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Harley-Davidson’s Livewire One electric motorcycle debuts at $21,995

By General Posts

  • Up to 146 Miles on a Single Charge
  • Customizable Riding Experience
  • Connected Communication
  • 105 HP
  • 30″ Seat Height
  • All-Electric
  • DC Fast Charge Compatible
  • Charging time is 0-100% charge in 11 hours using the included charging cord
  • $19,799 *Price includes tax credit of $2,200
  • ADDITIONAL ACCESSORIES: Radius Carbon Fiber Kit $1,299.95* and Rizoma® Precision Billet Kit $1,299.95*
  • CHECK FOR Federal Government Electric Vehicle Tax Credit by Clicking Here

by Gary Gastelu from https://www.foxnews.com

Reboot of H-D’s original electric motorcycle. Harley-Davidson’s rebooted electric motorcycle has been revealed.

The LiveWire One is an updated version of the Harley-Davidson LiveWire that was introduced in 2019 and will be sold under the newly established LiveWire electric motorcycle brand.

The LiveWire One has a claimed range of 146 miles per charge in urban driving and can be recharged to 100% in an hour at a public DC fast charging station.

The starting price has been reduced from $29,799 to $21,999, which will make it more competitive against similar offerings from Zero Motorcycles.

Twelve dedicated LiveWire showrooms located in California, Texas and New York are scheduled to be open this fall with additional locations to be added by the end of the year.

International sales will begin in 2022 and the LiveWire brand will be expanded with additional models in the coming years.

Harley-Davidson Launches LiveWire One Electric Motorcycle
from https://www.rttnews.com

Harley-Davidson (HOG) on Thursday launched its first electric motorcycle under LiveWire brand, LiveWire One, as the iconic motorcycle company re-attempts to make a mark in the electric motorcycle segment.

LiveWire ONE is priced at $21,999 and available to order at LiveWire.com, in addition to select LiveWire dealers. The price could go below $20,000 for most customers after federal tax credit for electric motorcycles.

The city range of the LiveWire One is listed as 146 miles, which is the exact same range as the original LiveWire. The bike also sports DC fast charging that can recharge from 0-100% in 60 minutes or 0-80% in 45 minutes.

CEO Jochen Zeitz said, “As part of The Hardwire Strategy, we made a commitment that Harley-Davidson would lead in electric. We recognized the pioneering spirit and brand value in LiveWire for our community and took the decision to evolve the original LiveWire motorcycle into a dedicated EV brand.”

SEE MORE AT https://www.livewire.com

Review of Triumph Thruxton RS 2021: a factory cafe racer

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Everyday café: Triumph’s factory cafe racer offers an engaging ride and killer looks, but is it worth the sky-high asking price?

The Thruxton RS is arguably the crown jewel of Triumph’s Modern Classic lineup of motorcycles. It’s an interesting mashup of modern, high-end components and technology, with a decidedly old-school powertrain. It’s a bike that shouldn’t make sense, but after spending time with it, it’s a bike I can’t get out of my head.

The 2021 Triumph Thruxton RS is powered by a 1,200-cc liquid-cooled 270-degree parallel-twin engine, which produces 103 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 83 pound-feet of torque at just 4,250 rpm. It’s an engine that, thanks to its large displacement and firing order, makes a noise that will get your heart pumping, even if its performance pales in comparison to more conventional naked and sport bikes.

The engine delivers its power smoothly, thanks to Triumph’s excellent fueling. The bike routes its power through a smooth six-speed sequential transmission and out a chain final drive. The gearbox offers light, crisp shifts and an easy-to-find neutral. The age of the engine’s design shows, but that’s a good thing, given Triumph’s continued development.

The formerly-range-topping RS is now the only Thruxton model you can get, and so Triumph seems to have spared no expense in kitting it out with the best-possible chassis components. While the Thruxton’s frame is a conventional and old-timey tubular steel affair, the suspension is modern and well considered. The front fork comes from Showa and uses that company’s “Big Piston” design as found on high-end sport bikes. It’s fully adjustable and makes for a controlled and plush ride, even over bumpy pavement.

The rear shocks (that’s right, two — this is a heritage bike, after all) come from Ohlins and are also fully adjustable. Typically, in my experience, twin-shock bikes don’t necessarily offer the best control over broken pavement or on fast roads, but these Ohlins units toss all that out the window. The back end of the Thruxton feels as comfortable and confident as I could hope for. It uses some fairly trick wheels to help with its handling, too. It has 17-inch, 32-spoke wire wheels, but unlike most wire wheels with steel spokes, the Thruxton uses weight-saving aluminum spokes. The wheels are wrapped in sticky Metzeler Racetec tires.

The brakes come from Brembo, and as such, they’re excellent. Having big Brembo brakes on a motorcycle isn’t unlike stopping at a Starbucks on a long road trip. Sure, there are other options, but this way you know exactly what you’re in for. In the case of the Brembos, what you’re in for is an excellent feel from the lever, huge stopping power and almost jewel-like build quality. The twin front rotors on the RS are sized at 310 millimeters and gripped by Brembo M50 four-piston radial-mount calipers. The single rear rotor comes in at 220 millimeters and is clamped by a single, twin-piston Nissin caliper.

The Thruxton has anti-lock brakes, but they’re not lean-sensitive since the bike lacks an inertial measurement unit. On a bike like the Thruxton — one that’s more about looking good and having fun than outright speed — this is totally acceptable. The Thruxton also packs user-selectable ride modes, which include Road, Rain and Sport. I generally find myself leaving the bike in Sport mode all the time because I like the extra responsive throttle. The Thruxton RS features a very handsome analog speedometer and tachometer. Each also packs an LCD display that provides all the pertinent rider information that I want to see — fuel level, gear indicator, trip odometer, etc. It’s a bit old school, but so is the bike.

When it comes to ergonomics, cafe racers aren’t generally what I’d call comfortable for longer rides. They feature a more leaned-forward, sport bike-like stance, which looks great and makes for agile handling, but can be hard on your wrists. The Thruxton somehow manages to pull off the cafe racer look while remaining relatively comfortable. The bike is slightly more upright than it might seem at first glance and a generous rider triangle means that even someone like me at 6 feet, 4 inches doesn’t feel incredibly cramped. Footpeg clearance is good, too, so leaning the bike way over isn’t an issue.

With a seat height of nearly 32 inches, the Thruxton may be a bit of a struggle for some smaller riders when it comes time to get both feet on the ground at a stop. It’s also not especially light, at 434 pounds dry, so that might also be something for smaller riders to consider. The Triumph Speed Twin might be better, in that case.

The Thruxton is a bike that somehow manages to ride as good as it looks, which is saying something. It’s easy to putter around town on, thanks to its compliant ride and torquey, under-stressed engine. It’s also a riot on a curvy road, thanks to its sticky tires and aggressive-ish riding position, and there are few pleasures greater than hearing the Thruxton’s big twin-cylinder engine echo off of canyon walls at 7,500 rpm.

The Thruxton RS is a fantastic machine, but of course, it should be, given its price tag. All of the motorcycle jewelry that Triumph bestows on the RS means that it’s packing a hefty asking price of $16,200. There is an almost limitless number of other motorcycles that can offer more performance or utility than the Thruxton for that money (or less). Still, I struggle to think of one that can offer performance with as much style.

BMW Motorrad to reveal a New “Pioneering Electric Vehicle” Next Week

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For the better part of the last ten years, electricity seemed like the way forward for four-wheeled vehicles alone. Sure, countless motorcycle startups popped up over the years, each trying to break the mold, but each has so far failed.

The first in the large group of established bike makers to go down the electrification path is Harley-Davidson. The Americans have the LiveWire on sale for some time now, but they also seem to struggle to make it stick.

But maybe over in Europe, things will be a bit different. There, BMW’s Motorrad has been more or less secretly working for some time on an electric motorcycle that, at least on paper, should forever change the segment.

Back in 2019, an amazing contraption called Vision DC Roadster was shown. In the place one would usually find a boxer engine, that thing packed a vertically mounted battery, complete with cooling ribs and integrated ventilators. Under the battery, shaped like a cylinder, resided the motor meant to spin the wheels.

Now, the Vision DC was just a concept, but a bit later that same year, something else came into the spotlight. It was called E-Power Roadster, a Frankenstein machine that took the front end of an S1000R and tied it to the rear of an R1200RS.

A lot of time has passed since, and it seems there is still no reveal in sight for electric motorcycles branded by BMW. But there are other things, possibly even as exciting, coming our way from Munich in lesser segments, namely the “urban single-track mobility“ one.

That’s where the Germans say their unveiling from next week will be playing, a pioneering electric vehicle whose teaser image you can see as the main photo of this piece.

No additional info was provided, apart from the fact the vehicle will premiere on July 7.

PRESS RELEASE:
Next Wednesday, BMW Motorrad will celebrate the world premiere of a pioneering, electric vehicle. The presentation will be streamed online.

Wednesday, 7 July 2021 – 10:00 am (CEST)

The online presentation will be broadcast on various channels of BMW Motorrad and the BMW Group. The live stream will be on the official Facebook page of BMW Motorrad, the YouTube channels of BMW Motorrad as well as the BMW Group and the BMW Group LinkedIn page.

https://www.facebook.com/BMWMotorrad

https://www.youtube.com/BMWMotorrad

Following this online presentation, further information on the topics of product and design will be answered by experts in a live chat on the BMW Motorrad channels.

Both events will be held exclusively in English to provide access for a broad, interested audience.

Harley-Davidson’s Next Electric Motorcycle is the LiveWire One

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by Dennis Chung from https://www.motorcycle.com

Motorcycle.com can confirm that the first LiveWire-branded electric motorcycle from Harley-Davidson will be called the LiveWire One. The information comes to us via Vehicle Identification Number deciphering information Harley-Davidson submitted to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. We expect the 2021 LiveWire One will be revealed on July 8. [Updated with some clarity about the claimed horsepower output]

The VIN filing confirms that the LiveWire One will claim a peak output of 101 bhp (that’s brake horsepower). By comparison, the 2020 Harley-Davidson LiveWire (which we’ll henceforth call by its model code, “ELW”, to avoid confusion) was previously listed in VIN filings at 70 bhp. We believe this was the measured continuous output rather than a peak output, which Harley-Davidson has claimed to be 105 hp. As we previously reported, Australian certification documents suggest the 2021 ELW will see its peak power drop from 105 hp to 101 hp, matching what the VIN filing indicates.

The LiveWire One will go by the model code LW1, and the internal vehicle code “XB”, making it distinct from the ELW and its internal vehicle code “XA”, and further confirming its status as Harley-Davidson’s second electric motorcycle. The VIN information also confirms the LiveWire One will be considered a 2021 model.

In retrospect, the LiveWire One name doesn’t come as a real surprise. The company’s first ever motorcycle was called the Model 1, and Harley-Davidson went back to that theme for its Serial 1 electric bicycle brand. Interestingly, “One” is spelled out for the LiveWire instead of being a number.

Apart from the name and its claimed brake horsepower output, we don’t know very much about the LiveWire One. The name may suggest something more classically styled, but on the other hand, one of the reasons for spinning off LiveWire into its own brand is to create some separation from Harley-Davidson’s heritage.

Harley-Davidson previously stated it would reveal the first LiveWire-branded model on July 8. The bike was supposed to make its first public debut on July 9 at the International Motorcycle Show at FivePoint Amphitheater Irvine, Calif., but the venue has since pulled out, deciding to only host musical concerts through 2021. Harley-Davidson hasn’t announced an alternate date, but we suspect the LiveWire One will be at the next IMS stop, July 16-18 in Sonoma, Calif.

Latest 3D-Printed Electric Motorcycle From Tarform

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by Cristina Mircea from https://www.autoevolution.com

Meet the Luna Racer Edition, Newest 3D-Printed Electric Motorcycle From Tarform.

There’s a new Luna in town. Brooklyn-based motorcycle manufacturer Tarform Motorcycles has announced a new version of its Luna electric motorcycle model. The Racer Edition will enter production this summer but you can preorder it now.

Tarform motorcycles might not have the most elegant and appealing design for everyone’s taste, but they compensate in other ways. The company aims to manufacture electric motorcycles that are modern in features, sustainable and upgradable, thanks to their modular design. Approximately 55 percent of the bike parts are 3D-printed using recycled materials such as recycled aluminium, biodegradable leather, flax fibers. You can upgrade pretty much anything on them, from the battery pack to the software and even body.

The Luna was announced in 2018 and it initially came in one version, called the Scrambled Edition. But things got delayed and the bike is still just a concept. Now the company announced a new version, the Cafe Racer Edition, and they are both available to preorder for the same price of $24,000. Tarform says they’ll both hit the market this summer.

There aren’t too many differences between the Scrambler and the Racer, as they both feature the same specs in terms of weight, battery, and motor. Both come with a 55 HP motor and 10 kWh battery pack. They both weigh 440 lb (200 kg).

Inspired by the British 60s, the Racer differs from the Scrambler mostly in terms of design. It features the Avon Sport ST street tires, comes with a slightly lower suspension and there are some lines on the battery box, which are missing from the Scrambler. The Racer also has black anodized bars, swingarm, indicators, and mirrors.

The Luna comes with a 3.4-inch HD display with Bluetooth, an HD 180-degree rearview camera, and three riding modes. It can reach speeds up to 120 mph (193 kph) and goes from 0 to 60 mph (96 kph) in 3.8 seconds. It has a range of 120 miles (193 km).

You can preorder the new Luna Racer Edition now on the Tarform website. The price of the bike is $24,000 and you can choose to pay in installments of $400 per month.

SEE VIDEO:

Ducati Multistrada V4: Zero to 5,000 in just six months

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Germany Becomes Home of the 5,000th Ducati Multistrada V4

Zero to 5,000 in just six months. It is the achievement of Italian bike maker Ducati’s Multistrada V4, which in just half a year managed to convince 5,000 riders it is the right choice for them.

Ducati announced the milestone this week, with the 5,000th two-wheeler ever made in the family ordered by a German rider from Ingolstadt. The bike is a fully-loaded V4 S Sport and was accompanied in the rider’s garage by a “sculptural reproduction” of the bike and a “personal letter certifying the motorcycle’s serial number.”

The V4 was presented by the Italians in November last year, and it is currently available in three versions, the V4, V4S, and V4 S Sport, all described as the most advanced of their kind ever. The most potent of them all can easily go in the high $20,000s (exact pricing is available upon request at dealers).

At the core of the bikes sits the so-called Granturismo engine, a 1,158cc piece of hardware rated at a massive 170 hp at 10,500 rpm and a maximum torque of 125 Nm (92 lb-ft) at 8,750 rpm. The engine is lighter than the one that preceded it and tips the scale at 66.7 kg (147 pounds).

But it is not only the engine that makes the bike special. The V4 is presently the first production motorcycle equipped with both a front and a rear radar, working together with the Adaptive Cruise Control (AAC) technology.

Only a limited range of colors is available for the bike, going from the Ducati Red of the entry-level to the “particularly aggressive dedicated livery“ of the S Sport. This one also gets an Akrapovic exhaust and carbon front mudguard.

The exhaust system is made of stainless steel and was designed to bring the motorcycle’s weight down by 5 kg (11 pounds) and increase the engine’s power output to 174 hp and 133 Nm (98 lb-ft) of torque.

One-Off Triumph Thruxton 1200 RS to be given away

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

One-Off Triumph Thruxton 1200 RS Steps Into the Spotlight, to Be Given Away

At the beginning of April, as it once again announced its support for the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride (DGR), British bike maker Triumph said it would be unveiling a one-off Thruxton 1200 RS during the event. The full reveal date is still set for May 23, but the bike maker gave us a preview of the motorcycle this week.

No exact details on the motorcycle were provided, and we do not know to the letter what makes this particular bike special, but a few of the released images with the two-wheeler show the paint scheme that makes this one stand out in its family.

Fully designed by Triumph’s paint shop, the scheme is clean and elegant, with white and black on the fuel tank, the DGR logo featured on the bodywork and the promise of unique customizations.

The bike maker will spill the full beans on the bike on May 23 because it is then when DGR is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The event came to be in Sydney, Australia, and it is meant to “raise funds and awareness of prostate cancer and men’s mental health.” To date, over 300,000 riders took part, and $27.45 million were raised for the cause.

The special Thruxton is meant as an additional perk for those willing to take part, as one of the participants in this year’s event will get to win it. The rides are open to all whose willing to attend and will take place all over the world. All one has to do to get a chance at winning the one-off motorcycle is to register, make a random donation, and raise an additional $250 from other rides.

Full details on rules and regulations for this year’s Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride and the ways of getting a shot at winning the unique bike can be found at this link.

Yamaha XSR125 makes global debut

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from https://www.financialexpress.com

Smallest neo-retro XSR to launch in Europe in June.

A new-retro-styled Yamaha has just been revealed which would make fun daily commuter, enter XSR125 – the smallest XSR to date. The Japanese manufacturer is expanding its 125cc portfolio with the XSR125 which is based on the same platform as the MT-125 and R125 but with classic clothing. Although it packs a range of modern features which are quite a necessity now.

Yamaha XSR125 is powered by a 124cc liquid-cooled SOHC engine that puts out 14.7 bhp at 10,000 rpm and 11.5 Nm of torque at 8,000 rpm and is paired with a six-speed transmission. The engine boasts advanced Variable Valve Actuation and is Euro V compliant.

Being a neo-retro, the XSR125 gets a round headlamp casing but with an LED lamp and an LED tail lamp as well, a rounded fuel tank design, and a long flat seat. Bodywork has been kept at its minimal with the underbelly revealing the engine and radiator, but it does get an engine guard.

The instrument cluster is a retro-themed LCD display with a chrome outer finish. Colour options include Redline, Impact Yellow and Tech Black, along with contrasting decals for each.

Suspension setup includes 37 mm upside-down forks and swingarm for the rear and brakes are covered by a 267 mm disc up front and a 220 mm at the rear. Tyre sizes are 110 and 140, front and rear. It weighs in at 140 kg with a seat height of 815 mm, 160 mm ground clearance and a fuel tank capacity of 11 litres.

Ducati Monster 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Take the edge off.
In 1992, Ducati designer Miguel Galluzzi shoehorned a 900SS engine into an 888 superbike frame. He then bolted on a 750 Supersport fork and the Ducati Monster was born. Galluzzi’s Frankenstein experiment was well-loved though, driving sales at the Bologna brand for years. The parts bin special saved Ducati, in fact, and the Monster has remained in Ducati’s stable ever since.

That hasn’t stopped the Monster from evolving through the years, though. Ducati frequently tweaked the ingredients, but the recipe remained the same: one part air-cooled L-twin, one part trellis frame. However, technology and design move on, and the model has changed with the times. By 2015, all Monster engines switched to liquid-cooling, and the latest iteration finally sheds its trellis frame—and the weight that comes with it.

That prompted traditionalists and ardent Ducatisi to click their tongues, lamenting over Ducati’s heresy. To many fans, the trellis frame was the Monster’s pièce de résistance. The quality that separated the muscular streetfighter from its “soulless” competitors. The trellis frame was the Monster’s greatest strength, but it was also its greatest weakness, imprisoning the naked bike to a bygone era as its counterparts forged ahead.

That’s no longer the case in 2021. Sure, the Monster is still “borrowing” from its counterparts by plucking the 937cc L-twin from the Supersport 950 and wedging it into a Panigale V4-inspried monocoque aluminum frame. Even the model’s 4.3-inch TFT dash sports a Panigale V4-derived interface. Despite those old habits, the question remains: is it still a Monster without the trellis frame? Did it trade in its panache for pastiche? Did it lose its character, its “soul”?

These questions loomed large when Ducati invited us to San Francisco, California, to ride the 2021 Monster. After spending a full day in the saddle of the new bike, it was clear that this is a very different beast.

Engine:
To meet Euro5 emissions standards, Ducati ditched the Monster’s 821cc Testastretta engine in favor of the proven mill found in Ducati’s Hypermotard 950 and Supersport 950. The 11-degree Testastretta configuration carries over, but Ducati bumps the capacity to 937cc for good reasons. That’s 111 good reasons, in the form of horsepower. Ducati couples that with a generous 69 lb-ft helping of torque. More than enough bark and bite for the naysayers.

The powerplant may tout a higher volume than the outgoing unit, but it also shaved off 5.7 pounds in the process. The new clutch drops three pounds alone while the cylinder heads and clutch cover account for two additional pounds of weight loss. The updated gear drum, alternator cover, and pistons and rods pitch in too, saving precious grams.

Ducati’s versatile Testastretta platform isn’t just performance-oriented, however, it’s surprisingly practical as well. New Monster owners can enjoy a whole lot of riding between the 9,000-mile oil services and 18,000-mile valve services. The revised hydraulic clutch also reduces resistance at the lever by 20 percent and the up/down quickshifter nearly eliminates clutch use altogether.

That’s the same Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Evo 2 found on the $24,095 Multistrada V4 S, and the IMU-dependent system works just as well on this $11,895 naked bike. In fact, the DQS equipped on the Monster produces an even more satisfying exhaust note upon downshifting. Modern emissions regulations have taken the voice box of many a motorcycle, but Ducati’s auto-blipper gives the Monster a formidable growl.

Upshifts were just as visceral, but for an entirely different reason. Though the bike’s fueling was pretty fluttery below 3,500 rpm, the Monster really bared its teeth between 4,000-7,000 rpm. A series of clutchless upshifts only amplified the effect. The power delivery never bordered on frightening, though. Of course, if 111 ponies are too much pep for your step, Ducati’s three ride modes help tame the Monster’s inner animal.

Those looking for an easy-breezy experience can switch to Urban mode, which restricts output to 75 horsepower. For highway blasts, Touring mode maintains peak horsepower but prioritizes smooth acceleration. Predictively, Sport mode is the least restrictive, but that doesn’t make it less manageable than its counterparts. After a short squirt through the hilly San Francisco streets, I kept the engine in Sport mode for the rest of the day. Even in the tight and twisty confines of Route 35, the lively engine response never felt overwhelming. Thanks, primarily, to the new superbike-derived frame.

Chassis:
While the engine’s before/after results were truly impressive, Ducati engineers went to greater lengths to reduce the chassis’ mass. Compared to the 821’s trellis front frame, the new monocoque saves 9.9 pounds. The fiberglass-reinforced polymer subframe comes in 4.2 pounds underweight while the swingarm and wheels reduce unsprung weight by 7.2 pounds. Ducati’s diet plan worked wonders for the Monster, converting the heavy brute to a lithe apex predator.

That new, low 414-pound wet weight is noticeable right off the kickstand. Fleet-footed yet planted, the Monster takes advantage of that newfound agility in the turns. Initial tip-in is effortless and side-to-side transitions are predictable and smooth. That sharp-handling quality should redeem the Monster in the eyes of Ducati fans, but focused track riders may discount the sporty naked bike for lacking fully adjustable suspension.

Speaking of, in stock form, the 43mm USD front end and preload-adjustable lean on the stiffer side. At least they did under my 160-pound frame. Heavier riders may benefit more from the spring rate, but the suspension only borders on harsh at the least favorable time—at lean. Northern California’s Skyline Boulevard is a relatively well-maintained mountain road, but a few inconveniently placed potholes unsettled the Monster’s sure-footed stance.

Of course, no suspension operates optimally when leaned over, but the sharp hit doesn’t just stop at the springs. That new, responsive aluminum chassis also relayed those shockwaves up through to the rider. Luckily, the Monster was quick to regain its composure and continued attacking corners. Aside from those rare moments of instability, though, the Monster handled everything the city and the canyons could throw at it.

Unlike the suspension, the braking system’s pedigree was never in question. Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers bite down on twin 320mm discs up front and a dual-piston binder mates to a 245mm disc out back. A radial master cylinder is the last piece of the puzzle, and it delivers incredible feedback at the lever. Whether navigating downtown traffic or approaching a decreasing radius hairpin, the braking performance was confidence-inspiring.

Of course, losing 40 pounds would help any motorcycle shed speed quickly, but that weight loss also informed the motorcycle’s design and user experience.

Ergonomics:
Ducati went to great lengths to reduce the new Monster’s proportions. Along with losing weight, the bike also lost the visual heaviness of its trellis frame and oversized gas tank. The new dimensions deliver a compact yet comfortable riding position that’s neither too aggressive nor lax.

A 58-inch wheelbase certainly helps with handling but it also relaxes the rider triangle. Ducati pairs that compact cockpit with a handlebar that’s 2.6 inches closer to the rider and footpegs positioned .5 inches lower and 1.5 inches rearward. At 32.3 inches, the standard seat height is easy to flat foot, but those with shorter inseams can also purchase a low seat and a lowering kit that drops the perch to 30.5 inches high.

Before jumping for the accessories catalog, I recommend throwing a leg over the new Monster. Ducati narrowed the seat-to-tank area to maximize stand over comfort, and the strategy worked. However, the narrow stand-over position also introduced my knees to a few Testastretta engine cases. On the left side of the bike, the radiator and water pump plumbing can get in the way and the clutch cover is just as obtrusive on the right. It wasn’t too bothersome throughout the day, but it’s definitely worth mentioning.

Aside from those slight discomforts, the new seating position encourages day-long riding. Stretch to the bars is minimal and the narrow cutouts promote clenching the tank with one’s knees. In turn, the ergonomic position alleviated pressure on my wrists and results in a very pleasant riding experience. In the city, however, the stop-and-go traffic definitely introduced wrist fatigue.

Urban riding also revealed that the Monster had the same heat management issues as its predecessors. At speed, the Monster didn’t throw off an irksome amount of warmth, but from light to light, the new naked bike simply radiated heat. Even in Urban mode, the engine reached high temps. If you’re considering a 2021 Monster, you should also consider living near a highway. The Monster is more play than business and excessive urban environs will get it hot under the collar.

The only other tick against the new-fangled Ducati is that L-Twin’s vibration. Of course, that rumble sets the Monster apart from its parallel-twin rivals, but by 7,000 rpm, the high-frequency buzz prompted early upshifts. The vibration is nearly imperceptible at the pegs, marginally more noticeable at the bars, but it’s most present at the seat cowl. With my tailbone pressed against the seat stop, I could tell when the tachometer was approaching that 7,000-rpm threshold just by the vibration.

Electronics:
I can’t wrap up this review without calling attention to the Monster’s impressive electronic suite. With three levels of ABS cornering, eight levels of cornering traction control, four-leveled wheelie control, and launch control, Ducati’s system presents an absurd degree of customization. With that said, I’m the type of person that likes to set it and forget it. Many customers will love the number of doodads on the middleweight roadster, but others will find what they like and stick to it.

Regardless of which camp you’re in, the rider aids and engine performance options make the Monster a more malleable platform. On the other hand, flipping through the numerous menus would be easier if Ducati consolidated the split function navigation and enter buttons on the left switchgear. Also, many electronic interfaces automatically navigate back to the previous menu when the rider confirms a selection. With the Monster’s system, the user has to manually backtrack.

Even with those minor gripes, the electronics suite is clear and easy to use. That should broaden the model’s appeal as it approaches three decades on the market. It’s clear that Ducati wants to angle the new Monster toward a younger demographic, and it believes robust safety aids and rider modes help those efforts.

While all the ride modes are tractable for seasoned vets, I’d hesitate to put the Monster in a brand-new rider’s hands. The entry-level naked bike may be the perfect first Ducati, but that doesn’t make it the perfect first bike. This new Monster is well-mannered, but it hasn’t lost its claws. Rider aids should be there as a safety net, not training wheels, but the Monster would be great bike for intermediate riders to grow into over the years.

Conclusion:
So, did the Monster lose its “soul” when it lost its trellis frame? No, it didn’t. At the same time, it isn’t the same Monster. It’s more youthful. Yes, the trellis frame’s absence is felt. Without its signature visual cue, the Monster doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much, but it does stand toe-to-toe with the KTM 890 Duke, Triumph Street Triple, and Yamaha MT-09. No, the Monster didn’t lose its “soul” it just developed a playful spirit.

If you’re someone that likes the “oohs and aahs” that come with a Ducati, the new Monster may not be for you. If you want a motorcycle that’s light on its feet, attacks the corners, and just happens to be red, the new Duc should be your cup of tea. The 2021 Monster will suit a wide swath of riders just like it did 28 years ago. Those customers may be different today than they were in 1993 and the Monster will only continue to evolve (without the trellis frame) for the next three decades.