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American racing champion Dick Mann passes away

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from https://www.roadracingworld.com

Racing Legend Dick Mann passes away – from a press release issued By American Motorcyclist Association

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer and Racing Legend Dick Mann Passes

Mann, a two-time AMA Grand National Champion, was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Dick “Bugsy” Mann, one of the most versatile racers to ever throw a leg over a motorcycle, passed away on April 26 at the age of 86.

Mr. Mann, born June 13, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah, was a two-time AMA Grand National Champion (1963 and 1971), and became best known for being the first person to achieve a motorcycle racing Grand Slam, which involved winning across all five types of circuits included in the Grand National Championship: road racing, TT, short track, half-mile and mile. When he retired from racing in 1974, Mann had 24 national victories, which — at the time — placed him second in all-time wins within the AMA Grand National Series.

While Mann got his racing start in scrambles, he soon got hooked on turning left on dirt ovals, and after some time learning his trade, headed to the professional racing circuit in 1954, turning expert in 1955. He achieved his first national win at the Peoria TT in 1959, quickly establishing himself as an elite racer in the series.

Mann also helped pioneer the sport of motocross in the U.S., competing in several of the early AMA professional motocross races in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Perhaps Mann’s most fulfilling national win was his victory in the 1970 Daytona 200 aboard the then-new Honda CB750. He’d been racing the Daytona 200 for 15 years and finished second three times, and in 1970 finally got to the top step of the podium, holding off rising stars and future Hall of Famers Gary Nixon and Gene Romero, as well as former world champion and Hall of Famer Mike Hailwood. That win wasn’t just Mann’s first victory at the 200, but the first time a Honda had won an AMA national.

Despite retiring from professional racing in 1974, Mann returned to his trail-riding roots in 1975, qualifying for the United States International Six Days Trial team, competed for the U.S. on the Isle of Man, and brought home a bronze medal.

Beyond being a legendary racer, Mann’s mentorship of the next generation of American racers and future Hall of Famers like Dave Aldana, Mert Lawwill and Kenny Roberts, was just as important.

In 1995, Mr. Mann was presented with the AMA Dud Perkins Lifetime Achievement Award, recognizing his significant contributions to the sport. He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Honoring Motorcycle Racing Legend Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Flat Track

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (April 28, 2021) – AMA Pro Racing joins the motorcycle community in mourning the loss of the great Dick Mann. Mann passed Monday at 86 years of age.

The winner of two Grand National Championships, Mann was touted as one of the greatest to ever compete in various motorcycle racing disciplines. Mann is best known for being the first person to ever win all five types of circuit included in the AMA Grand National Championship: short track, TT, half-mile, mile and road race.

Mann continued to contribute to the legacy of motorcycle racing by influencing some of the greatest names in flat track including Gene Romero, Gary Nixon, Mert Lawwill, Kenny Roberts and Dave Aldana.

Mann was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993 and the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1998.

Progressive American Flat Track will observe a moment of silence in Mann’s honor during its opening ceremonies at Saturday’s event at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

Statement of Condolence on Passing of Dick Mann – from a press release issued by American Honda

Hall of Famer earned Honda’s first big motorcycle-race win in the U.S.

April 28, 2021 — TORRANCE, Calif.

Following Monday’s passing of Dick “Bugsy” Mann at the age of 86, American Honda today honored the versatile racer.

A true Renaissance man, Mann was noted for his adaptability as a rider, and for the longevity of his professional motorcycle-racing career, which included charter membership in the exclusive Grand Slam Club (for riders who earned Grand National wins in road racing, short track, TT, half-mile and mile competition), two AMA Grand National Championships and a bronze medal for Team USA in the 1975 International Six Days Trial. According to Racer X Illustrated, Mann even scored a win at the first AMA-sanctioned professional motocross race. Those successes came with a variety of brands, but the Utah native’s primary tie with Honda centered on a single race—the 1970 Daytona 200.

It was Honda’s first factory effort in the legendary endurance event, with a four-rider project aboard CR750 machinery (the racing version of the now-iconic CB750 four-cylinder, which had started production just a year earlier). Conversely, Mann (then 35) had a long and relatively successful history at the race, though victory had eluded him to that point.

After launching from the front row of an all-star starting grid, Mann eventually secured the lead, then preserved the bike in the race’s latter stages to score a 10-second win over Gene Romero, with Don Castro third. In the process, Mann ran a record average race speed of 102.697 mph. It was Honda’s first AMA National Championship race win, and it established the CB750 at the top of the performance hierarchy. (Over four decades later, Motorcyclist magazine would name it the Bike of the Century.) As such, the victory was significant not only for Honda, but for its American subsidiary.

“For a Japanese company with its first, completely unproven big bike, it was hard to top that,” Bob Hansen, then American Honda’s National Service Manager, is quoted as saying in Aaron P. Frank’s book Honda Motorcycles.

“Hansen prepared the machine, and I rode it as best I could, just as I was contracted to do. That was it,” said the humble Mann in the same book.

Mann, who would back up the Daytona 200 win the following year aboard a BSA, was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 1993, and he is a charter member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

“Everyone at American Honda sends their heartfelt condolences to Dick Mann’s family, friends and fans,” said Bill Savino, Senior Manager of Customer Engagement at American Honda. “Dick tallied a number of accomplishments over the course of his long career, but he’ll always hold a special spot in our hearts for the role he played in proving that Honda motorcycles could perform with the very best.”

Dick Mann at Daytona in 1971 on his BSA road racer.

Mourning the first Honda US champion / MotoAmerica Superbike
by Eileen Curry from https://www.thewestonforum.com

The American motorsport world lost one of its first great champions. American Dick Mann died on Monday at the age of 86; He was an iconic character in the early Honda years.

Dick Mann was seen as a versatile racing driver who was quick to adapt to new conditions. His long career contained countless seasons in various categories of motorsport, all of which were easy to handle. Mann was a founding member of the exclusive “Grand Slam Club” in the USA, an organization that welcomed national winners in the fields of road, short track, tourist prize and drag races over the half-mile plus the full mile.

In 1975 he won a bronze medal with Team USA in a six-day international trial, and Mann won the AMA National Championship twice. Especially impressive: In AMA’s first-ever motocross race, the race driver emerged from Salt Lake City victorious.

The American competed for Honda at the Daytona 200 at the Daytona International Speedway in 1970 on the four-cylinder CB750. The 35-year-old surprisingly won his first Japanese factory outing in Daytona. Day to day, it made Honda a legend in American motorbike racing, and the manufacturer had never before been represented at an AMA event. Because he defeated GP star Mike Hailwood in that race, this success had an important place in his resume.

In 1971 he repeated the victory of Daytona over the Bosnian Serb Army. In total, Mann handled 240 AMA races, of which he won 24. At the age of 40, he ended his road racing career and returned to his trial roots. Until the 1990s, Mann regularly competed in races, and in 2006 he opened an exhibition in his honor entitled “Superman” in the American MotoGP Hall of Fame. During his career as a racing driver, he built motorcycle tires and other parts for off-road motorcycles.

Mann passed away on April 26, 2021 at the age of 86.

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Limited Edition

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by Dragos Chitulescu from https://www.autoevolution.com

MotoGP Inspired Honda RC213V-S Costs as Much as a Ferrari, Comes With Zero Miles.

When Honda first announced the RC213V-S a few years ago, quite a few people were hoping that they would at least get a chance to see this bike with their own eyes. After Honda took Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez to the RedBull Ring to test it, pointing out that this is the closest you could ever get to a MotoGP motorcycle, levels of excitement continued soaring.

Not long ago, we showed you a very spectacular Ducati 1299 Superleggera, which was already a very fast and very expensive motorcycle, and it looks like it still hasn’t been sold. But the fact that this RC213V-S just popped up is even more impressive. Because it’s nearly three times more expensive than the aforementioned Ducati, and it’s also much rarer.

Honda initially planned to release just 250 units of this bike, but rumors have pointed out that a smaller number has made it to production stages. It is a hand-built motorcycle in a dedicated factory in Japan, and the bike that is for sale here is unit number 007, which gives it an extra degree of coolness.

Looking over the specs, this particular unit is almost like the MotoGP bike but without the pneumatic valves and the seamless transmission.

Those were changed to provide increased reliability for people using them on public roads. There are also other elements to make it road-legal such as the headlights, taillights, side mirrors, a horn, and a license plate holder. While the “normal” (if you can call it that) version came with just 157 horsepower, this bike also has the optional HRC Sport kit, which should provide you with about 212 horsepower.

The parts included in the kit are just what you need to get the whole racing experience. There are many lightweight materials on this bike, and the way the chassis was built means that you will need a fair share of courage and skills to even acknowledge its potential. Not to mention the fact that just by riding it down the road won’t be enough for you to tell the difference from a tamer, albeit fast 1000cc bike.

All you need to do now is come up with £219,995 ($306,796), which is what you would expect to pay for a brand new Ferrari. But I guess it makes sense considering the odometer reads zero miles. Right now, I’m tempted to say that if I could afford to pay that much for a motorcycle, and if I had considerably more experience with race bikes than I do now, I would probably go all out and on a world tour of all the race tracks where MotoGP is held and see what it can do.

But I guess it’s considerably more likely for someone just to buy this and place it in storage or put it on display for years to come. And in 20 or 30 years from now, when everyone is likely to be riding electric bikes only, people will look at it and probably label it as a slow, outdated motorcycle, but a fascinating piece of history nonetheless.

Honda aims to have only electric vehicles sales by 2040

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by Reuters from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

New Honda CEO aims for 100% electric vehicles by 2040

Speaking at his first news conference since taking the chief executive position at the beginning of April, Toshihiro Mibe said the company expects EVs and FCVs to account for 40% of sales by 2030 and 80% by 2035 in all major markets.

TOKYO: Honda Motor Co’s new chief executive said on Friday the company was aiming to increase its ratio of electric vehicles (EVs) and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to 100% of all sales by 2040.

Speaking at his first news conference since taking the chief executive position at the beginning of April, Toshihiro Mibe said the company expects EVs and FCVs to account for 40% of sales by 2030 and 80% by 2035 in all major markets.

Mibe began his leadership amid a growing shift in automobile technology to electric vehicles and autonomous driving. Traditionally known for its fuel-efficient internal combustion engines, Honda launched its first mass-produced all-battery vehicle last August.

Mibe said the company also aimed to include advanced driver-assistance systems in all of its models in major markets by 2030.

10 Best Motorcycle Companies in the World

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by Qasim Aslam from https://www.insidermonkey.com

Which big players are ruling the motorcycle industry? This article is going to tell you about the 10 best motorcycle manufacturers in the world right now.

10. Indian Motorcycle/Polaris Inc. (NYSE: PII)

Polaris claims to be America’s first motorcycle company as it traces its origin back to 1901. It was established by an accomplished Bicycle racer George M. Hendee with the name of Hendee Manufacturing Company and established its first factory in downtown Springfield, USA in 1901. The company produced motorcycles for US Army during World War I. The name Hendee Manufacturing Company was changed to ‘The Indian Motorcycle Company’ in 1923. The company was closed in 1953 and several attempts failed to restart production until it was reborn with the name ‘Indian Motorcycle’ when Polaris Industries acquired it in 2011. It has over 300 international dealers in addition to a network of over 200 dealers in North America. Total sales of Indian Motorcycle and Polaris Slingshot in 2020 totaled 330,000 units. North America is the biggest market for them, where they sold 190000 units.

Indian Motorcycle currently competes only in three segments of the motorcycle industry that are cruiser, touring, and standard motorcycles and so far they do not offer sports bikes. Their bikes are known for heritage-inspired designs, premium suspension, and beautiful styling. The most popular model of Indian Motorcycle is no other than ‘Scout’ as currently it is the finest cruiser bike in the motorcycle market.

9. KTM Industries AG Inhaber-Aktie (XSTU: KTMI.SG)

KTM is currently the largest producer of motorcycles in Europe. The Austrian company which traces its origin from an engine repair shop in Austria made its first motorcycle in 1953. KTM went bankrupt in 1991 and was restructured in 1992. Now, KTM is jointly owned by Pierer Mobility AG and Bajaj Auto. Despite the impact of the pandemic, KTM was able to sell 212,713 units of motorcycles in 2020.

KTM offers a broad range of models for different purposes. Its ‘1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R’ having 1301 cc engine is capable to run on any terrain. But, the best thing about KTM is that it is superb in making dirt bikes. KTM has won 12 of the last 13 titles in the MX2 World Motocross Championship. Similarly, it has seen 18 consecutive victories from 2001 to 2019 in Dakar Rally.

8. Triumph Motorcycles Ltd

Triumph is the biggest British motorcycle manufacturing company. The organization made its first motorized cycle ‘The Triumph 1’ in 1902. Triumph supplied motorcycles for the British military in both the World Wars. Following a fiscal crisis, the company disappeared in the 1980s and reemerged after a few years with its Headquarters at Hinckley, United Kingdom. Since then, Triumph has seen continued success. Triumph has six production factories along with a network of around 700 dealerships to market and distribute its products.

Triumph witnessed the highest level of annual sales in 2017 when its sales peaked at 60,628 units. In the fiscal year 2020 that ended on June 30, 2020, the company could sell only 48,993 motorcycles with a turnover of around £480 ( or about $593.232) million, largely due to the impact of the pandemic. Distinct features of Triumph include retaining classic charm as many of their bikes like the Bonneville family have charming heritage designs that are equipped with modern technology.

Moreover, they try to emulate the performance of their competitors’ bikes that are priced twice as their bikes. Thus, their bikes having more or less the same traits as Ducati or BMW has, come at much lower and affordable prices. Many of their bikes fall in the price range of $10000 to $15000. Triumph’s most expensive motorcycle ‘ROCKET 3 GT TRIPLE BLACK’ with outstanding technology and incredible 2500cc, the largest production motorcycle engine, costs only $24,400.

7. Suzuki Motor Corporation (TYO: 7269.T)

Japanese organization Suzuki has been producing some of the most exciting models of motorcycles for decades. The company made its first motorized bicycle in 1952 leading to the establishment of the present-day Suzuki ‘S’ in 1958. Today, Suzuki has 35 production facilities in 23 countries and the widest network of distributors among all bike manufacturers, comprising 133 distributors in 192 countries.

In the fiscal year 2019 that ended in March 2020, the motorcycle segment of Suzuki sold 1,708,000 units recording a year-on-year decline of 2.1%. Sales revenues also dipped by 4.9% to $2.26 billion from $3.43 billion. Such huge numbers in sales speak well for the demand of Suzuki in the motorcycle market.

So what are the features that compel huge swathes of the motorcycle market to buy their motorcycles? Certainly, its durability, affordability, and diverse product range make it one of the most in-demand brands of motorcycles. Suzuki motorcycles are known to last long, especially their city riding models can serve your purpose for decades. Moreover, their bikes are affordable as in many developing countries they sell bikes that cost even less than $1000. In addition to this, they have a diverse range of motorcycles for different types of customers including sports bikes, cruisers, touring, and dirt bikes.

6. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (OTC: KWHIY)

Kawasaki motorcycles are manufactured by the Motorcycle & Engine segment of Japanese multinational Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industries. The company started making motorcycle engines in 1953 and released its first Motorcycle “B7” in 1961. Other than Japan, Kawasaki motorcycle & engine company has 12 production and sales subsidiaries in 10 different countries, having around 5,000 employees. The key to their success is universality. They cater to all types of customers. They have motorcycles with a price range from $2300 to $550000.

If you are not well-off economically, that’s not an issue, Kawasaki has 110cc KLX series for you with price tags varying from $2300 to $2550. On the contrary, Kawasaki offers NINJA H2 R at $55000 to sports bike lovers. Moreover, by getting an understanding of local culture in different countries, they craft their product according to the local needs which goes a long way for them in getting around half a million yearly sales. Kawasaki recorded all-time high annual sales when it sold 550000 units in 2018. In the fiscal year 2020 that ended on 31st March 2020, Kawasaki’s motorcycle business faced a decline in sales and the annual revenue decreased to $3.13 billion from $3.22 billion.

Kawasaki offers a broad range of models; their products are comparatively less costly than their competitors. Furthermore, they target all segments of the motorcycle market and are known for the ultra-fast speed of their sports bikes as 7 of the last 8 World Superbikes championships were won by Kawasaki. ZX-10RR is their most famous superbike that won the last 4 superbike championships consecutively.

5. BMW – Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft (ETR: BMW.DE)

BMW is a German multinational corporation and its motorcycle segment is known as BMW Motorrad. The Munich-based organization made its first motorcycle in 1923. Currently, its motorcycles are sold by more than 1,200 dealerships and importers in over 90 countries. BMW experienced a continuous rise in yearly sales from 2011 to 2019 as the number of motorcycle sales reached an all-time high figure of 175,162. Despite the pandemic-related decline in sales, BMW Motorrad sold 169,272 motorcycles worldwide in the financial year 2020.

Unlike its competitors, BMW Motorrad faced a year-on-year decline of only 3.4% in its sales and generated a sales revenue of €2284 (or about $2774.4) million in 2020. The top four big markets for the organization are Germany, France, Italy, and the U.S. Currently, they offer models in sport, tour, roadster, adventure, and urban mobility categories. The most compelling features of BMW motorcycles are aesthetics, excellent speed, safety, and reliability. They have produced some of the most beautiful bikes like BMW R 18 Cruiser and BMW RGS1150 with a dazzling outlook. They adopt a host of active and passive safety measures, to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries which include a highly effective braking system, optimized suspension tuning, and training for bikers.

BMW Motorrad offers training for BMW motorcycles in over 30 countries. Their top-notch model BMW S 1000 RR is a perfect blend of all of their outstanding features. With a captivating outlook and all of its amazing features including traction control, cruise control, and riding modes, it mesmerized the world of motorcycles at the time of its initial launch in 2009.

4. Harley-Davidson, Inc. (NYSE: HOG)

Next in the line is American Icon, Harley Davidson. The company made its first motorized bicycle in 1903 and gained fame after serving U.S troops in the First World War. Harley Davidson is the oldest continuously operating American motorcycle company. Today, Harley-Davidson has a global outreach with a network of 1379 dealers spanning across the world.

Despite the devastating impact of the pandemic on sales, Harley-Davidson managed to sell 180,248 motorcycles in the financial year 2020 with a sales revenue of $4.05 billion. They are specialized in large displacement cruisers, street motorcycles, and touring motorcycles. They do not manufacture sports bikes. Harley Davidson’s Iron 883 is considered their most popular brand. Having an average price of $20,338 in 2019, Harley-Davidson is considerably expensive than some of its competitors but their quality certainly stands up to their price.

Among big motorcycle companies, Harley-Davidson has the highest level of customer satisfaction and loyalty. Through their unique traits, they have been able to create an emotional bond with their customers as many of them can be seen deliberately tattooing the company logo on their bodies.

3. Ducati (ETR: VOW3)

Italian sensation Ducati stands at the third spot. Ducati started manufacturing Motorcycles in 1950 and it became part of Volkswagen Group (ETR: VOW3) in 2012. The most defining features of Ducati motorcycles are beauty, brisk speed, and high-price tags. As opposed to Japanese manufacturers, Ducati does not focus on making cheap and cost-effective motorcycles. It targets the premium segment of the motorcycle market, so their motorcycles are usually expensive but of supreme quality. Their desmodromic valve technology has helped them create many ultra-fast superbikes over the years. The fact that Ducati has won 17 World Superbike Titles, higher than all other manufacturers combined, further accentuates their position as top superbike manufacturers.

Aesthetics combined with state-of-the-art technology define Ducati motorcycles. You cannot come out of their showroom without being impressed by the beauty and refinement of their motorcycles. In 2019 Ducati sold 53184 units with a turnover of €716 ( or about $803.3) million. Notwithstanding exceptionally high prices, Ducati has been able to sell around 50 thousand units annually as the quality of their bikes worth every single penny the customer pays. One out of every four superbikes sold worldwide in 2018 belonged to the Panigale family of Ducati.

2. Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (NYSE: HMC)

Japanese giant in the motorcycle industry Honda lies at the second spot in the list of best motorcycle companies in the world. Honda is currently the largest producer of motorcycles on planet earth. The Tokyo-based organization sold 19.3 million motorcycles worldwide during the fiscal year 2020. Since its inception in 1949, Honda has sold over 300,000,000 units cumulatively. These figures testify its popularity in the motorcycle market. Honda has a global supply chain with 35 manufacturing plants in 21 different countries. The organization created history in 2017 when the production of ‘Honda Super Cub’ reached a milestone of 100 million units.

Honda gained traction in many developing countries owing to its cost-effectiveness and reliability. Their street bikes are famous for efficient engines that give extra mileage. They are known for making the most fuel-efficient bikes. It seems some of their bikes do not consume fuel at all and they just have to sniff fuel to get going. Honda CBF125 and Honda NC750X are famous in many countries for their fuel efficiency. Not only this, with 153 wins in MotoGP races, Honda has another jewel in its crown. Honda has produced one of the best racing motorcycles in its CBR series. Other than standard motorcycles, Honda produces cruisers, sports bikes, dirt bikes, and scooters.

The popularity of Honda can be gauged from the fact that in many countries word ‘Honda’ has become synonymous with the motorcycle.

1. Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. (OTC: YAMHF)

Yamaha occupies the top slot in the list of best motorcycle companies. Yamaha Motors headquartered in Iwata, Japan, has 135 subsidiaries, with more than 52,000 employees to conduct its production and marketing operations. In Financial Year 2019, Yamaha sold around five million motorbikes worldwide with annual sales revenue of $15.3 billion which speaks volumes for its popularity among two-wheel lovers. After decades of refinement and innovation, Yamaha is capable of manufacturing the highest quality products at a reasonable price.

Let’s take a look at their different models of Yamaha which proved to be the best in the motorcycle industry. Yamaha’s MT family is the best series of naked bikes. Its MT-07 is the best-selling hyper naked bike as over 125,000 units have been sold since its launch in 2014. Yamaha Tenere 700 with its adventure-focused slim body, flat seat, and the advanced twin-cylinder engine is a wonderful bike for adventure touring. Similarly, they provide YZF-R1M, which is one of the best sports bikes, only for $26,099. They make exceptional bikes for anyone who wants one.

Whether you are an adrenaline junkie looking for speed and excitement, a sports cyclist, or a daily rider; Yamaha has the best product for you in their line-up.

Conclusion

In a nutshell, every motorcycle manufacturer has its unique and special traits along with a loyal fan base. Every company has some models that are matchless. Japanese manufacturers still rule the motorcycle industry as they have a low cost of production, hence low price than their European and American competitors.

Moreover, Japanese bikes are easy to maintain and more reliable than others. But certainly, in some aspects like beautiful styling and technological sophistication, European and American brands outshine their Japanese competitors.

Custom Motorcycle with Three Engines

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by Arun Prakash from https://www.rushlane.com

Custom Motorcycle With 3 Honda CB750 Engines made with the objective of participating in Land Speed Racing.

Once in a while we come across an engineering marvel that makes us wipe our eyes and maybe even scratch our heads. Now, branding the latest case as a marvel would be an outstretch but it surely does make us carry out the last two acts. If you think you have witnessed insane aftermarket modifications that can’t be matched, this one might force you to rethink.

When you see a single motorcycle is powered by three engines, yes you read that right – three engines in one motorcycle, probably can be called MotorsCycle. You can easily judge for yourself the number and kind of mod jobs that would have been carried out. Named ‘The Galaxy’, this behemoth is powered by three bored-out CB750 motors which essentially makes it a 12-cylinder 2,508cc glory.

Idea of Three Engine Motorcycle
This motorcycle is a creation of California-based custom motorcycle builder Mitsuhiro ‘Kiyo’ Kiyonaga who intends to take this monster to Land Speed Racing. Kiyonaga started his aftermarket workshop in Los Angeles in 2013 and his first project ‘Cherry Blossom’ was a custom-built stretched land speed racer that featured a turbocharged Honda CB750 engine housed in a frame built from scratch.

A few years later he followed it up with another 1970s top fuel-style bike but powered by twin motors this time and named it ‘Gekko’. Even though the Galaxy was Kiyo’s pet project which he has dreamt of since his childhood, it was seriously materialised only when his first two motorcycles were acquired by Haas Moto Museum. Work on the bike only started when owner of the museum, approved and officially commissioned the project.

Galaxy- Powertrain specs
Coming to its specification, Galaxy draws its energy from three four-pot motors sourced from F2 large port heads. Each of these engines has been bored-out to 836cc has been completely rebuilt with balanced and lightened crankshafts, performance cams, oversized stainless steel valves and heavy-duty connecting rods. Special care was taken to ensure that each internal configuration was in line with the original spec.

The motors are held by a three-piece chassis that constitute a tubular upper frame, and two huge engine mounting plates that also act as a rigid swingarm. Front half of Galaxy has been integrated into the frame which hides the pump, fuel tank, battery and all other functional components under its skin.

That tail section is a hand-built aluminium piece that can hold up to 9.5 litres of gasoline for the oil-sucking engines. A tiny port found at back is essentially an outlet for the engine breather hose.

The alloy wheels made out of aluminium are a piece of art with holes cut out on the front wheel in order to limit the effect of crosswinds at high speeds. With stretched-out ergonomics, ‘rider triangle’ was carefully calculated that offers impressive control and grip when racing across salt tracks.

The designer claims that every component on the bike has been modified and built by hand without aid of any designing software which deserves high applause. The Galaxy now finds shelter in the same museum as Kiyo’s previous two projects. However, Kiyo is yet to tick off all boxes and that would happen only when he takes to Land Speed Racing.

Honda Plans To Unveil New 3D Printed Prototyping Project In 2021

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by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

For decades, OEMs like Honda have used clay modeling extensively in the process of designing their new bikes. Take the CBR1000RR-R, which won Honda’s first-ever Red Dot design award for a motorcycle in 2020. While clay modeling wasn’t the only part of the design process, it was an important part of how Honda brought that design to life.

It’s 2021 now, though, and technology is shifting and changing with the times. That change is nowhere more evident than the announcement that Honda R&D Europe has teamed up with Italian 3D printing company WASP (nothing to do with Vespa). The goal of the partnership is to create a brand-new 3D-printed prototyping process that is finished by hand. That way, they say, you get the best of both worlds.

Now, we can’t show you any of these just yet, because Honda and WASP haven’t unveiled them as of April, 2021. They plan to do so “in the coming months,” however, and we definitely look forward to seeing what they’ve created together.

While clay models have the advantages of being infinitely customizable in the hands of skilled craftsmen, they take a lot of time to get just right. One advantage of integrating 3D printing into the design process is, at least in theory, the time Honda will save. Naturally, how well it works remains to be seen.

WASP is no stranger to using its 3D printing processes in the motorcycle world. Back in 2019, the company was already making 3D printed carbon fiber parts on demand for bikes in the Italian Speed (CIV) motorcycle racing championship.

If you’ll recall, in October, 2020, BMW’s WSBK team made news when it started bringing a 3D printer to races to print up new parts trackside. WASP was already hard at work in the CIV championship doing the same thing a year earlier. Now, in 2021, Honda is bringing 3D printing into its own prototyping process.

On a much smaller scale, customizers have been making use of 3D printing to fabricate the parts they can see in their mind’s eye, as well. As 3D printing technology advances, in what other ways will we see it integrated into the motorcycle world? It’s going to be interesting to watch the technology evolve.

Agreement Reached to Standardize Swappable Batteries for Electric Motorcycles

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The Swappable Battery Consortium for Electric Motorcycles (Consortium) has reached an agreement to standardize swappable batteries and replacement systems, allowing battery sharing and paving the way for increased adoption of electric motorcycles in Japan.

The Consortium was established by Honda Motor Co., Ltd., Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Suzuki Motor Corporation and Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. in April 2019, aimed at increasing the adoption of electric motorcycles in Japan. Since its inception, the Consortium has been formulating the standards for mutual-use swappable batteries and their replacement systems, as a solution to the issues preventing widespread adoption of electric motorcycles as a more environmentally friendly and convenient form of mobility – the drive range and reduction of charging time. In order to establish the convenience and effectiveness of mutual-use swappable batteries, the Consortium has been cooperating since last year with the “e-Yan OSAKA” field tests conducted by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association’s Electric Motorcycle Promotion Subcommittee in collaboration with Osaka Prefecture and the national university corporation Osaka University, aimed at popularizing and increasing the adoption of environmentally-friendly electric motorcycles.

Parts of the common specifications agreed upon are compliant with the Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc. Organization (JASO) technical paper TP21003 issued on March 19. The Consortium will conduct technical verification and standardization of mutual-use swappable batteries, based on these common specifications. With the heightening worldwide demand for the electrification of mobility to realize a carbon-neutral society, the Consortium will work hand in hand with the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association to realize international mutual-use (international standardization).

As environmental awareness increases globally, the Consortium believes that cooperative consideration and promotion within the entire motorcycle industry, to build an environment for widespread adoption within the motorcycle industry, is vital to motorcycles continuing to be the customers’ mobility of choice, and aims to contribute to the realization of a carbon-neutral society.

Noriaki Abe | Consortium Representative Secretary, and Managing Officer, Motorcycle Operations, Honda Motor Co., Ltd. said:
“This agreement for the standardization of mutual-use batteries is an achievement made possible through the four Japanese motorcycle manufacturers working together over the past two years. I am grateful to all those associated with the Consortium and the Society of Automotive Engineers of Japan, Inc. for their understanding and support. While we will continue cooperation to build an environment allowing battery mutual-use based on our agreement, we will also be competing with each other to develop attractive products that meet the needs of our customers. Through our efforts in both cooperation and competition, we will work towards the widespread adoption of electric motorcycles to realize a sustainable society.”

Honda Ruckus 2022 now in Canada

By General Posts

from https://voiceonline.com

One of Honda’s most unique and iconic products, the new 2022 Ruckus® will be available in Canada in May 2021.

The Ruckus oozes personality and attitude complete with its industrial-looking design highlighted by dual, round headlights and an exposed frame. More practical features include nimble handling, unmatched reliability and frugal fuel efficiency, making the Ruckus a great choice as a platform for personalization or affordable, around-town transportation. Ruckus Specifications for the Engine and Drivetrain include: Lightweight 49cc four-stroke OHC liquid-cooled single-cylinder engine provides ample power for in-town riding, Fuel-sipping constant-velocity (CV) carburetor with automatic choke, electric starter system allows easy push-button starting, Maintenance-free ignition system, Electronic Control Unit (ECU) provides control for ignition timing, alternator regulator, ACG starter, electric fuel pump and automatic choke, ultra-quiet exhaust system, and Automatic Honda V-Matic belt-drive transmission provides spirited acceleration and smooth operation.

Chassis and Suspension updates include: Two-piece, die-cast aluminum front frame with steel upper-rear frame, Twin-down tube fork provides 56 mm (2.2 in.) of plush travel for a well-controlled ride. Single-side aluminum swingarm with single-shock rear suspension has 66 mm (2.6 in.) of travel for a compliant, comfortable ride. front and rear drum brakes offer predictable stopping, Well-padded seat boasts a low, 735 mm (29.9 in.) seat height for added confidence at stops. The instrumentation includes analog speedometer, odometer and indicator lights for fuel, coolant temperature and low/high beams. Fuel-indicator light comes on with 1.1 litres remaining. Also added is a Maintenance-free battery. Easy-to-use parking brake and a Helmet holder that locks helmet into place under seat. The 2022 Honda Ruckus is available in ur: Gray paint with a MSRP: $3,599. The latest model that launched an entire scooter-customization subculture coming to Canada this spring

Honda Canada Inc. was established in 1969 and is the sole distributor of Honda motorcycles, scooters, ATVs and side-by-sides in Canada. The Honda Canada Motorcycle Division is responsible for sales, marketing, and operational activities for these products through authorized Honda dealers. For more information on Honda Canada powersports products, please visit: https://motorcycle.honda.ca/.

Piaggio, KTM, Honda and Yamaha to set up swappable batteries consortium

By General Posts

from https://auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

The consortium will define the standardised technical specifications of the swappable battery system for vehicles belonging to the L-category, mopeds, motorcycles, tricycles and quadricycles.

Piaggio Group on Monday said it has signed a letter of intent with KTM AG, Honda Motor and Yamaha Motor to set up a Swappable Batteries Consortium for motorcycles and light electric vehicles.

The consortium will define the standardised technical specifications of the swappable battery system for vehicles belonging to the L-category: mopeds, motorcycles, tricycles and quadricycles.

The companies will be working closely with interested stakeholders and national, European and international standardisation bodies. The founding members of the consortium will be involved in the creation of international technical standards. The Consortium will start its activities in May 2021.

In the context of the Paris Climate Agreement and the transition to electromobility, the founding members of the consortium believe that the availability of a standardised swappable battery system would both promote the widespread use of light electric vehicles and contribute to a more sustainable life-cycle management of batteries used in the transport sector, the companies said in a joint statement.

Also, by extending the range, shortening the charging time and lowering vehicle and infrastructure costs, the manufacturers will try to answer customers’ main concerns regarding the future of electromobility.

Michele Colaninno, Piaggio Group chief of strategy and product, commented, “With the signing of this letter of intent, the signatories show their proactiveness vis-à-vis the major concerns of their customers and the political priorities as regards the electrification of vehicles.”

An international standard for the swappable batteries system will make this technology efficient and at the disposal of the consumers, added Michele Colaninno.

Honda extend MotoGP commitment

By General Posts

Honda extend MotoGP commitment: Most successful MotoGP team to compete until 2026

Honda will continue to add to their illustrious history in Grand Prix racing, having extended their contract for the next five years until 2026

from https://www.financialexpress.com

Honda will continue to expand their illustrious history in Grand Prix racing having signed an agreement with Dorna Sports S.L. to compete for the next five years, from 2022 to 2026. Honda started in 1954 when Honda’s founder, Soichiro Honda, declared entry into the Isle of Man TT, the premier motorcycle racing event of the era, with the aim of becoming the best in the world. This journey has so far seen 100 different riders win on Honda machines and amass over 800 wins across all categories. In the premier class alone, Honda has claimed 850 podiums and 25 Rider World Championships, more than any other brand in history.

The journey will continue for at least five more years as Honda have agreed with commercial rights-holder and series-promoter Dorna Sports S.L. to guarantee their place on the grid until 2026.

Noriaki Abe, Managing Officer, Motorcycle Operations, Honda Motor Co., Ltd.: “First, I would like to express my respect and gratitude to Carmelo Ezpeleta and everyone at Dorna Sports for their hard work in organizing races during the COVID-19 pandemic. I am very pleased that we have renewed our contract to compete in MotoGP from 2022 to 2026.

“Honda has been competing in the FIM Grand Prix World Championship since 1959, and won its 800th grand prix last year. Honda believes MotoGP racing is vital to our motorsports activities. MotoGP is the pinnacle of motorcycle racing – it allows us to develop various technologies, and through fierce competition, teach our engineers and nurture their skills. With these engineers working on the development of production vehicles, Honda can create better products for its customers. Honda will continue to bring dreams and joy to its customers worldwide through its motorsports activities, including MotoGP.”