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Music, Meaning & Motorcycling

By General Posts

Rocking On Requires Some Rolling

by Wayfarer

Sound has more impact on life than we know or credit it for. Sound is not just significant to humans but many lifeforms.

We now have turned sound to music. W have a whole range of music genres to choose from – for entertainment, for ‘edu-taiment’ of kids, for relaxing, for hitting the gym, for romantic night dinners, for wild parties and more.

In this article, there are also a few examples offered of some myths & inspirations from iconic Rock group ‘Creedence Clearwater Revival’ music & songs.

Often people assume meanings of songs based on lyrics, music style or other socio-cultural information from the period when a song first appeared.

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Siddhartha Lal exits Royal Enfield as Eicher seeks to shed ‘family-run’ tag

By General Posts

  • Siddhartha Lal has appointed Vinod Dasari as Royal Enfield CEO and will support him only on product and brand-related areas
  • The move has striking similarities to his father Vikram Lal’s decision to step away from Eicher Motors more than two decades ago

Mumbai: Twenty-two years after Eicher Motors Ltd founder and former chief executive officer (CEO) Vikram Lal gave up his executive powers to let professionals run the company, his son Siddhartha Lal has initiated a similar transition. Lal junior has appointed Ashok Leyland Ltd’s Vinod Dasari as the CEO of the company’s motorcycle brand Royal Enfield.

Lal is also giving up his executive responsibilities at Royal Enfield to ensure that Dasari gets a free hand in running the company. The move has striking similarities with the decision made by his father.

In 1997, Vikram Lal had stepped down as chairman of Eicher Motors and had elevated Subodh Bhargava as the group’s CEO and chairman. Subsequently, Vikram Lal had joined a newly formed supervisory board to monitor the operations of the group.

However, within a few years, Siddharth Lal had taken over the reins at Royal Enfield, which was then on the verge of closure, and revived it. In doing so, Lal also established his grip on the remaining group businesses and consolidated them under two verticals: motorcycles and commercial vehicles. Lal will continue to be the managing director of the parent company for now.

“To achieve our audacious goal of 2030, to catalyse and reshape the world of motorcycling towards middle-weights, thereby growing at twice the pace of the industry, I believe that we now need to run the company differently. While I have thoroughly enjoyed being at the helm of Royal Enfield for a large part of the 20 years that I have spent here, I believe I can serve Royal Enfield better by playing a role that is different from the CEO,” Lal told his employees in a letter on Monday.

Lal said that his job as the managing director of Eicher Motors will be to sign off on the business plan each year and to review it on a quarterly basis. He will also be involved with communication decisions and brand and product reviews.

“Any decision in the future should be in the normal course, by the relevant manager, head, CXO and the new CEO,” he said.

The move comes just three months after Lal reshuffled the management. According to an 8 January internal document reviewed by Mint, Lal had informed employees that Eicher chief financial officer Lalit Malik will take over the additional responsibility of chief commercial officer in the interim, after Royal Enfield’s president Rudratej Singh offered to quit after a four-year stint.

Shaji Koshy (head of business markets, India), Rod Copes (head of business markets, North America), Arun Gopal (head of business markets, Europe and LATAM), Vimal Sumbly (head of business markets APAC), Rich Rawlins (head of genuine motorcycle accessories), Puneet Sood (head of apparel business) and Pankaj Sharma (head of customer experience) were all asked to report to Malik.

Now, besides Lalit Malik, chief operating officer B. Govindarajan, chief human resource officer Rajeev Sharma and chief information officer Sudhakar Bhagavatula will report to Dasari, who will be based in Chennai.

Shubhranshu Singh (head of global brands) and Mark Wells (head of product strategy and industrial design) will now report to Malik. Wells and Singh were earlier reporting directly to Lal.

Lal, in his letter, has attributed these changes to Royal Enfield’s 2030 goal and its RE 2.0 plan, which he said will be an important part of aligning the company with the industry’s mega trends, such as digitization, electrification, connectivity and shared mobility.

 

Science Is Not Objective Because It Is A Product Like Anything Else

By General Posts

In my view, climate change is an issue concocted to distract from the larger issue of ecocide which is a direct result of human expansion.

People recognize that science is a product like any other media. People with degrees do research, which anyone who has fudged a lab report can testify can be slanted through variations in technique, and then publish that research.

They do this through grants, employment, or in anticipation of selling lots of books, magazines, movies, or other products. Academia has the same problem and this is why we are continually discovering that their theories were over-hyped, two decades later.

Usually these take a detail and amplify it into a theory of everything, and then it turns out, it was just a detail that cannot tell us much of significance, but at the time it was sold, it seemed to justify and exalt the lifestyles of those who bought the product.

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Meet The White House’s New Chief Climate Change Skeptic

By General Posts

William Happer, a Princeton scientist who is doubtful of the dangers of climate change, appears to be leading a White House challenge to the government’s conclusion that global warming is a threat.

Twenty five years ago, William Happer had an encounter with the White House that ended badly.

At the time, in 1993, the Princeton professor was taking a break from academia to direct scientific research at the U.S. Department of Energy. He turned a skeptical eye toward one of then-Vice President Al Gore’s favorite issues: the risks posed by chemicals eating away at ozone in the stratosphere and letting in dangerous ultraviolet radiation. As the story goes, Happer went to the White House and told Gore’s staff he saw no evidence that the ozone hole actually was hurting anyone.

Gore was annoyed, and Happer lost his job.

Today, Happer is back in the White House, still fighting against what he considers unfounded claims that our globe is in danger. But this time, his cause is backed by the man in the Oval Office.

Happer, 79, joined the staff of President Trump’s National Security Council last fall. And according to documents first leaked to The Washington Post, he appears to be pushing the White House to mount a challenge to the government’s official assessment of climate change, which calls climate change a serious national security threat.

On Thursday, the chairs of four different committees in the House of Representatives sent a letter to President Trump expressing concern about “recent reports that the National Security Council (NSC) is planning to assemble a secret panel, led by a discredited climate change denier, to undermine the overwhelming scientific consensus on the nature and threats of climate change.”

The four Democrats called it “deeply concerning that Dr. Happer appears to be spearheading” that effort.

Happer is an intriguing and controversial figure. He was born in India when it was a British colony, the son of a Scottish military officer and an American medical missionary. His mother, with young Will in tow, spent part of World War II working as a physician at the secret Manhattan Project site in Oak Ridge, Tenn. The family later settled in North Carolina.

Happer became a physicist. He taught at Columbia University and joined the faculty at Princeton University in 1980.

“He is a damn good scientist,” says Steven Koonin, a prominent physicist who is now a professor at New York University and who has known Happer for 30 years. “There are two really significant contributions associated with him.”

One of them made it possible to capture much better images of people’s lungs; the other allows astronomers to see the stars more clearly.

At the same time, Happer acquired a reputation as a contrarian, quick to challenge conclusions that struck him as unproven — especially when it came to environmental science.

That reputation was cemented by Happer’s confrontation with Gore’s staff over risks posed by the ozone hole. The incident was widely covered in scientific publications — Physics Today ran an article headlined “Happer Leaves DOE Under Ozone Cloud For Violating Political Correctness.”

Koonin thinks Happer was doing what a scientist should, demanding better evidence. “I think it sensitized him to the squishiness, if you will, of a lot of the environmental science,” he says.

Some of Happer’s scientific critics, though, see it as something more: a visceral distrust of scientists who study environmental risks.

Over the past decade, Happer has waged a fierce campaign aimed at debunking fears of global warming caused by emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

In a speech to a 2015 conference organized by the Heartland Institute, which has railed against restrictions on emissions from fossil fuels, Happer scoffed at these fears, calling them an Alice-in-Wonderland fantasy. “When I got into this area and started learning about it, I learned that when I looked at CO2, I should assume that it caused harmful warming, extreme weather, Noah’s flood, you know. I remember thinking, ‘Are they mad?’ ”

Carbon dioxide is actually good for the planet, Happer claims; it’s like fertilizer and makes crops more productive.

“We’ve got to push back vigorously on the demonization of fossil fuels,” he said in his speech. “They’re not demons at all. They’re enormous servants to us.”

Some of Happer’s colleagues at Princeton are reluctant to talk publicly about him; it’s like discussing a relationship that got messy.

“I mean, I liked him. We went off for coffee after our committee meetings a couple of times,” says Michael Bender, an emeritus professor of geoscience and climate researcher.

Bender says he wouldn’t do it now, though. It’s partly because of the scientific dispute, because he thinks Happer is misreading the evidence. But it’s also because of Happer’s style — he’s labeled climate science a cult and accused other scientists of whipping up climate fears to boost their own careers. Most offensive for Bender: Happer once said the “demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the Jews under Hitler.”minnn

“You know, there came a point where he attacked my colleagues’ integrity,” Bender says, “and I felt like I couldn’t have a cordial relationship with him after that.”

Happer, who last fall went to work in the White House as a senior aide to the National Security Council, wasn’t authorized to comment for this story.

Robert Socolow, another Princeton colleague, has mixed feelings about Happer’s post. Socolow’s own biography — first a physicist, then a specialist on the environment — makes him a kind of bridge between Happer and the environmental scientists on Princeton’s campus. He doesn’t doubt Happer’s technical grasp of climate science but says that “everybody has areas of irrationality.”

“I think the environment in general, and climate change in particular, is an area of Will’s irrationality. But nonetheless, I think he can accomplish something” in his current job, Socolow says.

Socolow hopes that while in the White House, Happer will behave less like an argumentative physicist and more like the kind of person who has to prepare for every possibility — including those that strike him as unlikely.

“A military person doesn’t underestimate the enemy. A business person doesn’t underestimate the competition,” Socolow says. And even if, as Happer insists, there’s uncertainty about the course of climate change, the U.S. can’t afford to underestimate those risks.

Top Electric Motorcycles For 2017

By General Posts

Challenges have popped to the surface regarding electric vehicles. They might be more emission prone than petrol based vehicles. Batteries are nasty. We will see.

The world is fast changing. No, not Governments and definitely those Senators never leave or change. While the more Hollywood movies change, the more they remain the same.

Generations change and the new millennials have different priorities and preferences. Climate is supposedly (“allegedly”) changing.

Demand and Supply of big bikes have changed. There are again more British motorcycle brands in the market than American bikes with the return of Enfield, BSA, Norton and the veteran Triumph.

Roads have changed with new taxes tolls on rush hour routes. The year has changed to 2018. My underwear has changed from boxers to briefs. Bikernet.com has changed and become mobile friendly.

Last year, Germany voted to ban the internal combustion engine by year 2030, and this just this year the UK government announced plans to ban the sales of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2040. China is leading the way with maximum ownership of electric vehicles in the world.

But the future is bright. In the four-wheel world Elon Musk is leading the way with his innovative Tesla brand, and over here in the two-wheel world there are a host of different manufacturers all looking to the future. Read more.