Skip to main content
Tag

BMW

Pirelli Takes Sixth Track Record of 2019 with Adam Robarts

By General Posts

Robarts Captures Pirelli Tire Credit on DIABLO™ Superbike Slicks.

ROME, Ga. (August 23, 2019) – Pirelli Tire North America congratulates Adam Robarts on capturing the brand’s sixth absolute motorcycle track record of 2019. Competing aboard a BMW S 1000 RR, Robarts set the track record at The Ridge Motorsports Park in Shelton, Washington during the fourth round of the Washington Motorcycle Road Racing Association (WMRRA) Championship on Sunday, August 18.

“Adam has consistently proved himself on the track as demonstrated by his long list of records using Pirelli tires,” said Oscar Solis, road racing manager, Pirelli. “What’s more impressive is he was able to capture this record with an SC1 compound on the rear, which shows you don’t always have to have the softest tire to achieve a record!”

Robarts’ new lap record of 1:37.797 was set during the Formula Ultra race, besting Ryan Sutton’s previous track record of 1:38.709 that was also set with Pirelli slicks in June of 2017. Robarts’ BMW was equipped with Pirelli DIABLO™ Superbike 120/70-17 SC2 front and 200/60-17 SC1 rear tires.

“Adam was great in each of his races this weekend and rode like a true champion,” said Sage Wilkinson, CT Racing NW, Pirelli trackside vendor. “We had perfect weather heading into the weekend, so the stage was set for fast lap times. Adam did a great job of riding smart to protect his points lead, yet still managed to put in some blistering lap times, and when the dust settled, held a very manageable lead and came away with a new track record. We’re proud to have Adam on Pirelli race tires and happy to be a part of his success.”

Pirelli continues to offer a tire credit prize for setting a new motorcycle track record and Robarts efforts made it the second time he has earned the reward this year. In addition to setting the new absolute motorcycle track record, Robarts carried his momentum into the 600cc class by setting a new lap record.

“It’s such a good feeling to end the weekend on top and by setting a new track record,” said Robarts. “I felt really good on my bike and with my setup every time I hit the track. I feel like I was able to push a pretty quick pace without ever riding outside of my comfort zone, which I give a lot of credit to my Pirelli DIABLO™ Superbike slicks for. The tires were phenomenal when it came to grip and I could put the bike anywhere I wanted.”

To learn more about the complete line of Pirelli motorcycle tires, please visit www.pirelli.com.

BMW Motorrad Days 2019 & New BMW motorcycle accessories

By General Posts

BMW Motorrad Days 2019 – About 40,000 visitors from all over the world

This year, the BMW Motorrad Days took again place in Garmisch-Partenkirchen and about 40,000 BMW Motorrad fans from all over the world came together to discover the latest trends concerning BMW Motorrad and to party together. Although the weather was not always perfect, visitors and exhibitors consistently were in a good mood, so that the BMW Motorrad Days were a full success again. We are already looking forward to next year!

Racing screen for BMW S1000RR (2019- )

This Racing screen gives a special and sportive character to your BMW S1000RR (2019- ) and is 40mm higher than the original windshield. Thus, the airflow which hits the torso and the head of the driver is considerably reduced.
Height: 445mm

Racing screen for BMW S1000RR (2019- )
94,90 Euro up (incl. VAT) plus shipping

Handlebar Risers for BMW G310R & G310GS

Raising the handlebar by 25mm results in a more upright, much more relaxed seating position. This considerably improves driving comfort. The overall result is a noticeable increase in stamina and concentration.

Handlebar Risers for BMW G310R & G310GS
28,95 Euro up (incl. VAT) plus shipping

We already have products for the new BMW Motorrad models:

R1250GS:
http://www.mhornig.com/BMW-R-1250-GS/

R1250RT:
http://www.mhornig.com/BMW-R-1250-RT/

F750/850GS:
http://www.mhornig.com/BMW-F-750-GS-F-850-GS/

R1250RS:
http://www.mhornig.com/BMW-R-1250-RS/

R1250R:
http://www.mhornig.com/BMW-R-1250-R/

V-Stream Windscreen for BMW F750GS
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=408

Fork Crash Protectors for BMW G310GS & G310R
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=409

BMW F850GS conversion by Hornig – the middle class touring Enduro developed to the next level
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=405

Inside bags for GIVI Aluminum Cases
http://www.mhornig.com/Company.html?newsid=404

Motorcycle Accessory Hornig GmbH
Gewerbepark Chammünster Nord C 5
D93413 Cham
Germany

http://www.motorcycleparts-hornig.com

Motorcycle Makers Are Getting Hip to Women-Only Rallies

By General Posts

Anxious to find new audiences after a decade of declining sales, the giants like Harley-Davidson and BMW Motorrad are finally taking notice of a self-made community.

On Valentine’s Day, Sharry Billings posted a photograph on Instagram. Below the image of herself, her hair a red caramel and her smile open, she wrote: “I love you so much I wanna squeeze you!”

The object of her affection? “All the motorcycles I have owned and will own in the future,” she explained. Alongside the photo of her astride a Harley-Davidson, she wrote that bikes “have changed my life, healed my soul, and brought me more love and friendships than I could have ever imagined.”

Billings goes by @sistermother13 on Instagram, but the main account she oversees is @thelitaslosangeles. The Litas is a group she joined three years ago as a way to connect with other women riders in her city. She’s co-led the L.A. branch for two years. When she joined, it provided her with much-needed healing and camaraderie after her kids grew up and she got divorced. Billings had ridden as a teenager and into her 20s but took a hiatus later. “It was always in my heart,” she says. But when she was married with young children, “I thought it was a little too dangerous.”

After the breakup in 2015, she found herself longing for escape. And adventure. “My prayer at the time was, ‘God, I don’t want to date.’ These men are not happening,” Billings says, laughing. “The first thing that came to my heart was the motorcycle I wanted. It was a Harley.”

She bought the bike, took the ride. Then she joined the Litas. “I’m very grateful to have found my heart again,” Billings says.

Founded in Utah by Jessica Haggett half a decade ago, the Litas have expanded to include hundreds of branches around the world (Litas Denver, Litas Lisbon, Litas Rome), with members ranging from twentysomething singles to 60- and 70-year-old retirees with grandkids. They take regular rides, often along wild back roads, including the Pine Mountain Ridge route near Ojai, Calif., that Billings took with 32 other riders one Saturday in July. It’s about riding with your own style and pace but surrounded by like-minded friends.

“If you’re learning to ride, you’re going to kill yourself riding with men—they ride like bats out of hell!” Billings says. “And women—I’m generalizing here—tend to be more careful. We are mothers, we are sisters, we feel obligated to stay alive.”

The Litas are singular but not uncommon. All across California, Oregon, and Utah, from Texas to New York, women-only motorcycle groups and riding events are springing up like wildflowers. They go by names such as the Miss-Fires (Brooklyn, N.Y.), the Chrome Divas (Austin), and Leather and Lace (Daytona Beach, Fla.). They do regular rides: Tuesday night pizza runs, say, or weekend coffee meetups—and they take periodic excursions to women-only destination events such as the Wild Gypsy Tour, which is organizing a festival in Sturgis, S.D., in August, and the Dream Roll in Ashland, Ore.; it’s early June event near Denver was photographed for this article.

The biggest crowd follows Babes Ride Out, a series of events founded by Anya Violet and Ashmore Ellis in 2013. It started with 50 women riders who gathered to camp out in Borrego Springs, Calif. They built fires, pitched tents, drank beer, and played games on Harleys, Husqvarnas, and Hondas while soaking in nature and one another’s company.

These groups are tapping into an undercurrent of the motorcycle industry. As sales have faltered, dropping more than 40% from 2008 to 2010, then recovering somewhat by 2014 but never to previous levels, manufacturers including Harley-Davidson Inc. and BMW Motorrad have struggled to create appeal beyond their core demographic of older white men. Their efforts include offering electric and less-expensive motorbikes and introducing exciting conceptual prototypes. Female riders offer enthusiasm and youth, and, yes, they’re spending money that brands crave.

The number of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled since 2010, according to a 2018 study by the Motorcycle Industry Council. Today, 19% of owners are women, up from 10% in 2009 and 8% in the late 1990s. And the number of female riders gets higher as you go younger: 22% of Generation X riders are women, and 26% of millennial riders are women. What’s more, the average woman who owns a motorcycle spends $574 annually on maintenance, parts, service, and accessories, while the average man who rides spends $497.

While the industry on the whole dropped 40% from 2008 to 2010, the amount of women who own motorcycles has almost doubled

“We are riding a ton,” says Joy Lewis, who started when she was 12. “I have a friend who put 20,000 miles on her bike in one year.” Lewis’s father, an Alaskan crab fisherman who owned a Harley, got her hooked. “We spend a lot of money on our gear and our bikes, and a lot of things to go with them. I think that’s starting to be appreciated.”

Andy Jefferson, a spokesman for Husqvarna, says one of the brand’s priorities must be to provide support for women’s motorcycling. “We were like everyone else—going after a piece of the pie,” he says. “But everyone was looking at men, and there are all these other people—women—that nobody even really talks about in conversations about how to sell more bikes.” The brand lacks figures for how many of its owners are women but is “working to change that,” Jefferson says. “That’s part of the problem.”

Husqvarna honed in on women riders five years ago when it started sponsoring Babes in the Dirt, an offshoot of Babes Ride Out that’s more focused on off-road and dirt-bike riding. Last year the company spent $50,000 to $60,000 in support of the three-day rally, lending 27 motorcycles and nine staffers to service the bikes and teach.

“We counted between 80 and 100 girls out there [trying out] Husqvarnas,” he says. “The number is not huge by any means, but those are 100 people we didn’t have before. It also jumps down to their brothers and sisters and kids. We never would have got these people without doing this.”

But more important, “we want to get you to ride a motorcycle,” Jefferson adds. “If you ride with Babes and have fun and go buy another brand, great. We just want people riding.”

At BMW Motorrad, which on July 1 named Trudy Hardy vice president for the Americas, the company is sponsoring women-only events including the Sisters’ Centennial Motorcycle Ride. It’s also covering travel expenses and appearance fees for brand reps such as Elspeth Beard, an architect who was the first British woman to ride her motorcycle around the world. The brand also sends pro racer Jocelin Snow and Erin Sills, who holds a 242 mph land speed record, to attend events at local dealerships.

Harley-Davidson has expanded its retail line in recent years to include a host of riding jackets, helmets, boots, and gloves sized and styled for women. It’s perhaps the most critical field of growth for the 116-year-old Wisconsin brand, which has seen sales steadily decline since 2014. The average age of a Harley owner is 50. The average price of one is $15,800—more than many millennials will spend on a car, let alone a motorcycle.

“Even just in the last five years the conversation has shifted,” says motorcycle aficionado Lewis. “I’m sitting here in leather Kevlar pants as we speak, about to go into a meeting. Not only are companies making cute technical stuff that you could wear to work—rather than some weird leather pants with pink embroidery all over the butt that you’d never wear—they’re making things we can actually use.”

Attendees at events for Babes Ride Out (or BRO, the ironic abbreviation they’ve adopted) come to America from as far away as Sweden and South America. Some have ridden since they could walk; some can’t operate a bike at all, preferring always to be a passenger and imbibe the inspirational atmosphere. There’s always plenty of denim and leather on-site—but the hipster kind, not the leather-daddy look. Local shops give classes on basic bike maintenance. Some women get tattoos to commemorate the experience.

“People camp, and there are trailers, too,” Lewis says. “The idea is that you grab coffee and breakfast, and then during the day everyone is out riding. And then all the stuff happens in the evenings with bands or karaoke and slow races”—feats of throttle control.

Earlier this year, a 96-year-old woman joined them at camp; she’d first ridden cross-country on her motorcycle 75 years ago. Last summer the annual California desert meetup saw 1,700 women ride in Yucca Valley; 500 attended an East Coast campout in the Catskill Mountains in New York; 700 attended the most recent Babes in the Dirt in Lebec, Calif.

“Maybe people think that women who ride are pretty tough and badass, which is probably true, but all in all, women riders come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and lifestyles, so any label that you want to give them does not really work,” co-founder Violet says. “I can honestly say that there is no ‘type’ … and we like it that way!”

Be Here Next for Motor-Loving Ladies

The Dream Roll
Set at New Frontier Ranch in the southern wilds of Oregon, the Dream Roll offers camping, tattoos, dirt trails, an on-site bar, and water activities near stunningly picturesque Crater Lake. Aug. 23–25; Ashland, Ore.

Wild Gypsy Tour – Sturgis Buffalo Chip
The biggest and baddest Gypsy festival of the year, the five-day South Dakota event will appeal to the truly unbridled spirit with Super Hooligan races, minibike showdowns, the Wall of Death—and multiple concerts including Keith Urban, Toby Keith, Snoop Dogg, and Styx. Aug. 3–7; Sturgis, S.D.

Babes in the Dirt East
A mix of flat-track and motocross riding gives dirt-loving ladies a place to experience and perfect their off-roading skills. Where Babes Ride Out focuses on asphalt routes, here you’ll be on trails. Sept. 20–22; Greenville, Tenn.

Babes Ride Out 7 – Central Coast
BRO 7 will include the jewels of years past: karaoke, free beer, performances from local bands, route maps for area rides, and hands-on classes for working on your bike. B.Y.O. tent. Oct. 11–13; Santa Margarita, Calif.

WorldSBK U.S. Round: Rea Wins The Superpole Race, But Yields To Davies in Race 2

By General Posts

01,Jonathan Rea,GBR,Kawasaki ZX-10RR,Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK ,Alpinestars,Monster,07,Chaz Davies,GBR,Ducati Panigale R,Aruba.it Racing – Ducati,Alpinestars,Xlite, ,54,Toprak Razgatlioglu,TUR,Kawasaki ZX-10RR,Kawasaki Puccetti Racing,Dainese

WorldSBK U.S. Round: Rea Wins the Superpole Race, but Yields to Davies in Race 2, While Bautista has a Weekend to Forget and Pirelli Achieves Satisfaction with the New SCX Solution

Sixth Race Win in a Row for Rea who Pulls Ahead in the Championship by 81 Points over Bautista

SALINAS, California (July 14, 2019) – The Californian weekend of the MOTUL FIM World Superbike Championship, hosted by the WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca, ended with two wins for Jonathan Rea and Kawasaki and one for Chaz Davies on Ducati.

After winning Race 1 on Saturday, the four-time World Champion of Rea also won the Tissot Superpole® Race on Sunday morning, but was unable to defeat Chaz Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R) in Race 2. On the other hand, for the other rider representing the manufacturer from Borgo Panigale, Álvaro Bautista, it was a weekend to forget with a crash in Race 1 and a DNF in Race 2 when he was forced to retire on the third lap. The Spaniard, who was the favorite for the world title in the early part of the year, is now 81 points behind Rea and will be forced to make a difficult comeback after the summer break, in the hopes that his rival is unable to finish consistently on the podium, as he has so far.

Worth a mention is the excellent performance by the talented young Toprak Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) who, with his two third place finishes in Race 1 and Race 2 and his fourth place in the Tissot Superpole® Race, confirms his status as the best of the private team riders.

Pirelli can consider itself to be very satisfied with the race results at Laguna Seca, particularly in terms of the new SCX solution. This option, which Pirelli introduced in the Championship just this year as a pre-qualifying option to be used in Superpole®and in the 10-lap sprint race, was not only used by practically all the riders at Laguna Seca in the Tissot Superpole®Race, but it showed that it can also last the 25 laps of the standard-distance races, proving to be very competitive.

The Tissot Superpole® Race, starting at 11:00 a.m. local time with Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) in pole position, lost one of its key players as early as the first lap when Bautista (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R) tumbled disastrously to the ground just a few meters after the start due to contact with the rear tire of Toprak Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) who was overtaking him. Then, on the following lap, an accident at the top of the Corkscrew involving Alessandro Delbianco (Althea Mie Racing Team / Honda CBR1000RR) and wild card JD Beach (Attack Performance Estenson Yamaha / Yamaha YZF R1) forced race direction to red flag the race, bringing the action to a halt.
The three riders involved in the accidents wound up in the medical center and were unable to be on the grid for the restart, which anticipated an eight-lap race.

As in Race 1, in this sprint race, Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) once again started well and managed to maintain the race lead from start to finish, winning with a 2.5 second gap ahead of Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R) and 3.6 seconds ahead of Tom Sykes (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR) who, unlike in Race 1, succeeded in snatching the bottom step of the podium from Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) who finished fourth ahead of the other factory Kawasaki ridden by Leon Haslam.

WorldSBK Tissot Superpole® Race standings:

1) J. Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
2) C. Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
3) T. Sykes (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR)
4) T. Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
5) L. Haslam (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
6) A. Lowes (Pata Yamaha WorldSBK Team / Yamaha YZF R1)
7) L. Baz (Ten Kate Racing – Yamaha / Yamaha YZF R1)
8) J. Torres (Team Pedercini Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
9) L. Mercado (Orelac Racing VerdNatura / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
10) M. Van Der Mark (Pata Yamaha WorldSBK Team / Yamaha YZF R1)
11) S. Cortese (GRT Yamaha WorldSBK / Yamaha YZF R1)
12) M. Reiterberger (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR)
13) M. Rinaldi (Barni Racing Team / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
14) E. Laverty (Team Goeleven / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
15) R. Kiyonari (Moriwaki Althea Honda Team / Honda CBR1000RR)
16) M. Melandri (GRT Yamaha WorldSBK / Yamaha YZF R1)
NS) A. Delbianco (Althea Mie Racing Team / Honda CBR1000RR)
NS) J. Beach (Attack Performance Estenson Yamaha / Yamaha YZF R1)
NS) Á. Bautista (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R)

In Race 2, the order of the riders on the podium changed, but the faces were the same as those in Race 1. Winning this second race was Welshman Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R) who, unlike in Race 1, chose the same tire used by Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR), managing to overtake him on the inside at the first turn after the start and then maintaining the race lead all the way to the checkered flag. With the exception of this pass, throughout the rest of the race, the riders in the front maintained the positions taken at the start, with the reigning World Champion, after winning Race 1 and the Tissot Superpole® Race, finished on the second step of the podium more than three seconds behind Davies. Finishing third was Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) who repeated his performance from Race 1, once again the best independent team rider. Alex Lowes (Pata Yamaha WorldSBK Team / Yamaha YZF R1), Sykes (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR) and Haslam (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) completed the top-six race finishers.

After crashing in the Tissot Superpole Race, Bautista attempted to partake in Race 2 anyway, but made a bitter return to pit lane, retiring on the third lap. The same fate awaited Michael Van Der Mark on the sixth lap.

WorldSBK Race 2 standings:

1) C. Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
2) J. Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
3) T. Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
4) A. Lowes (Pata Yamaha WorldSBK Team / Yamaha YZF R1)
5) T. Sykes (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR)
6) L. Haslam (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
7) L. Baz (Ten Kate Racing – Yamaha / Yamaha YZF R1)
8) J. Torres (Team Pedercini Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
9) M. Melandri (GRT Yamaha WorldSBK / Yamaha YZF R1)
10) M. Rinaldi (Barni Racing Team / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
11) L. Mercado (Orelac Racing VerdNatura / Kawasaki ZX-10RR)
12) E. Laverty (Team Goeleven / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
13) M. Reiterberger (BMW Motorrad WorldSBK Team / BMW S1000 RR)
14) S. Cortese (GRT Yamaha WorldSBK / Yamaha YZF R1)
15) R. Kiyonari (Moriwaki Althea Honda Team / Honda CBR1000RR)
16) J. Beach (Attack Performance Estenson Yamaha / Yamaha YZF R1)
17) A. Delbianco (Althea Mie Racing Team / Honda CBR1000RR)
RT) Á. Bautista (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R)
RT) M. Van Der Mark (Pata Yamaha WorldSBK Team / Yamaha YZF R1)

The Pirelli solutions chosen by the riders for WorldSBK Tissot Superpole®Race and Race 2:

In the Tissot Superpole® Race, rider choices were rather unanimous. At the start, practically all the riders had chosen the combination of the standard SC1 125/70 tire (option A) on the front and the SCX (option X) on the rear. The exceptions were Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) and Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR), who used the Y0446 SC0 development solution (option A) on the rear, and Ryūichi Kiyonari (Moriwaki Althea Honda Team / Honda CBR1000RR) who, instead of the SC1 on the front, went with the X1071 SC2 development tire (option B). At the restart, Razgatlioglu (Turkish Puccetti Racing / Kawasaki ZX-10RR) also opted for the SCX rear, leaving Rea as the only rider on the grid mounting the Y0446 SC0 development tire. Also worth a mention is the change made by Delbianco, opting for the X1071 SC2 development tire at the restart, as Kiyonari had.

On the other hand, the choices for Race 2 were different, with the riders making various changes compared to Race 1. On the rear, Davies and Eugene Laverty went from the SCX (option X) to the Y0446 SC0 development tire (option A) and the standard SC0 (option B) respectively, unlike Leandro Mercado, Markus Reiterberger, Beach and Kiyonari, who switched to the SCX (option X). In the end, the grid was split equally for the rear among the three available solutions, whereas on the front, the standard SC1 125/70 (option A) remained the tire chosen by all the riders except for Kiyonari.

Pirelli statistics for WorldSBK Tissot Superpole® Race:

• Winner of the PIRELLI BEST LAP AWARDJonathan Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team WorldSBK), 1’22.700 on the 2nd lap

• Most used front solution: standard SC1 125/70 (17 out of 19 riders)

• Most used rear solution: SCX (18 out of 19 riders)

• Maximum race speed reached by Pirelli DIABLO™ Superbike tires: 260.8 km/h, achieved by Michael Ruben Rinaldi (Barni Racing Team / Ducati Panigale V4 R) on the 6th lap

• Air temperature: 18° C
 
• Asphalt temperature: 36° C

Pirelli statistics for WorldSBK Race 2:

• Winner of the PIRELLI BEST LAP AWARDChaz Davies (Aruba.it Racing – Ducati / Ducati Panigale V4 R), 1’22.976 on the 3rd lap

• Most used front solution: standard SC1 125/70 (18 out of 19 riders)

• Most used rear solution: development SC0 Y0446 200/65 (7 out of 19 riders)

• Maximum race speed reached by Pirelli DIABLO™ Superbike tires: 261.4 km/h, achieved by Michael Ruben Rinaldi (Barni Racing Team / Ducati Panigale V4 R) on the 7th lap

• Air temperature: 15° C
 
• Asphalt temperature: 46° C

 

The BMW Motorcycle Story – New Edition Book

By General Posts

Features
• The complete history of BMW motorcycles from 1923 up to the present day
• From the very first BMW motorcycle, the R32 boxer, which established the lineage that continues today
• Covers BMW’s strong history of competition and world speed record attempts
• A look at the innovative technical solutions that have been pioneered by BMW
• How BMW rose from the ashes of World War II to survive and prosper
• How the company survived the threat of bankruptcy in 1959
• The creation of BMW’s first Superbike during the 1970s: the R90S
• The 1980 R80 G/S established a niche dual purpose market
• BMW’s most recent exploits, and its successful entry into the world of extreme high performance with the S1000RR
• Bringing the story right up to date: BMW now produces its widest range ever, encompassing single, twin, four and six cylinders

Description
From Max Friz’s R32 of 1923, until the K1600 Grand America 95 years later, every BMW motorcycle has been unique, and many have incorporated unconventional technical solutions. But the road hasn’t always been smooth and BMW has survived many ups and downs.

Synopsis
This new edition of Ian Falloon’s classic book on the history of BMW Motorcycles brings the story right up to date, and now includes all models from 1923 right through to 2019.

Over the past 80 years, BMW motorcycles have provided a unique alternative to those of other manufacturers. Some motorcycles may have been faster, certainly others were cheaper, but with their emphasis on quality and reliability, none have emulated the practicality of a BMW. With its commitment to ease of serviceability, the BMW motorcycle has become the preferred choice for hundreds of thousands of motorcyclists around the world. BMW motorcycles are made to be ridden, and if the journey includes a mixture of straight roads and corners, there is no better motorcycle. Factor in the best range of factory luggage and accessories available, and the success of BMW motorcycles isn’t surprising.

Ownership of a BMW is also generally a long-term affair. Because of long model runs, the designs are so well developed there seems little need to update on the whim of fashion. This is most definitely a refreshing change from the current trend towards instant obsolescence.

Falloon is a prolific author and one of the world’s foremost motorcycle historians with years of experience. His other BMW books include BMW Boxer Twin Bible, BMW R90S, and the Complete Book of BMW Motorcycles.

Additional Information
Period Covered: 1923-2019
Models Covered: All BMW motorcycle models from 1923 up to 2019.
The definitive history of BMW motorcycles.
Covers all road and racing models from 1923.

BMW Engine Trikes: Campagna Motors T-Rex

By General Posts

BMW Engine Trikes: Campagna Motors offers luxury, performance & style
Part One of a detailed profile of Campagna Motors Trikes
by Ujjwal Dey

Did you know that the T-REX has been commercially available since the early 1990s.

Riding the T-Rex will make you feel like you own your personal Formula 1 Race Car for everyday city streets and highways, wiht 1.3 G, which is difficult to obtain even in a mainstream production car. It’s just 5 inches from the ground. It is wide, maybe wider than some production cars. Going top gear will push you back in the seats like a rolling rollercoaster through city streets. This however is not a car. It is a motorcycle.

Basically if you are not a regular motorcycle rider then you will be scared shitless on a T-Rex at full throttle, so close to the road, neighbouring truck wheels and your own bouncing front wheels.

No matter what your riding or driving background, T-Rex is a unique experience unmatched in speed and control. It is literally a street legal Formula 1 racetrack vehicle.

READ THE FEATURE ARTICLE CLICK HERE.

Ural Phenomenon : the Incredible Sidecar Sub-culture Among Motorcyclists

By General Posts

Soviet Russian espionage during World War II, Nazi motorcycles, hacking, ancient resource rich Ural mountains, a defunct brewery factory, privatization – what have these things got in common? A legendary sidecar wielding motorcycle is what they all mixed together to create in the heat of world economy.

CLICK TO READ NOW !!!

A legacy of WWII is now an ambassador of goodwill and friendship across the world. We present two-part Feature Article on Ural sidecar motorcycles.