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Music, Meaning & Motorcycling

By General Posts

Rocking On Requires Some Rolling

by Wayfarer

Sound has more impact on life than we know or credit it for. Sound is not just significant to humans but many lifeforms.

We now have turned sound to music. W have a whole range of music genres to choose from – for entertainment, for ‘edu-taiment’ of kids, for relaxing, for hitting the gym, for romantic night dinners, for wild parties and more.

In this article, there are also a few examples offered of some myths & inspirations from iconic Rock group ‘Creedence Clearwater Revival’ music & songs.

Often people assume meanings of songs based on lyrics, music style or other socio-cultural information from the period when a song first appeared.

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Fear Rides with Motorcycling Photojournalist in WarZone

By General Posts

This is Photojournalist Kiran Ridley’s secondhand, 200 cc, Chinese-built motorcycle he relies on to get around in Ukraine. Second-language issues could be blamed for the Xplode name written on the side panel — something you don’t want your motorcycle to do, especially in a war zone.

From the Common Thread Team
by Neale Bayly of RevZilla

Editor’s Note: I discovered this story on Common Thread the ZevZilla web site. I hope they don’t mind Bikernet sharing this with our readers. You should go to their site to see Ridley’s moving photos.–Bandit

Simple things at first about his motorcycle: a badly wobbling rear wheel and a high idle speed, along with the machine’s refusal to run without the choke engaged. As a motorcycle journalist, I am surprised the motorcycle is not known to me. It’s an odd 200 cc single-cylinder, four-stroke machine that “rides like shit — you are fighting it all the time,” he tells me.

The circumstances of how he acquired the machine are fascinating, as he tells me about a chance meeting with a heavily tattooed pizza delivery rider that led to a conversation and an opportunity to purchase the delivery rider’s second motorcycle. It took just a few calls, a meeting, and with an exchange of cash the deal was done. Ridley was mobile.

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War Machine: Custom Bike Tribute to Soldiers

By General Posts

Built by Richie Russolello, Story and Photos by Dangerous Dave – Earl’s Garage

Richie Russolello was working in Kansas and meet with some Veterans building a memorial with no support.

As he talked to them, he made a promise to help them, and their mission to honor veterans and wounded warriors.

He has been working on airplanes, trains, and all the associated support equipment.

He worked for Continental, Colorado Railroad and now Signature Flight Support, and he is licensed to work on A&P aircraft and Qualified Maintenance Personnel (QMP) for trains.

This year he was elevated to judge at the Mountain Regions largest motorcycle event, Colorado Motorcycle Expo going strong for 43 years.

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The Flying Wrens: Sisterhood of Motorcycling Heroes

By General Posts

All-Female British dispatch riders of WW-II

Originally, the Women’s Royal Naval Service (WRNS) was formed in 1917, during WW-I.

Riding on narrow British roads in all weather conditions can be a dangerous enough occupation. Doing so around the clock during WW-II with the German Blitz going on around you required steel nerves.

The bikes used were mostly small, single-cylinder affairs, built specifically for military use.

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Over 8500 Motorcycles Ride in Support of Marine Cpl Humberto “Bert” Sanchez

By General Posts

by Rogue and John Lee

What an honor it was to be part of the procession for Marine Cpl Humberto “Bert” Sanchez. Over. 8500 bikes came in from multiple other states to show their support. That alone was something amazing to see. There were so many bikes that there was no good way to even get a photo to show the amount of bikes that were there.

The Marine Riders were towards the front of the procession and when we pulled out to follow the behind Cpl Sanchez there were people lining the streets. From the gates of Grissom Airforce base all the way to Logansport. A good 20 miles of people on the side of the road.

Everyone had American Flags waving. Lots of Marine Corps flags too. Multiple ladder trucks with flags draped over the road. Old men in their uniforms from when they served saluting the entire procession. Children holding their parents hands. Family pets. People crying and holding their hands over their hearts. People playing Patriotic music.

And that’s before we even got to Logansport.

Cpl Sanchez received an aerial escort from 4 A10 Warthogs as we neared. They flew over us multiple times before circling the front end of the procession. They would come buzzing in a couple hundred feet off the ground.

Then as we come into Logansport it’s just a sea of people lining the street. Tens of Thousands of people lined the city streets for Cpl Sanchez’s final few miles. I would guess anywhere from 10,000-20,000 people were lined up along the roads from Peru to Logansport.

Absolutely amazing. Well done Indiana! That’s was an amazing homecoming for a hero.

I am honored to have been a part of this and happy I got to ride next to my Marine Rider Brothers. Please keep the Sanchez family in your thoughts and prayers as they prepare to bury their hero in a couple of days.

Omaha Police refuse motorcade access to Patriot Guard Riders

By General Posts

from https://www.ketv.com

Omaha police: Only law enforcement in Cpl. Page motorcade for safety reasons

Patriot Guard Riders say they’ll follow behind motorcade.

OMAHA, Neb. — Omaha police said it’s not safe to have hundreds of motorcycles on the route that will only be blocked off for the fallen Marine Cpl. Daegan Page and his family to pass. The Patriot Guard Riders said it’s their honor to pay tribute to Page and still plan to follow the motorcade.

“I’m a bit flabbergasted with the decision. It really took me by surprise,” said Scott Knudsen, Nebraska State Captain, Patriot Guard Riders.

Knudsen and other Patriot Guard Riders said they’ve never been denied a place in a military motorcade and asked Page’s father for permission to be part of Friday’s event.

“We never go anywhere unless we are invited. We always seek out permission to achieve permission from appropriate people,” Knudsen said.

But Omaha police asked all groups to stay out of the motorcade for safety reasons, disappointing Knudsen and hundreds of riders coming from Western Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa.

“It’s really a shame that it has come to this, but we are in different times today. I don’t know all the details I’m certainly not blaming the Omaha Police Department or the sheriff’s department or anybody else,” Knudsen said.

“We decided for safety sake and not tie up the intersection,” said Steve Lahrs, Director of American Legions Millard Post.

Millard American Legion Riders were planning to join the escort to honor the fallen Marine until police asked them to stay parked on the sidelines.

“They are short-staffed and short-manned and it would create too much of a havoc for the city of Omaha to have hundreds of bikers blocking intersections,” Lahrs said.

In a statement to KETV, Omaha police said once again the decision is about safety.

“The ultimate goal for tomorrow’s motorcade escort of Marine Corporal Daegan Page is to safely transport him and his family from Eppley Airfield to the mortuary in Millard. We understand there are many organizations who want to assist us in this endeavor. We appreciate that and thank you. However, this motorcade is not a procession or parade. The route will be open, meaning traffic will be temporarily stopped just ahead of the motorcade to allow it to pass smoothly and safely. Once the motorcade is passed, traffic will again flow as normal. Only trained law enforcement officers with vehicles equipped with lights and sirens will be assisting with the motorcade to ensure the safety of all involved along the nearly seventeen mile route. We encourage the public to support Cpl. Page and his family along the route of the motorcade.

“On Friday, September 17th, the date of the funeral, there will be a closed route from St. Paul Lutheran Church to the Omaha National Cemetery. A closed route will allow the opportunity for organizations to safely assist with the procession at that time.”

That message came from Lt. Neal Bonnacci.

“We are absolutely not going to violate any laws and absolutely not go against their wishes and need to respect that and I do respect that,” Knudsen said.

“We start losing the reasoning behind the whole motorcade and it’s to show respect for the family and show respect for Cpl. Page,” Lahrs said.

Bonnacci also gave some safety tips to citizens wanting to pay honor on the motorcade route.

Citizens are encouraged to show their support along the route of the motorcade, but are reminded to allow room for the vehicles, and be mindful of the following:

• Park in compliance with parking regulations

• Ask permission before parking in private business parking lots

• Do not block private driveways

• Be patient if in traffic, and expect delays along the route

• Do not illegally park along the route, block intersections or impede the motorcade. Citizens are encouraged to utilize interstate overpasses for viewing, rather than stopping alongside the interstate.

Veterans’ campaigner Simon Weston gets special gift on 60th birthday

By General Posts

by Enda Mullen from https://www.coventrytelegraph.net

Veterans’ campaigner Simon Weston says 60th birthday gift of Triumph trike is dream come true.

It followed a crowdfunding campaign organised by former Meriden Triumph engineer Norman Hyde.

Veterans’ campaigner and Falkland War survivor Simon Weston has been presented with an extra-special gift to mark his 60th birthday in the shape of a Triumph trike.

Simon signed up for the British Army at 15. Aged 20, when serving in the Welsh Guards, he was aboard the logistics ship RFA Sir Galahad – laden with fuels and ammunition – when it was bombed by the Argentine Air Force during the conflict in the South Atlantic.

He suffered horrific injuries and underwent prolonged reconstructive surgery.

At times Simon said he was close to giving in, but courage and determination saw him emerge positively as a strong advocate for troops’ and veterans’ rights.

Along with his many charitable activities he gives inspirational talks on achieving mental wellness. Awarded the OBE in 1992, Simon was made a CBE in 2016.

Veterans’ campaigner and Falkland War survivor Simon Weston has been presented with an extra-special gift to mark his 60th birthday in the shape of a Triumph trike.

The gift was the result of a crowd-funding campaign which had its roots in a chance conversation at a presentation given by Simon two years ago.

Simon revealed to former Meriden Triumph engineer and world speed record holder Norman Hyde that he would really love a trike like the one ridden by Billy Connolly on his TV travel series.

It spurred Norman into action and he decided to embark on a mission to fulfil Simon’s dream.

He said: “Knowing what Simon had given to our country and knowing what good people there are in the bike world, from manufacturers and importers, through dealers to clubs and riders, I immediately said ‘leave it to me, I’ll fix it’.”

Norman organised crowdfunding and the £25,000 project got off to a fabulous start when Triumph Motorcycles, which is based in Hinckley, donated a new 1,200cc Bonneville for conversion.

Trike Design of Caerphilly South Wales (coincidentally Simon’s home town) was chosen to convert the two-wheeler and adapt controls for Simon, who has fingers missing from both hands.

“This is a dream come true,” said Simon of the crowdfunded Triumph trike, which was presented to him a few days before his 60th birthday.

“I can’t thank Norman Hyde and all the people who made this happen enough.”

Donations ranging from £5 to four-figure sums came from individuals and the trade, often accompanied by messages of affection for Simon.

The Triumph Owners MCC (TOMCC) made a substantial contribution as did the Duke of Richmond (the Goodwood Estate) and the Motorcycle Industry Association (MCIA), which is based in Coventry.

Simon’s helmet was donated by LS2 and the Held clothing company are making bespoke gloves.

Hank Hancock of Trike Design (TD), specialists in three-wheeler conversions and adaptation for disabled riders, took on the job with enthusiasm.

The Triumph is fitted with TD’s latest Brookland Sport design, with boot space inside the smooth GRP mouldings.

The 17-inch wheels have independent suspension with an anti-roll bar and the final transmission from the chain to twin shafts is via a differential.

Trike Design’s Robin Davies designed and fitted the specially adapted controls.

Kliktronic press-button electric gear shifting means that Simon can change up with a finger on his right hand and down with his left thumb.

Foot pedals for the throttle, brakes and clutch are similarly arranged to car controls.

“I soon worked out how to ride, and especially how to stop,” said Simon, who hopes to persuade his wife Lucy to travel on the pillion seat.

The presentation was held on Trike Design’s forecourt.

Those in attendance included several representing the TOMCC, including club chairman Ken Talbot and members who rode in from Shropshire, Max Roberts of Triumph Motorcycles, Dave Priddle of LS2 helmets and two motorcycle-mounted officers from the national police-run initiative BikeSafe; PC Richard Gibbs and PC Paul Rees.

Triumph Motorcycles has historic connections to Coventry.

Triumph, in its many guises, was born out of a company founded by Siegfried Bettmann, who had emigrated from Nuremberg, in 1884.

It went on to make bicycles before moving on to motorcycles and later cars.

The motorcycle making side of the business was originally based in Coventry and subsequently in Meriden.

A new company, Triumph Motorcycles, based in Hinckley, gained the name rights of the company in the 1980s and is now one of the world’s major motorcycle manufacturers.

1946 Harley-Davidson WL Puts On Red and Black Warpaint

By General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Harley-Davidson may have been born in the early 1900s, but it was not until the Second World War that the name became synonymous with the near perfect two-wheeled machines. And it was all due to a war-fighting motorcycle called the WLA.

Derived from the civilian pre-war WL, the WLA was made in vast quantities (some 90,000 units were produced) and was seen in action on battlefields across the world. The machine was so suited for the task that G.I.s simply fell in love with it, and their love lasted for years.

Such an impact the WLA had on the American soldier that in the years that followed the end of the war these bikes became the most customized motorcycle in America, often at the hands of the people who actually rode them in battle.

Trying to build on the success of the machine, Harley reverted production of the WLA back to the civilian WL, advertising it as a true war hero, and earning these bikes a place both in the post-war police departments and in the hearts of civilians.

As a result, to this day garages across the U.S. keep rolling restored versions of these WLA successors out their doors.

One fine example is the 1946 WL we have here. Made in the first year of peace after the war, it still uses the same 45ci V-twin engine that proved its worth the hard way.

The engine has been restored, of course, and complete with the stunning red and black frame and body, is waiting for a buyer as part of the Eddie Vannoy collection auction in June.

“You’ve got to take your hat off to the Harley-Davidson 45. It was the hero on the battlefields of Europe and the South Pacific, it has broken records on all the nation’s race tracks, and it is providing hundreds of thousands of riders many happy hours of pleasant, economical, and trouble-free rides,” the post on the Mecum website reads.