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Cops Stealing Motorcycles

By General Posts

True Story by Rogue

There have been many stories about stolen motorcycles over the years and one that has to be included is about a Connecticut State Trooper R.J Kenny. We originally did some articles on him and his tactics back in the ’70s in Easyriders and were retaliated against for doing so. More on that as the article continues.

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Batman body double drives motorcycle through streets for filming of The Flash

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by Sean O’grady For Mailonline from https://www.dailymail.co.uk

Batman body double drives motorcycle through streets of Glasgow during filming with both Ben Affleck AND Michael Keaton taking on the role of Caped Crusader.

A Batman body double drove the Batcycle through the street’s of Glasgow as filming of The Flash got underway on Monday.

The film, which also shot in London last month, stars Ezra Miller in the lead role while both Ben Affleck and Michael Keaton are reprising their roles as the Caped Crusader.

The double sported the eye-catching Batman costume as he filmed the Hollywood blockbuster on the streets of Glasgow which has been transformed into a US city.

Members of the production crew were seen trying to push the giant bike along the street with the double at the wheel.

The Flash, due for release in November 2022, is reportedly filming in George Square while Cochrane Street and George Street are also being used, according to Glasgow Times.

Large sections of the street were blocked off to pedestrians with several cars and trucks parked nearby.

The Flash is the latest film to be shot in Glasgow after the city was recently transformed into 1960s New York for filming of Indiana Jones 5 where Harrison Ford’s body double was seen earlier this month.

Michael Keaton has already been spotted filming in London but has yet to be seen sporting his Batman costume, implying he may only be returning as alter ego Bruce Wayne.

Ben, who played Batman more recently, has yet to be seen on set.

The film sees The Flash travel back in time to prevent the murder of his mother, triggering a string of unexpected consequences in the process, including meeting Batman in a parallel dimension.

The Flash was originally scheduled for release in 2018, although it was later pushed back due to its troubled development process.

Director Andy Muschietti was brought on to helm the feature. It was rescheduled for a June 2022 debut and was eventually pushed back to November 4th of that year as a response to the onset of the global pandemic.

Earlier in June, Muschietti, shared a photo of Michael’s bloody Batman costume to his Instagram account.

The actor was announced to be taking up the helm of the Caped Crusader in the much-awaited film this past April, although he was first speculated to have been involved with the project in June of last year.

Muschietti’s photo showed Batman’s iconic insignia that is typically placed on the center of the character’s costume.

A few drops of what appeared to be blood were notably spattered across its front.

The image seemed to signal that Keaton would be returning to his former role in the forthcoming superhero film.

The Birdman star’s first time portraying the character was in 1989’s Batman, which was directed by Tim Burton.

The feature was well-received by critics upon its release, with many reviewers pointing to the actor’s performance as especially strong.

Michael went on to portray the character in the film’s sequel, Batman Returns, which was also helmed by Burton and released in 1992.

After the Ed Wood director stepped down from a planned third sequel, the Beetlejuice actor also left the series, and the two were replaced by Joel Schumacher and Val Kilmer, respectively.

Other actors who have taken up the helm of the Dark Knight since then include George Clooney and Christian Bale, among others.

Ben went on to portray Batman in the 2016 feature Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice and played the character in several other features.

The 48-year-old actor was initially supposed to direct, write and star in the upcoming feature The Batman, although he later left the production and was replaced by Robert Pattinson.

Both Ben and Michael are set to portray younger and older versions of Bruce Wayne in The Flash.

A film based on the DC Comics character had been in development for several decades, with several aborted attempts to create a movie about the superhero occurring over a period of roughly thirty years.

The feature went through several prospective directors, including Rick Famuyiwa and Seth Grahame-Smith, before Muschietti stepped in to helm the flick.

The Barry Allen version of The Flash will be portrayed by Ezra Miller, who first played the speedster in Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice.

Other performers who will appear in the long-awaited movie include Kiersey Clemons, Sasha Calle and Ron Livingston.

The feature will follow the titular character as he travels back in time in order to prevent the untimely death of his mother, which causes consequences to occur in his own timeline.

Meanwhile, filming of the untitled fifth film in the Indiana Jones franchise has been going on for several weeks with parts of the Scottish city transformed into 1960s Manhattan.

Harrison himself has been forced to take a break from filming for three months as he recovers from a shoulder injury sustained on set.

During filming this month, Harrison’s stunt double charged through a crowded parade celebrating Apollo 11’s landing in 1969 on horseback.

Bolting down a city centre street in a grey suit, the action-packed scene saw a lookalike for 79-year-old Harrison rip through a banner as cheerleaders performed in the street and crowds waving American flags looked on in surprise.

Harley-Davidson Sportster S 2021 First Ride Review

By General Posts

by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Teaching an old dog new tricks.

Harley-Davidson has produced the Sportster for over six continuous decades. Despite the nameplate dating back to the Eisenhower administration, the Sportster canon only contains two periods: the Ironhead years and the Evo era. Since 1957, a pushrod-actuated, 45-degree V-Twin always thrummed at the model’s core. Along with the vibey powerplant, a cradle frame, conservative styling, and spartan accommodations defined the platform. That all changes with the 2021 Sportster S, however.

For the first time in the model’s history, the brakes read Brembo, the gearbox touts six speeds, and the lighting is LED. Boasting a feature-rich electronic suite, the historically entry-level Hog gains premium status overnight. A daring new design encompasses the brand’s acclaimed Revolution Max engine and aligns with the model’s performance ambitions. Of course, the 1,252cc, 60-degree V-twin doesn’t deliver the cruiser’s customary vibes. Instead, it delivers 121 horsepower. The Sportster may be a sexagenarian, but it’s spryer than ever in 2021.

To prove the new model’s mettle, the Motor Company invited us to a day-long ride through the picturesque canyons of the Angeles National Forest and the man-made canyons of Downtown L.A. With such a dramatic makeover, questions naturally arose. Will the 2021 interpretation appeal to the customer base? Will it retain its David vs. Goliath attitude? Is it still a Sportster? Like all Harleys, the answers center around the V-twin mill.

Engine
Since 1986, the Sportster harnessed the MoCo’s Evolution engine. Long after the Big Twin class moved on to the brand’s Twin Cam V-twin, and subsequently, the Milwaukee-Eight, the Sportster continued championing the bulletproof Evo. Undersquare, air-cooled, and rumbly, the engine’s charisma overshadowed its crudeness. Instead of refining the platform over the years, H-D didn’t fix what wasn’t broke.

Instead, it reinvented the model 35 long years later with the aptly named Revolution Max engine. Fresh off its debut in the Pan America, the liquid-cooled, DOHC, 1,252 V-twin earns a cruiser-appropriate retune in the Sportster S. The Revolution Max 1250T may concede 29 ponies to its adventurous cousin, but it’s hard to notice the difference in the saddle.

Unlike the Pan America, which spools up to its powerband, the Sportster S is all teeth all the time. Well, in Sport mode, at least. Predictably, Road is more mannerly and Rain is downright pleasant. Two additional custom ride modes allow users to adjust power delivery, traction control/ABS parameters, and engine braking settings to their liking. Whether you prefer a chill ride or a thrill ride, the Sportster switches identity with the tap of a button.

In Sport mode, performance reigns supreme. From the initial throttle crack, the torque piles on, peaking at 94 lb-ft at 6,000 rpm. The 1250T really shines in the mid-range, but power is accessible throughout the 9,500-rpm rev range. On the other hand, the throttle-by-wire system exhibited an abrupt, on/off quality in Sport mode.

Snappy roll-ons frequently pushed me to the edge of the plank-like seat and the front end dove under quick throttle cuts. What Sport mode lacks in finesse, it makes up with enthusiasm, so I reserved it for highway and canyon duty. In the city, Road mode smoothed out the V-twin’s power pulses without sacrificing too much raw acceleration. However, the Revolution Max and high-mount exhaust system threw off significant heat when confined to surface streets.

While the Sportster S does feature rear cylinder deactivation at a stop, the tracker-style pipes not only contribute to the engine heat, it traps it under the seat. Unsurprisingly, the rider’s right leg receives the first heatwave, but the engine’s port side follows suit in short order. In motion, the warmth goes unnoticed, but from light to light, the heat forced me to rest my right foot on the peg at a stop. Otherwise, the exhaust was liable to broil my inner thigh to a medium-well shank.

Despite those drawbacks, the Revolution Max remains the star of the show. Of course, to optimize that star performance, Harley had to surround it with a complimentary cast of components.

Chassis
Composed of three separate frame sections, the Sportster S chassis is like nothing in the company’s current cruiser lineup. The front, middle, and tail trellis frame units bolt directly to the 1250T engine, reducing weight while increasing rigidity. In turn, the handling improves markedly over the Evo era models, jumping from a 28-degree maximum lean angle to 34-degrees of lean. Tip-in and steering rate are predictable and stable.

Despite the 160/70 Dunlop GT503 tire wrapped around the 17-inch front wheel and the 180/70 rubber shod onto the 16-inch rear, the Sportster is surprisingly agile. Similarly, the 320mm single-disc front braking system seems lacking for a 121-horsepower machine, but the Brembo master cylinder delivers excellent bite along with nuanced feedback and feel. Needless to say, we would love to see how the Sportster S performs with slimmer tires and a dual-disc setup, but the stock equipment exceeds expectations.

The rear suspension suffers the same fate. With just 1.5-inches of travel, I anticipated the Showa monoshock to be one step removed from a hardtail. Thankfully, the linkage system helps the unit outperform the spec sheet, but the setup still has its limitation. The shock happily soaked up slow-speed bump, but fast-bump compliance was another story. Several large hits bucked me out of the seat or sent a shock directly through my back.

Of course, the model’s aggressive, low stance may look sporty, but it also restricts the suspension travel. Again, we would love to see a taller monoshock on the sportiest of Sportsters, but the piggyback unit performed admirably considering its handicaps. Luckily, the fully adjustable USD fork isn’t hindered by the same issues.

The front end only boasts 3.6 inches of travel, but the appropriately damped fork never bottoms under hard braking or big bumps. In a corner, the Sportster S holds its line in a smooth and predictable manner. The Dunlop GT503 tires suit the model well, with enough feedback and grip to inspire confidence. Of course, dragging the single-piston rear caliper on the 260mm disc helps stabilize the 500-pound rig upon corner entry.

The Sportster S was in its natural element in the canyons. The model holds its own in the city, but it reveals its naughty side on a curvy road. The high-spec componentry and adjustability certainly contributed to that nature, but the rider posture also factors into the Sportster’s performance.

Cockpit
At 29.6 inches, the S model’s seat height should fit a broad range of inseams. Despite the large exhaust heat shields pressing into the rider’s right leg, flat-footing the Sportster is effortless. Reach to the bars is a slight stretch, with the rider’s upper half leaned forward and a small bend at the elbows. The forward controls position the legs at a 90-degree angle, but feet point slightly upward on the pegs.

While the forwards increase long-distance comfort, they also place more weight on the rider’s hindquarters and off the pegs. As a result, I preferred the mid control-equipped Sportster S despite the acute leg bend. The sense of control provided by the mids would make it an instant upgrade for me. Unfortunately, the Motor Company doesn’t offer an option for mid control, but customers can purchase a conversion kit for $660.

The Sportster doesn’t perform poorly with the forwards, as both setups yield a 34-degree lean angle, but the mids allow the model to reach its full performance potential. Not to mention, after several hours with forward controls, my rear end started to ache due to so much of my weight bearing down on the thinly padded seat.

Harley also outfits the forwards with an extended shift lever (compared to the mid controls). The lever’s long throw also resulted in numerous unintentional shifts into neutral when kicking from first to second gear. I didn’t encounter the same problem once on the mid controls. I should note that the mids may prove too cramped for taller riders. At five-foot, 10-inches, I fit comfortably into the new rider triangle but the user’s purposes and preference will determine what’s best for them.

Last but certainly not least, the all-new round, four-inch TFT display is a first for the Sportster family. While the switchgear gains a host of new buttons and switches, the interface is intuitive and easy to navigate. From ambient temperature to engine temperature, from tire pressure to battery voltage, the rider can check every metric impacting the bike’s performance.

Bluetooth connectivity unlocks navigation, incoming call identification, and music-playing features. However, the Sportster S doesn’t include a GPS receiver, so the system relies on the rider’s smartphone network for those services. Also, without speakers included, the user will need to link their helmet communication system to the motorcycle.

The breadth and technology of the new infotainment system may be a giant leap forward, but the limited screen real estate can be restricting in navigation and diagnostic modes. With so much information crammed in such a small area, fonts quickly become illegible, especially at speed. For that reason, I stuck with the standard setup, pairing a large mph readout, needle-style tachometer, gear position indicator, and trip meters.

Conclusion
The 2021 Sportster S marks a watershed moment for the longest production motorcycle in history. From side valves to overhead valves to four valves per cylinder, the Sportster has come a long way, but its latest form is a major departure from the previous iterations. The Sportster S should appeal to existing, performance-oriented Harley customers but also draw new blood into the brand.

At 500 pounds and 121 horsepower, the historically entry-level model is lighter and more powerful than any other cruiser in the Motor Company’s portfolio, making it more of a giant killer than ever. By Sportster standards, the 2021 S model is a marvel, warts and all. While the Sportster S is a seminal entry in the Harley history books, the potential it presents is even more intriguing.

We can’t wait to see what the Bar and Shield does with the platform as it fills the slots under the flagship trim. No, this isn’t your grandad’s Sportster, it’s something entirely new, and Harley-Davidson plans to build on the model’s possibilities for the next 64 years.

Johnny Lewis at Flat Track and Build-Train-Race ladies

By General Posts

JOHNNY LEWIS TAKES HARD-FOUGHT FOURTH AT PORT ROYAL HALF-MILE

Women of Royal Enfield BUILD TRAIN RACE battle on at second BTR exhibition race

Milwaukee, WI (Monday, July 26, 2021) – On the heels of their historic win at Lima Half-Mile, Johnny Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield Team were looking to start a hot streak aboard the Royal Enfield Twins FT at the inaugural Port Royal Half-Mile, round eight of the Progressive American Flat Track Championship at Port Royal Speedway in Port Royal, Pennsylvania. While the all-new venue held its share of challenges for Lewis, he and the Moto Anatomy X crew fought for every inch throughout the day, ultimately coming in fourth overall in the AFT Production Twins main event.

“Days like today remind me what a great crew we have,” said Johnny Lewis, “Today had its ups and downs but our Moto Anatomy crew never stopped working hard. It was a bit of a battle for us, but we had competitive lap times in the end; it just showed that our work throughout the day paid off. It was great to end tonight on a positive note.”

After a hard-fought battle with Dan Bromely for fourth in the main event, Lewis was able to edge him out by 0.007 seconds at the checkered flag—an incredible sight for the Port Royal fans. “Within the team, it was a success!” Lewis added.

“Johnny puts every ounce of himself into each race weekend and you could see it at Port Royal,” commented Breeann Poland, Marketing and Communications Lead – Royal Enfield Americas. “After battling some issues throughout the test and earlier in the day he was able to push through to a fourth-place finish today. We were proud to see this level of passion and dedication from the whole team.”

Port Royal Speedway was host to the second round of the Royal Enfield BUILD TRAIN RACE (BTR) Flat Track program, and the ladies of AFT thrilled the Pennsylvania crowd with some great battles. In the end, Jaycee Jones beat Jillian Deschenes to the checkers for the overall win. Lanakila MacNaughton was holding third, but made a mistake on the final lap, opening the door for Sarah Dixon to nab the final podium spot.

The Port Royal weekend got out to a great start for the ladies of AFT on Friday when they were invited to participate in the test on Friday, allowing for extra track time and eight rounds of practice. “Extremely happy we got practice Friday,” said Jaycee Jones. “If we didn’t have that day to figure out the track and make changes to the bike it could have been completely different.”

Jones was able to dial in her new Ohlins rear shocks, that she credits with making “all the difference in the world.” Jones not only captured her first win of the season, but set a scorching lap of 27.939—a time that could have potentially qualified her for the Production Twins class.

Jones and Deschenes are now battling for the BTR championship with one win apiece. Sarah Dixon, with a pair of thirds, is looking to break through for a win, while the talented field of builders and racers is also hungry for podium finishes in the 2021 championship.

“It’s been over a month since the ladies first raced in Chicago and we were eager to see them back at it again,” said Breeann Poland. “The racing between the women is definitely heating up. I am proud of each and everyone of them for pushing themselves both on and off the track. Lana missed the test on Friday and was at a disadvantage all day but when the green flagged dropped she put everything she had into it and battled for a podium spot.”

Johnny Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield team will be back in action at Weedsport, New York for the Short Track doubleheader on August 13-14. They will be once again joined by the women of Royal Enfield BTR as the American Flat Track Championship makes its return to New York.

Tune in for broadcast coverage of the Port Royal Half-Mile on NBCSN on Sunday, August 15 at 10:00 p.m. ET/7:00 p.m. PT.

About Royal Enfield

The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901. A division of Eicher Motors Limited, Royal Enfield has created the midsize motorcycle segment in India with its unique and distinctive modern classic motorcycles. With its manufacturing base in Chennai, India, Royal Enfield has been able to grow its production rapidly against a surge in demand for its motorcycles. Royal Enfield is a leading player in the global middleweight motorcycle market.

The Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield team is supported by Harris Performance, SENA, Motul, Beringer Brakes, Solid Performance, EVS, ODI, Just 1, Tucker, Saddlemen, S&S Cycle, Team Lawant, Quayle Construction and Goon Glass and Rubber.

Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 125 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Harley-Davidson Announces “Let’s Ride Challenge” Sweepstakes

By General Posts

Celebrating the Open Road with a Sweepstakes that Unlocks Prizes as Miles are Ridden and Tracked Via H-D.com App

  • 0-999,999 mi: $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 1M mi: $5,000 USD cash and a $2,500 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card
  • 3M mi: Riding trip with 3 friends
  • 5M mi: Custom Harley-Davidson® Motorcycle†

You’ll also be automatically entered for a chance to win a $1,000 USD Harley-Davidson™ Gift Card.
*Miles update daily. When more miles are tracked and a bigger prize is unlocked, the previous prize will no longer be available.

MILWAUKEE (JULY 26, 2021) – Harley-Davidson is celebrating the summer riding season and the open road with the “Let’s Ride Challenge”. This sweepstakes encourages riders to rack up miles via the H-D.com app in order to unlock bigger prizes, as each milestone is reached. In addition, the sweepstakes also features personal riding challenges, including instant win games that provide riders a chance to win.

“We want to acknowledge and reward our Harley-Davidson riders, in the United States and Canada, for all the miles they’re putting in this summer,” said Theo Keetell, VP Marketing. “The ‘Lets Ride Challenge’ sweepstakes will encourage our riders to seek out new adventures, unlock new prizes via the H-D.com app and experience instant win games, as part of the Harley-Davidson community.”

From July 23 through September 30, riders in the U.S. and Canada who enter by registering on www.Harley-Davidson.com/ride or the H-D App. Through riding-related milestones and activities, by visiting their local Harley-Davidson dealer, and by alternative methods of entry, participants can earn entries for a chance to win prizes at increasing thresholds. Depending on the threshold number of miles entered via the H-D.com app, prizes would include H-D gift cards, cash rewards, a riding trip, or a custom 2021 Harley-Davidson® touring motorcycle.

For sweepstakes Official Rules, program and prize details and more information visit this page.

https://harleydavidson.promo.eprize.com/letsridechallenge/public/COMPILED/en/fulfillment/rules.649d0b8ca0016d712e194aaf1794b981.pdf

For full information on 2021 Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Genuine Motor Parts and Accessories, and general merchandise visit: www.h-d.com.

Creation of Harley-Davidson Museum

By General Posts

The new 8,200-square-foot “Garage,” is to be an event facility and replace a seasonal tent on the grounds, and will certainly increase the value of the property.

by Michael Horne from https://urbanmilwaukee.com

  • Name of Property: Harley-Davidson Museum
  • Address: 400 W. Canal St. Milwaukee. Also known as 126 N. 6th St.
  • Assessed Valuation 2020: The 661,807-square-foot (15.93 acre) lot is assessed at $1,899,100 ($2.87/s.f.) and the 110,250 square foot improvements are valued at $10,120,600 for a total assessed valuation of $12,019,700. (In 2008 the land was assessed at the same amount, while the improvements were valued at $9,000,900 for a total of $10,900,000.)
  • Taxes: 2020 Tax Bill $319,187.51. Payments current on the installment plan.
  • Owner: HD MILW, LLC
  • Type: Commercial
  • Architect: HGA in collaboration with Pentagram Architects. Harley-Davidson Museum – HGA
  • Year Built: 2007
  • Neighborhood: Menomonee River Valley
  • Subdivision: Walkers Point
  • Aldermanic District: 12th, Jose G. Perez
  • Walk Score: 61 out of 100 “Somewhat Walkable” Some errands can be accomplished on foot. Score would leap if pedestrian connection over canal to east were constructed. City average: 63 out of 100
  • Transit Score: 69 out of 100 “Good Transit” Many nearby public transportation options. City average: 48 out of 100
  • Bike Score: 78 out of 100; “Very Bikeable.” Biking is convenient for most trips. Plus, it is flat terrain, once you cross the 6th St. Viaduct. City average: 59 out of 100
  • Bridgehunter 6th Street Viaduct https://bridgehunter.com/wi/milwaukee/bh36811/
  • 1910 Map https://cdm17272.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/san/id/855
  • 1894 Map https://collections.lib.uwm.edu/digital/collection/san/id/241/rec/9
  • Historic Photos of Site https://www.thevalleymke.org/history

Schlitz beer may have made Milwaukee famous, but the Cream City’s most famous and widely available product is the Harley-Davidson motorcycle. The firm has retailers in 98 countries spanning the globe. So strong is the brand loyalty that the H-D logo is frequently requested by customers at tattoo parlors. The firm’s headquarters remains at 3700 W. Juneau Ave., where the first factory was built in the back yard of the home of William C. Davidson (1846-1923). His sons Walter Davidson, Sr. (1876-1942), William A. Davidson (1870-1937) and Arthur Davidson (1881-1950) founded the firm in 1903 with their neighbor, engineer William S. Harley (1880-1943). Since 1915 the company has set aside one of each model made, storing the machines along with an incredible amount of corporate memorabilia in its warehouses and other facilities. The collection of motorcycles includes the earliest known H-D vehicle, Serial Number One.

Such a burgeoning assemblage begged to be placed in a home of its own, so during the 1990s the firm hired Dr. Martin Jack Rosenblum (1946-2014), a UWM professor and poet who styled himself as The Holy Ranger, a character appealing to the motorcycle crowd, becoming a cult figure in his own right. According to his obituary:

Marty was a diehard Harley enthusiast and while working for Harley-Davidson, he was responsible for organizing the archives, motorcycles, and materials that went back to the beginning of the Motor Company. His efforts played a major role in the creation of the current Harley-Davidson Museum.

But where to locate the museum? The company wanted a high-visibility location, so the headquarters was out of the running. There were plans to place it at Schlitz Park, the site of the former brewery, but they fell through. But in the early 2000s, a home was found on 15 acres of land at the eastern end of the Menomonee River Valley, surrounded by canals on three sides, and contaminated by over a century of heavy industrial uses.

A parcel was assembled on land used by the Milwaukee Department of Public Works, Morton Salt Company and Lakeshore Sand Company at 125 N. 6th St. The huge property was bisected by W. Canal St., and located between the two spans of the cable-stay bascule bridges of the new 6th St. Viaduct, a dramatic structure that opened to traffic in 2002. It replaced a 1908 viaduct that spanned the entire valley, with a small spur leading below. When engineers from the state proposed a similar design, Mayor John Norquist pushed instead for the current one, which allowed for development of the region to accelerate with ground level access to W. Canal St.

On June 1st, 2006, a groundbreaking ceremony was held, with a distinctly H-D touch. Eschewing the traditional golden shovels, the soil was broken by dirt biker Scott Parker, riding a Hog. Attendees received a small vial of the earth, with a tag attached, commemorating the event. The museum opened to the public on July 12th, 2008, and now ranks as one of the city’s top tourist attractions and event venues. At the time, the city assessor calculated the property’s value at $1,899,100 for the land and $9,000,900 for the improvements, for a total valuation of $10,900,000. Today the land is valued at the same amount, while the improvements are assessed at $10,120,600 for a total of $12,019,700.

It will soon be time for the assessor to pay another visit to the property, as a second groundbreaking was held on Thursday, July 15th, as Jeramey Jannene noted in his story for Urban Milwaukee. Once again, a motorcycle replaced the golden shovels. The new 8,200-square-foot “Garage,” is to be an event facility and replace a seasonal tent on the grounds, and will certainly increase the value of the property.

The Site in History

“Milwaukee” is sometimes translated from the Native American “Milioke” as “Gathering Place by the Water.” The Menomonee River flowed lazily to its confluence with the Milwaukee and Kinnickinnic rivers, rimmed by native plants and wild game, with abundant marshes of wild rice (“Menomin”) to provide grain. The Potawatomi tribe occupied the land by the 1700s. Other tribes to gather here at various times included the Ojibwa, Fox, Menominee, Ottawa, Sauk and Winnebago. They were displaced by white settlers in 1835. By 1850 the Milwaukee and Mississippi Railroad ran from the valley five miles west to Wauwatosa, ultimately reaching the Big Muddy at Prairie du Chien in 1857.

Byron Kilbourn, the founder of the railroad, intended it to bring the bounty of Wisconsin’s farms and forests to Milwaukee’s port. As early as 1861, Milwaukee’s port led the world in the shipment of wheat, exporting as much in a day as Edward D. Holton did in a year, when he sent the first load by ship in 1842. As traffic grew, port improvements were called for, and by 1869 the valley floor was raised 21 feet, while the bluffs to the north were lowered as much as 60 feet. The river was channelized, and the site for the Harley Museum was for a period of time an island, with the since-filled-in Holton’s Canal to its west, along with the extant North and South Menomonee canals. Bagnall’s Slip, also since filled in, ran east-west on the middle of the site, now the middle of the museum.

For over a century, the four-mile long and half-mile wide valley became the polluted heart of “The Machine Shop of the World,” with hundreds of factories employing thousands of residents in a panoply of 19th century industrial jobs.

Here, at the northeast corner of the valley, where we now find the museum, were located a number of enterprises typical of the time. One of them has a family connection to its current use.

J. S. Davidson’s “Shoddy Mill”

The Sanborn Atlas of 1894 shows a number of heavy industrial uses on the site. J. Gross & Sons and the Wisconsin Fuel Co. stored mountains of coal on the site, while the Milwaukee Lumber Company, Steinman Lumber Co. and Moe and Bentley did the same with the enormous volume of logs transported from the interior of the state. J. Rademacher did them one better, dealing in coal and wood. A. C. Beck planed the lumber at its mill, while Mueller & Sons converted scraps into boxes, with the entire third floor of its factory devoted to the manufacture of cigar boxes.

The map also mentions the “Shoddy Mill” of J. S. Davidson. This was not to disparage the property of Mr. Davidson, but to describe it for fire insurance purposes. A “Shoddy Mill” is used to convert waste fabric scraps into an inferior type of cloth, often used to stuff mattresses. Many of this city’s industrial recycling firms began with an early family member buying rags and transporting them to the mill. Upon such humble beginnings are great fortunes made.

The mill’s owner, John S. Davidson (1849-1907) was the younger brother of William C. Davidson, whose three sons and William Harley were to found the motorcycle company in 1903.

By 1910 we find a new viaduct rising 22 feet above the site, with a U-shaped approach leading to the docks of the Western Line and Cement Co., organized by Orren Robertson, the son-in-law of Edward D. Holton, whose canal was right around the corner from the cement warehouse. Bentley and Company’s lumber piles averaged 12-feet to 15-feet high. Davidson’s shoddy mill was gone, with the adjacent Gross coal piles expanding to that site, at more than twice the height of their woody counterparts.

As the decades rolled on, the entire valley fell into a general disuse, with only a few firms remaining by midcentury. These tended to be rather disagreeable affairs like stockyards, slaughterhouses, and the Milwaukee Tallow Company, whose malodorous emanations were familiar to nearby residents and County Stadium visitors on humid summer nights, and much remarked upon. The Stockyard Bar and Feedlot Restaurant lasted until the late 1980’s, located right in the middle of the mess and popular with those who used knives at work, and occasionally for mischief, as a scarred bartender who worked at the establishment made abundantly clear.

The Site Today

By 1999 the Menomonee Valley Partners was incorporated to help redevelop the area, including the Harley site, raised yet another five feet to contain the contaminated soil beneath. The sheds of the city were torn down, as the factories preceding it had been decades before. HGA designed the brick-clad structure, which was once again surrounded by native plants and trails. The Menomonee Valley Partners also is now spearheading the reclamation of the stagnant and polluted Burnham Canal to the south. The valley has also drawn a number of modern factories, sandwiched between American Family Field, the Potawatomi Casino and Hotel and the Harley-Davidson Museum — three of the area’s principal attractions, which have returned the valley to its historic role as the “Gathering Place by the Water.”

Davinci DC100 Is a Two-Wheeled Robot Disguised as an Electric Motorcycle

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

  • 0 to 60 mph (100 kph) in 3 seconds
  • top speed of 124 mph (200 km)
  • peak power 135 hp and peak torque 627 ft-lb (850 Nm)
  • ride range of 222 miles (357.51 km)
  • fast-charging to full charge in 30 minutes

The motorcycle of tomorrow is, according to makers Davinci Dynamics, the DC100, or its fancier, more expensive version, the limited-edition, hand-crafted masterpiece DC Classic. Introduced this week in Beijing (hat tip to New Atlas), it is said to be the culmination of seven years of hard work, the first step toward the electric two-wheel revolution that the world has been hoping for but is yet to fully witness.

Big words for an equally big moment, but you don’t get the chance to stand out from everyone else if you don’t show cojones, figuratively speaking. Hopefully, Davinci Dynamics can back up the impressive claims with a futuristic cafe racer to match, because, on paper, the DC100 sounds like a dream. It’s more than just an electric motorcycle, the company says: it’s a two-wheeled robot disguised as an elegant, futuristic, electric cafe racer.

The DC100 rides on a monocoque aluminum alloy chassis. It has a single-sided swingarm and a cover for the giant lithium 17.7kWh battery pack that gives it a boxy but still streamlined appearance. It rides on Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires, and it’s painted in muted gray or bright orange, making it feel as if it belongs in a video game of some sorts.

On paper, the DC100 delivers solid performance, meant to “rival the performance of their 1000cc gas-powered counterparts:” you get 0 to 60 mph (100kph) acceleration time of 3 seconds, peak torque of 627 ft-lb (850 Nm), and a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph). The hub motor delivers a peak power of 135 hp, while the battery is good for an estimated WLTP range of 222 miles (357.51 km). Fast-charging ensures a full charge in just 30 minutes.

The DC100 is also very smart, using technology for smoother and more intuitive, longer, and safer rides. It’s packed with sensors that collect and track information, says Davinci, with the ultimate goal of maximized efficiency and comfort, so you can truly enjoy your ride.

Features include Hill-start Assist Control (HAC), regen braking and improved balancing on descent, reverse assist (which allows you to back out of a spot on torque, even on an incline), traction control, and combined braking for maximized stopping power. In Drive mode, if you release the brake, the motorcycle “creeps forward slowly” at 3 mph (5 kph) to ensure a “smooth” start.

But the most intriguing features are listed as “to come:” self-balancing capabilities, target recognition, and remote control. Davinci promises that the DC100 “will be able to balance itself” and “to automatically follow a target,” hence the promise that it could become your “jogging companion.” The idea, one assumes, is that it won’t ever go any faster than in the creep mode mentioned above, at 3 mph (5 kph). Not that you should ever go out jogging with your bike, as if you’d have your dog tag along.

Remote control will also be offered as an OTA update, through the Davinci App. Though the press materials released so far show the bike with a display, the Davinci website and the press release that went out this week note that, even in this stage, your “phone is the key, and your display.” This means that riders have to use the Davinci App for settings and stats, and their phone to visualize them, including speed. They would also use this method for remote control, when and if it becomes available – maybe even to summon their bike to them in the way drivers do their Teslas today.

As noted above, Davinci is offering two models of this two-wheeled robot that poses as an electric motorcycle: the DC100 and the DC Classic. Spec-wise, the only difference between the two is that the latter will be limited to just 50 units worldwide and will come with a hand-crafted, hand-assembled and custom-tailored body that stands out for the “striking minimalist aesthetics,” each carrying an ID number.

The other, more significant difference is in pricing: the DC100 costs $27,500 / €26,000, while the DC Classic is $90,000/ €78,000. Assuming you picked yourself up from the floor, here’s the good news: the pre-order books are open, and all you need is a $150 / €150 deposit to secure your bike of tomorrow right now. That’s not a figure of speech, because the wait for either is long: the Classic ships in April 2022, and the DC100 in July 2022.

 

Over 100 motorcycles roll in to benefit Cleveland Clinic pediatrics

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by Cris Belle from https://fox8.com

CLEVELAND (WJW) — Over 100 motorcycles rolled through town today to raise money and collect toys for the pediatric unit at Cleveland Clinic Fairview Hospital.

Riders arrived at the hospital around 1:30 p.m.

The Community West Foundation, Cleveland Clinic Fairview Hospital and Rock-In-Roll City Harley-Davidson held the event.

The mission of Community West Foundation is to advance the health and well-being of the community. The staff and Board of Directors are guided by the words in Matthew 25:35-40: “For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me… Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”

Many police departments were there as well to support the event: Beachwood police, Fairview Park police, Cleveland police, Bratenhal police, Cuyahoga County Sheriffs Department, Lorain County Sheriffs Department and Rocky River police.

For more information, contact Community West Foundation at 440-360-7370 or click here.

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for July 2021

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Highway Bill passes House, Right to Repair moves ahead, Motorcycle Industry Council program, Emission free motorcycles in UK and more nations to phase out new gas engine motorcycles, EU & US truce on Trade Tariffs, Mandatory Motorcycle Inspections for Europe, Easyriders magazine to come back.

E-news service from National Coalition of Motorcyclists

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Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride for 2021 this Weekend

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by Nate Bird from https://newsradio1310.com

I can’t be the only one who does this, but every time a group of motorcycles drives by me when I’m driving I will roll down the window so I can hear each of them zip past me. I don’t ride motorcycles but I love the sound they make. This weekend there will be a whole bunch of opportunities to hear bikes as they fly by when the Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride happens this Sunday in I-84 between Meridian and Mountain Home.

What Is The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride is an annual motorcycle ride organized by the High Desert Harley-Davidson. The motorcycle ride raises money for the Idaho Guard and Reserve, Family Support Fund, and the Operation Warmheart. This year will be the 11th annual event after taking a break last year due to the pandemic.

When Is The 2021 Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

The Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride for 2021 will happen on Sunday July 25th. The event starts at 8 AM and is expected to last until 5 PM. Participants in the Ride will meet at High Desert Harley-Davidson for sign in and breakfast. The group will then be led on a police escorted ride from the Harley dealership to Carl Miller Park in Mountain Home. The ride is about 55 miles each way and runs down I-84.

For those not participating, you can expect there to be delays as the bikes travel down the highway. If you’re going to be in that area it will be a nice opportunity to roll down your windows and listen to the thunder of the bikes as they drive by.

How Do You Sign Up For The 11th Annual Idaho Patriot Thunder Ride?

Registration Website https://www.eventbrite.com/e/11th-annual-idaho-patriot-thunder-ride-tickets-111370235372

Registration can be done in advance online for $25 per rider or at the event for $35. A select number of VIP tickets are being sold as well for $100 and those get you placed at the front of the pack during the ride. The event is only open to 1,200 motorcycles.

Get all the details on the event on the ticket purchase website. We may not see, or hear, much from the event in Twin Falls but if Boise travel is in your plans on Sunday morning or afternoon you can expect to see lots of motorcycles and probably some driving delays.