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Indian Motorcycle Announces Indian Chief Custom Program

By General Posts

Indian Motorcycle is tapping four renowned builders to customize the new 2022 Indian Chief Dark Horse. To showcase the range of the platform, each builder has a signature style that differs from the next. First, Indian Motorcycle is excited to reunite Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, as the two haven’t teamed up for a project in nearly 15 years. Next, Indian is tapping Go Takamine to see his interpretation of a custom Chief. Lastly, Indian will see how Carey Hart will follow up his first custom Chief with this build.

Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced plans for three customization projects based on its recently unveiled 2022 Indian Chief. In an effort to showcase the vast personalization possibilities inherent to the Indian Chief platform, three renowned V-twin customizers were selected to produce totally unique interpretations of the iconic motorcycle; including former Indian Larry tandem, Paul Cox and Keino Sasaki, freestyle motocross legend Carey Hart, and creator of “Bratstyle,” the popular brand and globally recognized “throwback” aesthetic for motorcycle customization and restoration, Go Takamine.

For Cox and Sasaki, this project marks the first time in nearly 15 years the duo has worked together, dating back to the early 2000’s when they disbanded after the untimely passing of legendary customizer and friend, Indian Larry.

“Keino and I have stayed in touch over the years, continuing to work in our own individual styles, but when Indian Motorcycle approached us about this collaboration, the timing seemed right. We both bring unique skills to this project, and it will be interesting to collaborate again,” said Cox. “Initially, I found the new Chief platform to be beautifully designed and thoughtfully engineered in its stock form. It’s tough and clean but possesses a modern elegance at the same time. These are all qualities that I try to combine in my own work, for a well-balanced custom.”

With its classic steel tube frame, exposed rear shocks and Thunderstroke motor, the new Indian Chief was designed with a mindset fixed on reaching back to the past, while pushing into the future. To that point, it was also by design that Indian Motorcycle selected three builders that span the spectrum of classic and modern customization styles.

“This bike is as much about history and heritage, as it is about modern design sophistication, and that’s why we were intentional in choosing builders that represented both old and new styles,” said Ola Stenegard, Director of Design for Indian Motorcycle. “With Go, we have a builder who honors and takes inspiration from the post-war bobber scene. On the other hand, Carey will push forward with modern, performance-oriented design elements, while Paul and Keino bridge the gap between past and future.”

Over the past five years, various Indian Motorcycle models have served as the canvas for Hart’s design creativity and customization skills. He recently unveiled the first-ever, custom 2022 Indian Chief – a modern club-style take on the new Chief platform – just following the bike’s debut in early February.

“With the new Chief, Indian Motorcycle has done an incredible job of capturing the strength and timeless lines of what we all have come to expect from a true American V-twin, and in doing so, they’ve served up the ultimate platform for customization,” said Hart. “I’m proud to be amongst this incredible group of builders, and I couldn’t be more excited to see what each of us comes up with.”

Well-known for his Bratstyle brand, a design aesthetic and lifestyle that has inspired followers and copycats across the globe, Takamine has focused much of his work on restoring and customizing vintage Indian Chiefs and Indian Scouts. This project will be the first time that Takamine will bring Bratstyle to a modern Indian Motorcycle.

“Indian Motorcycle has been at the heart of my work for many years, and I have great admiration for the company. It’s an honor to be included in this elite group of builders,” said Takamine. “The new Indian Chief is ideal for customization with its classic steel tube frame and air-cooled motor, and I’m excited by the possibilities of what I can do with it.”

To inspire personalization, Indian Motorcycle has curated three Authentic Accessory collections that dramatically change style, enhance comfort and increase power and performance. Each piece within the collections are sold individually and can pair with any Chief model – allowing riders to mix and match parts to fit their style and riding preference. Riders can design and build their own Chief on Indian Motorcycle’s accessory configurator.

The curated accessory collections consist of the following:

Rogue Collection
Providing a stripped-down riding experience where power and minimalism lead the way, Indian Motorcycle curated the Rogue Collection to enhance performance and deliver aggressive attitude for the Indian Chief and Indian Chief Dark Horse. With the all-new Thunderstroke Forward Stage 1 Intake, Stage 1 Slip-On Exhaust and Thunderstroke Stage 2 Performance Kit, the Rogue Collection delivers 17% more horsepower than a stock Thunderstroke 116 engine. Indian Motorcycle’s Slash Cut Exhaust Tips personalize style, while a passenger seat, backrest and pegs provide two-up riding capabilities.

Authentic Collection
With bulky tires wrapped around spoke wheels, a muscled-up front end and a solo bobber seat, the Chief Bobber and Chief Bobber Dark Horse pay stylistic homage to the classic post-war era V-twins. Riders looking to personalize their ride can outfit it with premium accessories from Indian Motorcycle’s Authentic Collection. Featuring a floating solo seat, luggage rack, Mini Ape Handlebars, and various performance accessories, this collection pays tribute to the original 1922 Indian Chief.

Tour Collection
Featuring soft saddlebags and a windshield, the Super Chief and Super Chief Limited begs riders for longer miles and an even bolder escape. For those looking to take the capable day tripper to the next level, Indian Motorcycle assembled its Tour Collection. Heated grips, a passenger backrest, highway bar lower closeouts and highway pegs take the Super Chief’s comfort to an entirely new level for both the rider and passenger going the extra mile.

Shipping to dealers now, the 2022 Indian Chief lineup offers three distinct models with two trim levels. Powering all premium Chief models, including the Chief Dark Horse, Chief Bobber Dark Horse and Super Chief Limited, is Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 116 engine with 120 ft-lbs of torque. ABS is standard, while premium finishes set these bikes apart and further showcase the craftsmanship and attention to detail. The Chief Dark Horse and Chief Bobber Dark Horse each pack further attitude with premium gloss black finishes, while the Super Chief Limited touts premium chrome finishes. All are equipped with Indian Motorcycle’s industry-first 4 inch touchscreen powered by Ride Command which offers turn-by-turn navigation, Bluetooth® pairing for access to mobile phone information, as well as bike and ride information.

The Indian Chief, Chief Bobber and Super Chief are each powered by Indian Motorcycle’s Thunderstroke 111 powertrain with 108 ft-lbs of torque. Each model features an analog gauge, chrome and matte black finishes, and is available with or without ABS.

Riders can learn more about the Chief Customs program on the Indian Motorcycle Customs Garage webpage. Additionally, riders can learn more about the Indian Chief at their local Indian Motorcycle dealership, by visiting IndianMotorcycle.com, or by following along on Facebook®, Twitter® and Instagram®.

Modified motorcycles roll into Packard Museum

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by Andy Gray from https://www.tribtoday.com

Some people aren’t satisfied with a motorcycle straight off of the lot.

Collectors and motorcycle enthusiasts often modify those dealer purchases, restore damaged bikes that look like scrap metal to everyone else or build their own motorcycles from scratch.

The 21st Vintage Motorcycle Exhibit at the National Packard Museum celebrates those kinds of machines with “Roll Your Own,” which opens Saturday and runs through May 22.

“Last year when we were working on the exhibit ‘Two Wheels at the County Fair,’ we realize there were a lot of bikes that were highly modified, that guys got real crazy with,” museum Executive Director Mary Ann Porinchak said. “We decided to show off some of that creativity.

“The challenge was to find enough bikes, but once we started, they came out of the woodwork. It snowballed and had a life of its own, and there are some truly unique pieces that came about … One bike was built from the ground up from just a pile of parts. That shows a determination to ride and a fair amount of ingenuity.”

For the restorers, it’s a point of pride. Bruce Williams, a past organizer of the motorcycle show, has reconstructed several machines from most humble beginnings.

“People see you have half a motor (and ask), ‘What are you gonna do with that?’ I’ll build a bike,” Williams said. “They’ll say, ‘You’ll never do that,’ and a year and a half later, there it is.”

That doesn’t mean it’s easy. For one 1906 motorcycle he rebuilt, Williams had to hire a guy in Holland who could build the rims and back pulley he needed. Since that kind of rim was outlawed in the U.S. in the 1930s, the guy in Holland wouldn’t ship it to Williams directly. The parts were shipped to England and then to the U.S., and Williams had to pay duty fees on the parcel twice.

“I had $2,000 (invested) in two bare unfinished rims and a pulley, but it was the only guy I could find in the world who could make it for me,” Williams said.

For another restoration, he found a photograph of the motorcycle model when it was for sale in England. He knew the size of the rims, so he had the photo blown up to actual size and used it to create the bike’s frame and the other parts he needed.

A full list of the motorcycles usually is included with the preview story, but some of machines on display truly are one of a kind. One was built around 1922 Villiers frame. Another was assembled from parts from various Triumph motorcycles from the late 1960s and early ’70s and started with a single bolt.

Some of the motorcycles featured this year are a 1902 Sylvester & Jones, 1905 Riddle (with a Thor motor), 1908 Crouch, 1912 Indian Beltdrive, 1922 Agricycle, 1923 Douglas Model W, 1928 Indian Scout, 1949 Harley Panhead, 1951 Vincent black Shadow, 1954 BMW R-25/3, 1967 Triumph T-100R, 1968 Triumph T-100C, 1971 BSA Diesel 2 cylinder, 1971 BSA-A65 Lightning, 1974 Triumph T140V, 1974-75 Penton Custom, 1976 Yamaha TT 500 Hill Climber, 1976 GS750 Suzuki, 1984 BMW R80 RT and 1996 Buell ST Lightning.

Not all of the motorcycles are vintage. There are a few 21st century bikes in the show, including a 2021 Triumph Scrambler inspired by the motorcycle featured in the upcoming James Bond film “No Time to Die.”

William Dennis, president of the Packard board, has his 2015 California Custom show bike on display.

“Every piece of bling on there is an accessory that’s in their catalog,” Dennis said. “It has every accessory they make except for the fringe seat. Every piece of chrome on there is an add-on. The paint is a custom color. It emulates a Harley-Davidson paint scheme from years and years ago.”

Dennis said he and his son bonded over their mutual love of motorcycles and they’ve restored several bikes over the years.

The annual motorcycle show is popular attraction, and it’s earned the National Packard Museum several awards, including the Antique Motorcycle Foundation’s highest honor, the Award for Excellence, as well as three consecutive first place awards in the Interpretive Exhibits Category from the National Association of Automobile Museums.

Dennis is one of the people who became involved with the museum because of the motorcycle show, and he said he would like its success to guide the museum’s future programming by preserving the Packard history but also exploring other areas.

“I would like for this museum to be a mecca for transportation,” he said. “The people who own Packards are older … You ask young folks today about a Packard, they think you’re talking about Hewlett Packard.

“My thought is looking backward to move forward. What did we do in the past that worked and what can do in the future to keep going?”

One new challenge in organizing this year’s motorcycle show was the COVID-19 pandemic, which kept the committee members from being able to meet and interact the way they normally do.

“With the motorcycle guys, their excitement and enthusiasm feeds off each other,” Porinchak said.

As a result, there aren’t as many supplemental items accompanying the motorcycles compared to past shows, but one addition for 2021 is a piece by Youngstown artist Guy Shively that is part of the permanent collection of the Butler Institute of American Art.

“It’s a black-and-white piece, a pile of just motorcycle parts,” Porinchak said. “One of our committee members remembered seeing it there and said let’s see if we can borrow that piece and hang it up here. It’s the epitome of what we’re doing with this show. It’s a nice partnership, collaboration with them.”

If you go …

WHAT: 21st Vintage Motorcycle Exhibit — “Roll Your Own”

WHEN: Saturday through May 22. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday.

WHERE: National Packard Museum, 1899 Mahoning Ave. NW, Warren

HOW MUCH: $8 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and children ages 7 to 12 and free for children 6 and younger. For more information, go to www.packardmuseum.org or call 330-394-1899.

Triumph Over Tragedy For Local Motorcycle Company

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by Kelly Wise Valdes from https://www.ospreyobserver.com

Jared Weems from Riverview is no stranger to adversity. But, as Albert Einstein said, “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.” No one knows this better than Weems. The 42-year-old is from a fourth-generation vintage motorcycle enthusiast family. He explained that the passion for all things involving vintage British motorcycles runs in his blood.

Weems was born in Tampa, but ultimately he was raised for the majority of his life in South Tennessee. After high school, he returned to the Tampa area and eventually joined the Army in 2003. He proudly served his country in Special Ops and spent a majority of his military time parachuting from airplanes. It was during this time that he married his wife, Breanne, and they had two children—a son, Austin, 13, and a daughter, Adelaide, 11.

After the onset of some health issues, Weems was medically discharged from the Army in 2018 and moved to Riverview. Unfortunately, his health issues proved to be serious and he was diagnosed with a brain tumor that caused seizures. It was at this time that he hit a low point in his life. “I sold my motorcycles and was unsure where my life was headed,” said Weems.

A pivotal moment took place when a friend came to visit and brought a painting from a famous artist, David Mann. Mann’s work mostly featured Harley Davidson bikes and his paintings were published regularly in Easyriders magazine for more than 20 years. During his lifetime, Mann painted only two pictures of a Triumph bike, and Weems was holding one of those pictures.

“I wanted to build the Triumph bike that Mann had painted,” said Weems. “The painting was something of Mann’s creation—it wasn’t a bike that ever really existed.”

Weems was motivated by his new goal—a ground-up build of the 1952 Speed Twin Triumph from the Mann painting. Weems used this new purpose and his shop as a place of refuge and healing. His intention was to use his savings to build the bike, take it to bike shows, then sell it to recover his costs. The other good news is that Weems’ health had stabilized, and he has now been seizure-free for nearly three years.

Subsequently, his return to Riverview also gave Weems the opportunity to join the staff at The Chapel at FishHawk, currently serving as the director of ministry and leading community-based life skills classes.

It was through this outreach that he met with Cindy Tilley, founder of Forgotten Angels, a nonprofit organization that focuses on helping children that have aged out of the foster care system. Tilley was looking for fundraising ideas to raise money to help build more tiny houses on a property for the foster children.

During the meeting, Weems had an epiphany. “God’s voice said to me, ‘Give them the motorcycle.’”

The ball was rolling, and Weems even had several of the young men from Forgotten Angels help finish the motorcycle build with him. The motorcycle is now being raffled off to support Forgotten Angels.

The raffle is underway until Friday, March 19. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at www.weemsmotorco.com/raffle. For information about preservation, restoration, repair or custom builds of vintage British motorcycles, visit www.weemsmotorco.com.

Royal Enfield announces road racing participants

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Seven female motorcyclists have been selected for the road racing program

Milwaukee, Wis (January 19, 2021) Royal Enfield today announced its seven finalists for the BUILD TRAIN RACE (BTR) road racing program. The seven female motorcyclists come from diverse backgrounds and over the course of the next year are tasked with converting Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 motorcycles into road racing motorcycles, for a series of exhibition races to be held in 2021.

Royal Enfield launched the BTR program in 2019, challenging four women to build flat track motorcycles and compete in select exhibitions during American Flat Track events. After a strong response to the program, the second phase of BTR will showcase the road racing capabilities of the Continental GT 650 and the abilities of seven female motorcyclists to build, train and race the motorcycles they create. Melissa Paris, veteran road racer, and BTR flat track participant will serve as a mentor to the selected participants and provide valuable insights throughout the duration of the program.

“The BTR flat track program received an enormous outpouring of support and interest in the last year,” said Breeann Poland, Marketing Lead – Americas and Continental GT 650 global brand manager. “A panel of judges including myself, Melissa Paris and Anne Roberts have handpicked a group of fantastic female motorcycle enthusiasts from across the U.S. through a video submission process, and will be providing each of them with a Continental GT 650 motorcycle, so that they may begin the customization process.“

After careful review, the panel of judges selected Michaela Turnbull of Wyoming, CJ Lukacs of California, Kayla Theisler of Wisconsin, Becky Goebel of California, Trisha Dahl of Minnesota, Alyssa Bridges of California and Scarlett Grosselangehorst of New York to take part in the BTR program.

The BTR road racing program will kick off in the coming weeks, as the participants receive their motorcycles and begin the customization process. Melissa Paris will provide guidance during the build process and will mentor the ladies during the training and racing portions of the program. Upon completion of their builds, the women will partake in a series of training sessions lead by Paris. The culmination of the program will take place when the seven women participate in yet-to-be-announced race exhibitions.

To learn more about the program and to follow along throughout the year, visit BTR here.

CJ Lukacs – “This BTR program is beyond anything I could have imagined being part of. That it even exists is such a rad opportunity. Being on display to learn with, grow with, and inspire other women through the passion of motorcycling, is truly remarkable and the greatest honor.”

Alyssa Bridges – “This is certainly the opportunity of a lifetime and I couldn’t be more grateful and excited to participate. I am still in shock that we actually get to do this.”

Trisha Dahl – “Royal Enfield is creating a motorcycle movement to make riding simply about fun again, the Build. Train. Race program and the Continental GT650 are proof of that.“

Kayla Theisler – “I’m super excited to not only share my passion for bikes with the world but also to learn and grow as a rider and racer with such incredibly inspiring women!”

Michaela Trumbull – “I am beyond words excited and grateful to be a part of the Build Train Race Program! This company and the people involved are making my dreams come true and I can’t wait to work hand in hand with them!”

Scarlett Grosselangehorst – “I am enthusiastic about every part of Build Train Race. My favorite aspect of the BTR program is that Royal Enfield actively supports the female riding community by demystifying wrenching and racing.”

Becky Goebel – “I don’t know what the heck I just got myself into but I am excited! I closely watched last year’s Royal Enfield Build Train Race Program and thought it was an awesome idea to get women on bikes in these race realms and now I’m going to do it as well!”

Harley-Davidson Street Devil

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

For people living in most parts of the world, motorcycle riding is pretty much over this year. Winter is upon us, and two-wheelers are being tucked away until the hot days of the spring and summer reach us once more.

But as we prepare to celebrate Christmas, we can’t stop from continuing to show you the incredible builds coming from Germany, out the doors of a garage called Thunderbike. For the past 25 years or so, these guys have rolled out literally hundreds of Harley-Davidson-based builds, and their work only seems to be accelerating.

For today we’ll focus on a slightly older project of theirs. Called Street Devil, it too is based on the Street Bob (a 2006 model), one of the favorite canvases of the shop.

As usual, the bike has been modified in key areas, namely by tampering with existing or adding new hardware – these new parts are either of Thunderbike or Harley make.

The bike’s twin-cam engine has remained pretty much unchanged, but breathes through a new shotgun exhaust with tapered mufflers made by the Germans. They are also responsible for the engine cover, air cleaner, grips, forward control kit, and seat.

The Americans supplied the fuel and oil tanks, rear fender, shortened front end (by 2 inches), and the lowered suspension (by 1 inch), among others.

The bike rides on custom wheels wrapped in Avon tires and the front and Metzeler at the rear. Just like the rest of the build, and to be in tone with it, the wheels come in red and white – the graphics on the motorcycle is the work of Thunderbike’s favorite partner in this area, Kruse Design.

The shop gives no indication as to how much the build of the Devil cost to make. Usually, we have a way of giving you an estimate on the cost, because Thunderbike uses mostly in-house made parts, and we know the pricing for those. But given the large quantity of Harley hardware still fitted on this one – and we’re not being told from where they were acquired – this is an almost impossible task.

Suicide Machine Harley-Davidson Softail

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Suicide Machine Harley-Davidson Softail Is All About Bare Bones, Light Riding

Weight saving. This was pretty much the idea behind the latest project coming from Suicide Machine Company (SMCO) and destined for the now canceled Born Free Motorcycle Show.

SMCO is a shop we’ve featured before. Led by two brothers, Shaun and Aaron Guardado, the garage was part of the bike maker’s The No Show online motorcycle event, held a few months back in support of all the builders that because of the health crisis were left without a venue to show their creations.

Back then, they presented a 2019 Road Glide Special modified to get a more aggressive riding position, one better suited for trips down highways. And now we’re getting a bike the shop describes as a “performance-driven and race-inspired” product.

What you’re looking at is a seriously lightened and undressed Harley-Davidson Softail Standard. It is the result of two months of work that saw a lot of the motorcycle’s hardware either being removed completely or replaced, all with the goal of making it lighter.

First, a lot of the original bodywork is gone. The fenders have been taken out, a new and full carbon fiber bodywork was placed on top of the frame. Not even the tank remains, having been replaced with a fuel cell hidden inside the new body.

Carbon fiber has been used extensively on this build, down to the tubes and the wheels that now weigh just a quarter of what the original ones weighed. Also, lighting and wiring have been kept to a minimum, and a titanium exhaust was added.

The bike continues to be powered by the stock 107 Milwaukee Eight engine, only it is no longer fuel-injected, but uses a 45mm Mikuni carburetor.

SMCO says the bike can be ridden as is, and you can see a bit of how that’s like by having a look at the video embedded below.

 

Harley-Davidson Knucklehead Project Brings Back the Cool of Pre-1950s Bikes

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Very few bike makers out there (and by extension car makers) are innovative enough to give birth to new families of engines that inspire generations. Harley-Davidson is one of those that are, as its powerplants were at times as famous as the bike models assembled in Milwaukee.

Say the word Knucklehead, and the mind immediately links that to Harley. And it has done so since 1936, when the engine came into the world.

Named so after the shape of valve covers, Knucklehead has come to stand for the type of motorcycles that were made in Milwaukee from 1936 to 1947, when the Panhead engine replace it. The name is still very much alive because bikes powered by this type of hardware are still a craze in the custom bike industry.

And you know that to be true when guys like Andreas Bergerforth, the main man of Thunderbike, a German custom shop specializing in Harleys, has one built for himself.

Put together close to a decade ago, the Knucklehead Project, as the garage calls this build, has all the traits of a bike of its age. Not only does it stay true to a wartime-era two-wheeler when it comes to shape and tech, but it also brings with it enough patina and beat-down stance to speak volumes about its lineage.

We’re told that for this bike to be brought back in shape, the original had to be dismantled “up to the last screw” and only then, after some love and care, put back together – there’s no mention on whether some of the hardware had to be replaced with new one.

Because this bike was built for in-house use, Thunderbike makes no mention of cost, but the Germans do say similar builds snatched back in 2012, when this one was put together, some 30,000 euros ($35,500 at today’s exchange rates), so that should give you an idea.

Meet the Ducati master re-creating Isle of Man-winning motorcycle

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by Ellie Honeybone from https://www.abc.net.au

You may be forgiven for assuming the world’s leading manufacturer of Ducati bevel drive engine parts would live in a bustling city, perhaps in Italy or the United States, somewhere central and close to consumers.

But in fact, this talented engineer and self-described “petrol head” lives in a tiny historic town, deep in the forests of south-west WA.

Even though shipping his handmade engine parts around the world from Nannup is a logistical nightmare, Brook Henry wouldn’t have it any other way.

A family business

Mr Henry grew up surrounded by Ducatis.

His older brothers imported and distributed the high-performance motorcycle brand in New Zealand from the late 1960s through to the 1980s.

“I spent pretty well all my time at the workshop, fixing, racing and working on Ducati bevel drive twins and singles,” Mr Henry said.

“I also did an apprenticeship outside that business as a toolmaker, but I never liked doing toolmaking and I always wanted to go back to motorcycles.”

That love of motorcycles grew and continued for the next 40 years with Mr Henry now a household name and ‘master’ in the Ducati world.

He has travelled extensively, inspected designs inside Ducati’s Bologna factory and even appeared on bike lover Jay Leno’s US television show.

After settling down first in Perth and then further south in Nannup, Mr Henry developed a business building, designing and shipping bevel drive parts, engines and complete motorcycles across the world.

Pandemic revives restoration projects

There are only so many original bevel drive Ducatis in existence, making Brook Henry’s business incredibly niche.

These bikes were built during the 1970s and 80s and made famous after legendary British champion Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man race in 1978.

When the world went into COVID-19 lockdown during early 2020, many owners of bevel drive bikes decided it was the right time to blow off the cobwebs and reignite their restoration projects.

“I’ve never been so busy because guys who bought bevel drives put them in the back of a shed and chucked a rag over them,” Mr Henry said.

“The wives got sick of their husbands being in the kitchen and told them to go out and find something to do in the shed.

“So they went out and pulled the cover off the old Ducati bevel drive and started looking around to where they could get the parts to start putting it back together.

“Our customer base worldwide has been huge with COVID because anyone who’s got a bevel drive has gone and started working on it.”

The next chapter

In addition to supplying global customers with all the parts they need for their pandemic restorations, Mr Henry has another project in the works.

Through what he calls a “crazy set of circumstances”, he purchased the drawings for the original engine used in the late Mike Hailwood’s Isle of Man race winning bike, of which only a handful were ever made.

“We’ve actually been talked into making 12 exact replicas of Hailwood’s bike,” he said.

“We decided that we would make a limited run of them and the number we decided on was 12, because that was his racing number.”

While there will only be a dozen of these Hailwood recreations made, the engine — dubbed the ‘Ritorno’ — is available on its own with the approval of the Ducati factory.

“The business is expanding at 100 miles an hour because people worldwide want that engine and want parts for it,” Mr Henry said.

“So we’re gathering speed at a frightening rate at the moment, but I’m so passionate about it and I love what I do.”

Government funding leads to expansion

Mr Henry has big plans for expansion after receiving a $113,000 Regional Economic Development grant from the WA Government.

The investment will be used to employ more staff and purchase state of the art manufacturing equipment to build Mr Henry’s own version of the iconic bevel drive engine.

“I like to keep the outside of the engine looking the same where I can,” he said.

“And now I’ve got the opportunity to basically build my own internals and to improve on the existing engine.”

Despite being extremely busy these days, Mr Henry still enjoys the occasional ride through the scenic forest roads near his home.

“They say that motorcycles are built to transport people, but Ducatis are built to transport the soul,” he said.

“The only thing is, you do not have any control over emus and wildlife, kangaroos running out of the bush, all that sort of thing.

“So I really don’t want to hurt myself, because I’ve got too much to do — and it’s a damn shame I’m 66 and not 36.”

Harley-Davidson Wrinkled Bob Looks All Military and Mean

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

If you’re a bike owner, it’s very hard to decide on what customization path to go down on, especially when there’s nothing to inspire the build you want.

One way would be to leave the design and the build to the custom shop of choice, and trust that what comes out the garage’s doors at the end was worth the while and money spent.

The owner of the Harley-Davidson Fat Bob we have here seems to have done just that. He trusted German garage Thunderbike with the creation of a unique machine, and what resulted is the aptly called Wrinkle Bob.

The bike takes its name after the colors used all over the bodywork. Featuring powder-coated military green and Wrinkle-style paint, it looks extremely solid and matt, while at the same time presenting us with a very soldiery feel.

Unlike most of Thunderbike’s projects, the Wrinkled Bob was not subjected to an extreme makeover as far as mechanical modifications go, but there are changes to talk about, especially considering how expensive they are.

The biggest upgrades compared to the stock motorcycle are the fitting of a custom aluminum fuel tank, an air ride suspension system, and a new forward control kit. The two-wheeler also sports new fenders and a custom exhaust system the Germans call Dragonfly.

The Wrinkled Bob is one of Thunderbike’s older projects. As usual, we’re not told how much the project cost to make, but given the parts listed as being used by the garage, we estimate the worth of the changes at around 7,500 euros (roughly $8,700 at today’s exchange rates). That’s not including the paint job and of course the base motorcycle – the price makes the Wrinkled Bob one of the more expensive projects the Germans have made over the years.

World of Road Racing

By General Posts

CALLING ALL FEMALE RIDERS!

We’re back for another round and expanding the Build. Train. Race Program into the world of Road Racing! We’re ready to hit the asphalt and bring a whole new crew of women road racers to the sport. If you’re a female who is interested in learning how to road race and willing to give 100% commitment, this is for you!

Think you have what it takes? We want to hear from you!

Royal Enfield North America announced today its phase two of the BUILD TRAIN RACE (BTR) program which will now seek out female motorcyclists to go road racing with the Royal Enfield Continental GT 650. Similar to the flat track BUILD TRAIN RACE four women will be handpicked by Royal Enfield for this iteration of the program through a video selection process. Women interested in the program must submit a video questionnaire here to be considered.

Professional Road Racer and current BTR Flat Track Participant Melissa Paris has agreed to mentor the women during every phase of the program. She will work with each participant on creating a design for their builds, building sponsorship decks, and training off and on the track.

“Building upon the success of the initial BUILD TRAIN RACE program, we decided to carry the momentum into the road racing segment, ” said Royal Enfield Americas Head of Marketing Breeann Poland. “This is a unique opportunity for women interested in getting into road racing and to make a name for themselves in a national racing program. Working with a world class racer like Melissa Paris is not an opportunity that comes along often. The ladies will also be some of the first people to road race the Continental GT 650 platform, so the motorcycling world will be watching.”

The participants will be chosen by a panel of judges which includes Breeann Poland, Head of Marketing – Americas, veteran road racer and flat track BTR participant Melissa Paris and accomplished racer and journalist Anne Roberts. The selected participants will then have several months and a small budget to convert a Continental GT 650 Twin into road racing trim. Paris will provide valuable insights during the build process.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY NOW AT ROYAL ENFIELD.