle in the vein of BMW’s R1250GS or Ducati’s Multistrada 1260 and the latter an upright naked bike meant to take on the smaller-displacement Monsters from Ducati, among others.

Both bikes looked awesome, and Harley seemed earnest in its plans to produce both for the 2020 model year, but then the pandemic happened and things took a turn for the worse. Now, according to a report published recently by Motorcycle.com, Harley won’t debut the Bronx in 2020 or 2021 at all. Does that mean it’s dead? Harley isn’t telling.

Harley-Davidson representatives have confirmed that while the Bronx won’t be happening next year, the Pan America has become the chief focus for the brand and that it’s focusing its efforts on that launch being successful. This makes sense, given how profitable the adventure bike segment has become in the last decade.

The change to the launch schedule isn’t the only thing going down in Milwaukee, though. New CEO Jochen Zeitz is pushing a new brand strategy that he’s calling the Hardwire, itself an extension of the Rewire strategy that saw several significant changes — including 700 jobs being cut — earlier this year.

“A total rewire is necessary to make Harley-Davidson a high-performance company. Building on our strong brand legacy, we are reinvigorating our core profit driving business – powered by our strongest dealers, most exciting products and careful inventory management, while focusing on the most important opportunities for future expansion,” said Zeitz, in a statement.

“We’re overhauling our operating model and our product plan and are rewiring our market structure and organization to focus on the strengths of our brand and company,” Zeitz continued. “We are now working on our new five-year strategic plan, the Hardwire, which will be grounded in enhancing the desirability of our brand and protecting the value of our iconic products.”

Rewire, hardwire, haywire — whatever. Harley-Davidson is still in a seemingly precarious position. The decision to push into other market segments seems like a smart one, particularly if it focuses on its strengths and looks for ways to improve its weaknesses.

I’m sad that we won’t be seeing the Bronx anytime soon, but hopefully, the extra time will give the folks in Milwaukee time to perfect the bike, giving it a chance to be something other than a weird American also-ran.

Covid-19 puts low-cost 350cc Harley-Davidson bike plans in danger

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

The proposal by Zeitz suggests scrapping 30 percent of the current models in the favour of a more sorted lineup. So far, the models that would be axed have not been revealed but expect a lot of bikes to retire especially from the Softail family that includes as many as 14 models. Here is why the upcoming India-bound 350cc Harley might be in danger.

The year 2020 is no less than a nightmare for multiple sectors and the automotive space is no different! Not only the production of the vehicles is getting affected but the sales have taken a severe hit too. America has been one of the worst affected nations by Covid-19 and hence, for obvious reasons, the industries and companies there are seeing some of the worst days. One such manufacturer is Harley-Davidson that has reported a loss of USD 92 million. Now, in order to offset the losses a bit, the company has came up with a new ‘Hardwire’ plan that includes aborting some of the models that the brand was planning to bring in the coming months. Now the worst piece of news is that the company’s strategy might include a 350cc low-cost motorcycle that was meant for Indian and some of the Asian markets.

Previously, the brand had announced the introduction of as many as 50 new models over the next five years. As a part to rejig strategies, the proposal of Jochen Zeitz, President, CEO and Chairman, Harley-Davidson suggests scrapping 30 percent of the current models in the favour of a more sorted lineup. So far, the models that would be axed have not been revealed but expect a lot of bikes to retire especially from the Softail family that includes as many as 14 models. Now here comes the worrying part. During one of the conversations, Zeitz said that complexity needed to be dramatically reduced and goals set needed to be achievable and realistic. He adds that the company is streamlining its motorcycle models by approximately 30 percent with plans to further refine its product portfolio.

This will enable the brand to invest in the products and platforms that matter the most while better balancing the company’s investment in new, high-potential segments. The reason why we think that India-bound 350cc Harley might not be a part of the plans now is because Zeitz further stated that “the brand is not willing to sacrifice the strength of its legacy in a quest for pure volume growth going forward”.

The Year Is 2025 and Yamaha Just Released Its New XT 500 “H20” Edition

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by Cristian Curmei from https://www.autoevolution.com

2025 is not so far off. But if things work out as they should, it’s possible we could see something like this XT 500 H2O on our streets. Fingers crossed for this concept.

Yamaha’s XT 500 is an iconic two-wheeler. Manufactured between 1976-1989 with a four-stroke single cylinder engine, this enduro motorcycle pushed out a top speed of 82 mph (132km/h) and 28.03 lb-ft (38 Nm) of torque.

One of the main features of the XT was that the front tire was a whole three inches larger than the rear one. This allowed for it to be equally versatile on the road and off it. It’s to this motorcycle that Maxime Lefebvre, the author of this rendering, pays tribute. But I frankly can’t see much of a resemblance. Just look at this beast of imagination.

The initial design started with a spin on the retro body style, keeping true to the shape, but giving it a more modern appeal. From there, that design was taken and modified for specific purposes, resulting in three different models. The first concept was a smart bike, the second concept a lightweight version, and a third was dubbed the “Inexhaustible.”

But that wasn’t the end. Lefebvre took a shot and got together with the Yamaha design team and after the meeting was over, decided to go nuts and truly free up his creativity.

I wish I had a meme right now with Morpheus saying, “What if I told you that this motorcycle is designed to function only on water?” Nothing else. That’s right. The design includes an engine made to run solely on water. Composed of many smaller sections, each with its own specific function to keep you moving, but all of it centered around H2O as the fuel.

It should work like this. The main water tank holds the water and from there a pump feeds it into a pressure system where it can be used to power the engine at the rear of the bike. We have absolutely no details about the way the engine functions, and I’m sure this is no coincidence. If I designed a motor to function on water, only a select few would know about it.

But we have some info as to the components within the system. We can guess that the engine builds pressure and then shoots this pressurized water at the motor, basically the same way a water-wheel works.To do so the flow of water passes through an injector to make sure no pressure is lost.

The result of this type of engine should be a lack in noise. And because it runs on water, it’s considered environmentally sustainable.

The body has the classic enduro look with a few accents to make it more futuristic. After all, it is 2025. We can see a use of white, blue and black to highlight and designate components.

Let’s talk a little about the body and accents for the bike. The front fork breaks away from the classic tube design we’re used to. Large disk brakes and Yamaha calipers on both sides of the front wheel let you know this thing means business. Something I found neat was the steering mechanism for the bike. It doesn’t seem to be steered by conventional means. The handlebars and fork are not attached in any direct way. This leads me to believe that when you turn the handlebars a motor within the frame should take care of steering.

The rear swingarm houses the injection components of the motor that I mentioned earlier, but also the return system to pull unused water back into your tank. This same water is just to be used again, creating an endless flow of power. To take care of suspension, a heavy duty springless shock absorber gives you a smooth ride no matter your terrain.

The blue wheels have no specific purpose, they’re just for show, to accent the overall use of water in the bike. Another color variation exists too, dubbed the collector edition, it includes yellows instead of whites, and purples instead of blues.

If this thing ever makes out of the concept stages and into production, it will be marketed as inexpensive, lightweight, and within everyone’s reach.

Aston Martin teamed up with a motorcycle maker to create one of the only turbo bikes in the world

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by klee@businessinsider.com (Kristen Lee) from https://news.yahoo.com

Aston Martin

  • The AMB 001 is an upcoming bike created by Aston Martin and Brough Superior.
  • It has a turbocharged motor, which is very unusual for a production motorcycle.
  • Only 100 will be made and the starting MSRP is 108,000 Euros, or approximately $121,000.

The words “cheap” and “Aston Martin” don’t typically go together, so it’s of no surprise that the upcoming Aston Martin motorcycle is ludicrously expensive.

Aston Martin teamed up with the motorcycle company Brough Superior to create the upcoming AMB 001. It’s a sleek, futuristic-looking thing that seems way more appropriate for the upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 video game than our lowly reality.

The two companies are currently in the testing stages for their new bike. The specifications aren’t yet final, but a Wednesday press release says that the bike will produce a claimed 180 horsepower from a turbocharged, 88-degree V-twin engine.

The turbocharged aspect of the AMB001 is especially interesting, as the majority of production motorcycles — save for a few attempts by Japanese companies in the 1980s — are not turbocharged. There are a couple of reasons for this.

First, as The Drive reports, packaging a turbocharger into a motorcycle is a difficult job. They add extra power and weight the bikes weren’t originally designed for. Turbos and all their related parts are bulky things and it’s not easy to fit them nicely on a bike.

Second, a turbocharged engine tends to produce very sudden torque. Cars, with four wide tires, are more suited to handle this. Bikes are not, so a sudden burst of power is more likely to spook the back tire and cause it to break loose uncontrollably, explains Cycle World.

Aston Martin, in response, says that the “modern turbine with low inertia is avoiding the turbo lag that was damageable on the Turbo motorcycle attempts from the ’80s.”

Aston Martin and Brough Superior will make just 100 examples of the AMG 001. They will start at 108,000 Euros, which is approximately $121,000.

Keep scrolling to see more.

The AMB 001 is the result of a partnership between Aston Martin and motorcycle company Brough Superior.

A key design feature is the aluminum “fin” that runs along the carbon-fiber gas tank, under the saddle, and onto the rear.

The rest of the bike is largely made from light-weight carbon fiber.

It’s unclear if the rider will be able to see the full gauge cluster with the fin appearing to block some of it. Also, it sort of seems like the gauge cluster is an iPhone. Business Insider has reached out to Aston Martin for clarification.

Aston Martin says the AMB 001 will produce a claimed 180 horsepower from a turbocharged engine.

Production motorcycles are not typically turbocharged. This makes the bike extra special.

Here, you can see it wearing the traditional Aston Martin camouflage livery.

And being tested at a track in Pau-Arnos, France.

The leather seats are as well-crafted as any car interior.

High quality leather and stitching were used.

No official weight figures are available yet, but Automobile Magazine says the AMB 001 will probably weigh “less than 600 pounds in final form.”

And that’s with all the turbocharger bits. Impressive.

Only 100 examples will be made.

Each will have a starting price of 108,000 Euros, or approximately $121,000.

Review: 2020 Kawasaki W800

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

A legend brought back to life.

The 2019 show season was a good one for Kawasaki. Not only did Team Green unveil the Z H2 as well as the updated Ninja 1000 SE SX+ and 650, but it also teamed up with Bimota to create the polarizing Tesi H2 prototype. As though that wasn’t enough, the manufacturer also introduced the W800, a stripped down, entry-level version of the W800 Cafe.

I remember vividly the collective gasp we had when the model was first unveiled. The clean and simple lines were a hit among the RideApart team. I even remember being just a little upset about the U.S. and Canada getting the bike in red rather than in the gorgeous shade of green we saw in Tokyo. My disappointment didn’t last long, however, and by the time I picked one up from the Kawasaki HQ, it was completely crushed by how charming the bike actually looked. More on that later, let’s start from the beginning, shall we?

The year was 1965. While Americans and Russians were continuously outshining one another on the aerospace innovation front, Japanese and European motorcycle manufacturers had an ongoing Space Race of their own. Instead of reaching for the stars, however, the Big Four were competing for the title as the maker of the most powerful motorcycle on the market.

The early- to mid-60s were also formative years for newly-formed Kawasaki Motorcycle Co—a new competitor on the motorcycle scene born from the fusion of Kawasaki Aircraft Industry and Meguro Manufacturing Company in 1964. Thanks to the solid foundations provided by Meguro’s 30-year experience with motorcycles, it wasn’t long before Kawasaki introduced its first big displacement bike, the W1, in 1965. The 624cc parallel-twin is credited for putting Kawasaki on the map as a big bike maker and a serious competitor to Honda and Yamaha. The W1 was followed by the W2, then the W3 before the badge was ultimately dropped in 1975.

Fast-forward 24 years and Kawasaki revived the nametag just in time for the new millennium. In 1999, the W650 became Team Green’s attempt to take its share of the retro-revival cake, going up against an old-school heavyweight, the Triumph Bonneville. The model sold in North America for a meager two years before lame sales caused Kawasaki to pull the bike from the States and focus on the European and Japanese markets instead.

The reality of emissions standards soon caught up to Kawasaki and, by 2007, the manufacturer had to bid the W goodbye once again. Thankfully, the company didn’t wait another quarter of a century to revive the venerable badge. In 2011, it introduced the new and improved W800. The parallel-twin was fully overhauled a met the then current regulations. The fun lasted for another five years before the European Union came knocking once more with new regulations on emissions. This time, the turn-around was much faster and after a short year off the market, the W800 made a triumphant comeback in 2018.

Interestingly, instead of introducing an entry-level model first and following up with more elaborate version, Kawasaki did the opposite got the W ball rolling once again with the W800 Café. The entry-level W800 came the following year as a 2020 model-year. 55 years later, the W continues to roll out of the same plant that first produced the W1—talk about looping the loop.

2020 Kawasaki W800
Engine: 773cc, four-stroke, parallel-twin
Transmission: five-speed
Performance: 52 hp/46 lb-ft
Brakes: 1 x 320 mm disc with two-piston caliper front, 270 mm disc with two-piston caliper back
Suspension: 41mm telescopic fork front, preload adjustable twin-shocks back
Wheels: 100/90-19” front, 130/80-18” rear
Wheelbase: 57.6 inches
Seat Height: 31.1 inches
Weight: 496 pounds
Price: $9,199

If you like the look of the Kawasaki W800 in pictures, wait until you see it in person—I have yet to find a photo that does it justice. The W800 is a handsome bike. The proportions are elegant and Kawasaki found the right balance of chrome and black so that the bike doesn’t look like a disco ball. The manufacturer has been particularly attentive to the small details that give the model its tasteful but not tacky vintage look. Features such as the peashooter exhausts, the round turn signals, the braced fenders, and the exposed bevel-drive camshaft were borrowed from the original W, the one that started it all.

There’s no fluff or luxuries involved here—the W800 has standard ABS and that’s about as fancy as it gets. The two big dials at the center of the headstock are your analog speedometer and rpm gauge. There is a small digital display that shows mileage, trips, time, and such in the left-hand side dial and the usual panel of warning lights in the right-hand side one. There isn’t even a fuel gauge to let you monitor your progress. Just like on an older bike, you either have to do a bit of guessing or wait for the fuel warning to turn on.

As a standard, the W800 is your run of the mill, easy-to-get and to ride-on type of bike. The ergonomics are relaxed; for my 5’8” stature, the knees were at a comfortable, almost-90-degree bend and the straight handlebar is easy to reach without having to stretch the arms completely. This is as standard—and as comfortable—as this type of bike gets.

The Ride

If you’re looking for a bike that stands out with a particularly spicy or spunky personality, then chances are the W800 will feel a little underwhelming. Keep in mind that this isn’t a bike meant to be flashy—it plays the understated card and it plays it well. There’s beauty in simplicity, and while the W doesn’t have the spark of, say, a Z, it does have a few good things going for it.

The engine note is my favorite part. As the Kawasaki representative put it when I picked up the bike and did the walkaround, the bike has a really rich note at low rpm. Then, around the 5,000rpm mark, the grunting engine evens out and becomes as smooth as silk. Sure enough, I started the engine and a nice, musical rumble echoed out of the peashooters. Having to hear that aria in parallel-twin at every take-off definitely made city commuting a delight.

In the city, the W behaves impeccably—not even the addition of an occasional passenger fazes it. It’s nimble and easy to whirl around in an environment where obstacles and traffic lights abound. The stopping power provided by the single discs front and back was efficient without being too mushy or aggressive—a good middle ground for a standard bike that won’t try to buck you off the saddle.

Despite weighing a healthy 496 pounds, the bike is easy to maneuver at low speed, or even to walk out of a tight spot. The steering is breezy and light in the hand, you don’t have to wrestle it into submission or convince it to make a turn.

Once you get on the highway, you get acquainted with the bike’s only real flaw. At a certain speed, I could feel the front wheel buffet, a feeling exacerbated by speed. If you wish to put a few hundred miles on the factory tires (hey: they’re “free” tires!) then adjusting your speed accordingly, below the 70-mph mark will help for a while. If you’re willing to spend the extra money, a good set of radials can make the bike virtually perfect.

The engine itself is irreproachable at any speed. Even cruising at highway speeds felt effortless and I barely even touched the fifth gear—the mill happily purred away in fourth around the 6,000rpm mark. Power is easy to manage, the gears are long (you only get five instead of the now-standard six) and the throttle output is nice and gradual. The clutch is light under the fingers and the gears are smooth as butter—just make sure you give the lever a good kick shifting from first to second, the travel between the two seems a tad long which means I often ended up in Neutral. User error, probably.

The Conclusion

A small part of me thought the W800 would have a little more personality. Just a little something-something to give it more oomph, like with the other Kawasakis. However, I was wrong to expect that of the W because that’s not what the bike is for. It’s the celebration of a legacy rather than something revolutionary. Did I smile while riding it? I did, so in that regards, it fulfilled its mission.

The W800 is designed to be simple, straightforward, and mostly to play nice. In fact, it’s so well-mannered that I could easily recommend it as a starter bike. Think about it: it’s easy to maneuver and easy to control which also makes it easy to learn on without being overwhelmed.

Personality-wise, it might not be the right fit for me. That being said, if I could justify owning more than one bike, I would own a W for its looks alone. If you decide to buy one, be ready to have people come and ask you about it because they will. It seriously is that pretty.

MotoGP-Fast Ducati Superleggera V4 Enters Production, Soon on the Streets

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

In the second month of 2020, Italian bike maker Ducati announced the launch of the Superleggera V4, a bike for street use so fast it is borderline a MotoGP two-wheeler. Production of the motorcycle began this week, meaning there isn’t that long until we get to see it on the tarmac, where it belongs.

The first Superleggera V4 already rolled off assembly line, and work is ongoing on the other 499 that will make up the limited production run. Once ready, the world would have 500 examples of the only motorcycle “approved for road use with a carbon fiber frame, swingarm and rims.”

So, what’s so special about it?

First, the engine. Packing a 998 cm3 Desmosedici Stradale R powerplant that is usually good for 224 hp, the bike produces even more than that, 234 hp, thanks to the racing kit all will be offered with. That’s enough power to make it nearly as fast as the Panigale V4 R SBK, a race bike that won the 2019 Italian Motorspeed Championship – the V4 went around the Mugello circuit in 1:52:45 minutes, just a couple a seconds slower than the racer.

Then, the extensive use of carbon. The material is at the core of important hardware fitted on the motorcycle, including the frame, swingarm and rims. And it has also been incorporated in other related parts, like the helmet specifically created for this model.

Last, but not least, the many kits available. They comprise an Akrapovi exhaust system, headlamp and light replacement, license plate holder removal, side stand removal, mirror replacement aluminum caps from billet, Data Analyzer and GPS, racing fuel cap, brake lever protection, motorcycle cover, and front and rear stand and battery charger.

Prices for the Ducati Superleggera V4 are available upon request. Customers will also receive a track test on the factory Panigale V4 R, and the chance to ride for a brief time a Desmosedici GP20.

 

After The Ninja And The Z, Is The Kawasaki Vulcan H2 Next?

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by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com

The God of Fire is getting a boost.

In 2015, Kawasaki introduced its first modern-day supercharged motorcycle, the Ninja-based H2. Four years later, the Z H2 hypernaked followed. What will happen next? After all, developing a new engine takes time, R&D, and funds, so when a new block is created, it makes sense for manufacturers to take full advantage of its potential. So, will Kawasaki simply stop there or will find other applications for its forced induction mill?

The answer to that could be the latter. Rumors from Japan suggest that Kawasaki could be about to shake things up in the power cruiser segment, supercharger style.

According to Japanese site Young Machine, there is apparently a Vulcan H2 in the works at Kawasaki. The model would, of course, use the same 998cc supercharged inline-four as its Ninja and Z siblings.

The speculations about a Vulcan H2 are connected to the rumor that Kawasaki is planning to overhaul its Vulcan lineup altogether. Considering the manufacturer would likely have to rethink the chassis to accommodate the supercharged engine, timing the new H2’s development with a lineup upgrade all makes sense.

Thai site MotoRival produced a render of what they imagine the Vulcan H2 would look like. Silhouette wise, the design seems inspired by the Vulcan S with the single-rider saddle, tear-drop tank, and elongated handlebar but the headlamp cluster is clearly borrowed from the Z H2 which creates a weird blend of modern and more classic lines.

This is only speculation as Kawasaki has neither confirmed or denied the rumor. According to Indian Autos Blog, if the manufacturer really is working on a (super)powercruiser, chances are we won’t see it for another couple of years. Whether you like powercruisers or not, the notion of a supercharged model is admittedly something we can be curious about.

Benelli SRK 600 street fighter spied undisguised

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by Nithyanandh Karuppaswamy from https://www.rushlane.com

Chinese-owned Italian motorcycle brand Benelli is in the process of strengthening its middle-weight sportsbike portfolio

Several months ago, a sharp looking street fighter with 600 badge was spied in China, sparking speculations that it was the next generation TNT 600i. However, in November 2019, Benelli unveiled the new gen TNT 600i which looked more like a facelift of the current version and had nothing in common with the previously spotted prototype.

The sportier version of the 600 has now emerged online again, this time with SRK 600 moniker. It looks like Benelli SRK 600 is a premium alternative to the TNT 600i with additional features.

Visually, the Benelli SRK 600 is up there with contemporary street fighters with a sporty headlamp, complete with aerodynamic cowl. The new motorcycle also features edgy fuel tank with sharp extensions and a stubby cantilevered tailpiece with contoured seat and a minimal taillight.

As far as the hardware is concerned, the Benelli SRK 600 appears to inherit its TNT sibling’s components. The new street fighter is underpinned by a trellis frame which is supported by a sturdy inverted telescopic front fork and an eccentrically mounted rear monoshock. The alloy swingarm also looks pretty similar to the unit seen on the new TNT 600i. The 17-inch alloy wheels, thick rubber, twin front discs and a single rear disc are also identical to those of the TNT.

The four down-tubes confirm that the 600 cc inline-four cylinder engine has been carried forward as well. On board the 2020 Benelli TNT 600i, the sweet sounding motor produces 81.6 hp and 51 Nm of torque. Transmission is a 6-speed unit. Considering that the SRK 600 will be positioned above the TNT 600i, we expect the motor to dish out a slightly higher power output. The SRK ditches the underbelly exhaust for a short canister which terminates just below the swing arm.

From the spyshots, we can also observe that the Benelli SRK 600 is equipped with color TFT instrument panel, a flat handlebar, alloy brake and clutch levers. We expect the sportsbike to offer riding modes and a few electronic systems like multi-stage traction control and ABS.

The Benelli SRK 600 is expected to make its world premiere at EICMA 2020 in November provided the even is not cancelled. We expect the motorcycle to make it to India a few months later. Benelli’s immediate focus in India after this lockdown period would be to upgrade its existing portfolio to BS6 emission standards before ushering in new products.

Honda’s upcoming inline-four ADV to take on Ducati Multistrada: Patent images leaked

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by Pradeep Shah from https://www.financialexpress.com

Looks like Honda’s Multistrada V4 challenger will come with a breathtaking design! Find all details here.

Honda is currently working on a full-fledged ADV and very recently, the patent for the same has been filed with the European Intellectual Property Office. While on one hand, Honda’s Africa Twin CRF1100L aims at serious off-roading, on the other, the said ADV model will have a focus on the roads and will compete against the likes of the upcoming Ducati Multistrada V4, BMW S 1000 XR and the Kawasaki Versys 1000 in the segment. One of the important highlights of the upcoming Honda ADV will be that it will feature an inline four-cylinder engine. The ADV will get 17-inch alloy wheels at both ends. As one can see in the patent images, courtesy RideApart, the bike will get a semi-fairing and should get a full-LED lighting system.

Moreover, in terms of features, the ADV is expected to get a fully coloured TFT instrument cluster and the unit should support Bluetooth connectivity as well. The bike is also expected to get an adjustable windscreen. Also, as one can see in the patent images, the bike will get inverted forks upfront along with a rear monoshock. Moreover, the bike will come with dual disc brakes upfront along with a single disc at the rear and a dual-channel ABS (Anti-Lock Braking System) will be a part of the package as well. The bike will get a single-sided swingarm too.

Coming to the powertrain, there aren’t much details available yet. However, we believe that being a full-fledged, full-size ADV, the bike will draw power from a litre-class engine that should have a power output of well over 100hp. We can expect to see this bike sometime next year with a public debut likely at the 2021 EICMA motorcycle show.