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BMW Goes After Harley-Davidson with Stunning R 18 Big Boxer Cruiser

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Despite being at the top of sales charts in the motorcycle industry, BMW hasn’t had an entry in the cruiser segment since the R1200 RC . That changed with the introduction of the brand new R 18 this week.

Featuring the Big Boxer engine, the “most powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production,” the R18 is described as a bike that blends the classic lines of older BMW bikes with modern day technology.

The design of the motorcycle, and parts of its construction, like the rear swingarm, are reminiscent of the R 5, a bike designed way back in the 1930s as the first BMW motorcycle to use a foot-operated four-speed gearbox. Cues to that resemblance are also the double-loop frame, the pear-drop tank, the open-running driveshaft, the pinstriped paintwork, and of course the exposed drive-shaft.

At the center of the motorcycle lies the Big Boxer BMW has been teasing for more than a year now. The 2-cylinder engine is 1,802 cc in displacement, develops 91 hp at 4,750 rpm, and provides a maximum of 158 Nm of torque at 3,000 rpm.

The motorcycle comes with three driving modes – Rain, Roll and Rock – and is equipped with automatic stability control (can be disengaged) and drag torque control as standard. Optionally, reverse assist and hill start control can be specified.

BMW did not announce yet when the motorcycle will become available and how much it will charge for it. When it hits the market though, it will be available in First Edition guise, adding a few unique extras like a classic black finish with white pinstriped paintwork, chrome highlights and First Edition badges.

Additionally, for the U.S. market BMW partnered with several companies to give the bike a local flavor. The customization program there includes parts from Roland Sands Design, Mustang Seat, or Vance & Hines.

Full details on the BMW R 18 can be found in the press release section below.

 

2020 Honda CBR250RR Details Revealed

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by Satya Singh from https://www.rushlane.com

The high-performance, fully faired quarter-litre bike was launched last year and it is on sale in many international markets including Japan and Indonesia. In its 2020 avatar, the bike gets a new colour option and some mechanical upgrades. Updated Honda CBR250RR borrows some of its styling from its bigger siblings, the CBR650R and CBR1000RR. There’s a new colour option – Grand Prix Red with Pearl Glare White. This variant comes with gold-plated rims and forks, which create an exciting contrast with the red and white colour scheme.

Apart from these, there aren’t any major cosmetic changes in the updated bike. It continues with its aggressive profile, as accentuated by dual LED headlamp, LED position lights, sculpted side cowl, sleek side panels, low-set handlebars, and muscular fuel tank.

2020 Honda CBR250RR was scheduled to be unveiled at Osaka Motorcycle show and Tokyo Motorcycle Show, but these have been cancelled due to coronavirus. Subsequently, Honda decided to unveil 2020 CBR250RR at Honda Virtual Motorcycle Show. Along with CBR250RR, other Honda bikes such as CT125 Hunter Cub and CBR1000RR-R Fireblade will also be unveiled at the virtual event.

Features that have been continued from the earlier model include fully-digital instrument cluster, double-barrel exhaust and petal disc brakes. Updated CBR250RR is powered by a new 250cc twin-cylinder, liquid cooled engine that generates max power of 41 ps. This is around three units more than the earlier model. Torque output is also expected to go up, even though exact numbers have not been revealed yet. For records, torque produced by earlier model was 23.3 Nm at 11,000 rpm. Engine is mated to a 6-speed transmission.

Coming to mechanicals, one key upgrade is the addition of slipper clutch. This was not available in the earlier variant. However, based on customer feedback, Honda has introduced the slipper clutch as a standard feature in new CBR250RR. Honda will continue to offer bi-directional quickshifter system as an option. CBR250RR is already equipped with ride-by-wire throttle system. Users will be able to choose from three riding modes of Comfort, Sport, and Sport+.

New CBR250RR will sport a price tag of 847,000 yen, which is around Rs 5.78 lakh. It will rival the likes of Kawasaki Ninja ZX-25R. In the Indian market, Honda sells CBR250R, which will be discontinued after BS6 emission norms come into effect from March 31. CBR250RR is unlikely to be launched in India, owing to its high pricing. In case it is launched in India, CBR250RR will emerge a formidable competitor to the likes of Kawasaki Ninja 400.

Copyright (C) https://www.rushlane.com.

Ducati Multistrada V4, an ADV with hyper bike performance

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The upcoming Ducati Multistrada V4 is expected to make global debut at the coming EICMA 2020 motorcycle show that is slated to take place towards the end of this year.

Ducati Multistrada V4 has been snapped testing and the latest set of images issued by Morebikes.co.uk gives a clear idea of what the upcoming ADV will be like. The upcoming Ducati Multistrada V4 can be seen wrapped in camouflage and hence, the exact visual details are not visible entirely. The test mule has been spotted somewhere in Europe. Take a look at the pictures and you will notice without any mistake that the test mule is that of a Multistrada. However, there are a few changes that make you believe that this one is a V4. In terms of visuals, the new Ducati Multistrada V4 can be seen with a new all-LED headlamp set up and the front fairing has also been revised. Moreover, the rear view mirrors also look new.

Take a deeper look and you will also notice the radar units placed between the two headlamps and these are a part of the company’s radar-assisted Advanced Rider Assistance System (ARAS). As the name suggests, these units will monitor the distance with other vehicles and will give the rider a warning when a vehicle comes too closer to the bike. Apart from these changes, the upcoming Ducati Multistrada V4 will also get a new subframe along with a double-sided swingarm.

You can see that the subframe is trellis type and is painted in red. Coming to the engine, this is the same motor that powers the Ducati Panigale V4 and the streetfighter V4. However, don’t expect the power figures to be as much astonishing as the engine might be detuned to order to suit the characteristics of an adventure tourer. The upcoming Ducati Multistrada V4 is expected to make global debut at the coming EICMA 2020 motorcycle show that is slated to take place towards the end of this year.

Royal Enfield J1D (new motorcycle codename) launch by 2020 April-end

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Besides the J1D, Royal Enfield is actively working on the next-gen ‘350’ models Royal Enfield plans to launch an all-new motorcycle by the end of this April. Codenamed J1D, minimal details of the product are known so far. The news comes at the same time when the Chennai-based motorcycle manufacturer is actively testing its next-gen ‘350’ range. Prototypes of the 2020 Royal Enfield ‘350’ models have been spotted on public roads on multiple occasions. In fact, the company is also introducing the Royal Enfield Meteor — the virtual successor to the Thunderbird 350. The Meteor is codenamed J1C0 internally.

Over the months, Royal Enfield has filed trademark applications for the names: Hunter, Sherpa, Flying Flea and Roaster. It is not rare for OEMs to trademark product names way ahead of its actual development and for the same reason, one can expect the upcoming Royal Enfield J1D to sport one of them.

Rumours suggest that the J1D would be a lighter and accessible product. Earlier this year, we had shared a few images of a prototype couple that had similar attributes. Furthermore, Royal Enfield had also shared its plans to develop a new range of lightweight motorcycles targeted for young buyers and women riders. Still, that product bears the codename, J1C. Hence, nobody really knows what the J1D would be in its final production format.

Meanwhile, Royal Enfield is busy updating its current-gen ‘350’ range to BS6 emission specifications. The company initially planned to launch the next-gen models as its first BS6-compliant products but time proved that they were far from being market-ready. In the latest development, prices of the Royal Enfield Bullet 350 BS6 were revealed.

The engine specifications of the BS6-compliant ‘350’ models have not been shared officially and we expect it to be slightly lesser than their BS4 counterparts. The BS6 models sport an FI system while the BS4 models came with a carburettor, with which the 346cc air-cooled single-cylinder UCE (Unit Construction Engine) power plant made 19.1bhp and 28Nm of torque. The gearbox is a 5-speed unit.

The much-awaited next-generation Royal Enfield ‘350’ models would be a much better package thanks to its OHC (Over Head Cam) engine architecture. The current Royal Enfield UCE models (including the discontinued ‘500’) employ an archaic platform and are technically some of the weakest of their kind in the entire Indian motorcycle scenario. Hardcore Royal Enfield enthusiasts would not agree with this. Yet, we are equally interested to see what the next-gen ‘350’ line-up offers.

New from Harley-Davidson in 2020: the Bronx

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Because we chose to dedicate this month to Harley-Davidson, we’ve been keeping you up to date with all things Harley ever since the beginning of March. Most of our coverage focused though on what was and what is, and less on what’s coming from probably the world’s most famous motorcycle maker.

There are three major projects in the works in Milwaukee, and two of them will be released by the end of this year. The three are the Bronx (2020), the Pan America (2020), and the uber-exciting and yet unnamed custom model that will see daylight in 2021.

This piece here is about the Bronx, a bike built on a new middleweight platform that was shown for the first time at the EICMA show in Milan last year.

The Bronx will be Harley’s first product to be fitted with the 975cc version of the new Revolution Max family of engines. Although the official specs have not been announced, the 60-degree V-twin should develop 115 hp and around 95 Nm of torque.

The bike will most likely use a new braking solution from Brembo – one that should make its way on all Revolution Max-engined bikes, as well as dedicated Michelin tires.

There’s no official date for the release of the Bronx yet, but we should have it detailed sometime in the near future. The bike is part of an expansion plan cooked up by Harley that would see over 15 models being developed on the new middleweight platform.

This is one of the ways Harley is using as a means to meet the target it set for itself: 1 million new riders by 2027, bringing the total to 4 million in the U.S. alone.

“We’ll continue to fuel all aspects of the riding experience and add new solutions to fully develop, engage and retain riders through their journey, starting with the very first spark of interest,” said in a statement when the plan was announced in September 2019.

BMW R 18 Motorcycle with Monster Big Boxer Engine to Be Unveiled on April 3

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s been a long time in the making, but BMW Motorrad’s newest entry to the cruiser segment, a bike aptly called the R 18, is just around the corner. On Friday, April 3, the Germans will pull the wraps off what is to become one of the most potent motorcycles in its segment.

And this bike owes it all to a new engine BMW likes to call the Big Boxer. First shown on a bike called the Concept R 18 at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in May 2019, the engine moved over to two custom builds, before getting the official thumbs up at the end of 2019.

The two-cylinder powerplant has a capacity of 1,802 cc, which should make it the highest-capacity engine ever used on a production motorcycle. According to the specs revealed by the Bavarians, the engine has a power output of 91 hp and 158 Nm of torque, and that should also make it the most powerful boxer ever built by BMW.

It’s the R 18 that will see the first application of the Big Boxer, and on the bike it will be linked to a single-disc dry clutch that sends torque to the 6-speed transmission. Although the power ratings have already been announced, the performance specs are still unknown.

“All of us at BMW Motorrad are very much looking forward to the absolute highlight of the year for us – the world premiere of the BMW R 18,” said in a statement Dr. Markus Schramm, Head of BMW Motorrad.

“BMW Motorrad achieved record sales for the ninth year in succession in 2019. With the R 18 and the associated entry into the cruiser segment, we are consistently pursuing our growth strategy with the clear goal of becoming the number one in the premium segment worldwide.”

More details and official photos of the bike will become available at the unveiling.

2020 Zero Motorcycles Zero S review: A naked electric bike

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by Bruce Brown from https://www.digitaltrends.com

Pros
A mature e-motorcycle design
Excellent driving per charge range
No gears, no clutch, no shifting
Powerful brakes and suspension
Inexpensive to fuel and maintain

Cons
Forward-leaning rider posture
Rider and passenger pegs high
Expensive for an entry-level bike

MSRP $10,995.00

Zero Motorcycles‘ 2020 Zero S is the most highly-evolved version of a vehicle with the longest production history in a product class that most people don’t know exists. Most people would be surprised to learn electric motorcycles are on the street today. They’re even more surprised to hear the first arrived over 12 years ago.

Founded in 2006 by a former NASA engineer, Zero Motorcycles’ first production model was the 2009 Zero S, making 2020 its 12th model year. Depending on the buyer’s choice of installed power pack, the Zero S price varies from $10,995 to $18,390. The most powerful (and expensive) Zero S has a 223-mile maximum city driving range.

Design and performance

I asked Zero Motorcycles to suggest which model in its nine-model 2020 lineup would be the best choice for an e-bicycle rider who wanted to pick the Zero as their first motorcycle. After discussing the lighter, taller, more off-road-bike-looking Zero FXS, I decided on the Zero S with the lowest power battery pack. I tested the base 7.2 kWh Zero S, priced at $10,995, which the company describes as “ideal for the first time rider looking for an entry-level street motorcycle.”

The 2020 Zero S base model ticks the boxes for e-motos. Acceleration is immediate with the S’s full torque on tap from a standing stop. Other than tire noise and a slight whirring sound from the carbon fiber drive belt, the bike is quiet. There’s no clutch and no shifting because there’s only one gear. So, as with most electric motorcycles, you don’t need to know how to use a manual transmission to ride it.

To ride the Zero, just turn the key and wait a few seconds for the indicators on the display panel to settle down. Zero includes two throttle intercepts to protect riders from unintentional acceleration from a standing stop. A motor stop switch on the right-hand grip cuts out power to the motor, and the bike won’t move if the kickstand is down.

The Zero remains silent when it’s on and ready to move. If you’re only familiar with vehicles that have gas or diesel engines, the lack of noise may lead you to think it’s not on. Oh, but it is. It definitely is.

I was cautious with the throttle at first. Electric motors can deliver full torque from a standing stop, so it’s a good idea to approach with caution. However, I’m happy to report you can ride comfortably at slow speeds on the Zero S. The throttle isn’t overly sensitive, with excellent “feel” and granularity.

The Zero S’s regenerative braking slightly recharges the battery when you roll off the throttle. If you’re familiar with engine braking in a car with a manual transmission, regenerative braking feels roughly the same, just quieter.

If you need to stop quickly, the Zero S’ brakes have more stopping power than you may ever need. I found the learning curve for modulating the potent brake system steeper than getting used to the throttle. The Zero S has Bosch ABS disc brakes, with dual 320mm calipers in front, and a single 240mm caliper in the rear.

This nearly-naked sportbike has no fairing and little bodywork covering the functional components. The rider geometry (the relative positions of the handlebar, seat, and rider footpegs) requires a moderately forward-leaning posture. Forward-leaning is excellent for going fast and carving turns and canyons. Entry-level riders with previous experience on a more upright bike will need to adjust, but not as dramatically as with more aggressive bikes.

Speed and range

Motorcycle companies are typically cautious with quoting acceleration numbers. I didn’t time my runs, but I have heard from others Zero riders that 60 mph comes in under 4 seconds. My butt says that’s about right and, speaking as someone who’s not a veteran rider, it was exhilarating.

My test bike, with the basic 7.2 kWh power pack, has a 98 miles per hour (mph) maximum top speed with a sustained top speed of 80 mph. The rated driving ranges for the Zero S with the base power pack are 89 miles in city driving, 45 miles at 70 mph on the highway, and 60 miles combined.

If you are willing to pay for more range, the Zero SR, which is essentially the same bike, has a 14.4 kWh battery pack. The SR starts at $15,495 and boosts the range to 179 miles for city driving, 90 miles on the highway, or 120 miles combined. For the maximum possible driving distance with Zero S models, you can also add the 3.3 kWh Power Tank for $2,895. The Zero SR with the Power Tank is rated for a maximum of 223 miles in the city, 112 miles on the highway, or 150 miles combined.

Note that larger power packs don’t just drive up the price. They weigh more. The 7.2 kWh Zero S weighs 313 pounds. The Zero SR with the 14.4 kWh power pack weighs 408 pounds, and if you add the 3.3 kWh Power Tank for a total of 18 kWh, the weight climbs to 452 pounds.

Your choice will balance cost, range, and weight. You can’t switch power packs or add the Power Tank later, so it’s essential to buy the right power combination from the start.

Charging the battery

The Zero S has a 1.3 kW integrated battery charger and a thick power cable that plugs into a standard 110/220 power plug. Charging the Zero S requires 4.7 hours for a 95% charge, or 5.2 hours to charge 100%. With a $600 optional quick charger, it takes 3.1 hours for a 100% charge, or 2.6 hours for 95%.

A third option is to buy an optional Charge Tank ($2,495). With the Charge Tank, you can plug into a standard Level 2 charge station for a 95% charge in one hour, or 100% in 1.5 hours. Note that you can’t order a Zero S or SR with both the Power Tank and Charge Tank options.

Riding modes and app

The Zero S has two preset performance profiles, Eco and Sport. The profiles control maximum speed, torque, and regeneration levels.

As set by the factory, Eco mode cuts the top speed to 70 mph, limits the torque, and dials up the regen-style engine braking effect. Sport mode unlocks the top speed of 98 miles per hour, full torque, and little or no regenerative braking. You can customize both profiles with Zero’s mobile app.

I rode the Zero S most of the time in Eco mode through suburban neighborhoods, in small towns, and on country roads and highways. The Zero S is well-balanced, so riding slowly is easy. I quickly became used to its smooth throttle operation to roll on speed as desired. The dialed-up regeneration setting in Eco mode meant I rarely needed to use the brakes until I came to a full stop.

It’s quiet. Too quiet?

Electric motorcycles’ are silent, and that can be a mixed blessing. Motorcyclists are used to noise alerting pedestrians and other drivers, but you don’t get that with an electric powertrain. It’s a good idea to locate the horn button on the left grip, so you can alert anyone who needs it.

The upside of running silent is there’s less chance you’re going to disturb your neighbors with the Zero S, and certainly not with the noise. On one of my first rides checking out the bike’s operation, a neighbor used to seeing me on e-bikes came over to check out the Zero S.

“That’s an actual motorcycle?” he asked. I was able to answer without raising my voice over the Zero S’ motor because, of course, it was silent. On a regular motorcycle, I wouldn’t have even heard him unless I stopped and turned off the engine.

Our Take

I thoroughly enjoyed riding the Zero S, and was particularly impressed by its balanced, quiet ride. Seasoned sports bike riders would likely switch right over to Sport mode and fly with it. The power, brakes, and handling are certainly there.

Ease of operation makes the Zero S accessible for beginning riders. My only hesitation is that new riders will need to get used to the forward-leaning riding position.

Is there a better alternative?

In a few years, there will be many more choices for people shopping for electric motorcycles, but Zero already has a 12-year lead. No other company has Zero’s experience and range of current electric models.

The Harley-Davidson Livewire makes fans of most who ride it, and Harley has been showing other concept electric bikes, but the Livewire’s $30,000 price tag limits its appeal. The Lightning Motorcycles LS-218 is the fastest production motorcycle, but starts at $38.888. Both bikes target experienced riders with money to spend.

Several companies make much smaller e-motorcycles, like the Ubco 2×2 and the Cake Kalk OR. They’re more affordable, but often focused on off-road or multi-surface riding, with a lower top speed and less range.

How long will it last?

Zero Motorcycles include a two-year general warranty and a five-year warranty on the power pack. Zero is an established company with dealers throughout the United States, so parts and service shouldn’t be concerns.

Should you buy one?

Yes. If you want an electric motorcycle for recreational riding or commuting, the Zero S is a great choice.

Zero’s SR/S electric motorcycle promises up to 201 miles of range

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by Steve Dent from https://www.engadget.com
by Alex Perry from https://mashable.com

You can also charge the premium model in under an hour.

Like EV owners, electric motorcycle riders suffer from range anxiety. Zero Motorcycles is trying to alleviate that a bit with a new model, the SR/S. It can go up to 201 miles in the city and 103 miles on highways — better numbers than the last SR/F model all around. Best of all, Zero managed to keep the price just above the SR/F by keeping the same platform and introducing a full fairing to improve aerodynamics.

On top of the full fairing, the SR/S has a more relaxed riding position, but otherwise uses the same battery pack and engine as the last model. As more of a sport touring-type bike, it also weighs about 20 pounds more than the 485-pound SR/F. However, it still goes like heck thanks to a 100 horsepower, 140 foot pound motor, hitting speeds up to 124 mph.

The base SR/S can go 161 miles on a charge or 82 miles on the highway, so to get the extra range you’ll need to add the Power Tank option. It takes four hours to charge the base model with a regular charger, or 1.3 hours with the 6 KW rapid charge option. However, you can speed that up to two hours (regular charge) and one hour (fast charge) with the premium bike.

Other features include the Cypher III operating system that can handles traction control, braking and charging, along with connected capabilities that lets the owner monitor bike status, alerts, system upgrades and more. The SR/S is now available starting at $19,995 (compared to $19,495 for the SR/F), or $21,995 for the premium model. The 3.6 kWh Power Tank option runs an additional $2,895 and will be available starting March 1st.

Zero’s new SR/S electric motorcycle has a new design and increased range

If you want to roam cities and highways in style without relying on a single drop of gasoline, Zero’s newest electric motorcycle might be up your alley.

Zero invited members of the press to an unveiling of its new SR/S e-bike on Wednesday. It has a sleek new design compared to its SR/F counterpart, and was designed with aerodynamics in mind, according to Zero. This should allow 13 percent more range at highway speeds once riders are fully leaned in, the company says.

As far as more detailed specs are concerned, the SR/S boasts 140 ft-lbs of torque, 110 horsepower, and a top speed of 124 mph. Its city range by default is 161 miles, while its highway range is 82 miles. Those numbers are bumped up to 201 miles and 103 miles, respectively, with an optional power tank add-on.

The SR/S comes in both standard and premium configurations. The first, with a 3 kW charger, is $19,995, the second, with a 6 kW charger, is $21,995. That power tank we mentioned earlier is an additional $2,895, so expect to spend a good deal more money than the starting price if you want all the bells and whistles.

Oh, and there are two colors: Cerulean Blue and Skyline Silver. We saw the blue version at the press briefing and it looked, well, blue. One last thing to note is that the Zero SR/S is using level 2 electric charging. It seems level 3 charging is still just a little too prohibitive for Zero’s liking. The standard model takes four hours to go from zero to 95 percent battery, while the premium takes two hours. You can cut that down to merely an hour with the 6 kW charger.

It may cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $25,000 to get the SR/S with everything that makes it cool, but it seems like it might be cool nonetheless. Zero said it ships to dealers immediately, so anyone who wants one should look into their local options.

Indian Motorcycle Unveils 2020 FTR Rally – Now Available In North America

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INDIAN MOTORCYCLE’S NEW FTR RALLY COMBINES SCRAMBLER STYLING WITH MODERN PERFORMANCE

2020 FTR Rally Now Available in North America

MINNEAPOLIS (February 7, 2020) – Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced the North American retail availability of the 2020 FTR Rally, a scrambler-inspired FTR 1200 that combines retro styling with modern performance capabilities. Launched internationally in Milan at EICMA in November 2019, the FTR Rally will begin shipping to Indian Motorcycle dealers throughout the U.S. and Canada.

With an urban scrambler aesthetic that’s certain to turn heads, the FTR Rally takes a step in a new direction while still maintaining some of the original styling DNA of the FTR 1200.  The FTR Rally features Titanium Smoke paint with the Indian Motorcycle headdress graphic, aluminium wire wheels with stainless steel spokes and a red pinstripe, brown aviator seat, a new rally windscreen and Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires.

“We’re excited to offer North American riders a new take on the FTR 1200 that combines the unmistakeable look and stance of the FTR with the more classic, rugged elements that have made scramblers so beloved to city riders,” said Reid Wilson, Vice President of Indian Motorcycle. “The FTR 1200 is as much about style and self-expression as it is about street-oriented performance, and the FTR Rally delivers that combination in a totally unique way.”

The FTR Rally combines responsive handling with upright ergonomics to create a commanding riding experience suitable for urban environments or backroad adventures. It’s equipped with cruise control, a USB fast charge port, and new ProTaper handlebars that are two inches higher for better comfort and handling. The FTR Rally also features an LED headlight and LED turn signals offering better visibility with minimal maintenance.

The 1203cc V-twin engine features a smooth power delivery with loads of low-end punch.  The engine produces 123 horsepower, 87 ft-lbs of torque, and features a flat torque curve to deliver a fun riding experience in all conditions. The engine is housed in a black trellis frame and the FTR Rally will continue to feature an inverted front suspension with radially mounted dual Brembo brakes for exceptional control and stopping power.

The 2020 FTR Rally is compatible with the entire range of 40+ accessories specifically developed for the FTR platform, giving riders the ability to customise combinations and maintain the independence they seek when purchasing an Indian Motorcycle.

Pricing for the FTR Rally will start at $13,499 MSRP. Riders can learn more by visiting their local Indian Motorcycle dealer. For more information on the 2020 FTR Rally, or to find the nearest dealer, visit IndianMotorcycle.com and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Bajaj Triumph motorcycle launch in 2022

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Bajaj and Triumph will introduce new affordable motorcycles in India and abroad under a new partnership.

Bajaj Auto and Triumph Motorcycles have formally announced their new partnership to produce a range of mid-size motorcycles and platforms for the Indian and global markets. The decision was initially announced back in 2017, but the formal agreement was signed only now. The partnership will see a positive impact in either brand’s future business in India as well as abroad.

The long-term partnership agreement follows a non-equity approach under which both brands retain their intellectual property rights. Beyond the operational side of the business, motorcycle enthusiasts have been eagerly looking forward to seeing what the partnership would introduce in our market in due course.

Apparently, Triumph will introduce ‘big bike experience’ while Bajaj continues its expertise at making smaller-capacity motorcycles. Both brands will collaborate on the R&D of each motorcycle and platform, but manufacturing will be done solely at Bajaj’s Chakan facility for all global markets. Eventually, Bajaj will take over Triumph India and introduce the iconic British motorcycle brand to newer markets.

This move will also make Triumph motorcycles much more accessible in the country and have an edge over other premium two-wheeler brands. The first-of-the-line products under the partnership will debut in the Indian market sometime in 2022. There is no news of a bigger-capacity multi-cylinder Bajaj motorcycle yet, but there’s no harm in expecting something of that sort.

With the help of Bajaj, Triumph aims to penetrate further into major Asian markets that are currently dominated by the likes of Japanese motorcycles. In markets where Bajaj does not operate, Triumph Motorcycles will sell the upcoming mid-size products alongside its regular portfolio.

Hence, Bajaj will open doors to a new market in major European nations where Triumph Motorcycles leads. On the other hand, the British motorcycle maker will reap an untapped potential present in the lower, affordable, mass-volume segment. More information regarding the upcoming Bajaj-Triumph products will be shared in the coming months and as the launch timelines close in. The products’ naming will be borrowed from the roots of Triumph’s strong heritage.

While it is too early to confirm the exact specifications and output of the upcoming Triumph-Bajaj motorcycles, the partnership aims to make them “aspirational and affordable” with a targeted ex-showroom price tag starting from under Rs 2 lakh. Currently, the Royal Enfield 650 Twins are the most desirable mid-size motorcycles available in foreign markets that offer superior value for money.

With the introduction of the new range of products under the alliance, major rival brands such as Royal Enfield, Harley-Davidson, etc., might have to worry a bit. Harley-Davidson has already anticipated such a scenario and is working on a 338cc motorcycle for the affordable segments in the Asian market.