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Honda CBR300R ABS 2022 : Road Test

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by Kyle Smith from https://www.hagerty.com/

Picture this: You’re hanging around the Rock Store at the top of Mulholland Highway with your rental Camry the day before you fly home. The leather-clad crowd around praises the virtues of the GSXR600 chassis and the electronics package on the R1 for what seems like hours before a voice from the ether comes down and declares that, in fact, all of that sucks. Instead the holy follow the real truth of Slow Bike Fast.

This truly enlightened rider who belongs to that voice is astride a miniscule machine that looks like a sportbike that stayed in the dryer just a bit too long and has an exhaust note like a mix of an old enduro machine and the Singer your mom used to repair your jeans way back when. Is this person insane or a prophet? There’s only one way to say for sure. I took the Honda CBR300R out for a week of playing in the canyons alongside some high-horsepower (and highly capable) machines to see if it truly held up.

This 250cc-400cc market segment is now a packed class, with the KTM RC390, Yamaha R3, Kawasaki Ninja 400, and Suzuki GSX250R all competing for both attention from new riders and track rats alike. That is two very different subsets of buyers but it all boils down to similar wants and desires: Reliability, approachability, and fun factor.

Honda comes right out and calls the 300 a commuter machine in some of its press materials. It is an evolution of the CBR250R which lived from 2011 to 2015, after which the engine was upsized to the current 286cc. The non-ABS equipped model comes in at $4,899 plus $600 in destination and freight charges. Add in the well-tuned ABS, as seen on our test bike, and the price rises to just $5,099. Either trim can be had in grand prix red or matte gray metallic.

The engine is not the main reason I would recommend this bike though. It’s the chassis that gives the baby CBR the most fun character. A scant 30” seat height is the first thing that stood out when I threw my leg over the bike for the first time. My 32” inseam means that I am rarely bothered by seat heights, but the CBR’s lower seat combined with the narrowness of the chassis to feel playful to me. Riding through twists and turns was an absolute delight.

Straight line speed was not astonishing, but the Honda still moved quickly enough to be safe and fun. Unfortunately, those canyon roads were a place the CBR’s suspension really showed its pricepoint and intended use case. The fork is sprung on the soft side and the rear begs for more rebound damping.

The dash consists of a simple analog sweep tachometer and LCD display for speed, distance, and other necessary measurements. Simple and functional. A cable-pull clutch and hydraulic front brake round out the rider touchpoints.

The ready-to-ride weight comes in at just 354 pounds and it very much feels like it. The single front brake measures just 296mm diameter, with 220mm rear disc and the combination has no problem slowing the CBR. The ABS threshold is fairly high, as we had to work to get it to intervene but it cycled quickly and consistently once engaged.

(Editor’s note: I think the 320cc Yamaha R3, which I’ve ridden quite a bit, feels even lighter on its feet — Jack Baruth)

The CBR is a delight to ride just about everywhere. The only place it fell short was highway riding. Honda claims a top speed just shy of 100mph, but 70mph felt busy on the little machine and the tach needle fluttered in the top third of its range. Will it do it? Yes. If that is your main use though, the larger CBR500R is likely a better fit.

Once off the superslab we had no trouble racking up miles on the comfortable seat. The bike just was not tiring to ride like most small-displacement bikes tend to be.

The low seat height and light weight combine with smooth controls to make a very beginner-friendly package.

It’s also one that veteran riders will find playful to ride–this is the core of “Slow Bike Fast.”

The little CBR is not the perfect motorcycle, but it is a great second (or third) bike; delightful to ride, and once you have one you will likely find yourself reaching for its keys more than you would think.

Progressive Suspension Daytona Bike Week Specials

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SAVE 10% ON FRONT AND REAR SUSPENSION TO IMPROVE THE RIDE AND PERFORMANCE OF YOUR HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Use Discount Code DAYTONA 22 at progressivesuspension.com
or call 714-523-8700

Bring your bike by the Progressive Suspension Rig at Daytona to Save 10% and have your new Progressive Suspension installed by one of our Certified Technicians.

SHOCK TEST RIDES AVAILABLE – FEEL THE DIFFERENCE!

Select your make from Harley-Davidson, Indian, Metrics, Triumph, Honda to view Products & Availability

Visit Website to Purchase Online at: http://progressivesuspension.com/

Alt-Rock Cruisers: BMW targets American brand’s market

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by Jack Baruth from Hagerty.com

BMW R18 meets Indian Challenger and Harley Heritage Classic

The slightly ridiculous 1800cc, two-cylinder, leather-saddlebag, CHiPs-windshielded cruiser I’m trying to force through six stopped lanes of Los Angeles traffic can’t be taken as anything but an admission on the part of the Bayerische Motoren Werke that Harley-Davidson knows

a) what boys like;
b) what men want …

in America, anyway.

CLICK HERE To Read a comprehensive Road Test & Review of the cruiser models from the 3 motorcycle brands.

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4 Major Motorcycle Trends Sir Hagerty Witnessed at the Mecum Auction

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by James Hewitt from Hagerty.com

Values have skyrocketed of late in the motorcycle world but there were still deals to be had.

The spending frenzy at Scottsdale’s January auto auctions may have garnered the headlines, but just a short road trip away in Las Vegas, Mecum’s motorcycle auction put on a similarly spectacular show for the two-wheeled crowd.

We reported last year that millennials prefer classic & vintage Harleys over Indians.

Knuckleheads are benefitting from broader, multi-generational appeal, and demand is increasing because younger buyers continue to move into the market while older ones aren’t leaving.

CLICK HERE To Read this Classic Motorcycle Market Report on Bikernet.com

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Six Ways to Sunday project reaches its final discipline for racing

By General Posts

The Garage Fridge saves the day
by Kyle Smith from Hagerty.com

The garage fridge is not a tool. It does not actively assist in the completion of a project. If anything, the cooler in the corner often conspires to defeat productivity. For me, recently, it did just the opposite.

Taking the one motorcycle out to compete in cross country, motocross, flat track, road racing, trials, and finally on ice requires a lot of time in the garage.

So much that I was getting burnt out. Luckily this final conversion only required three items: studded tires, over fenders, and a tether kill-switch.

Simple, right? I thought so, too.

CLICK HERE To Read Kyle’s adventure in Racing at 6 Different AMA Race Categories

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Gevin Fax Blazes Her Own Trail

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by Emily Chavous from russbrown.com

Whether riding a motorcycle or challenging norms, Gevin Fax is no stranger to blazing trails.

She says, “I think this is the best, most wonderful country in the world, but we are not flawless. I want women to not sell themselves short. We are stronger than we give ourselves credit for. We are more possible than we could ever imagine.”

“Everybody kept telling me my life was going to change after I bought the Harley. Let me tell you something: Everything changed.”

CLICK HERE To Read this Feature Article on Bikernet.com

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Honda RC213V-S Breaks Auction World Record

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An as-new example of Honda’s RC213V-S has just broken a new world record, becoming the most expensive Japanese motorcycle ever sold at auction.

Hosted by specialist automotive marketplace Collecting Cars, the ‘MotoGP bike for the road’ sold for a remarkable total sales price of £182,500.

The rare superbike has never been ridden and remains in its original flight case, with just one mile on the odometer. Having never left its shipping crate, the bike is totally pristine with absolutely no damage or wear.

Created with a focus on light weight and agility, the RC213V-S is a road-legal MotoGP bike, built around a hand-fabricated aluminium frame with carbon-fibre body panels and titanium fasteners, resulting in a dry weight of just 170kg.

Powered by a 999cc four-stroke V4 engine, this 2016 model also features the full HRC Race Kit, which comprises a recalibrated ECU, a titanium exhaust system, a front ram duct, a race-pattern quickshifter, a data logger and a remote control cable for the front brake lever. These upgrades reduce the bike’s total weight by 10kg and increase power output from 157hp to 215hp.

Also fitted are some of the highest quality components available, including Ohlins TTX front forks, powerful Brembo brakes and forged magnesium Marchesini Racing wheels.

Edward Lovett, founder of Collecting Cars, said:

“Honda’s RC213V-S is a thrilling, exquisitely crafted machine, and this example attracted global attention and extremely competitive bidding on Collecting Cars. We are proud to have achieved yet another world-record sales price – this time for an incredible road-legal MotoGP that will be a jewel in the new owner’s collection.”

To find out more information on this lot, visit Collecting Cars.
https://collectingcars.com/for-sale/2016-honda-rc213v-s-1

Compared to traditional car auctions, Collecting Cars offers significantly better value for sellers and buyers alike. For sellers, the detailed photographic presentation and professional descriptions mean their car is showcased in the best possible way, and is marketed to a huge captive audience of passionate enthusiasts. Furthermore, there is no listing fee, and they receive 100% of the hammer price.

For buyers, the premium on auction lots is levied at just 5% + VAT – substantially lower than traditional auction houses, which typically charge 12% or more – and is capped at £6,000. On hammer prices above £100,000 this means that the buyer’s premium is even less than 6%.

About Collecting Cars:
Collecting Cars is an online auction platform that curates consignments from around the world and markets them to a global audience.

The streamlined and transparent process makes buying and selling cars, motorbikes, and automobilia via its online auctions one of the most effective and hassle-free ways of transacting.

To date, the Collecting Cars platform has sold more than 5,300 lots, and total sales value generated for sellers exceeds £191 million. The multi-national auction company has headquarters in London, and offices in Munich, Sydney, and Los Angeles.

More than 90% of sales since launch have happened without a physical viewing, underscoring the significant trust that Collecting Cars has earned among its customers.

Visit Website at: https://collectingcars.com/

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for December 2021

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Industry & Legislative Motorcycle News from USA and the world
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) News provides updates on motorcycle industry, market, legislation, rights of bikers, motorcyclists in USA, and motorcycle news from around the world.

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

CLICK HERE To Read the December 2021 News from NCOM

Join the Cantina – CLICK HERE To Subscribe

Red Cross Philippines vows faster, more effective response with motorcycles

By General Posts

from https://mb.com.ph by Dhel Nazario

The Philippine Red Cross vowed on Saturday, Dec. 11, to provide a more effective humanitarian response now that it is more equipped after receiving motorcycles donated by Honda Philippines Inc.

PRC Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Sen. Richard Gordon gave this assurance to the public during the ceremonial distribution of Honda motorcycle units to local Red Cross chapters in North Luzon, Central Luzon, South Luzon, Bicol, Visayas, and Mindanao clusters.

Gordon expressed his gratitude to Honda Philippines Inc. President Susumu Mitsuishi for the carmaker’s turnover of 104 motorcycles, complete with insulated top box.

“These motorcycles will level-up the capacity of PRC’s fleet for responding to emergencies. The PRC is now more equipped to provide speedy and effective responses during disasters, public health crises, and other situations that require humanitarian aid,” Gordon said.

Gordon also thanked respected automotive industry parts supplier Eddie Jose as he assured the group of the PRC’s commitment to use the assets to protect the public’s well-being, health, and to save lives.

“Each PRC chapter will use these new motorcycles to ensure faster and easier access to blood, saliva RT-PCR testing, and soon, even first aid assistance. These motorcycles will enable PRC volunteers and staff to quickly reach areas that would be inaccessible to larger vehicles.” Gordon said.

He also reiterated that PRC personnel assigned to use the motorcycles will undergo a series of safety trainings that will enable them to properly handle and operate the units safely especially during high-stress, high-pressure situations.

“The humanitarian situations faced by PRC riders will range from the routine to the extreme. This makes it a priority for us to train volunteers and staff on the safe and proper handling of these vehicles especially during high-stress incidents. We are a staunch advocate of road safety and I want our volunteers and staff to achieve a high level of skill and safety in their use of these motorcycles,” he said.

The initial phase of the training is composed of three hours of classroom lectures and three hours of practical motorcycle handling. Further training will be given as needed to the PRC staff and volunteers.

Motorcycle Live: Inside the UK’s biggest motorcycle show

By General Posts

from https://www.standard.co.uk/ by David Williams

It’s that time of year bikers dread – the days are shorter and the weather is colder and wetter, forcing fair-weather riders to leave their bikes parked at the roadside. Which means it’s time to head to Birmingham by train for Motorcycle Live, to see what they’ll be riding (and wearing) next year, when it all improves again.

The UK’s biggest bike show rolls Birmingham’s NEC from Saturday December 4 to Sunday December 12, revealing dozens of new motorcycles, even presenting show-goers with the chance to try some of them out.

More than 55 leading motorcycle manufacturers are showing off their latest machinery, and attendants are being encouraged to try them for size. New metal being revealed includes the Suzuki GSX-S1000 GT, the Triumph Tiger Sport 660, the Ducati Multistrada V4 Pikes Peak and the Husqvarna Norden 901.

Kawasaki will be showing off its new Z650RS, while other new bikes include the CFMoto 700CL-X and the Honda NT1100. Show-goers also get to see the British-built Langen Two Stroke, as well as the Norton V4SV, while BMW will have its futuristic-looking CE04 electric scooter on show.

Celebrating the future of motorcycling with electric technology is also high on the show’s agenda, with the brand-new Electric Test Ride Zone giving consumers an opportunity to try out a range of battery-powered models on a special indoor track.

This feature will give riders a feel for the instant power and responsiveness typical of an electric motorcycle – all without any emissions. Electrically-assisted bicycles – e-bikes – will also be available for show-goes to try out.

Elsewhere at Birmingham’s sprawling NEC there will be custom and classic bike zones, while race fans will be able to meet their track heroes, as stars from WorldSBK, British Superbike and road racing make guest appearances across the nine days.

Visitors can also watch Moto Trails, featuring the jaw-dropping skills of pro trail riders Jack Price, former World Trails 2 Champion and seven-time British Champion, and Michael Brown, European and multiple British Trials Champion, with show times throughout the day.

Honda will be paying homage to the original 1992 Fireblade by displaying a range of heritage models from across the years, while rival firm Suzuki is displaying all seven of its world championship-winning Grand Prix machines, including the GSX-RR of 2020 title-winner Joan Mir and Barry Sheene’s 1976 and 1977 500s.

Harley-Davidson will be showcasing its ‘Sportster Evolution Galley’, tracing the development of its 64-year-old Sportster range, while ‘bikers’ aged 1.5 to five years can try their skills at the Kiddimoto Balance Bike Experience, on an inflatable course.

Riders aged between four and twelve will be able to get kitted out in motocross clothing, gloves and a helmet – and be unleashed on a circuit designed to give a taste of the motocross experience, for novices and more experienced riders alike.

‘Experience Adventure’, supported by Honda, Royal Enfield and Triumph, will allow participants to enjoy a taste of off-road adventure riding, which will include tuition on bike set-up, body positioning and balance across an assortment of terrains.

For those wanting to break into motorcycling, meanwhile, every day during the show the Motorcycle Industry Association (MCIA) will be offering free 20-minute riding lessons with a professional instructor, all protective clothing provided. Participants will be introduced to the brakes, gears and slow speed handling, giving visitors the chance to see if a life on two wheels is for them.

Who knows; maybe next year they’ll be riding to the show at the NEC too.

More information at: www.motorcyclelive.co.uk/features/category/ride-bikes/