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BMW Motorrad campaign for Women’s International Day in Motorcycle

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Bia Dantas celebrates Womens International Day in Motorcycle success campaign

BMW MOTORRAD launched campaign starring Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose was to emphasize the empowerment of women in commemoration of Women’s Day.

My time in the world of motorcycles just started & I couldn’t have a better start… happy to participate in this project, from a brand that I admire and with such outstanding professionals and women” — Bia Dantas

MIAMI, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, May 10, 2021 — Under the motto: Together we are stronger. Make Life a Ride. On March 8, BMW MOTORRAD launched a campaign starring the Influencer, DJ and Top Model Bia Dantas among other figures. The purpose of the campaign was to emphasize the empowerment of women in the framework of the commemoration of International Women’s Day.

The campaign was recorded in the vicinity of the Teotihuacan pyramids, which allowed the construction of a perfect and unique setting.

Weeks after the campaign launch, we can assure you that the campaign was very successful and had a relevant scope. Consolidating BMW Mexico as the leading motorcycling company and with great proximity to the female consumer.

It should be noted that the message of the campaign focuses on highlighting the path that each personality has had to travel with its challenges and the power of motorcycling to support the development of women in groups and individually. Emphasizing that together or individually with effort and preparation the woman is stronger. Bia Dantas was the perfect influencer for this campaign. Also, the crew had a Balloon Ride next to the Teotihuacan Pyramids that create a perfect environment for team production.

On the other hand, Bia Dantas highlighted that during the filming of the campaign she had her country very present: “I bring my jacket from my dear old Moto Club with the flags of my country and the Brazil-Alagoas State. Always representing ”.

BMW Motorrad Mexico is part of BMW de México S.A de C.V. with address at Av. Javier Barros Sierra 495, 14th floor Cdmx.

Recently Bia Dantas starred on the cover of Glamour Bulgaria with a production dedicated to commemorating the mergers between the different cultures of Brazil. Also, Bia Dantas was cover in Harpers Bazaar a few weeks ago.

Bianca Dantas is an Influencer, DJ and Top Model. Account @biadantasbr. She has collaborated in various campaigns and editorials, highlighting covers of world-renowned titles such as Harpers Bazaar, Vogue Magazine, and Glamor. She currently stands out in the world of music under the name of DJ BiaD @ Biad.oficial. She was born in Brazil and currently lives in Mexico City.

 

Ride Review of BMW R18

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by Anthony Conroy from https://www.post-gazette.com

BMW’s R18 First Edition is powerful, simple and sophisticated

Size isn’t everything, the old saying goes, but when you take a ride aboard BMW Motorrad’s R18 First Edition, its size is impossible to ignore.

Put a leg over the seat, settle in and take in those two massive, chromed cylinder covers sitting in front of you, each one its own 901cc power-making factory. It’s like sitting on the neck of a shiny hammerhead shark.

The engine — a twin-cylinder configuration known as a Boxer — has been BMW’s signature since 1923. But the Boxer on the R18 is the largest the German manufacturer has ever produced, with a claimed output of 91 horsepower and 116 pounds-foot of torque.

Other manufacturers will claim to have bigger and better numbers, but the R18 isn’t designed for life on the rowdy edge. It’s a power cruiser, but with the soul of something vintage and simple. A modern throwback, if you will.

In fact, despite the $20,000 price tag, there aren’t many frills. Some adjustability in the rear, none in the front. Heated grips. A reverse gear. BMW’s automatic stability control, which is essentially traction control. And three power modes: Rock, Roll and Rain. For our purposes, those might as well have been called Road Rage, Easy Jaunt and Tip-Toeing Through the Puddles.

In other words, let’s Rock.

The R18 has a keyless ignition and once the starter is pushed, the bike thunders and shudders to life. At stops, there’s quite a bit of vibration, but that’s exactly what you’d expect with two giant metal buckets rotating and internally combusting between your legs. The vibrations don’t exactly fade away once on the go — you’ll see a lot of blurring in the rear view mirrors, but I never felt any numbness in the hands, feet or butt after long rides.

Rock mode taps into the full potential of the beastly Boxer. You’ll feel the torque at 3,000 rpm. Max horsepower comes at 4,750 rpm. The best part is there’s nothing grabby or choppy about its power delivery. A sharp pull on the throttle produces smooth, linear power through six gears. Despite the nearly 800 pounds of motorcycle sitting beneath you, the bike requires minimum inputs at speed. A long wheelbase and a wonderful center of gravity contribute to the bike’s stability. Handlebars that are wide but nicely swept provide excellent leverage and contribute to the bike’s agility.

And it is agile — at speed anyway. It actually feels light going around fast, sweeping turns. And going faster feels right, as your feet are not in front of you, like with most American cruisers. They’re underneath you, which seems more natural during aggressive riding.

At the front wheel, twin four-piston calipers developed in-house by BMW are paired with dual 300mm discs to slow down the big Beemer. When the pace gets really slow — like in a parking lot — the R18’s weight does feel a bit cumbersome, like pushing around a fully-dressed Harley-Davidson without the cabinetry.

Potential buyers also will need to carefully decide how they intend to ride the bike, particularly if long hauls are on the agenda. Those massive cylinders look great, but they make the prospect of having highway pegs impossible. There’s also no back rest or cruise control (at least not on the First Edition), so it’s not the kind of bike you’ll be able to kick back on while eating up highway miles. The tank holds 3.2 gallons of fuel with a 1-gallon reserve, so expect to get around 120 miles per fill-up. For some reason, BMW opted against a fuel gauge. However, a warning light will let you know when you have about 20 miles left to go.

Riders looking for a more travel-friendly R18 right out of the box may want to opt for the Classic model, which comes with a windscreen and baggage, rather than the First Edition. To be honest, there will be no shortage of aftermarket accessories for any model marketed under the R18 badge.

The BMW was flawless in tearing around town and rural backroads, with the seating position and seat itself good for all-day riding. There’s 3½ inches of travel at the rear suspension, but it’s a bit stiff. Best to avoid the bumps. Ergonomically, there wasn’t much to complain about.

One complaint, if you can call it that, is that the R18 has a very quiet transmission. When going from neutral to first gear, there was hardly ever a sound or a shimmy — no knock, ping or usual KERTHUNK! that I’m used to hearing (and feeling). Without that, quite frankly, I sometimes found myself doing double-takes for the neutral light to make sure I was in gear before speeding away.

In other words, leave it to the Germans to make something so mechanically perfect that it’s worth complaining about.

Aesthetically, it’s hard to miss those giant cylinders, but there are other visual items that shouldn’t go unnoticed.

If chrome is your thing, there’s no shortage of it, especially on those those wonderful looking fishtail mufflers. They don’t make a lot of sound, but they are beautiful to look at and give the R18 a distinctive look. Also chromed is the front of the engine housing. Overall, the housing eliminates clutter and gives the bike a polished, clean look, but it does make everything else — apart from the cylinder heads — a bit of a mystery.

Thankfully, for those who need to see something mechanical to soothe our inner motorhead, BMW’s engineers gave us an exposed bevel-geared driveshaft. Seeing it in action while actually riding is a bit of a task, but we’ll take mechanical porn however we can get it.

Overall, this Beemer is an excellent motorcycle. The price tag may be a bit on the high side, but the R18 is for owners wanting two things: a cruiser with impressive performance and one that distinguishes itself from American cruisers and Japanese knock-offs. The R18 First Edition definitely accomplishes both goals.

BMW celebrates 40 years of GS with Special Editions

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by Inigo Roces from https://mb.com.ph

Easily one of BMW Motorrad’s most popular line of motorcycles is the GS. Standing for Gelände/Straße (on and off-road), the very first model debuted in 1980 in the form of the R80 G/S. The R80 featured innovative technology like the use of the shaft drive, and was later entered into the Paris-Dakar Rally.

Since then, the GS has continued to evolve with its engine displacement growing and the lineup expanding to become the family that we know it as today. To date, BMW Motorrad has been able to hand over more than 1.2 million BMW GS models to customers, worldwide.

In celebration of its 40 years of success, BMW is offering special 40 Years of GS limited edition models, each with a unique livery, across its lineup.

In a virtual launch, BMW unveiled the six motorcycle models that will be sporting this unique livery and features: the BMW G 310 GS, F 750 GS, F 850 GS, RnineT Urban GS, R 1250 GS, and the R 1250 GS Adventure. These special editions will only be available in 2021 in limited numbers while supplies last.

Each 40 Years GS limited edition motorcycle comes with a unique design that pays homage tothe pioneer of the enduro motorcycle segment, the BMW R 100 GS in ‘bumblebee’ livery.

G310 GS
The special edition lineup begins with the G 310 GS (P320,000.00). This most accessible member of the GS family, it comes with ride-by-wire technology, an LED headlight and indicators, adjustable brake and clutch levers, ABS, a stainless steel exhaust, and a luggage rack fitted as standard.

F 750 GS
Next up is the first of the parallel twins, the F 750 GS (P855,000.00). This middleweight adventure bike is fitted with an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket.

F 850 GS
Higher up on the lineup is the F 850 GS (P975,000.00). Similar to the F750, it has an LED headlight with daytime running lamps and LED indicators, keyless ride system, a 6.5 inch full-color TFT display. It also comes with the enviable electronic riding aids like Riding Modes Pro (Dynamic and Enduro), Gear Shift Assistant Pro, ABS Pro, Dynamic Traction Control with MSR, Tire pressure control and a 12V and USB power socket. The F 850 also gets the enviable gold wheels.

RnineT Urban GS
Easily the hot rod of the family is the RnineT Urban GS (P1,275,000.00). This model will appeal to those that enjoy customizing with its Option 719 cylinder head covers, gold wheels, LED headlight with daytime running light, and speed indicator with on-board computer.

Among its electronic features are ABS, Riding Modes Pro (including Riding Mode Dirt), Cruise Control, an ASC. It doesn’t have to be confined to the city with features like off-road tires and heated grips.

R 1250 GS
Naturally, the flagship R 1250 GS and GS Adventure also get the 40 Years of GS treatment.

These include black and yellow Option 719 cylinder head covers, short sport windscreen in yellow, gold handlebars, gold wheels, full LED headlight with adaptive cornering function and cruising light, keyless ride, and heated grips.

Among its electronic features are Riding Modes Pro (with Dynamic, Dynamic Pro, Enduro, and Enduro Pro modes), customizable modes, Dynamic ESa with automatic load leveling and damping, Gear Shift Assistant Pro, Hill Start Control Pro, and Dynamic Stability Control with Dynamic Brace Control.

They’re now available at all BMW Motorrad dealers.

BMW F900R Force Limited Edition Bike

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by Otilia Drăgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

Aviation-Inspired F 900 R Force Is BMW’s Most Recent Limited Edition Bike

BMW is synonymous with luxury but, in case you didn’t know, the Group has also dipped their toe in more affordable market segments, with the launch of the F 900 R, last year. The middleweight motorcycle was targeted at beginner riders, in particular, and it looks like that was successful, because there’s a new launch this year.

BMW launched the F 900 R Force at Lyon, as a limited edition motorcycle inspired by aviation. And the design of this new BMW model is indeed eye-catching. The San Marino metallic blue, with neon yellow accents, inspires dynamism and is reminiscent of aircraft design. The F 900 R Force’s sleek silhouette is also derived from fighter plane design.

Apart from its unique design, the new, limited edition BMW bike has similar features to the first F 900 R. The 895cc parallel-twin engine is able to deliver 67 lb.-ft.(31nm) of torque at 6,500 rpm, and has a maximum capacity of 99 hp.

Both F 900 models are also fitted with an electronically adjustable suspension, the Gear Shift Assist Pro, which adds to the sport character of these bikes. The adaptive headlight with LED elements gives the rider the best illumination when approaching curves, and several safety-features, like Dynamic Traction Control and Engine Braking Control, prevent sliding and help ensure a smoother ride.

Aimed mostly at younger riders, the F 900 R Force also features an A2 restriction kit, which means that it can be detuned, in order to be accessible to those who have an A2 license. And it can be unlocked at a later time, to access its full power.

Sadly, for those in other parts of the world, the new BMW motorcycle is only available to customers in France and there are only 300 bikes of this kind on the market. The F 900 R Force comes with a € 9,790 ($ 11,800) price tag, almost €1,000 more than the previous version.

10 Best Motorcycle Companies in the World

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by Qasim Aslam from https://www.insidermonkey.com

Which big players are ruling the motorcycle industry? This article is going to tell you about the 10 best motorcycle manufacturers in the world right now.

10. Indian Motorcycle/Polaris Inc. (NYSE: PII)

Polaris claims to be America’s first motorcycle company as it traces its origin back to 1901. It was established by an accomplished Bicycle racer George M. Hendee with the name of Hendee Manufacturing Company and established its first factory in downtown Springfield, USA in 1901. The company produced motorcycles for US Army during World War I. The name Hendee Manufacturing Company was changed to ‘The Indian Motorcycle Company’ in 1923. The company was closed in 1953 and several attempts failed to restart production until it was reborn with the name ‘Indian Motorcycle’ when Polaris Industries acquired it in 2011. It has over 300 international dealers in addition to a network of over 200 dealers in North America. Total sales of Indian Motorcycle and Polaris Slingshot in 2020 totaled 330,000 units. North America is the biggest market for them, where they sold 190000 units.

Indian Motorcycle currently competes only in three segments of the motorcycle industry that are cruiser, touring, and standard motorcycles and so far they do not offer sports bikes. Their bikes are known for heritage-inspired designs, premium suspension, and beautiful styling. The most popular model of Indian Motorcycle is no other than ‘Scout’ as currently it is the finest cruiser bike in the motorcycle market.

9. KTM Industries AG Inhaber-Aktie (XSTU: KTMI.SG)

KTM is currently the largest producer of motorcycles in Europe. The Austrian company which traces its origin from an engine repair shop in Austria made its first motorcycle in 1953. KTM went bankrupt in 1991 and was restructured in 1992. Now, KTM is jointly owned by Pierer Mobility AG and Bajaj Auto. Despite the impact of the pandemic, KTM was able to sell 212,713 units of motorcycles in 2020.

KTM offers a broad range of models for different purposes. Its ‘1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R’ having 1301 cc engine is capable to run on any terrain. But, the best thing about KTM is that it is superb in making dirt bikes. KTM has won 12 of the last 13 titles in the MX2 World Motocross Championship. Similarly, it has seen 18 consecutive victories from 2001 to 2019 in Dakar Rally.

8. Triumph Motorcycles Ltd

Triumph is the biggest British motorcycle manufacturing company. The organization made its first motorized cycle ‘The Triumph 1’ in 1902. Triumph supplied motorcycles for the British military in both the World Wars. Following a fiscal crisis, the company disappeared in the 1980s and reemerged after a few years with its Headquarters at Hinckley, United Kingdom. Since then, Triumph has seen continued success. Triumph has six production factories along with a network of around 700 dealerships to market and distribute its products.

Triumph witnessed the highest level of annual sales in 2017 when its sales peaked at 60,628 units. In the fiscal year 2020 that ended on June 30, 2020, the company could sell only 48,993 motorcycles with a turnover of around £480 ( or about $593.232) million, largely due to the impact of the pandemic. Distinct features of Triumph include retaining classic charm as many of their bikes like the Bonneville family have charming heritage designs that are equipped with modern technology.

Moreover, they try to emulate the performance of their competitors’ bikes that are priced twice as their bikes. Thus, their bikes having more or less the same traits as Ducati or BMW has, come at much lower and affordable prices. Many of their bikes fall in the price range of $10000 to $15000. Triumph’s most expensive motorcycle ‘ROCKET 3 GT TRIPLE BLACK’ with outstanding technology and incredible 2500cc, the largest production motorcycle engine, costs only $24,400.

7. Suzuki Motor Corporation (TYO: 7269.T)

Japanese organization Suzuki has been producing some of the most exciting models of motorcycles for decades. The company made its first motorized bicycle in 1952 leading to the establishment of the present-day Suzuki ‘S’ in 1958. Today, Suzuki has 35 production facilities in 23 countries and the widest network of distributors among all bike manufacturers, comprising 133 distributors in 192 countries.

In the fiscal year 2019 that ended in March 2020, the motorcycle segment of Suzuki sold 1,708,000 units recording a year-on-year decline of 2.1%. Sales revenues also dipped by 4.9% to $2.26 billion from $3.43 billion. Such huge numbers in sales speak well for the demand of Suzuki in the motorcycle market.

So what are the features that compel huge swathes of the motorcycle market to buy their motorcycles? Certainly, its durability, affordability, and diverse product range make it one of the most in-demand brands of motorcycles. Suzuki motorcycles are known to last long, especially their city riding models can serve your purpose for decades. Moreover, their bikes are affordable as in many developing countries they sell bikes that cost even less than $1000. In addition to this, they have a diverse range of motorcycles for different types of customers including sports bikes, cruisers, touring, and dirt bikes.

6. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (OTC: KWHIY)

Kawasaki motorcycles are manufactured by the Motorcycle & Engine segment of Japanese multinational Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industries. The company started making motorcycle engines in 1953 and released its first Motorcycle “B7” in 1961. Other than Japan, Kawasaki motorcycle & engine company has 12 production and sales subsidiaries in 10 different countries, having around 5,000 employees. The key to their success is universality. They cater to all types of customers. They have motorcycles with a price range from $2300 to $550000.

If you are not well-off economically, that’s not an issue, Kawasaki has 110cc KLX series for you with price tags varying from $2300 to $2550. On the contrary, Kawasaki offers NINJA H2 R at $55000 to sports bike lovers. Moreover, by getting an understanding of local culture in different countries, they craft their product according to the local needs which goes a long way for them in getting around half a million yearly sales. Kawasaki recorded all-time high annual sales when it sold 550000 units in 2018. In the fiscal year 2020 that ended on 31st March 2020, Kawasaki’s motorcycle business faced a decline in sales and the annual revenue decreased to $3.13 billion from $3.22 billion.

Kawasaki offers a broad range of models; their products are comparatively less costly than their competitors. Furthermore, they target all segments of the motorcycle market and are known for the ultra-fast speed of their sports bikes as 7 of the last 8 World Superbikes championships were won by Kawasaki. ZX-10RR is their most famous superbike that won the last 4 superbike championships consecutively.

5. BMW – Bayerische Motoren Werke Aktiengesellschaft (ETR: BMW.DE)

BMW is a German multinational corporation and its motorcycle segment is known as BMW Motorrad. The Munich-based organization made its first motorcycle in 1923. Currently, its motorcycles are sold by more than 1,200 dealerships and importers in over 90 countries. BMW experienced a continuous rise in yearly sales from 2011 to 2019 as the number of motorcycle sales reached an all-time high figure of 175,162. Despite the pandemic-related decline in sales, BMW Motorrad sold 169,272 motorcycles worldwide in the financial year 2020.

Unlike its competitors, BMW Motorrad faced a year-on-year decline of only 3.4% in its sales and generated a sales revenue of €2284 (or about $2774.4) million in 2020. The top four big markets for the organization are Germany, France, Italy, and the U.S. Currently, they offer models in sport, tour, roadster, adventure, and urban mobility categories. The most compelling features of BMW motorcycles are aesthetics, excellent speed, safety, and reliability. They have produced some of the most beautiful bikes like BMW R 18 Cruiser and BMW RGS1150 with a dazzling outlook. They adopt a host of active and passive safety measures, to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries which include a highly effective braking system, optimized suspension tuning, and training for bikers.

BMW Motorrad offers training for BMW motorcycles in over 30 countries. Their top-notch model BMW S 1000 RR is a perfect blend of all of their outstanding features. With a captivating outlook and all of its amazing features including traction control, cruise control, and riding modes, it mesmerized the world of motorcycles at the time of its initial launch in 2009.

4. Harley-Davidson, Inc. (NYSE: HOG)

Next in the line is American Icon, Harley Davidson. The company made its first motorized bicycle in 1903 and gained fame after serving U.S troops in the First World War. Harley Davidson is the oldest continuously operating American motorcycle company. Today, Harley-Davidson has a global outreach with a network of 1379 dealers spanning across the world.

Despite the devastating impact of the pandemic on sales, Harley-Davidson managed to sell 180,248 motorcycles in the financial year 2020 with a sales revenue of $4.05 billion. They are specialized in large displacement cruisers, street motorcycles, and touring motorcycles. They do not manufacture sports bikes. Harley Davidson’s Iron 883 is considered their most popular brand. Having an average price of $20,338 in 2019, Harley-Davidson is considerably expensive than some of its competitors but their quality certainly stands up to their price.

Among big motorcycle companies, Harley-Davidson has the highest level of customer satisfaction and loyalty. Through their unique traits, they have been able to create an emotional bond with their customers as many of them can be seen deliberately tattooing the company logo on their bodies.

3. Ducati (ETR: VOW3)

Italian sensation Ducati stands at the third spot. Ducati started manufacturing Motorcycles in 1950 and it became part of Volkswagen Group (ETR: VOW3) in 2012. The most defining features of Ducati motorcycles are beauty, brisk speed, and high-price tags. As opposed to Japanese manufacturers, Ducati does not focus on making cheap and cost-effective motorcycles. It targets the premium segment of the motorcycle market, so their motorcycles are usually expensive but of supreme quality. Their desmodromic valve technology has helped them create many ultra-fast superbikes over the years. The fact that Ducati has won 17 World Superbike Titles, higher than all other manufacturers combined, further accentuates their position as top superbike manufacturers.

Aesthetics combined with state-of-the-art technology define Ducati motorcycles. You cannot come out of their showroom without being impressed by the beauty and refinement of their motorcycles. In 2019 Ducati sold 53184 units with a turnover of €716 ( or about $803.3) million. Notwithstanding exceptionally high prices, Ducati has been able to sell around 50 thousand units annually as the quality of their bikes worth every single penny the customer pays. One out of every four superbikes sold worldwide in 2018 belonged to the Panigale family of Ducati.

2. Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (NYSE: HMC)

Japanese giant in the motorcycle industry Honda lies at the second spot in the list of best motorcycle companies in the world. Honda is currently the largest producer of motorcycles on planet earth. The Tokyo-based organization sold 19.3 million motorcycles worldwide during the fiscal year 2020. Since its inception in 1949, Honda has sold over 300,000,000 units cumulatively. These figures testify its popularity in the motorcycle market. Honda has a global supply chain with 35 manufacturing plants in 21 different countries. The organization created history in 2017 when the production of ‘Honda Super Cub’ reached a milestone of 100 million units.

Honda gained traction in many developing countries owing to its cost-effectiveness and reliability. Their street bikes are famous for efficient engines that give extra mileage. They are known for making the most fuel-efficient bikes. It seems some of their bikes do not consume fuel at all and they just have to sniff fuel to get going. Honda CBF125 and Honda NC750X are famous in many countries for their fuel efficiency. Not only this, with 153 wins in MotoGP races, Honda has another jewel in its crown. Honda has produced one of the best racing motorcycles in its CBR series. Other than standard motorcycles, Honda produces cruisers, sports bikes, dirt bikes, and scooters.

The popularity of Honda can be gauged from the fact that in many countries word ‘Honda’ has become synonymous with the motorcycle.

1. Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. (OTC: YAMHF)

Yamaha occupies the top slot in the list of best motorcycle companies. Yamaha Motors headquartered in Iwata, Japan, has 135 subsidiaries, with more than 52,000 employees to conduct its production and marketing operations. In Financial Year 2019, Yamaha sold around five million motorbikes worldwide with annual sales revenue of $15.3 billion which speaks volumes for its popularity among two-wheel lovers. After decades of refinement and innovation, Yamaha is capable of manufacturing the highest quality products at a reasonable price.

Let’s take a look at their different models of Yamaha which proved to be the best in the motorcycle industry. Yamaha’s MT family is the best series of naked bikes. Its MT-07 is the best-selling hyper naked bike as over 125,000 units have been sold since its launch in 2014. Yamaha Tenere 700 with its adventure-focused slim body, flat seat, and the advanced twin-cylinder engine is a wonderful bike for adventure touring. Similarly, they provide YZF-R1M, which is one of the best sports bikes, only for $26,099. They make exceptional bikes for anyone who wants one.

Whether you are an adrenaline junkie looking for speed and excitement, a sports cyclist, or a daily rider; Yamaha has the best product for you in their line-up.

Conclusion

In a nutshell, every motorcycle manufacturer has its unique and special traits along with a loyal fan base. Every company has some models that are matchless. Japanese manufacturers still rule the motorcycle industry as they have a low cost of production, hence low price than their European and American competitors.

Moreover, Japanese bikes are easy to maintain and more reliable than others. But certainly, in some aspects like beautiful styling and technological sophistication, European and American brands outshine their Japanese competitors.

Car and Motorcycle Companies Now Making Electric Bikes

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Lee Iacocca with his electric bike in 1998. It had a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour.

by Roy Furchgott from https://www.nytimes.com

They see branding opportunities as the pandemic and a desire by cities to curb traffic propel e-bike sales to new heights.

The transportation industry has seen the future, and the future is 1895.

That was the year Ogden Bolton Jr. of Canton, Ohio, was awarded U.S. Patent 552,271 for an “electrical bicycle.” A century and change later, electric bikes have gained new currency as car and motorcycle companies like Ducati, Harley-Davidson, Jeep, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Yamaha have horned into the market with their own designs.

While the pandemic has accelerated bike sales, the overriding attraction is that cities worldwide are beginning to restrict motor traffic. These companies are betting that e-bikes are the urban vehicles of tomorrow — or at least vehicles for good publicity today.

“In the past 12 to 18 months, you have seen a lot of new brands come into the market,” said Andrew Engelmann, an e-bike sales and marketing manager at Yamaha, which has been in the electric bike business since 1993 and claims sales of two million worldwide. “We in the U.S. have not seen this new energy toward cycling since Lance Armstrong won the Tour de France.”

Credit the coronavirus pandemic, which has ignited bike sales of all stripes, but none so much as e-bikes. While retail unit sales of bicycles from January to October last year were up 46 percent from a year earlier, electric bikes were up 140 percent. Measured in dollars, regular bikes were up 67 percent and e-bikes 158 percent — so don’t expect a discount. Those numbers, from the market researchers at NPD, do not include online-only retailers such as Rad Power Bikes, so sales may actually be higher still.

Ogden Bolton aside, there is a historical connection between bicycles and motorcycles. Many early motorcycles came from bicycle makers that simply clapped a motor on a bike, often retaining the pedals in the style of a moped.

The automotive industry’s bicycle connection is more recent, with the likes of Malcolm Bricklin and Lee Iacocca introducing electric bikes in the ’90s. Both flopped. Mr. Iacocca’s design, typical for the time, was hampered by a lead-acid battery with a 15-mile range and a top speed of 15 miles an hour. Many car companies, including Ford, Audi, Maserati and BMW, have gotten into and out of e-bikes since.

“No car company has had any success selling an electric bicycle,” said Don DiCostanzo, chief executive of Pedego Electric Bikes, who in 2014 licensed a bike design to Ford. “It’s fool’s gold. It can never replace the profit on a car.”

Yet car and motorcycle makers are being drawn in. “I think they are seeing a lot of the same opportunity we see,” said Ian Kenny, who leads the e-bike effort at the bicycle company Specialized. “But I think there is a very big difference between demonstrating you can do something and doing something very well at scale.”

However, changes in the way people get about, especially in Europe and Asia, are enticing motor vehicle companies that operate internationally. Overseas, in cities that manage pollution and overcrowded streets by restricting motor traffic, e-bikes often fill a gap.

“In Europe, the e-bike is more of a fundamental transportation tool,” said Dirk Sorenson, an analyst for NPD. London, Madrid, Oslo and Paris are among the growing number of cities restricting downtown traffic.

The pandemic has American cities testing similar restrictions. Boston, Minneapolis and a number of California cities have instituted Slow Streets programs, restricting motor traffic on side streets in favor of cycling and walking. It even has UPS, Amazon and DHL trying out e-cargo bikes in New York.

“There is a huge opportunity for e-bikes in the U.S., which is a huge untapped market,” said Rasheq Zarif, a mobility technology expert for the consulting firm Deloitte.

Some companies are preparing now for the possibility that “micromobility,” as the buzzword has it, will catch on here.

“Let’s imagine Harley-Davison is not a motorcycle company but a mobility company,” said Aaron Frank, brand director for Serial 1, which builds an e-bike in partnership with Harley. “There is a strong argument we can do for urban commuters what Harley-Davison did for motorcycles.”

Other companies see e-bikes as a gateway to sell their primary products. Though best known for its motorcycles, Ducati North America wants e-bikes to “potentially turn people on to Ducati,” its chief executive, Jason Chinnock, said. “And we’ve seen that with people at some events and with the media reaching out.”

E-bikes may be more expensive than bicycles, but are cheaper than cars or motorcycles. And improved motor and battery technology is bringing prices down. Low-priced e-bikes with a motor in the wheel hub — similar to that 1895 design — can be had for about $1,000. Prices for versions with more complex, geared motors at the pedals can reach more than $10,000.

“Spending $1,000 on a bike seems out there,” Mr. Kenny said, “but when you don’t look at it as a toy — when it becomes transportation — it becomes a very different conversation.”

Price isn’t the only hurdle. E-bikes confront a crippling hodgepodge of laws. Although the Consumer Product Safety Commission deemed “low speed” e-bikes (with a motor equivalent to 1 horsepower or less) a bicycle, states still decide where that bike can be ridden.

“It’s up to 50 states to define the use, and that’s been a big problem in the past,” said Claudia Wasko, general manager of Bosch eBike, a prominent manufacturer of drive systems.

The PeopleForBikes coalition drafted model state legislation to allow most e-bikes in bike lanes and parks. It suggests three classes of e-bike, with a top speed between 20 and 28 m.p.h. Twenty-eight states have adopted some version of the legislation.

Some companies may be less concerned with the future of mobility and more interested in getting some attention now.

“I think it’s a halo thing,” said Mr. DiCostanzo, whose company has produced e-bikes for Tommy Bahama, Ford and others. Halo vehicles represent a brand’s aspirations, like concept cars.

“I think that’s what it is for Ford,” he added. “They wanted it for window dressing, and that’s what they got. I think they sold 500 in the five years it ran.”

Mercedes, which is taking orders for its top-of-the-line Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula One Team V11 e-bike at $12,000, said it was a chance to showcase its ability with high-tech materials from carbon fiber to paint.

“High-performance road bikes and e-bikes provide a great way to showcase such technologies into a range of consumer products,” said Damian Cook, a spokesman.

For some in the bicycle industry this all smacks of déjà vu. In the 1970s, a bike boom was thought to presage a new future for transportation in which cycling was central. But it failed. Though there were many contributing factors, roads weren’t made more bicycle-friendly and people didn’t want to arrive at work sweaty.

With the combination of Slow Streets programs, which address the first problem, electric bikes, which address the second, and a pandemic that has given people a chance to adjust to both, experts like Mr. Zarif find hope.

“When you give people a chance to try something, it reduces resistance to change,” he said. “As a society, the reality is we go forward — we don’t go backward.”

BMW Motorcycles the First to Use Bosch’s New Integrated Split Screen Display

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Providing motorcycle riders with the same level of infotainment technology already available for drivers has proven to be quite a challenge. Because of the particularities of two-wheeled motoring, technologies that have been available in cars for some time now are just beginning to be adopted.

Take for instance Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, which have been brought as standard to the range of bikes just this year by two of the biggest names of the industry, Harley-Davidson and Indian. And this sluggishness applies to hardware as well.

In a move that is certain to cause a stir, parts supplier Bosch announced at the beginning of the month the launch of its (and the world’s) first integrated split screen for motorcycles, but also a smartphone integration solution called mySPIN.

The screen is a TFT 10.25-inch in size that can simultaneously display relevant vehicle information, and smartphone apps content like navigation. According to Bosch, BMW motorcycles (we are not being told which ones) will be the first to use them this year (also, unclear when will BMW have time to integrate it in its bikes in the little time left until the end of 2020).

As for the mySPIN app, it was designed to work with both the split screen and the usual ones. Ducati, for instance, will deploy it together with a new 6.5-inch display without the split-screen option, and Kawasaki will follow, although we’re not told with what screen it will use.

mySPIN has been around for about two years now in the watersports segment, but now expands to motorcycles to provide “smartphone content in an integrated and easy way while riding their bike.” Using it, riders get access to a community, Dash Radio, Genius Maps and Sygic, among others.

“Our clusters in combination with mySPIN offer a new riding experience with more safety and convenience for motorcycle riders. For us, this is the next step in terms of connectivity for motorcycles,” says Geoff Liersch, President of the Two-Wheeler & Powersports unit at Bosch.

Hot New BMW Roadster Motorcycles Coming

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There are presently four roadster motorcycles in BMW Motorrad’s lineup for the U.S. market: the R 1250 R, the S 1000 R, the F 900 R, and the G 310 R. As of later this week, that number will grow, as the Bavarians are getting ready to present two new models in the range.

The announcement was made with just a couple of days left before the unveiling is set to take place. The Germans will be showing the two new bikes on their Youtube and Facebook channels on Thursday, November 19, starting at 4.00 pm CEST.

We are also promised “exciting guests,” but more importantly the launch of the configurator for the two new models as soon as the presentation concludes. Naturally, we’ll be covering the story as soon as the info and photos for the bikes are released, so check back here for more later in the week.

Despite all the things going on in the world, BMW has been very active in 2020 on the motorcycle front, a sign that in the coming years it will focus more on this industry.

The biggest reveal of the year for the Germans was the R 18, the first entry in the cruiser segment since the R1200 RC (and a direct jab at Harley-Davidson), but also a bike powered by the “most powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.”

More recently, we’ve been given a preview at the bike maker’s plans for the electrified scooter segment, with the presentation of the near-production version of the Concept Link. Called Definition CE 04, the electric two-wheeler is supposed to revolutionize the segment through a series of technological advancements, including the use of the largest display in the scooter world, a 10.25-inch unit.

Given how extreme these two premieres of 2020 have been, we expect BMW to up the stakes in the roadster segment as well as soon as the new models are unveiled.

BMW and Bosch will debut a massive 10.25-inch motorcycle dashboard in 2021

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by Kyle Hyatt from https://www.cnet.com

The screen will also be the first to offer split-screen functionality for your phone.

BMW’s big screen will split your bike’s dash between phone and bike info.

We recently covered BMW Motorrad’s totally cyberpunk and totally excellent CE04 scooter concept, and one of that vehicle’s coolest features was a 10.25-inch information screen for the rider. A screen that size is pretty big in a car, and on a motorcycle or scooter, it’d be gargantuan, but that’s not going to stop the Germans.

See, BMW is planning on adding that 10.25-inch screen to some of its motorcycles in 2021, according to an announcement made Thursday by Tier 1 supplier Bosch. And it gets more interesting than that because this screen is the first motorcycle TFT that can do split-screen. By that I mean you can have your motorcycle’s dash information on one side and your phone’s info on the other.

The screen can do this magic trick thanks to a piece of software for your phone called from Bosch called MySpin, and while the big screen is going to hit BMW first, Bosch also confirms that both Ducati and Kawasaki have MySpin-based apps of their own in the works, though those are meant to work with existing 6.5-inch screens.

The big problem with that much smartphone integration is the possibility of distraction for the rider, which is dangerous in a car, borderline suicidal on a motorcycle. Bosch believes it’s nailed down a way to bring smartphone integration to a motorcycle dash without that risk. Based on what we can tell, it involves limiting access to only motorcycle-specific apps like Rever (which is excellent and something I use personally).

The push toward TFT LCD dashes on motorcycles has been going on for a few years now, and it’s exciting to see screens get bigger, better and more functional. We’d like to see more of these screens become touchscreens too — like on our long-term Indian FTR1200 — but it remains to be seen if that will be the case with the big Bosch unit.

Futuristic Electric Scooter from BMW

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Back in 2017, BMW’s motorcycle company Motorrad did the unthinkable and presented not only a scooter, but an electric one. It was called Concept Link, and, it seems, the contraption is about to spawn a production version: it’s called, for now, Definition CE 04, and was shown as part of BMW’s #NEXTGen 2020 event this week.

BMW calls the two-wheeler you see in the gallery above a “near-series” version of the Concept Link. It’s not all that different, visually speaking, from the idea that led to its creation, and that’s a good thing because the first one looked really cool.

The Germans set out to seriously differentiate their product from everything else in the segment. And they kind of achieved that, as the scooter does look a lot more futuristic and high-tech than everything else out there. It’s perhaps even cooler than most of the motorcycles Motorrad is responsible and so famous for.

The two-wheeler is supposed to be high tech. It sports a massive 10.25-inch display – the largest in the scooter world – and it even comes with smart rider equipment. That translates into stuff like light guides integrated in the sleeves and hood, or inductive charging tech in the pocket of a parka for the smartphone’s needs.

“We have managed to transfer many innovative elements and details of the concept into the series,” said in a statement Alexander Buckan, Head of Vehicle Design BMW Motorrad.

“The new architecture has led to a visual revolution and has produced many new design themes. Maybe it will polarise, but it will definitely stand out.”

Of course, it all sounds way too good to be real, at least at this point in time. And BMW, despite claiming this scooter and the accompanying tech are near-series version, there is no mention as to when we should expect to actually see it on the road.

Also, we have no info yet on the powertrain for the thing, apart from the fact that it would be electric.