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Yamaha XSR125 makes global debut

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from https://www.financialexpress.com

Smallest neo-retro XSR to launch in Europe in June.

A new-retro-styled Yamaha has just been revealed which would make fun daily commuter, enter XSR125 – the smallest XSR to date. The Japanese manufacturer is expanding its 125cc portfolio with the XSR125 which is based on the same platform as the MT-125 and R125 but with classic clothing. Although it packs a range of modern features which are quite a necessity now.

Yamaha XSR125 is powered by a 124cc liquid-cooled SOHC engine that puts out 14.7 bhp at 10,000 rpm and 11.5 Nm of torque at 8,000 rpm and is paired with a six-speed transmission. The engine boasts advanced Variable Valve Actuation and is Euro V compliant.

Being a neo-retro, the XSR125 gets a round headlamp casing but with an LED lamp and an LED tail lamp as well, a rounded fuel tank design, and a long flat seat. Bodywork has been kept at its minimal with the underbelly revealing the engine and radiator, but it does get an engine guard.

The instrument cluster is a retro-themed LCD display with a chrome outer finish. Colour options include Redline, Impact Yellow and Tech Black, along with contrasting decals for each.

Suspension setup includes 37 mm upside-down forks and swingarm for the rear and brakes are covered by a 267 mm disc up front and a 220 mm at the rear. Tyre sizes are 110 and 140, front and rear. It weighs in at 140 kg with a seat height of 815 mm, 160 mm ground clearance and a fuel tank capacity of 11 litres.

Ducati Monster 2021 First Ride Review

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Take the edge off.
In 1992, Ducati designer Miguel Galluzzi shoehorned a 900SS engine into an 888 superbike frame. He then bolted on a 750 Supersport fork and the Ducati Monster was born. Galluzzi’s Frankenstein experiment was well-loved though, driving sales at the Bologna brand for years. The parts bin special saved Ducati, in fact, and the Monster has remained in Ducati’s stable ever since.

That hasn’t stopped the Monster from evolving through the years, though. Ducati frequently tweaked the ingredients, but the recipe remained the same: one part air-cooled L-twin, one part trellis frame. However, technology and design move on, and the model has changed with the times. By 2015, all Monster engines switched to liquid-cooling, and the latest iteration finally sheds its trellis frame—and the weight that comes with it.

That prompted traditionalists and ardent Ducatisi to click their tongues, lamenting over Ducati’s heresy. To many fans, the trellis frame was the Monster’s pièce de résistance. The quality that separated the muscular streetfighter from its “soulless” competitors. The trellis frame was the Monster’s greatest strength, but it was also its greatest weakness, imprisoning the naked bike to a bygone era as its counterparts forged ahead.

That’s no longer the case in 2021. Sure, the Monster is still “borrowing” from its counterparts by plucking the 937cc L-twin from the Supersport 950 and wedging it into a Panigale V4-inspried monocoque aluminum frame. Even the model’s 4.3-inch TFT dash sports a Panigale V4-derived interface. Despite those old habits, the question remains: is it still a Monster without the trellis frame? Did it trade in its panache for pastiche? Did it lose its character, its “soul”?

These questions loomed large when Ducati invited us to San Francisco, California, to ride the 2021 Monster. After spending a full day in the saddle of the new bike, it was clear that this is a very different beast.

Engine:
To meet Euro5 emissions standards, Ducati ditched the Monster’s 821cc Testastretta engine in favor of the proven mill found in Ducati’s Hypermotard 950 and Supersport 950. The 11-degree Testastretta configuration carries over, but Ducati bumps the capacity to 937cc for good reasons. That’s 111 good reasons, in the form of horsepower. Ducati couples that with a generous 69 lb-ft helping of torque. More than enough bark and bite for the naysayers.

The powerplant may tout a higher volume than the outgoing unit, but it also shaved off 5.7 pounds in the process. The new clutch drops three pounds alone while the cylinder heads and clutch cover account for two additional pounds of weight loss. The updated gear drum, alternator cover, and pistons and rods pitch in too, saving precious grams.

Ducati’s versatile Testastretta platform isn’t just performance-oriented, however, it’s surprisingly practical as well. New Monster owners can enjoy a whole lot of riding between the 9,000-mile oil services and 18,000-mile valve services. The revised hydraulic clutch also reduces resistance at the lever by 20 percent and the up/down quickshifter nearly eliminates clutch use altogether.

That’s the same Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) Evo 2 found on the $24,095 Multistrada V4 S, and the IMU-dependent system works just as well on this $11,895 naked bike. In fact, the DQS equipped on the Monster produces an even more satisfying exhaust note upon downshifting. Modern emissions regulations have taken the voice box of many a motorcycle, but Ducati’s auto-blipper gives the Monster a formidable growl.

Upshifts were just as visceral, but for an entirely different reason. Though the bike’s fueling was pretty fluttery below 3,500 rpm, the Monster really bared its teeth between 4,000-7,000 rpm. A series of clutchless upshifts only amplified the effect. The power delivery never bordered on frightening, though. Of course, if 111 ponies are too much pep for your step, Ducati’s three ride modes help tame the Monster’s inner animal.

Those looking for an easy-breezy experience can switch to Urban mode, which restricts output to 75 horsepower. For highway blasts, Touring mode maintains peak horsepower but prioritizes smooth acceleration. Predictively, Sport mode is the least restrictive, but that doesn’t make it less manageable than its counterparts. After a short squirt through the hilly San Francisco streets, I kept the engine in Sport mode for the rest of the day. Even in the tight and twisty confines of Route 35, the lively engine response never felt overwhelming. Thanks, primarily, to the new superbike-derived frame.

Chassis:
While the engine’s before/after results were truly impressive, Ducati engineers went to greater lengths to reduce the chassis’ mass. Compared to the 821’s trellis front frame, the new monocoque saves 9.9 pounds. The fiberglass-reinforced polymer subframe comes in 4.2 pounds underweight while the swingarm and wheels reduce unsprung weight by 7.2 pounds. Ducati’s diet plan worked wonders for the Monster, converting the heavy brute to a lithe apex predator.

That new, low 414-pound wet weight is noticeable right off the kickstand. Fleet-footed yet planted, the Monster takes advantage of that newfound agility in the turns. Initial tip-in is effortless and side-to-side transitions are predictable and smooth. That sharp-handling quality should redeem the Monster in the eyes of Ducati fans, but focused track riders may discount the sporty naked bike for lacking fully adjustable suspension.

Speaking of, in stock form, the 43mm USD front end and preload-adjustable lean on the stiffer side. At least they did under my 160-pound frame. Heavier riders may benefit more from the spring rate, but the suspension only borders on harsh at the least favorable time—at lean. Northern California’s Skyline Boulevard is a relatively well-maintained mountain road, but a few inconveniently placed potholes unsettled the Monster’s sure-footed stance.

Of course, no suspension operates optimally when leaned over, but the sharp hit doesn’t just stop at the springs. That new, responsive aluminum chassis also relayed those shockwaves up through to the rider. Luckily, the Monster was quick to regain its composure and continued attacking corners. Aside from those rare moments of instability, though, the Monster handled everything the city and the canyons could throw at it.

Unlike the suspension, the braking system’s pedigree was never in question. Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers bite down on twin 320mm discs up front and a dual-piston binder mates to a 245mm disc out back. A radial master cylinder is the last piece of the puzzle, and it delivers incredible feedback at the lever. Whether navigating downtown traffic or approaching a decreasing radius hairpin, the braking performance was confidence-inspiring.

Of course, losing 40 pounds would help any motorcycle shed speed quickly, but that weight loss also informed the motorcycle’s design and user experience.

Ergonomics:
Ducati went to great lengths to reduce the new Monster’s proportions. Along with losing weight, the bike also lost the visual heaviness of its trellis frame and oversized gas tank. The new dimensions deliver a compact yet comfortable riding position that’s neither too aggressive nor lax.

A 58-inch wheelbase certainly helps with handling but it also relaxes the rider triangle. Ducati pairs that compact cockpit with a handlebar that’s 2.6 inches closer to the rider and footpegs positioned .5 inches lower and 1.5 inches rearward. At 32.3 inches, the standard seat height is easy to flat foot, but those with shorter inseams can also purchase a low seat and a lowering kit that drops the perch to 30.5 inches high.

Before jumping for the accessories catalog, I recommend throwing a leg over the new Monster. Ducati narrowed the seat-to-tank area to maximize stand over comfort, and the strategy worked. However, the narrow stand-over position also introduced my knees to a few Testastretta engine cases. On the left side of the bike, the radiator and water pump plumbing can get in the way and the clutch cover is just as obtrusive on the right. It wasn’t too bothersome throughout the day, but it’s definitely worth mentioning.

Aside from those slight discomforts, the new seating position encourages day-long riding. Stretch to the bars is minimal and the narrow cutouts promote clenching the tank with one’s knees. In turn, the ergonomic position alleviated pressure on my wrists and results in a very pleasant riding experience. In the city, however, the stop-and-go traffic definitely introduced wrist fatigue.

Urban riding also revealed that the Monster had the same heat management issues as its predecessors. At speed, the Monster didn’t throw off an irksome amount of warmth, but from light to light, the new naked bike simply radiated heat. Even in Urban mode, the engine reached high temps. If you’re considering a 2021 Monster, you should also consider living near a highway. The Monster is more play than business and excessive urban environs will get it hot under the collar.

The only other tick against the new-fangled Ducati is that L-Twin’s vibration. Of course, that rumble sets the Monster apart from its parallel-twin rivals, but by 7,000 rpm, the high-frequency buzz prompted early upshifts. The vibration is nearly imperceptible at the pegs, marginally more noticeable at the bars, but it’s most present at the seat cowl. With my tailbone pressed against the seat stop, I could tell when the tachometer was approaching that 7,000-rpm threshold just by the vibration.

Electronics:
I can’t wrap up this review without calling attention to the Monster’s impressive electronic suite. With three levels of ABS cornering, eight levels of cornering traction control, four-leveled wheelie control, and launch control, Ducati’s system presents an absurd degree of customization. With that said, I’m the type of person that likes to set it and forget it. Many customers will love the number of doodads on the middleweight roadster, but others will find what they like and stick to it.

Regardless of which camp you’re in, the rider aids and engine performance options make the Monster a more malleable platform. On the other hand, flipping through the numerous menus would be easier if Ducati consolidated the split function navigation and enter buttons on the left switchgear. Also, many electronic interfaces automatically navigate back to the previous menu when the rider confirms a selection. With the Monster’s system, the user has to manually backtrack.

Even with those minor gripes, the electronics suite is clear and easy to use. That should broaden the model’s appeal as it approaches three decades on the market. It’s clear that Ducati wants to angle the new Monster toward a younger demographic, and it believes robust safety aids and rider modes help those efforts.

While all the ride modes are tractable for seasoned vets, I’d hesitate to put the Monster in a brand-new rider’s hands. The entry-level naked bike may be the perfect first Ducati, but that doesn’t make it the perfect first bike. This new Monster is well-mannered, but it hasn’t lost its claws. Rider aids should be there as a safety net, not training wheels, but the Monster would be great bike for intermediate riders to grow into over the years.

Conclusion:
So, did the Monster lose its “soul” when it lost its trellis frame? No, it didn’t. At the same time, it isn’t the same Monster. It’s more youthful. Yes, the trellis frame’s absence is felt. Without its signature visual cue, the Monster doesn’t stand out from the crowd as much, but it does stand toe-to-toe with the KTM 890 Duke, Triumph Street Triple, and Yamaha MT-09. No, the Monster didn’t lose its “soul” it just developed a playful spirit.

If you’re someone that likes the “oohs and aahs” that come with a Ducati, the new Monster may not be for you. If you want a motorcycle that’s light on its feet, attacks the corners, and just happens to be red, the new Duc should be your cup of tea. The 2021 Monster will suit a wide swath of riders just like it did 28 years ago. Those customers may be different today than they were in 1993 and the Monster will only continue to evolve (without the trellis frame) for the next three decades.

BMW Motorrad campaign for Women’s International Day in Motorcycle

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Bia Dantas celebrates Womens International Day in Motorcycle success campaign

BMW MOTORRAD launched campaign starring Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose was to emphasize the empowerment of women in commemoration of Women’s Day.

My time in the world of motorcycles just started & I couldn’t have a better start… happy to participate in this project, from a brand that I admire and with such outstanding professionals and women” — Bia Dantas

MIAMI, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, May 10, 2021 — Under the motto: Together we are stronger. Make Life a Ride. On March 8, BMW MOTORRAD launched a campaign starring the Influencer, DJ and Top Model Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose of the campaign was to emphasize the empowerment of women in the framework of the commemoration of International Women’s Day.

The campaign was recorded in the vicinity of the Teotihuacan pyramids, which allowed the construction of a perfect and unique setting.

Weeks after the campaign launch, we can assure you that the campaign was very successful and had a relevant scope. Consolidating BMW Mexico as the leading motorcycling company and with great proximity to the female consumer.

It should be noted that the message of the campaign focuses on highlighting the path that each personality has had to travel with its challenges and the power of motorcycling to support the development of women in groups and individually. Emphasizing that together or individually with effort and preparation the woman is stronger. Bia Dantas was the perfect influencer for this campaign. Also, the crew had a Balloon Ride next to the Teotihuacan Pyramids that create a perfect environment for team production.

On the other hand, Bia Dantas highlighted that during the filming of the campaign she had her country very present: “I bring my jacket from my dear old Moto Club with the flags of my country and the Brazil-Alagoas State. Always representing ”.

BMW Motorrad Mexico is part of BMW de México S.A de C.V. with address at Av. Javier Barros Sierra 495, 14th floor Cdmx.

Recently Bia Dantas starred on the cover of Glamour Bulgaria with a production dedicated to commemorating the mergers between the different cultures of Brazil. Also, Bia Dantas was cover in Harpers Bazaar a few weeks ago.

Bianca Dantas is an Influencer, DJ and Top Model. Account @biadantasbr. She has collaborated in various campaigns and editorials, highlighting covers of world-renowned titles such as Harpers Bazaar, Vogue Magazine, and Glamor. She currently stands out in the world of music under the name of DJ BiaD @ Biad.oficial. She was born in Brazil and currently lives in Mexico City.

 

All electric brand separate from the Harley-Davidson brand

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Harley-Davidson launches new electric-only LiveWire brand. Harley-Davidson’s LiveWire is no longer just a model, it’s a whole brand.

The brand’s first dedicated model will debut on July 8.

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

Pretend you’re Harley-Davidson for a minute. You’re the oldest continually operating American motorcycle manufacturer. You have legions of rabid fans acting as unpaid brand ambassadors. Your name is basically synonymous with motorcycling. Sounds good, right?

Now, as Harley-Davidson, try and do something completely and utterly different than what you’ve done in the past. Now that history is working against you, and those loyal customers think you’ve betrayed the ideals of the brand they love. It’s a real Catch-22. You need to innovate, or you’ll die, but if you innovate, you make your core customers angry, and then you die. While things weren’t actually quite that dire for H-D, it’s definitely been tough.

That’s pretty much what happened when Harley-Davidson launched the LiveWire electric motorcycle a few years ago. Now though, the folks in Milwaukee have decided to try a different route with the whole electric motorcycle thing, and that’s to spin LiveWire off into its own brand, according to an announcement Monday. New brand equals no baggage and that extra freedom to do new things could be just what Harley needs.

“One of the six pillars of The Hardwire Strategy is to lead in electric – by launching LiveWire as an all-electric brand, we are seizing the opportunity to lead and define the market in EV,” Harley-Davidson CEO Jochen Zeitz said in a statement. “With the mission to be the most desirable electric motorcycle brand in the world, LiveWire will pioneer the future of motorcycling, for the pursuit of urban adventure and beyond. LiveWire also plans to innovate and develop technology that will be applicable to Harley-Davidson electric motorcycles in the future.”

The LiveWire brand will have its own models and its network of showrooms, the first of which will be in California. It will be separate from Harley-Davidson in most respects, but it will share technology with the mothership as well as its manufacturing footprint and supply chain.

The first new model from the LiveWire brand is set to debut on July 8, 2021.

Harley-Davidson launches all-electric motorcycle brand ‘LiveWire’
by Reuters from https://www.saltwire.com

Harley-Davidson Inc on Monday launched an all-electric motorcycle brand “LiveWire,” the latest effort by the company to ramp up bets on the rapidly growing electric-vehicle market.

Named after Harley’s first electric motorbike, which was unveiled in 2019, the “LiveWire” division is slated to launch its first branded motorcycle in July.

The company had said in February it would create a separate electric vehicle-focused division, as it aims to attract the next generation of younger and more environmentally conscious riders.

“We are seizing the opportunity to lead and define the market in EV,” Chief Executive Officer Jochen Zeitz said in a statement on Monday.

“LiveWire also plans to innovate and develop technology that will be applicable to Harley-Davidson electric motorcycles in the future.”

Ride Review of BMW R18

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by Anthony Conroy from https://www.post-gazette.com

BMW’s R18 First Edition is powerful, simple and sophisticated

Size isn’t everything, the old saying goes, but when you take a ride aboard BMW Motorrad’s R18 First Edition, its size is impossible to ignore.

Put a leg over the seat, settle in and take in those two massive, chromed cylinder covers sitting in front of you, each one its own 901cc power-making factory. It’s like sitting on the neck of a shiny hammerhead shark.

The engine — a twin-cylinder configuration known as a Boxer — has been BMW’s signature since 1923. But the Boxer on the R18 is the largest the German manufacturer has ever produced, with a claimed output of 91 horsepower and 116 pounds-foot of torque.

Other manufacturers will claim to have bigger and better numbers, but the R18 isn’t designed for life on the rowdy edge. It’s a power cruiser, but with the soul of something vintage and simple. A modern throwback, if you will.

In fact, despite the $20,000 price tag, there aren’t many frills. Some adjustability in the rear, none in the front. Heated grips. A reverse gear. BMW’s automatic stability control, which is essentially traction control. And three power modes: Rock, Roll and Rain. For our purposes, those might as well have been called Road Rage, Easy Jaunt and Tip-Toeing Through the Puddles.

In other words, let’s Rock.

The R18 has a keyless ignition and once the starter is pushed, the bike thunders and shudders to life. At stops, there’s quite a bit of vibration, but that’s exactly what you’d expect with two giant metal buckets rotating and internally combusting between your legs. The vibrations don’t exactly fade away once on the go — you’ll see a lot of blurring in the rear view mirrors, but I never felt any numbness in the hands, feet or butt after long rides.

Rock mode taps into the full potential of the beastly Boxer. You’ll feel the torque at 3,000 rpm. Max horsepower comes at 4,750 rpm. The best part is there’s nothing grabby or choppy about its power delivery. A sharp pull on the throttle produces smooth, linear power through six gears. Despite the nearly 800 pounds of motorcycle sitting beneath you, the bike requires minimum inputs at speed. A long wheelbase and a wonderful center of gravity contribute to the bike’s stability. Handlebars that are wide but nicely swept provide excellent leverage and contribute to the bike’s agility.

And it is agile — at speed anyway. It actually feels light going around fast, sweeping turns. And going faster feels right, as your feet are not in front of you, like with most American cruisers. They’re underneath you, which seems more natural during aggressive riding.

At the front wheel, twin four-piston calipers developed in-house by BMW are paired with dual 300mm discs to slow down the big Beemer. When the pace gets really slow — like in a parking lot — the R18’s weight does feel a bit cumbersome, like pushing around a fully-dressed Harley-Davidson without the cabinetry.

Potential buyers also will need to carefully decide how they intend to ride the bike, particularly if long hauls are on the agenda. Those massive cylinders look great, but they make the prospect of having highway pegs impossible. There’s also no back rest or cruise control (at least not on the First Edition), so it’s not the kind of bike you’ll be able to kick back on while eating up highway miles. The tank holds 3.2 gallons of fuel with a 1-gallon reserve, so expect to get around 120 miles per fill-up. For some reason, BMW opted against a fuel gauge. However, a warning light will let you know when you have about 20 miles left to go.

Riders looking for a more travel-friendly R18 right out of the box may want to opt for the Classic model, which comes with a windscreen and baggage, rather than the First Edition. To be honest, there will be no shortage of aftermarket accessories for any model marketed under the R18 badge.

The BMW was flawless in tearing around town and rural backroads, with the seating position and seat itself good for all-day riding. There’s 3½ inches of travel at the rear suspension, but it’s a bit stiff. Best to avoid the bumps. Ergonomically, there wasn’t much to complain about.

One complaint, if you can call it that, is that the R18 has a very quiet transmission. When going from neutral to first gear, there was hardly ever a sound or a shimmy — no knock, ping or usual KERTHUNK! that I’m used to hearing (and feeling). Without that, quite frankly, I sometimes found myself doing double-takes for the neutral light to make sure I was in gear before speeding away.

In other words, leave it to the Germans to make something so mechanically perfect that it’s worth complaining about.

Aesthetically, it’s hard to miss those giant cylinders, but there are other visual items that shouldn’t go unnoticed.

If chrome is your thing, there’s no shortage of it, especially on those those wonderful looking fishtail mufflers. They don’t make a lot of sound, but they are beautiful to look at and give the R18 a distinctive look. Also chromed is the front of the engine housing. Overall, the housing eliminates clutter and gives the bike a polished, clean look, but it does make everything else — apart from the cylinder heads — a bit of a mystery.

Thankfully, for those who need to see something mechanical to soothe our inner motorhead, BMW’s engineers gave us an exposed bevel-geared driveshaft. Seeing it in action while actually riding is a bit of a task, but we’ll take mechanical porn however we can get it.

Overall, this Beemer is an excellent motorcycle. The price tag may be a bit on the high side, but the R18 is for owners wanting two things: a cruiser with impressive performance and one that distinguishes itself from American cruisers and Japanese knock-offs. The R18 First Edition definitely accomplishes both goals.

Yamaha Bolt 2021 bobber-style V-Twin cruiser

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

2021 Yamaha Bolt Cruiser Gets Updated With R-Spec Variant – will be offered in two paint options- Metallic Black or Grayish Blue Metallic.

Yamaha boasts a wide range of motorcycles across a variety of body styles and segments in its international lineup.

The international lineup of Yamaha continues to grow stronger as it has launched an updated version of Bolt in its home market. For reference, the Bolt moniker was first introduced in 2013 as a 2014 model, specifically for the US market. In its upgraded form revealed recently, the big bobber-style cruiser will only be available in the R Spec trim while the base variant has been axed from the lineup.

Traditional Cruiser Styling
The new 2021 Bolt R Spec rides on premium 19-inch front and 16-inch rear alloy wheels with a brushed metallic finish wrapped around by tubeless tyres. The base variant, on the other hand, was offered only wire-spoke wheels.

It flaunts a retro theme styling featuring round headlamps, taillamps, circular instrument cluster and a teardrop-shaped fuel tank. The split-seat design further enhances its bobber stance.

Overall, the cruiser features elegant styling which is accentuated by a beautifully styled engine taking centre stage with a polished crankcase and cooling fins. It will be offered in two colour schemes- Metallic Black or Grayish Blue Metallic. The latter also comes with understated body graphics.

Hardware Setup
Hardware configuration of the motorcycle is kept intact. It is built on a dual cradle frame with the front end suspended on a pair of 41mm telescopic forks. While the rear end is suspended on a set of twin gas-charged shocks with gold-coloured external reservoirs. Anchorage is handled by front and rear 298mm petal disc brakes which are assisted by dual-channel ABS. At a kerb weight of 252kg, it surely is a very hefty machine. The fuel tank can hold up to 13-litres of fuel.

Engine Specs
Coming to its performance, it is powered by a 942cc V-Twin air-cooled, SOHC, fuel-injected engine that has been rated to return an output of 54 bhp at 5500rpm and 80 Nm of peak torque at 3000rpm. It is mated to a 5-speed gearbox that transfers power to the rear wheel via a belt drive just like traditional cruisers. This suggests it is an easy-going cruiser rather than a hustler.

The latest iteration Bolt R Spec has been priced at 10,45,000 Japanese Yen which could be around $8,499 in USA. Yamaha currently has no plans to ship this model to foreign markets, other than the USA.

Get Dealer and Availability Details at https://www.yamahamotorsports.com/sport-heritage/models/bolt-r-spec

Harley-Davidson’s Icons Collection Electra Glide Revival

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

$29K Electra Glide Revival Is Harley-Davidson’s Icons Collection Treat for 2021

For a while now, we’ve gotten used to Harley-Davidson launching special editions of its models included in something called the Icons Collection. Each year, at most two models get included in the series with exclusive looks and equipment. For 2021, we have only one so far, and it’s the Electra Glide Revival.

For it to be included in the Icons Collection, the bike had to put on some special clothes, some that would make people reminisce about the 1969 Electra Glide, the “first Harley-Davidson motorcycle available with an accessory batwing fairing.” And for what it’s worth, it seems Harley nailed that look.

Sporting various colors on various pieces of hardware (Hi-Fi Blue and Black Denim on the fuel tank, Birch White here and there on the fenders and side panels), the motorcycle sure looks like it was transported through time from decades ago.

But it was not, of course, and proof of that are the mechanical bits that make this thing up. In the frame sits a modern Milwaukee-Eight 114 V-Twin engine rated at 118 lb-ft (160 Nm) of torque, there’s the 6-speed Cruise Drive transmission to control it, and a wide range of acronyms depicting the bike’s safety systems: ABS, ELB, TCS, HHC, and so on.

Back to this thing being part of the Icons Collection, its belonging to this breed is highlighted by a unique serial number, a certificate of authenticity, a period-inspired tank medallion, and Electra Glide script on the front fender.

Harley says it will be making no more than 1,500 units of this Electra Glide Revival and will sell each starting this week from $29,199. As with any motorcycle in the Icons Series, the 1,500 units are all there is to this machine, as “production of that model will never be resumed or repeated.”

Husqvarna Electric Motorcycle E-Pilen Concept Revealed

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Husqvarna E-Pilen is expected to undergo production by late this year with a launch aimed at late 2021 or late 2022

With every other OEM venturing into electric mobility space, we often get to witness new designs and advent of some new technology even if it’s minuscule. The latest manufacturer is Husqvarna who plans to enter the emission-free auto world with the production version of E-Pilen Concept revealed recently.

Based on the unique and pioneering design of successful twins- Svartpilen and Vitpilen, E-Pilen Concept is the Swedish bikemaker’s first step into urban electric mobility. The company has ensured that the production-spec electric motorcycle will bear stark resemblances to the concept version showcased.

Modern Design
The progressive design philosophy of Svartpilen and Vitpilen has been carried forward to the electric bike which features some distinct styling elements such as an exposed trellis frame, wide handlebars, a compact fuel tank and a round headlamp.

While a light paint scheme has been carried forward from Vitpilen, the tank rack has been inspired by Svartpilen. Other design elements included are inverted forks, mono-shock at rear, and a gullwing swingarm.

Expected Powertrain Specs
It should be pointed out that the fuel tank houses the electric battery setup. The battery supplies energy to an electric motor with a rated capacity of 8kW (10.73 bhp). Although exact details of the powertrain are yet to be revealed, the company claims a modest range of 100km on a single charge. However, Husqvarna has assured that it will address the range anxiety issues of consumers by equipping E-Pilen with swappable batteries featuring a modular system.

Official statement from the company read as “It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand.”

More Details
More details regarding E-Pilen will be revealed as the electric motorcycle nears its final production-spec version. Husqvarna’s Austrian cousin KTM has already ventured into electric mobility space with 5 kW SX-E and 16 kW Freeride E. If E-Pilen indeed undergoes production it can also pave the path for electric KTM Dukes. Motorcycles of both brands are manufactured at Bajaj’s manufacturing facility in Chakan near Pune, Maharashtra.

In fact, Bajaj and KTM have been working together on a common electric platform that will underpin products ranging from 3kW to 10kW electric motors using a 48V electric system. Also, it was reported a couple of months back that KTM and Husqvarna are developing an all-new electric scooter as well which will be based on Bajaj Chetak Electric. We can expect E-Pilen to be launched late this year or early next year.

Husqvarna announces a new concept for Electric Motorcycle
by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Just as more car manufacturers are switching over to electric vehicles, well-known motorbike companies are also extending their line-up to include e-motorcycles. This year, we are definitely seeing a lot of innovative electric motorbikes being released, and that’s just the beginning.

Husqvarna is one of the brands that recently announced a new concept that’s on its way to being added to their successful motorcycle range. The E-Pilen model is actually intended to be the first of an entirely new series. The company has not yet revealed more details about what the E-mobility line will consist of, but it’s proof that they are serious about developing environmentally-friendly alternatives to classic models.

Fans were not given a lot of information about the upcoming E-Pilen model but, from what we can see so far, it resembles Husqvarna’s classic Vitpilen and Svartpilen in terms of design. The sharp silhouette, five-spoke wheels and retro-inspired round headlight are some of the elements that all of these bikes have in common. The company itself states that E-Pilen is meant to look as good as their most popular models, with the added benefits of electric mobility.

Aimed at “leisure riders”, the Husqvarna electric motorcycle would be ideal for regular commuting in urban environments. The company promises a 62-mile (100 km) range and an 8 kW power output for the electric model, that’s also equipped with a modular and swappable battery system. With E-Pilen currently under development, the motorcycle manufacturer is still considering various options as far as batteries, so we’ll know more about that in the future.

Since they are now appealing to a wider public who is interested in electric alternatives, Husqvarna also intends to extend their dealership network in urban and metropolitan areas.

According to their official statement,“It has always been the aim of Husqvarna Motorcycles to develop new products accessible to the broadest possible spectrum of riders. The E-mobility range will retain and continue the riding pleasure and dynamics refined through the long history and experience of the brand”.

E-Pilen will be launched in the near future, stay tuned for updates.

Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review

By General Posts

by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport review: The Brits take on entry-level adventure

Can Triumph’s cheaper, leaner Tiger stand out in a crowded motorcycle class?

Middleweight adventure bikes are among my favorite motorcycles. They’re good at everything — comfortable, fun to ride, capable off-road and surprisingly competent on a canyon road. The middleweight Triumph Tiger is a bike I know and love, having owned a 2015 800 XCX. Now there’s a new, lower-cost Tiger 850 Sport. Is the middleweight magic still there?

The heart of the bike is its three-cylinder engine. This engine offers the torque of a twin but the increased top end of a four-cylinder, and makes its own unique set of noises. The Tiger 850 Sport’s triple is an 888-cc unit that produces 84 horsepower at 8,500 rpm and 60 pound-feet of torque at 6,500 rpm.

The engine is basically the same unit you’ll find in the more expensive Tiger 900. In the 850 Sport, the triple is detuned to make it a little more new-rider-friendly and help differentiate it from its sibling. The engine is paired with a six-speed gearbox with a chain final drive and a cable-actuated clutch. The transmission is accurate and direct, but not as slick as I’ve come to expect from other modern Triumphs. The clutch is light, though, and easy to modulate.

Off-the-line performance is reasonable if not thrilling, and I doubt that most people will notice the 9-hp deficit between the 850 Sport and the more expensive 900. The transmission’s gearing is well-suited to the triple engine’s power band. While it no longer sounds like the whistly, warbly Triumph triples of old, I still consider it and its derivatives some of the best engines in the business thanks to their smoothness, tractability and overall personality.

The Tiger 850’s Marzocchi-sourced suspension is a little more basic than I’d like in terms of adjustability, but the stock settings are comfortable and should work just fine for most riders. The 45-millimeter front fork isn’t adjustable, and the rear monoshock is adjustable for preload only. The Tiger’s braking system comes from Brembo, with some nice four-piston Stylema calipers up front gripping 320-mm rotors. The rear brake is a single-piston affair gripping a 255-mm rotor. Anti-lock brakes are standard.

The Tiger 850 Sport is a heavily road-biased adventure bike, and the lack of off-road pretensions is a good thing. Even with its large-ish 19-inch front wheel, the Sport feels agile on the road, where other, more off-road focused Tigers with 21-inch wheels can feel a little sluggish when changing direction. The suspension is also well-calibrated for road use, with the ability to smooth out rough pavement but enough stiffness to keep the bike from feeling too floaty when pushed hard.

Modern Triumphs are generally pretty well equipped in the electronics department. The Tiger 850 is a little less feature-rich than other models, but it offers plenty for its target riders. In addition to the standard two-channel ABS, you also get basic traction control and user-selectable ride modes. Regrettably, one of the ways in which Triumph opted to lower costs was to ditch the inertial measurement unit that adds lean sensitivity to the bike’s electronics. If you want that, you have to step up to the 900.

The Tiger 850 Sport doesn’t suffer much from the lack of more advanced electronics, thanks to its well-engineered chassis and fantastic ergonomics. The Tiger does an excellent job of riding the fence between being a capable adventure bike and an approachable, easy-to-ride touring motorcycle. The bike’s 31.9-inch standover height is still going to be a little tall for some, but it’s in line with other bikes in the class. It’s also relatively light for the category at 428 pounds dry.

The 850 Sport goes up against bikes like the BMW F750 GS, the KTM 890 Adventure and the Moto Guzzi V85TT. Out of these, the Triumph holds its own in terms of power with all but the KTM. It also lacks some of the BMW’s optional technical goodies, like a dynamic suspension, but that’s reflected in the Tiger’s price.

The 2021 Triumph Tiger 850 Sport retails for $11,995 before you add anything like accessories or luggage. For comparison, the higher-spec Tiger 900 will cost you $14,700, while the BMW F750 GS starts at $11,490. The KTM begins at $13,099 and the Moto Guzzi goes for $12,990.

In a segment with as much competition as the middleweight adventure bike category, would I buy the Tiger 850 Sport? Honestly, no. It’s not that it’s a bad bike, it’s just that the Tiger 850 doesn’t make a compelling argument for itself. With their added electronics and other niceties, the Tiger 900 or its European competitors are likely better buys.

Indian Motorcycle Announces Indian Chief Custom Program

By General Posts

Indian Motorcycle is tapping four renowned builders to customize the new 2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse. To showcase the range of the platform, each builder has a signature style that differs from the next. First, Indian Motorcycle is excited to reunite Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, as the two haven’t teamed up for a project in nearly 15 years. Next, Indian is tapping Go Takamine to see his interpretation of a custom Chief. Lastly, Indian will see how Carey Hart will follow up his first custom Chief with this build.

Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief. In an effort to showcase the vast personalization possibilities inherent to the Indian Chief platform, three renowned V-twin customizers were selected to produce totally unique interpretations of the iconic motorcycle; including former Indian Larry tandem, Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart, and creator of “Bratstyle,” the popular brand and globally recognized “throwback” aesthetic for motorcycle customization and restoration, Go Takamine.

For Cox and Sasaki, this project marks the first time in nearly 15 years the duo has worked together, dating back to the early 2000’s when they disbanded after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

With its classic steel tube frame, exposed rear shocks and Thunderstroke motor, the new Indian Chief was designed with a mindset fixed on reaching back to the past, while pushing into the future. To that point, it was also by design that Indian Motorcycle selected three builders that span the spectrum of classic and modern customization styles.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, various Indian Motorcycle models have served as the canvas for Hart’s design creativity and customization skills. He recently unveiled the first-ever, custom 2022 Indian Chief – a modern club-style take on the new Chief platform – just following the bike’s debut in early February.

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Indian Chiefs and Indian Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian Motorcycle.

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model – allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

The curated accessory collections consist of the following:

Rogue Collection
Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection
With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection
Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Shipping to dealers now, the 2022 Indian Chief lineup offers three distinct models with two trim levels. Powering all premium Chief models, including the Chief Dark Horse, Chief Bobber Dark Horse and Super Chief Limited, is Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 116 engine with 120 ft-lbs of torque. ABS is standard, while premium finishes set these bikes apart and further showcase the craftsmanship and attention to detail. The Chief Dark Horse and Chief Bobber Dark Horse each pack further attitude with premium gloss black finishes, while the Super Chief Limited touts premium chrome finishes. All are equipped with Indian Motorcycle’s industry-first 4 inch touchscreen powered by Ride Command which offers turn-by-turn navigation, Bluetooth® pairing for access to mobile phone information, as well as bike and ride information.

The Indian Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief are each powered by Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 111 powertrain with 108 ft-lbs of torque. Each model features an analog gauge, chrome and matte black finishes, and is available with or without ABS.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Customs Garage webpage. Additionally, riders can learn more about the Indian Chief at their local Indian Motorcycle dealership, by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com, or by following along on Facebook®, Twitter® and Instagram®.