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Daytona Bike Week 79th Anniversary!

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March 6-15, 2020

Daytona Bike Week, the world’s largest motorcycle event, is celebrating 79 years in 2020!

It’s an event you won’t want to miss. This year’s 10-day event proves it’s high-octane with street festivals, concerts, motorcycle races, bike shows, rallies, manufacturer showcases and more. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world enjoy spring riding in Daytona Beach along historic Main Street to Midtown, Scenic A1A Highway and through the best of old Florida, the Ormond Beach Scenic Loop. The celebration continues at Daytona International Speedway, Bruce Rossmeyer’s Destination Daytona, and the U.S. 1 corridors in Daytona Beach and Ormond Beach.

Looking for a place to stay? Book your hotel now.

Get even more excited and watch this video! OfficialBikeWeek.com for event information including parking.

Watch video: Enjoy 10 days of high-octane street festivals, concerts, motorcycle races, bike shows, rallies, manufacturer showcases, and more.

 

‘It’s about freedom’: Local lawmaker trying again on motorcycle helmet law repeal

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by Austin Huguelet / Gannett from https://www.therolladailynews.com

A local lawmaker still wants to let some Missouri motorcyclists ditch their helmets.

Sen. Eric Burlison, R-Battlefield, almost had it last year. After pitching the idea as a win for individual freedom, he got it attached to a larger transportation bill that passed both houses. But Gov. Mike Parson couldn’t stomach another part of the bill and vetoed it.

This year, Burlison thinks he’s got a decent shot to pass the idea as its own bill. Parson, a Republican, supported similar stand-alone bills as a legislator, so Burlison’s main focus is on getting it through the legislature again.

“We’ll see how much time (Senate leaders) give it on the floor,” he said Friday, “but over time, we’ve made so many compromises on this, so I hope people will take that into consideration.”

Those compromises, Burlison said, include a requirement for those going without helmets to have qualifying health insurance. The exemption from the state’s helmet rule would also only apply to riders ages 18 and up.

Those provisions will likely never be enough for opposing lawmakers who say the plan will lead to more deadly accidents. They have a point.

National Highway Transportation Safety Agency research indicates helmets saved more than 1,800 lives in 2016, and that if all motorcyclists would have worn helmets that year, 802 more people could have been saved.

On its website, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention make its position clear: “The single most effective way for states to save lives and save money is a universal helmet law.”

They also point out that riders wouldn’t have to prove insurance coverage unless they were pulled over by law enforcement and worry the cost of accidents will ultimately take a toll on Medicaid.

But Burlison sees the entire issue differently.

“At the end of the day, it’s about individual responsibility and individual freedom,” he said. “I want my neighbor to stay safe and healthy, but it’s not my business to force those decisions upon my neighbor.”

He added that many supporters of his change are retired veterans who deserve to make their own choices.

“These are big boys and big girls that have fought and risked their lives for the country,” he said. “The least we can do is let them be free while they’re here.”

In previous interviews, Burlison has also pushed back on the troubling statistics his opponents cite. He pointed out that after Michigan repealed its law in 2012, researchers found no difference between death rates in the 12 months before and after the move.

They noted a 14 percent increase in head injuries, however.

After leaders of motorcyclist groups spoke in favor of Burlison’s bill in a Senate committee hearing in January, a long list of representatives from health care organizations testified against it.

Burlison’s bill nevertheless passed out of committee Jan. 30. It now awaits debate before the full chamber.

The legislation is Senate Bill 590.

Motorcycle clubs come together to offer Vietnam vet one last ride

By | General Posts

by Danielle Avitable from https://www.nbc4i.com

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — A local Vietnam veteran had one last wish while in hospice care, and that was to ride a motorcycle one more time.

On Sunday, a group of riders made his dream possible.

Vietnam veteran Roger L. Smith was wheeled out of the house, surrounded by loved ones and riders.

“I said I want to get on a bike at least one time before I die,” said Smith.

And that’s what he got.

“He requested a last ride and, for us, it’s veterans helping veterans,” said Steve Murray of Combat Veterans Motorcycle Club.

In addition to Combat Veteran, other groups taking part in the ride included Ohio Patriot Bikers and Punishers Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club.

Smith’s health has been declining over the last three weeks.

“He started having issues with Agent Orange affecting his lungs. His lungs are crystalizing. He can’t breathe that well,” said one friend.

Prior to his health issues, friends said he used to solely drive a motorcycle to work, but before Sunday, he hasn’t been on a bike in two years.

“I feel like I lost a part of myself,” Smith said. “I haven’t been on a bike in a couple years because of my lungs. I’m dying from inside out. I had to do this for me.”

Before the group took off, everyone gathered around Smith for a prayer. “We give you thanks for these veterans as they make his wish come true.”

More than two dozen rider then hopped on their bikes, and engines started roaring before they took off for one last ride.

“I kept pulling up beside him and he kept putting his thumbs up,” said Murray. “He was so happy. He was so happy it made my day.”

Murray added a ride like Smith’s is a demonstration of unity not only among veterans, but also motorcycle clubs.

“I think everyone was here for the same purpose and he was the purpose,” said one rider. “That’s pretty much what we do. We stick together and support each other.”

As the group pulled back into the driveway, Smith had a big smile on his face and gave everyone a thumbs up. However, the other riders were also thanking him for this ride.

“It’s truly an honor to do this and we do a lot of rides for charities and events, but when you can do this for a veteran who requested one final ride, it’s a great feeling,” Murray said.

NCOM Biker Newsbytes Feb 2020

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National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM)
Compiled & Edited by Bill Bish

The National Coalition of Motorcyclists (NCOM) is a nationwide motorcyclists rights organization serving over 2,000 NCOM Member Groups throughout the United States, with all services fully-funded through Aid to Injured Motorcyclist (AIM) Attorneys available in each state who donate a portion of their legal fees from motorcycle accidents back into the NCOM Network of Biker Services (www.ON-A-BIKE.com / 800-ON-A-BIKE).

READ THE NCOM NEWS BY CLICKING HERE

Wild Adventure Bikernet Weekly News for February 13th 2020

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I now have a new morning workout. I shovel and sweep snow for an hour to clear the historic sidewalk in front of our house on Jackson Street. I discovered yesterday that Jason, who owned Deadwood Custom Cycles lives on Taylor, less than a block away.

I met with a contractor yesterday, Paul. He said this region is all cowboys and bikers. Sounds good to me. We need to watch out.

READ THE BIKERNET WEEKLY NEWS – CLICK HERE

Do you want more fun, action, tech, reviews and reports? Join the Cantina

https://www.bikernet.com/pages/custom/subscription.aspx

The best of 24 years of Bikernet.com content – at the Cantina.

Indian Motorcycle Unveils 2020 FTR Rally – Now Available In North America

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INDIAN MOTORCYCLE’S NEW FTR RALLY COMBINES SCRAMBLER STYLING WITH MODERN PERFORMANCE

2020 FTR Rally Now Available in North America

MINNEAPOLIS (February 7, 2020) – Indian Motorcycle, America’s First Motorcycle Company, today announced the North American retail availability of the 2020 FTR Rally, a scrambler-inspired FTR 1200 that combines retro styling with modern performance capabilities. Launched internationally in Milan at EICMA in November 2019, the FTR Rally will begin shipping to Indian Motorcycle dealers throughout the U.S. and Canada.

With an urban scrambler aesthetic that’s certain to turn heads, the FTR Rally takes a step in a new direction while still maintaining some of the original styling DNA of the FTR 1200.  The FTR Rally features Titanium Smoke paint with the Indian Motorcycle headdress graphic, aluminium wire wheels with stainless steel spokes and a red pinstripe, brown aviator seat, a new rally windscreen and Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires.

“We’re excited to offer North American riders a new take on the FTR 1200 that combines the unmistakeable look and stance of the FTR with the more classic, rugged elements that have made scramblers so beloved to city riders,” said Reid Wilson, Vice President of Indian Motorcycle. “The FTR 1200 is as much about style and self-expression as it is about street-oriented performance, and the FTR Rally delivers that combination in a totally unique way.”

The FTR Rally combines responsive handling with upright ergonomics to create a commanding riding experience suitable for urban environments or backroad adventures. It’s equipped with cruise control, a USB fast charge port, and new ProTaper handlebars that are two inches higher for better comfort and handling. The FTR Rally also features an LED headlight and LED turn signals offering better visibility with minimal maintenance.

The 1203cc V-twin engine features a smooth power delivery with loads of low-end punch.  The engine produces 123 horsepower, 87 ft-lbs of torque, and features a flat torque curve to deliver a fun riding experience in all conditions. The engine is housed in a black trellis frame and the FTR Rally will continue to feature an inverted front suspension with radially mounted dual Brembo brakes for exceptional control and stopping power.

The 2020 FTR Rally is compatible with the entire range of 40+ accessories specifically developed for the FTR platform, giving riders the ability to customise combinations and maintain the independence they seek when purchasing an Indian Motorcycle.

Pricing for the FTR Rally will start at $13,499 MSRP. Riders can learn more by visiting their local Indian Motorcycle dealer. For more information on the 2020 FTR Rally, or to find the nearest dealer, visit IndianMotorcycle.com and follow along on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Vagos Motorcycle Club trial to resume later in this month

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Defendants Bradley Campos, left, Diego Garcia and Cesar Morales depart the Lloyd George U.S. Courthouse following opening statements in a federal racketeering trial for eight Vagos Motorcycle Club members on Aug. 12, 2019, in Las Vegas.

by Rio Lacanlale from https://www.reviewjournal.com

A lengthy federal racketeering trial against eight Vagos Motorcycle Club members will take a weeklong break after four days of closing arguments, which initially were expected to wrap up this week.

Arguments will continue Feb. 18 due to a conflict in U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro’s schedule. The Las Vegas trial began in July.

Between Monday and Thursday, jurors heard from federal prosecutor Daniel Schiess and five of the eight men’s defense attorneys.

On trial are Vagos members Pastor Fausto Palafox, Albert Lopez, Albert Benjamin Perez, James Patrick Gillespie, Ernesto Manuel Gonzalez, Bradley Michael Campos, Cesar Vaquera Morales and Diego Chavez Garcia.

The men previously pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiracy to participate in a racketeering enterprise, murder, and using a firearm to commit murder during and in retaliation to a crime. Each faces up to life in prison if convicted.

The charges stem from a 2017 indictment accusing Vagos members of a slew of crimes dating to 2005 and spanning more than a decade, including the 2011 fatal shooting of a Jeffrey Pettigrew, a rival Hells Angels gang member in Sparks.

Under the racketeering charge, in addition to the 2011 killing, the defendants are accused of robbery, extortion, kidnapping and possession of narcotics with the intent to sell.

Arguments this week from both sides reiterated two different versions of the 2011 shooting previously told to the jury.

Schiess spent nearly three days carefully laying out the most significant evidence presented during the trial, arguing that the killing was both an authorized hit by Palafox, the international president of Vagos at the time, and part of a broader criminal conspiracy.

But according to the defense, Gonzalez, accused of being the shooter, was “acting in the defense of others” when he fired the fatal shots. Michael Kennedy, his attorney, said Pettigrew and another Hells Angels member were “actively shooting” inside a casino after picking a fight with Vagos members.

The defense also has argued that the government’s case was largely built on lies from Gary “Jabbers” Rudnick, an ousted member who received immunity for his testimony against his former allies. In September, the government’s star witness admitted to repeatedly lying on the witness stand after testifying for three days that Vagos members had plotted the killing.

“They have asked you to convict Ernesto Gonzalez and these other men on first-degree murder and racketeering conspiracy on the word of a man whose reliability they questioned,” Kennedy said.

A book about Government controlling your life

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SAM “CHOPPER” ORWELL – BOOK

$13.44

Fast-action fiction on two wheels! What does the future hold for rough and ready bikers? Discover how society eliminates motorcycles. Hold on as Sam “Chopper” Orwell fights to find freedom for the last remaining riders!

BUY IT TODAY – CLICK HERE TO SHOP

All 5-Ball Books will be signed by the Author and contain 5-Ball Bling—Amazing!

Chapter III Excerpt

The coffin hit the hard earth, split, and dumped Sam onto the ground. He gasped for air. The bright sun seared his clamped eyelids. He was covered with sweat and his body reeked from the confined, three-hour trek into the mountains.

Sam rolled over and pulled himself onto all fours, his lungs drawing in the hot air. Several men and a couple of women, their faces weathered from months in the desert, surrounded him. One raised a large, galvanized bucket and dumped several gallons of lukewarm water on Sam’s limp torso. His longtime friend and riding partner, Red, kneeled at his side and held him from trying to respond to the watery assault. – See more here in the Cantina – Subscribe Today.

About the Author

K.Randall Ball is an old biker and writer, who’s hung around with many of the greats in the custom motorcycle world. He’s written a handful of books, built a few motorcycles, set Bonneville records, and traveled around the world. He spends most of his time working in his Wilmington, California shop, writing for his web site, Bikernet.com, and wondering why he’s so attracted to redheads.

These two SA female motorcycle racers defied the Dakar odds

By | General Posts

by Sean Parker from https://www.wheels24.co.za/

While many of us were enjoying a break over the festive period and new year, Kirsten Landman and Taye Perry began 2020 by competing in one of the world’s toughest sporting events: the Dakar Rally.

This year’s race took place in Saudi Arabia for the first time and competitors were faced with a route of 7900km. They traversed massive sands and rocky terrain and performed exceptionally well to finish the race.

Wheels24 reported earlier in January that Landman, a 28-year-old from Durban, completed the two-week-long race in an excellent 55th-place overall, while Perry (29) came home in 77th place.

They performed incredibly well over the twelve days on the bikes and the reality of how dangerous the Dakar came to light when Portuguese rider Paulo Gonçalves died after crashing in the seventh stage of the race, the first casualty since 2015.

“I was very nervous, one of the officials came to me and said this is the point of no return. Once you go over this (starting) podium it’s over. It’s the beginning, but it’s over,” says Perry in an interview on Carte Blanche.

Landman, whose love for motorbike racing started at 10-years-old, said: “I grew up watching Dakars, and you see videos of riders crying because they are so physically exhausted they can’t get out of a section, it is so physically tough and draining.”