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Invasion of the Small Capacity Engines

By General Posts

Small is Big: Motorcycles with less power, more styling, high sales volumes

Just as the world was recognising the perks of weekend motorcycle getaways and big V-Twin engines, there was also economic collapse, trade tariff wars and then the curse of the climate. Everyone complained about the weather and then somebody actually did something about it. Like all solutions, the proposal was a ban.

In this Article we dive into the world of small things making big waves in motorcycle industry

Click Here to Read this Comprehensive Overview of All Things Big About Small

Summer Ride to Kolad Farmhouse

By General Posts

Friends as diverse as their range of motorcycle brands ride India’s Countryside

There is this wonderful group of riders who have accumulated a million kms and plenty more goodwill.

Musafirs motorcycle club started in 2010 and camaraderie, discovery, adventure, expertise and fun have ensured that they have been on a group ride almost every month since they started their club.

The word ‘Musafir’ literally means ‘traveller’.

There is plenty of information about The Musafirs group on their website and social media links.

Do check it out and follow them on social media in case you plan to visit India anytime for long-distance riding adventures to splendid destinations.

Their Website: https://themusafirs.com/

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/musafirsmotorcycleclub

The destination for 149th ride of Musafirs motorcycle group was Kolad.

The ride was in a single-line formation. The neon-green reflective vests are for most of the riders. The red ones are for ‘Pilots’, ‘Pointers’ and ‘Shepherds’.

CLICK HERE To Read this Travelogue from Incredible India – at Bikernet.com

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NCOM Biker Newsbytes for December 2021

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Industry & Legislative Motorcycle News from USA and the world
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) News provides updates on motorcycle industry, market, legislation, rights of bikers, motorcyclists in USA, and motorcycle news from around the world.

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

CLICK HERE To Read the December 2021 News from NCOM

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NCOM Biker Newsbytes for November 2021

By General Posts

Legislative Motorcycle News from USA and the world
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) News provides updates on motorcycle industry, market, legislation, rights of bikers, motorcyclists in USA, and motorcycle news from around the world.

Read the latest on legislation, State laws, European motorcycle law changes and more.

Click Here To Read the November NCOM News on Bikernet.com

Join the Cantina for more – Subscribe Today!

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Blind Spot Warnings Display On Motorcycles

By General Posts

from https://www.malaymail.com

How blind spot warnings could be displayed directly in motorcycle mirrors.

Motorcycle manufacturers are exploring ways of alerting riders to the risk of collision with vehicles in their blind spot.

TOKYO, Sept 30 — Yamaha has filed a new project with the Japanese Patent Office for a system that alerts motorcycle or scooter riders when a vehicle is in their blind spot. This solution takes the form of LED strips placed directly behind the mirrors that face the rider. This solution could prove an effective means of alerting riders to this type of danger.

Most motorcycle manufacturers are actively working on blind spot warning systems. Yamaha recently filed a patent revealing a new technology that displays specific icons directly on the bike’s mirrors.

The idea is to be able to alert riders to dangers quickly and effectively. To do this, the Japanese manufacturer relies on displaying warnings on the bike’s mirrors in case of danger. The solution takes the form of a small screen placed behind each of the mirrors in the bike’s two rearview mirrors, capable of displaying a warning icon in the event of a collision risk, i.e., a vehicle in a blind spot. Note that the system could also display the warning on just one mirror, depending on the side where the danger is located.

In addition to the presence of a vehicle in their blind spot, this device could also warn riders of a risk of collision with another vehicle, when they’re breaking the speed limit or when they receive an incoming phone call. It could theoretically be fitted to a motorcycle as well as a scooter. Still, it remains to be seen whether this solution will eventually see the light of day.

Currently, the most advanced solution in this field is undoubtedly Bosch’s Blind Spot Detection (BSD), which is used in many motorcycle models, including BMW, Ducati or KTM bikes. In the event of a risk of impact with a vehicle coming from the rear, the system emits a sound or displays a visual alert on the screen.

Of course, the easiest & safest way to avoid this type of accident is to turn your head before pulling out or changing lanes, to make sure that there are no vehicles in your blind spot.

Piaggio, KTM, Honda and Yamaha set up swappable batteries consortium

By General Posts

by Reuters from https://www.investing.com

MILAN (Reuters) – Italian scooter maker Piaggio said on Monday it had set up a consortium with Honda Motor Co., KTM AG and Yamaha Motor Co. to encourage the use of swappable batteries for electric motorcycles and light electric vehicles.

The Swappable Batteries Motorcycle Consortium (SBMC) aims to broaden the use of light electric vehicles, such as scooters, mopeds and motorcycles, and support a more sustainable management of their batteries, a joint statement said.

It will focus on issues such as battery life, recharging times, infrastructure and costs and will work on defining international standard technical specifications for swappable batteries.

The companies in the consortium said they welcomed others joining them to extend standards to as many companies as possible.

“Urban mobility is going through a delicate transition moment towards electrification. Thanks to this consortium, motorbikes will keep their key role,” Piaggio Chief of Strategy and Product Michele Colaninno said.

Honda’s Motorcycle Operations Chief Officer Yoshishige Nomura said the consortium’s objectives aimed to make electric motorbikes more convenient for clients, as their “use on large scale can substantially contribute to the creation of a more sustainable society”.

Piaggio Group owns iconic two-wheeler brands such as Vespa, Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, among others.

Eight of the Fastest Street-Legal Motorcycles You Can Buy in America

By General Posts

by Todd Halterman from https://www.autoevolution.com

It begins with the story of the legendary Suzuki Hayabusa. When that beast launched back in 1999, it triggered a hurricane of anxiety among various manufacturers – and it all came down to the top speed of the bike – a stunning 194 mph.

The Hayabusa represented a quantum leap in speed and made it the fastest motorcycle you could buy and ride on the streets. In fact, it took the title away from the already insanely fast Honda CBR1100XX Super Blackbird, and it did it by a startling 14 mph.

In answer, Kawasaki announced the creation of the Ninja ZX-12R, and it promised a top speed of more than 200 blistering miles per hour. That announcement led regulators to consider tamping down the lust for speed among manufacturers, and it also led to what’s come to be known as The Gentleman’s Agreement among the top motorcycle manufacturers across the globe.

As the story goes, the “agreement” called on manufacturers to set the upper limit on motorcycle speed at 200 mph. Since then, that agreement has been violated to varying degrees, and here are some of the motorcycles that flirt with – and exceed – the barrier posited by The Gentlemen’s Agreement.

The Yamaha YZF-R1M, which purports to achieve a top end of 185.7 mph, has itself become legendary for its on and off-track precision and power. The R1 line and the street legal R1 models achieve their punch following a power-and-less-bulk formula.

Offering lightweight carbon-fiber construction and powered by an explosive 998cc, liquid-cooled “cross-plane” inline-four, the R1 creates 200 hp and offers 89.2 lb-ft torque. When that kind of juice moves through its 6-Speed manual, the R1M does 0-60 mph in a snot-loosening 2.3 seconds. One of these beasts will set you back just over $26,000 USD.

Next up on this rogues gallery is the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. This KTM is a naked hypersport bit of lunacy that packs a 1301 cc, 75-degree V-twin motor into a novel frame. The 1290 Super Duke R wacks the limits of physics to the tune of 180 hp and cranks out 103 lb-ft of torque.

At a svelte 462 lbs. dry weight., the Super Duke R covers 0-60 mph in just 2.6 seconds and is limited to 186 mph. If you must have one, this KTM will set you back right around $18,000 USD.

The Hayabusa is back, and the 3rd Generation variant uses the same 1340cc inline-four motor to produce a healthy 188 hp and 110 ft-lbs of torque and covers 0-60 mph in a serviceable 3.2 seconds.

While it’s now restricted to 186 mph top speed, it does its progenitors proud. It will be priced at just north of $22,000 USD.

The BMW S1000RR represented a huge technological leap for the time, and when it launched in 2009, it was packed to the brim with electronics and rider-assist features unheard of even for the sophisticated ‘ultra bikes’ of the time.

The latest iteration, the 2021 BMW S1000RR is powered by a water/oil-cooled inline-4 motor that generates a stunning 205 hp and 83 lb-ft of torque.

In ‘Race Pro Mode’ it covers 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds and is capable of reaching a top speed of 192 mph. All that performance does not come cheap and the sticker price is expected to come in around $30,000.

An Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory is a sublime example of Italian design and engineering and an amazing achievement when you consider the fact that the has only been in the game since the end of the Second World War. Aprilia is dedicated to motorcycle sports and they use the competitive anvil to forge their lightning-fast and supple machines.

The RSV4 1100 Factory is powered by a 1099cc V4 engine which turns out 217 hp and 90 lb-ft of torque. And perhaps most critically, it weighs just 390 lbs and that finely-balanced power-to-weight ratio means it can do 0-60 mph in just 2.9 seconds and achieve a reported top speed of 198.8 mph. The Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory sports an MSRP of $25,999.

Known for the subtlety and innovative character of their designs, Ducati remains iconic for their blend of finish, style and pure power. The Panigale V4R combines carbon fiber and their signature desmodromic engine, Desmosedici Stradale R 998 cc Inline-4, produces 221hp straight out of the factory and you can ramp that power up to 234 hp with the addition of an Akrapovic full-racing exhaust.

The Desmosedici Stradale motor puts out 92 lb-ft of torque and travels from 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds before ultimately achieving a top speed of 199 mph. You can be the proud owner of a 2021 Ducati Panigale V4R for just under $23,000.

As we near the top of this list, we find a pair of Kawasakis perched near the pinnacle. The ZH2 and the Ninja H2 are both said to be capable of 200+ mph, and these novel supercharger-boosted motorcycles feature 998cc inline-4 motors that crank out 200 hp and 101 lb-ft of torque.

The ZH2 with the ability to cover 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds and reach a top speed of more than 200 mph also represents a devil’s bargain of sorts. For 2021, Kawasaki ZH2 is priced at just over $17,500.

The lunatic Kawasaki Ninja H2R – with a stated top speed of 248 mph, is a track-only machine and therefore not allowed on our list. The H2R does hold the record holder for top end speed as it reached a snot-loosening 250 mph in just 26 seconds. For 2021, the Kawasaki Ninja H2 is priced at $29,500.

But the bike at the top of the list of mad-dog bikes you can ride on the street belongs to the Lightning LS-218.

Electric motorcycles are clearly the future, and the neck snapping torque offered up by an electric motor is surely attractive to wild fools in search of speed at all costs.

The Lightning LS-218 is powered by a 380V electric powerplant coupled to any of three battery packs: 12, 15, or 20 kWh. At its top tuning settings, this nearly silent monster churns out 200 hp and 168 lb-ft of torque and can reach a top speed of 218 mph.

Coupled with a demented 0-60 mph time of just 2.2 seconds, it takes the top slot when it comes to streetworthy guts. The 2021 Lightning LS-218 comes in at around $39,000 USD out the door.

Of course, most of these figures are reported by the manufacturers and results may vary according to conditions and tuning…

98th Loudon Classic a Great Success

By General Posts

LOUDON, NH, UNITED STATES – The 98th Annual Loudon Classic weekend by Mayhew Tools featured three days of perfect weather, fans from all over New England and racing with the NorthEast Motorcycle Road Racing (NEMRR) series. NEMRR is part of the national Championship Cup Series organization and riders from the Northeast, Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic regions competed in a twin sprint weekend that ran an impressive 45 races in total.

The feature events of the weekend were the three Grand Prix classes, which boasted $9500 in purse money in total. Specialty Saw presented the Seacoast Sport Cycle Lightweight Grand Prix class and the Street and Competition Unlimited Grand Prix classes. Mayhew Tools was the title sponsor of the featured Loudon Classic Middleweight Grand Prix class together with presenting sponsors Motorace and New Hampshire Motor Speedway. In the twin sprint format the lap times from the Friday races were used to set the grid for the Saturday main events, and the Friday Motorace Middleweight Grand Prix race featured a $1500 purse.

Saturday’s feature races were held in front of a fantastic crowd and led off with the two support classes presented by Specialty Saw, Lightweight GP and Unlimited GP. First off were the small displacement machines and NEMRR #1 rider Rick Doucette of Sandown, NH showed why he was the heavy favorite, scoring the holeshot and running a string of blazing fast laps in the 1:14 and 1:15 range on his special de-stroked Yamaha R5. The surprise of the day came from Eli Block riding a strong running KTM 450 motard bike who challenged Doucette right to the very end. The Motard bike was down on power to machine of Doucette, but the combination of the nimble handling and equisite skill of Block made for an incredibly entertaining race to watch. Block was especially fast on the brakes and would be all over the back tire of Doucette in the back section of the track. In the end Doucette’s experience and consistency proved too much to handle as he pulled out the win by 0.4 seconds at the line. The battle for third was a similar battle between the SV650 of Steven Hieder and the Honda 450 motard of Moto America Junior Cup star Ben Gloddy, and in this case the motard won the battle and claimed the last spot on the podium.

In the Unlimited GP feature, pole sitter Shane Narbonne was forced to ride his Yamaha R6 after his Suzuki GSXR1000 suffered a mechanical failure. Scott Mullin won the drag race off the line, and 2nd row starter Eric Wood of Ashburnham, MA was able to use the power of his Kawasaki ZX10 to pass Narbonne to assume 2nd place as the trio rocketed into turn 1. Wood made an inside pass on Mullin into turn 6 and the two Kawasaki riders began to separate themselves from Narbonne. Mullin kept Wood honest throughout the contest, staying within a few bike lengths until Wood begin to open his advantage to an eventual 2.4 second gap as the pair navigated traffic in the closing laps.

The featured 98th running of the Loudon Classic by Mayhew Tools went off under 84-degree sunshine with a paddock abuzz and stands full of spectators excited to see the action. With all eyes focused on the front row, starting lights came on and perennial NEMRR star Scott Greenwood of Dunbarton, NH made an uncharacteristic mistake. To get a jump on the field, Greenwood launched out of his grid spot too early, a mistake that he clearly signaled as he entered turn one with a gap on the field while he was shaking his head in disbelief. Greenwood would be assessed a 30 second penalty, and the race was on. Greenwood and Narbonne separated themselves from the field while running a string of 1:12 lap times, Narbonne racing for the win and Greenwood racing against the clock to try to secure a podium position despite his penalty.

Meanwhile, the battle for the podium was raging between the trio of Rick Doucette, Teagg Hobbs (riding a 600 at NHMS for the first time) and Paul Duval together. The 18-year-old Hobbs was going to be fast to the end and came from a mediocre start through Doucette and up to the rear wheel of Duval. After several laps sizing up his competitor Hobbs finally made the move forward and separated himself in the later stages of the race from his competitor to secure a solid 2nd place. Duval was racing against Greenwood and the 30 second penalty, and in the end managed to keep the gap to less than 30 seconds and finished the 20-lap final on the podium. Rounding out the top 6 were Greenwood in 4th, Doucette and 5th and young upstart Joe LiMandri in 6th. The top finishing amateur rider was Paul Hosue, finishing a very respectable 12th place in a field of 27 riders.

A 17-year-old is taking the motorcycle racing world by storm

By General Posts

by James Warren from https://www.theolivepress.es

SPAIN has often been called the mecca for motorcycle racing, with world champions being cultivated from the moment they can sit on a bike.

Household names like Marc Marquez, Aleix Espargaro and current champ Joan Mir all started riding and racing while they were at school, making use of Spain’s love of two wheels to develop their talents unhindered.

As these riders fight to earn their latest victories in 2021, they all have one eye on one name that is causing waves in the Moto3 World Championship.

And that name is Pedro Acosta, a young 17-year-old from Mazarron, Murcia.

So far in 2021, the young man has taken three victories and one podium in the first four races, shattering records for the 250cc class and leaving experts to hail him as a ‘future legend’.

But how has this teenager become one of the most exciting prospects since Marc Marquez arrived on the scene back in 2008.

The answer can be found at the Circuito de Cartagena, a race track six kilometres northwest of the popular resort.

The circuit is popular with trackday riders, people who own motorcycles who rent sessions on the track to hone their skills.

Acosta’s father, also Pedro, was one such rider, with a love for American legend Kevin Schwanz, and eager for his son to inherit his love for two wheels.

“Dad had a Suzuki like Schwantz’s and I grew up looking at the photos and videos of him.” said Acosta in an interview with Spanish publication Marca.

Acosta’s father, keen to see his son carry on the mantle, give him a €150 Chinese Motina bike at the age of five, and brought him to track days at the Cartagena circuit to watch his father ride.

“At first he was not interested, spending more time playing rather than watching, but he soon began to become intrigued to what I was doing.” said his father.

Acosta enrolled into a youth development program at the track ran by early mentor Francisco Marmol, a name that would become an integral part in Acosta’s rise to stardom.

“He would always be at the track with his father, and after a few years we enrolled him in our program, like an after-school club for riders.” said Marmol.

“He developed a taste for it very quickly, and grew a strong bond with me, he listened very intently and it became apparent that he had no fear.”

“He was open to experiment and try new things that I suggested. Some people say they can see a natural talent in children this age but it is not true, it is too early. But Acosta was always ready to learn, and enjoyed every moment, and that was the key.”

The son of a modest fisherman and a mother Mercedes, who didn’t care for racing, Acosta, with the help of Marmol and the KSB Federation, entered numerous national championships as soon as he was old enough, and won the Pre Moto3 championship in 2017.

As a result, Acosta entered the Spanish Junior Moto3 category (CEV), finishing 33rd after racing in just five races, but more importantly giving him his first proper taste of 250cc machinery.

His stint in the CEV gave him the confidence to apply for the Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup, the official starter class for the MotoGP championship and a place where teams scalp for potential talents.

Acosta made the cut, and in 2019 he began his first foray into international racing.

He impressed, taking three victories and five podiums on the way to a second place finish after 12 races.

In 2020, Acosta remained in the Rookie’s Cup and claimed an unprecedented six straight victories and a further three podiums to take the championship n his second attempt.

His performance got teams talking, and for 2021 Acosta joined the Austrian Red Bull Ajo KTM team on the factory KTM RC250, colours that would propel him into the eyes of the world.

The current crop of riders are already heaping praise on the Spanish youngster, but are concerned that his rapid rise to stardom could be his downfall.

“It is clear that he can become a champion, he has the talent, but he has to surround himself with the right people.” said 2020 champion Joan Mir.

This is a sentiment that is echoed amongst the other riders, with Franco Morbidelli and Marquez all offering words of wisdom to the 17-year-old.

“He must be left alone to enjoy his time on the bike, to concentrate on his development and not be forced to advance to quickly.” said Marquez.

Marquez is referring to rumors that Acosta is already being touted for MotoGP ride, skipping the intermediate Moto2 category altogether, a move that has concerned many.

“Moto2 is a valuable stepping stone, you learn a lot from 675cc racing machinery that you can’t pick up from Moto3, or even training on larger bikes.” said Mir.

“As Pecco (Bagnaia, current Ducati rider) said, two years in each category is sensible, it is important not to rush. It is clear he is something special but he must do what is best for him not what is best for the teams or promotions.”

What Acosta does next year is uncertain, but from humble beginnings he has gained admiration from not only his childhood heroes, but also racing fans across the globe.

Motorcycle manufacturer KTM expanding U.S. HQ in Murrieta

By General Posts

by Samantha Gowen from https://www.sbsun.com

KTM, an Austrian manufacturer of street and off-road motorcycles, is expanding its North American headquarters in Murrieta to a new campus.

A groundbreaking is expected in August.

KTM NA (North America) is building its campus at the northeast corner of Winchester and Borel roads. The company, led by CEO John Hinz, says it will span 20 acres and include at least three buildings with more than 150,000 square feet of technical, office, warehouse and racing departments.

The development is one block south of KTM NA’s private motorsports facility, which is used for testing products and athlete training. It has two supercross-style dirt tracks, two extreme off-road courses and a trials competition section.

The company sells its motorcycles and related gear through independent dealers across the U.S.

We asked the company about its new HQ and what it’s bringing to the Temecula Valley. Tom Moen, KTM’s marketing manager, gave us an update.

Q: Tell us more about the KTM brand and what it makes.

A: We have three brands of motorcycles we build and distribute to our dealers, KTM, Husqvarna and GasGas. In those brands, we have an array of products from balance bikes for 3-year-old children up to 1290 Adventure motorcycles. Plus we have electric minibikes and a full-size, off-road electric bike.

We also produce and sell parts and accessories to our dealers, everything from T-shirts to full riding suits and anything for protection and safety equipment, kids to adults sizes.

Q: Where was KTM’s North American HQ previously?

A: Our headquarters was back in Amherst, Ohio. We also had sales and marketing offices down in El Cajon. We moved to Temecula in 2004 and opened our current headquarters in Murrieta in 2009, which has grown to four buildings now (and we are outgrowing them). Our Ohio offices are now the parts warehouse and dealer training center

Q: How long has the test track been operational?

A: Our private test track has been fully operational for 3 years now. It’s right above our current offices off Technology and Innovation streets, south of French Valley airport.

Q: It sounds like business is going well. Can you share more?

A: Our company has been doing very well in the off-road market for a while. This is where we lead in market share among the other brands. Our street segment has grown in the past three years, and we are/have been the largest European motorcycle manufacture in North America.

We’ve been seeing 10% average growth for the past years, and this last year was our best year retail sales-wise for our dealers.

Q: How did the pandemic impact the company?

A: COVID just made people want to get out and do things. Riding motorcycles was something you could do with yourself and your families. We were lucky that our production was down for only a month or so, but once it got going, they delivered what we had planned for the year, pre-COVID. Plus, we took some other countries’ product while they were in lockdown. There was demand and we were able to supply the product.

Q: Will KTM NA be hiring?

A: Yes, with the new HQ expansion we will be hiring more staff. It’s hard to say how many at first, but the company sees potential to increase HQ staff by 50 within the first year at the new HQ.

Q: Does the region (and a certain love for the outdoors) help KTM’s business?

A: Yes Southern Cal and the Southwest is the hot spot for offroad and all general motorcycling. We have the best weather!!

KTM has been making motorcycles and gear in the North American market since 1967. The company says it has grown its U.S. workforce, expanding to 150 employees from 30 since 2009.