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Honda CBR300R ABS 2022 : Road Test

By General Posts

by Kyle Smith from https://www.hagerty.com/

Picture this: You’re hanging around the Rock Store at the top of Mulholland Highway with your rental Camry the day before you fly home. The leather-clad crowd around praises the virtues of the GSXR600 chassis and the electronics package on the R1 for what seems like hours before a voice from the ether comes down and declares that, in fact, all of that sucks. Instead the holy follow the real truth of Slow Bike Fast.

This truly enlightened rider who belongs to that voice is astride a miniscule machine that looks like a sportbike that stayed in the dryer just a bit too long and has an exhaust note like a mix of an old enduro machine and the Singer your mom used to repair your jeans way back when. Is this person insane or a prophet? There’s only one way to say for sure. I took the Honda CBR300R out for a week of playing in the canyons alongside some high-horsepower (and highly capable) machines to see if it truly held up.

This 250cc-400cc market segment is now a packed class, with the KTM RC390, Yamaha R3, Kawasaki Ninja 400, and Suzuki GSX250R all competing for both attention from new riders and track rats alike. That is two very different subsets of buyers but it all boils down to similar wants and desires: Reliability, approachability, and fun factor.

Honda comes right out and calls the 300 a commuter machine in some of its press materials. It is an evolution of the CBR250R which lived from 2011 to 2015, after which the engine was upsized to the current 286cc. The non-ABS equipped model comes in at $4,899 plus $600 in destination and freight charges. Add in the well-tuned ABS, as seen on our test bike, and the price rises to just $5,099. Either trim can be had in grand prix red or matte gray metallic.

The engine is not the main reason I would recommend this bike though. It’s the chassis that gives the baby CBR the most fun character. A scant 30” seat height is the first thing that stood out when I threw my leg over the bike for the first time. My 32” inseam means that I am rarely bothered by seat heights, but the CBR’s lower seat combined with the narrowness of the chassis to feel playful to me. Riding through twists and turns was an absolute delight.

Straight line speed was not astonishing, but the Honda still moved quickly enough to be safe and fun. Unfortunately, those canyon roads were a place the CBR’s suspension really showed its pricepoint and intended use case. The fork is sprung on the soft side and the rear begs for more rebound damping.

The dash consists of a simple analog sweep tachometer and LCD display for speed, distance, and other necessary measurements. Simple and functional. A cable-pull clutch and hydraulic front brake round out the rider touchpoints.

The ready-to-ride weight comes in at just 354 pounds and it very much feels like it. The single front brake measures just 296mm diameter, with 220mm rear disc and the combination has no problem slowing the CBR. The ABS threshold is fairly high, as we had to work to get it to intervene but it cycled quickly and consistently once engaged.

(Editor’s note: I think the 320cc Yamaha R3, which I’ve ridden quite a bit, feels even lighter on its feet — Jack Baruth)

The CBR is a delight to ride just about everywhere. The only place it fell short was highway riding. Honda claims a top speed just shy of 100mph, but 70mph felt busy on the little machine and the tach needle fluttered in the top third of its range. Will it do it? Yes. If that is your main use though, the larger CBR500R is likely a better fit.

Once off the superslab we had no trouble racking up miles on the comfortable seat. The bike just was not tiring to ride like most small-displacement bikes tend to be.

The low seat height and light weight combine with smooth controls to make a very beginner-friendly package.

It’s also one that veteran riders will find playful to ride–this is the core of “Slow Bike Fast.”

The little CBR is not the perfect motorcycle, but it is a great second (or third) bike; delightful to ride, and once you have one you will likely find yourself reaching for its keys more than you would think.

Royal Enfield Reveals Scram 411

By General Posts

ROYAL ENFIELD REVEALS ALL-NEW SCRAM 411 ADV CROSSOVER

Ready. Set. Scram!

Milwaukee, WI (Tuesday, March 15, 2022) – Royal Enfield, the global leader in the midsize (250cc – 750cc) motorcycling segment, today unveiled the Scram 411 – the brand’s first ADV crossover. The new Scram 411 is an engaging, accessible and capable street scrambler, with the heart of an adventure motorcycle. Built on Royal Enfield’s proven 411cc single-cylinder engine platform and the Harris Performance chassis, the Scram 411 combines spirited agility on urban streets, with competent rough-roading capabilities. Focused and purposeful changes in the riding geometry and ergonomics make it ideal for in-city riding, as well as unpredictable, challenging trails off the urban grid.

Unveiled for global audiences today, the new Scram 411 is already available in India, and will be available in Europe, Asia Pacific, North America and Latin America later this year. The Scram 411 is scheduled to arrive in the U.S. late summer/early fall. Pricing and colorways will be announced in the coming months.

The Scram 411 is a continuation of Royal Enfield’s constant pursuit of exploration, and building motorcycles to enable every adventure. One such motorcycle is the Himalayan—Royal Enfield’s flagship adventure tourer. Launched in 2016, the Himalayan has fostered a subculture of adventure touring around the world, most recently, even Antarctica’s South Pole. Its unique design and well-rounded capability make it among Royal Enfield’s best-selling motorcycles, and it is upon this stalwart platform that the style evolution continues with the more urban-focused ADV-crossover motorcycle—the Scram 411.

The all-new Scram 411 is a new subspecies that has the authentic vibes of a scrambler and adventure touring in its DNA. With long-travel suspension and class-leading ground clearance paired with a 19-inch front wheel and 17-inch rear, the Scram 411 is playfully agile on city streets, yet is highly capable of tackling more rugged terrain, so the exploration doesn’t end when the pavement stops.

Siddhartha Lal, Managing Director, Eicher Motors Ltd., simply loves the fluidity and the
multipurpose ability of the Scram 411. Speaking about this in the context of modern existence, he said, “Whether it’s London, New Delhi or Tokyo, the contours of modern urban existence are ever-changing. With our world increasingly becoming more fast-paced, life in the urban context has become about the weekday hustle and the weekend getaway, and everything in between. We wanted to build a motorcycle that could effortlessly navigate this entire gamut, and be the perfect ally for the young, modern-day rider. The Scram 411 is truly a motorcycle made for now, and is always ready to tackle whatever surprise is in store.”

Speaking about the inspiration behind the Scram 411, and about the new motorcycle, Executive Director,
Royal Enfield, B Govindarajan, said, “The globally lauded versatility and competence of the Himalayan inspired us to reimagine the motorcycle in a more young, modern-day, urban context. The Scram 411 is the perfect crossover for young city-dwellers, who prefer a motorcycle that is fun and engaging to ride around the city, yet has a rugged appeal. By shifting the riding geometry to make the motorcycle more at home on busy city streets, and retaining its strong ability to take on rough roads and take on the weekend dirt trail, we’ve brought a unique subcategory for consumers. Like all our motorcycles, the Scram 411 is built for the global rider, and manufactured with world-class engineering. We also have an array of genuine motorcycle accessories and a vibrant apparel range inspired by the Scram lifestyle. This is a very exciting and spirited new motorcycle, and we are confident that young riders from across the world will love the new Scram 411.”

Mark Wells, Chief of Design at Royal Enfield, enjoys riding the Scram 411, and loves how easily it can navigate a wide spectrum of terrain and challenges. Speaking about creating a new subspecies of motorcycles, he said, “Most scrambler motorcycles focus only on aesthetics and looks. When we began work on the Scram 411, we were determined to create a motorcycle that would be distinct in design and purpose, and bring the best of rough-road capability to urban riding. With its distinctive look and design, playful colorways, accessible riding proposition, the Scram 411 is an ultimate ADV crossover for the urban environment.”

ROYAL ENFIELD SCRAM 411 – DETAILS & SPECIFICATIONS

The Scram 411 is powered by the globally appreciated 411cc, fuel-injected, 4-stroke, SOHC, air-cooled single-cylinder engine. The counterbalanced engine ensures smooth power delivery and strong bottom-end torque that elevates the overall performance. The wide spread of useable power makes it easy to manage over long urban commutes with minimum gear shifts, and the confidence-inspiring low-revving torque allows it to tackle bad road, and off-road sections easily.

Long-travel suspension and monoshock design, together with class-leading 7.8 inches (200mm) of ground clearance, the Scram 411 delivers a smooth and comfortable ride. The telescopic front suspension with 41mm forks and 7.4 inches (190mm) travel, pairs with 7.0 inches (180mm) travel on the rear, where the link-mounted monoshock enables stable and confident riding over rough roads. Front and rear disc brakes combined with dual-channel ABS, ensures confident braking.

The change in the riding geometry is brought about by the 19-inch front wheel and dual-purpose tire. This, combined with the 17-inch rear wheel, are key to the Scram 411 motorcycle’s nimble handling. The dual-purpose tires ensure a confident grip over tarmac and loose gravel for the ideal combination of on-road grip and rough-road tractability.

The seat on the new Scram 411 is designed for comfort over long saddle time. The single seat that reflects the urban styling of the motorcycle, offers great comfort for both rider and passenger. The accessible 31.2-inch (795mm) seat height enables and easy reach to the ground, making it easy to maneuver in stop-and-go traffic.

The Scram 411 features a new digital-analog instrument cluster that provides easy access to essential information. Circumvented by a traditional analog speedometer, the Scram retains this classic style element, also making for easy viewing.

WATCH THE Live Launch of the Royal Enfield Scram 411

More details, information and specifications on the North America-spec Royal Enfield Scram 411 ADV crossover motorcycle, including colorways, options, genuine accessories and pricing, will be released in the coming months. U.S. arrival is anticipated in late summer/early spring.

#readysetscram #scram411 #royalenfieldscram

About Royal Enfield
The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901.

Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 140 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Alt-Rock Cruisers: BMW targets American brand’s market

By General Posts

by Jack Baruth from Hagerty.com

BMW R18 meets Indian Challenger and Harley Heritage Classic

The slightly ridiculous 1800cc, two-cylinder, leather-saddlebag, CHiPs-windshielded cruiser I’m trying to force through six stopped lanes of Los Angeles traffic can’t be taken as anything but an admission on the part of the Bayerische Motoren Werke that Harley-Davidson knows

a) what boys like;
b) what men want …

in America, anyway.

CLICK HERE To Read a comprehensive Road Test & Review of the cruiser models from the 3 motorcycle brands.

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Super Soco TCMax & TS Street Hunter Electric Motorcycles

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Super Soco TCMax 2022

from https://www.rushlane.com/ by Satya Singh

Vmoto Soco had unveiled multiple products at EICMA 2021 including electric scooters, motorcycles and fleet vehicles

Currently focused on European and US markets, Vmoto Soco Group will eventually expand its footprint globally.

The company has set ambitious plans to emerge as one of the leading brands in e-mobility. Towards that end, Vmoto Soco spent some busy days at 2021 EICMA, where a number of new electric vehicles were showcased.

Two of these are Super Soco TS Street Hunter, which seeks inspiration from the naked streetfighter design format. The other one is TCMax retro motorcycle.

2022 Super Soco Electric Motorcycles – styling and features
Vmoto Soco’s TS range currently has TS and TS-X electric motorcycles.

Overall styling of TS Street Hunter looks familiar to these motorcycles.

Some key features include a quirky headlamp face, spear-shaped turn signals, wide handlebar, sculpted fuel tank, prominent side fairing, single-piece seat and trendy tail lamp.

Super Soco TS Street Hunter

It is likely that TS Street Hunter will be borrowing several of its features from existing TS motorcycles. There could be slight variations or tweaks in line with the bike’s sportier profile. Things like an all-LED lighting setup and full-digital instrument console are apparent.

Instrument console used on TS 2021 displays a range of information such as battery status, real-time speed, odometer, full range, air temperature, clock and riding map. The screen has minimalistic black lettering against a light grey background, which should work well in terms of visibility in both bright and dark conditions. Any fancy stuff appears to have been intentionally avoided to save battery power.

Another notable feature is racing-style side wings. These not only work to enhance the bike’s looks, but also ensure better cooling and improved stability at high speed. Like other TS bikes, TS Street Hunter could get ample storage space. This will make it more practical for everyday use.

Super Soco TS Street Hunter powertrain
Powering the bike is a 2500W high-performance wheel hub motor. Applicable torque is 180 Nm. Existing Super Soco TS motorcycle also has a 2500W hub motor, which could be the same as TS Street Hunter. However, things like range and top speed could be different on both bikes. Considering that TS Street Hunter will focus on performance, it will have a relatively higher top speed and lower range.

Super Soco TS has max range of 200km, when used with a dual battery setup at a speed of 25 kmph. Top speed is 75 kmph. Maximum load capacity is 150 kg. The bike utilizes a 60v 32 Ah lithium-ion battery pack. It can be charged from 0 to 100% in around 3 hours 30 minutes.

Charging time will be more in case of dual-battery setup. Battery packs are located at a lower height, which improves the bike’s handling and balance. The battery system comes with features such as battery balancer, temperature protection and short circuit protection. It is likely that Super Soco TS Street Hunter will be equipped with connectivity platform. It could get features such as remote access, keyless start, and anti-theft alarm.

Crazy Affordable Honda Navi wrapped in miniMoto package Coming to the U.S.

By General Posts

from https://www.autoevolution.com  by Florina Spînu

Honda is finally bringing the Navi to the U.S.! Adding to the miniMoto family for 2022, the machine combines the looks of a motorcycle with scooter features. Given its compact size, it makes up for a sporty and fun commuter that’s easy to maneuver around the city.

Flaunting miniMoto aesthetics, the Navi is somewhat a cross between Honda’s Ruckus and Grom. It features a low 30-inch seat height that allows most riders to touch the ground with their feet and effortlessly hop on the ride. Not only that, but it’s easy to find a parking spot or handle it through the concrete urban jungle.

The bike weighs 236 lbs (104 kgs), including all of its standard equipment and a full tank of fuel, so it’s a light machine that can be transported on an RV bumper rack. It even has a storage unit that is big enough to carry a backpack, a jacket, or a laptop.

The bike is equipped with a 109cc air-cooled four-stroke single-cylinder, and it has scooter-like features that set it apart from other members of the miniMOTO family, such as a CVT transmission. That means no clutch, no shifting, no neutral or park. All the riders have to do is hop on, turn the key, press a button and start Navi-gating (pun intended).

Those who want to get a taste of what this bike feels like will have the opportunity to get up close and personal with it this weekend at the IMS Outdoors motorcycle show in Costa Mesa, California. The Navi is set to hit the U.S. showrooms in January (February for California) next year. The bike will be available in four colors: Red, Grasshopper Green, Nut Brown, and Ranger Green. What’s more, it is offered at a crazy affordable price of $1,807.

According to Honda, another five on-road models for 2022 will make a comeback: the Gold Wing tourer and NC750X adventure tourer, the Rebel 1100 and Fury cruisers, and the CBR600RR sportbike. Most of them will be available in multiple trim levels and will sport a fresh set of paint.

Piaggio, KTM, Honda and Yamaha set up swappable batteries consortium

By General Posts

by Reuters from https://www.investing.com

MILAN (Reuters) – Italian scooter maker Piaggio said on Monday it had set up a consortium with Honda Motor Co., KTM AG and Yamaha Motor Co. to encourage the use of swappable batteries for electric motorcycles and light electric vehicles.

The Swappable Batteries Motorcycle Consortium (SBMC) aims to broaden the use of light electric vehicles, such as scooters, mopeds and motorcycles, and support a more sustainable management of their batteries, a joint statement said.

It will focus on issues such as battery life, recharging times, infrastructure and costs and will work on defining international standard technical specifications for swappable batteries.

The companies in the consortium said they welcomed others joining them to extend standards to as many companies as possible.

“Urban mobility is going through a delicate transition moment towards electrification. Thanks to this consortium, motorbikes will keep their key role,” Piaggio Chief of Strategy and Product Michele Colaninno said.

Honda’s Motorcycle Operations Chief Officer Yoshishige Nomura said the consortium’s objectives aimed to make electric motorbikes more convenient for clients, as their “use on large scale can substantially contribute to the creation of a more sustainable society”.

Piaggio Group owns iconic two-wheeler brands such as Vespa, Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, among others.

BMW Vision AMBY showcases excellence against H-D Serial 1 e-bikes

By General Posts

SOURCE: https://www.autoevolution.com/

SOURCE: https://www.financialexpress.com/

BMW unveils Vision AMBY electric bikes: 300+ km range, 60 km/h top speed!
BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY Breaks the Norm With Striking Design and Advanced Tech

Of BMW’s 2021 IAA display, a very interesting one is the BMW i Vision AMBY, a peddle electric bicycle that boasts three speed ratings – 25 km/h for cycle tracks, 45 km/h for the city and 60 km/h for multi-lane roads (although, higher speeds would require a licence as well).

The i Vision AMBY also gets the rest of fancy EV features like geofencing which can be used for automatically adjusting its speed. It is one of five different concept vehicles with which the BMW Group is presenting at the IAA Mobility event.

While users of the BMW i Vision AMBY have to constantly pedal in order to benefit from the assistance of the electric drive system, BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY accelerates via a throttle grip

One of the five concept vehicles showcased by BMW at IAA Mobility 2021 is truly innovative – neither a bike or a motorcycle, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY blends the best of each category with advanced connectivity and geofencing technology.

BMW unveiled two electric vehicles with two wheels under the “Adaptive Mobility” (AMBY) concept. Both of them come with three speed levels for different types of road, and require an adequate driving license, insurance license plates, and a helmet for riding at maximum speed. Compared to the BMW i Vision AMBY that requires constant pedaling, the Motorrad Vision uses the throttle grip and features footrests instead of pedals, like a motorcycle.

According to BMW, while it resembles a bicycle, the new Motorrad Vision flaunts the features of a powerful motorbike, including an 830 mm-tall (32.6”) seat, a large bicycle fork, a small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature, and the fact that it’s accelerated from the handlebars. However, at 65 kg (143 lbs), it’s lighter than typical motorbikes, which makes it more agile and manageable.

Instead of manually selecting the riding mode – 25 kph (15.5 mph) on cycle paths, 45 kph on inner-city roads (27.9 mph), 60 kph (37.2 mph) on multi-lane roads and out of town, geofencing technology and the HERE map service could be enough for automatically adjusting speed levels.

This way, the vehicle could determine the type of road and adjust the speed accordingly, without any intervention. Plus, the license plate would act as an innovative display, where the operating mode would be visible for the other road users.

The problem is that, at the moment, there’s no legal basis for this “modular speed concept”. This is where the Motorrad AMBY becomes a true pioneer, because it’s precisely intended to help bring out the legislation that will regulate this concept in the near future.

No future driving or riding experience can be envisioned without connectivity, and the BMW specially developed app allows the rider to activate the motorbike, while providing access to basic functions and status data.

While additional features such as an optimized ABS system or a tire pressure monitoring system could make the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY even safer and more efficient, this concept motorbike already reflects a truly innovative spirit that redefines the boundaries between bikes and motorcycles.

PRESS RELEASE: 6 SEPTEMBER 2021

As a completely new concept between bicycle and motorbike, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY taps into fresh possibilities for the innovative, urban mobility of the future. It is one of five different concept vehicles that the BMW Group will use at the IAA Mobility 2021 in Munich to showcase its vision of individual mobility in and around the urban setting.

Under the common umbrella of electric mobility, digitalisation and sustainability, these five pioneering concepts form a versatile and sustainably conceived mobility mix on two and four wheels that comprehensively addresses a highly diverse range of mobility needs.

BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and BMW i Vision AMBY.

AMBY stands for “Adaptive Mobility”. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY and the BMW i Vision AMBY (see BMW i Vision AMBY press release) interpret the fundamental idea of adaptive urban mobility on two wheels based on differing facets. Both vehicles are electrically powered with three speed levels for different types of road. The drive allows up to 25 km/h on cycle paths, up to 45 km/h on inner-city roads and up to a top speed of 60 km/h on multi-lane roads and out of town. A helmet, insurance licence plates and the relevant driving licence are required to be able to travel at higher speeds, however. While the BMW i Vision AMBY as a high-speed pedelec requires constant pedalling in order to gain assistance from the electric drive, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated using the throttle grip and has footrests instead of pedals, as is typical of a motorcycle.

The modes available to the rider are stored in the app on the smartphone that connects to the respective AMBY vision vehicle.

Manual selection of the speed level is conceivable, as is detection of the road by means of geofencing technology, thereby allowing automatic adjustment of the top speed. As there is currently no legal basis for such a vehicle with a modular speed concept, the idea behind the AMBY vision vehicles is to prompt legislation that will enable this kind of set-up. In this way, the BMW Group is demonstrating that it will continue to be involved in providing mobility options in big cities in the future and offers innovative solutions.

New stimuli for emotional mobility on two wheels.

“The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY takes us into new territory. For us, the focus is on user behaviour – the question is: how will customers want to get around in the future? What will they expect their vehicle to be capable of? This was precisely the starting point of our deliberations. Our aim was to develop an extremely emotional vehicle for smart mobility in and around the city that offered maximum freedom. The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY really does enable our customers to experience urban life in a whole new way, cover distances more flexibly and “break free” of the city from time to time, too. At the same time, BMW Motorrad is consistently pursuing its electromobility strategy for urban conurbations. It’s a fascinating introduction to the world of BMW Motorrad that also promises maximum riding pleasure,” explains Edgar Heinrich, Head of Design BMW Motorrad.

The design – the DNA of BMW Motorrad.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY defies all existing categories: visually akin to the world of bicycles, it is a motorbike at heart. Its slender proportions promise ruggedness and adventure, while its design suggests clear echoes of the expressive style and layout of an BMW Enduro motorbike. With chunky treads on both the 26-inch front wheel, which has a thinner tyre, and the 24-inch rear wheel with its more rounded tyre, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY clearly shows that it is both willing and able to go anywhere. The firmly integrated seat with a height of 830 mm is just as typical a motorbike feature as the fixed footrests.

The seat also acts as a design element over the flat, rising upper frame section, creating a striking flyline. This produces a completely new, fresh look for BMW Motorrad – a link between the e-bike and motorbike world.
The large energy storage unit and drive unit form a dark graphic block at the centre of the frame.

The large-dimensioned bicycle fork on the front wheel features protectors and gives the entire front section a more massive, powerful look. A small headlight with the U-shaped BMW Motorrad light signature is a clear reference to the roots of the concept, as is the double LED element as a tail light. Another BMW Motorrad feature is that the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is accelerated from the handlebars, as is customary on a motorbike.
With a total weight of just 65 kg, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY is significantly lighter than other motorbikes, ensuring it offers excellent manoeuvrability and agility.

Colour and material concept featuring depth and unexpected details.

As compared to a conventional combustion engine, the concept of the electric drive in the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY means there is little in the way of visible mechanics.
For this reason, its technical heart is deliberately disguised and showcased in a striking machine-like style. This accentuates the highly elaborated colour and material concept, which goes well beyond the traditional dark underlying colour scheme and use of white highlights.

In its use of materials, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY cross-references two other concept vehicles that will also see their world premiere at the IAA Mobility 2021: The BMW i Vision Circular and the BMW i Vision AMBY. The trim material used on the energy storage unit – known as “floating grey polymers” – is also used in the bumper of the BMW i Vision Circular. It consists of recycled plastic and can itself be fed back into the material cycle at the end of the product lifecycle. Meanwhile the material used for the seat is also to be found in the saddle of the BMW i Vision AMBY and in the tyres of the BMW i Vision Circular. Based on recycled plastic granulate and sporting a fascinating terrazzo look, it demonstrates how several materials can be given a second life with a new form and function.

Asymmetrical design of the sides of the vehicle.

In keeping with the unexpected, self-assured character of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, its two sides have deliberately been designed distinctively. On both sides, the white “AMBY” lettering catches the eye above the light-coloured drive unit, making a striking statement as a stylised graphic on the trim of the energy storage unit. While the lettering on the left gains additional visual depth from a colourfully shimmering, iridescent drop shadow, the inscription on the right appears deliberately without a drop shadow. Below the energy storage unit there are two iridescent elements that add a further accentuation.

On the right-hand side of the vehicle, three small turquoise blue tubes visibly emerge from the silhouette, clearly alluding to the electric heart of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY. Next to this is a quote by Markus Schramm, Head of BMW Motorrad: „Electro-mobility will be very significant for the future of motorcycling. We foresee a slew of upcoming products with a focus on electric propulsion, particularly in the field of urban mobility. And I’m not only thinking of classic scooters here, but also of alternative modern, emotional products. Electro-mobility on two wheels needs to be really fun and adventurous and BMW is committed to developing corresponding products.”

On closer inspection, the interplay between the technoid pixel font with the classic serif font reflects a great attention to detail at several points: together these bridge the gap between the past and the future – just like the vision vehicle itself. The coordinates on the right are a reference to the BMW Motorrad Design Studio in Munich, where the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY came into being. On the opposite side, the letters “AMBY” also appear in Morse code, but with dashes visualising the dots. In their perfect interplay, all these carefully conceived details create a unique graphic and a highly contemporary sense of style.

The smartphone as the key.

The specially developed app enables the user to activate the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY for riding, read in their stored driving licence classes and make use of the appropriate insurance cover on an on-demand basis as required. In this way, the app performs the classic key function while also making use of the customary identification options provided by the smartphone such as Face ID. Basic functions and status queries (e.g. current charge status) are available as in the BMW App. Further developments and adjustments to the software can be provided to customers at any time via over-the-air updates.
The smartphone shown in the vision vehicle charges inductively on the magnetic holder in the rider’s lower field of vision. These connectivity options would also allow anti-theft protection and the freely programmable immobiliser to be offered as basic functions.
And the answer to the question “Where is my BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY?” would be just a click away on the smartphone, too.

Geofencing as a key technology.

Instead of choosing the riding mode yourself, geofencing technology combined with the detailed HERE map service could provide the required parameters for automatically adjusting speed levels (25/45/60 km/h) and the matching insurance cover. This technology enables the vehicle to detect the type of road, cycle path or slow-traffic area currently being used so that the maximum permitted speed can be automatically adjusted. In this way, the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY would transform from a vehicle similar to an S-pedelec to something that is more motorcycle-inspired. The user cannot override the mode. The required licence plate takes the form of an innovative display surface, so the mode selected at any given time can be easily recognised and read by other road users.

Additional technological innovations are conceivable for the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY, too: an optimised ABS system could further increase safety, as could an automatic high beam or brake light assistant, as well as daytime running lights. A tyre pressure monitoring system such as the one already available as an optional extra in BMW Group motorcycles is also conceivable. Finally, potential safety features could also include a distance radar with a range of up to 140 m to provide a visual and acoustic warning in the app when there is a vehicle approaching from behind.

The BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY shows one possible manifestation of what the modern, urban mobility of tomorrow might look like. It is intended as a blueprint to drive forward conversations about future-oriented travel in cities.

Figures of the BMW Motorrad Vision AMBY.

Battery: not specified

Output: not specified

Vmod1: up to 25 km/h

Vmod2: up to 45 km/h

Vmodmax: up to 60 km/h

Range: approx. 110 km (combined according to WMTC)

Wheels: Studded spoke wheels with 26-inch front and 24-inch rear

Seat height: 830 mm

Unladen weight: approx. 65 kg

NCOM Biker Newsbytes for August 2021

By General Posts

Legislative Motorcycle News from Around the World

The Highway Bill passes but…, Feds investigate auto-pilot car accidents, anti-profiling in California, lane-filtering, Sturgis Motorcycle Rally turnout, bad-driving and road-rage post-lockdown, fuel prices at a high, International Motorcycle Show, news you should use.

Click Here to Read the NCOM News on Bikernet.com

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Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

By General Posts

by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

Zero FXE launched: Review and Details

By General Posts

by Andrew Cherney from https://www.cycleworld.com

The brand’s sleekest and most fun ebike yet. The lightweight, agile FXE is a new addition to Zero’s 2022 lineup.

  • In a segment full of either high-priced, tech-heavy options or cheap flimsy junk, the FXE is a step in the right direction, especially for commuters not too concerned with range. It’s also a ton of fun.
  • The design adds a minimal, supermoto style onto the existing FX platform for a more modern, updated feel.
  • Steel frame holds the tried-and-true ZF 75-5 air-cooled motor in the FXE, rated at 46 hp. The 7.2kWh battery is not removable.
  • Certain design elements like the front headlight design (an LED) and “beak” got carried over directly from the Huge Design concept bike.
  • The bike’s light weight and short wheelbase make it easy to work turns, with good lean angle and sticky Pirelli tires aiding in your attack. You can drag the kickstand if you’re super aggressive though.
  • The relaxed, commuter-friendly riding position is even more upright than the SR/F’s but it makes for a comfy perch (except at higher speeds).
  • You’ll find the Cypher II operating system on the FXE displayed on a new 5-inch TFT screen, giving various ride modes and bike data. Pair your phone with the app to tailor them and get more detailed info.
  • Stylish cast wheels hold grippy Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, which upped our confidence in deeper high-speed turns.
  • The rear Showa monoshock delivers nearly 8 inches of travel for an impressively stable ride.
  • Inverted Showa fork is adjustable. J.Juan brakes offer excellent feel and good stopping power, and ABS can be turned off.

2022 Zero FXE Specifications
MSRP: $11,795
Motor: ZF 75-5 air-cooled IPM motor
Battery: 7.2kWh (max capacity) lithium-ion integrated battery
Charger type: 650W integrated
Charge time: 9.7 hours to 100% w/ standard 110V or 220V input
Claimed Range: 60 miles highway, 100 miles city, 75 miles combined
Claimed Peak power: 46 hp @ 3,500 rpm
Claimed Peak torque: 78 lb.-ft.
Top speed: 85 mph
Transmission: Clutchless direct drive
Final Drive: Carbon belt
Frame: Steel trellis
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa fork, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 7.0 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa 40mm piston monoshock, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 8.9 in. travel
Front Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 320mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 240mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast alloy; 17 x 3 in. / 17 x 3.5 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II; 110/70-17 / 140/70-17
Rake/Trail: 24.4°/2.8 in.
Wheelbase: 56.0 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Claimed Curb Weight: 299 lb.
Standard warranty: 2 years
Contact: zeromotorcycles.com

Conventional wisdom says there will be more EVs on the street within the next five to 10 years, and our urban roadscape will look a lot different than it does now. But conventional wisdom usually skips over the equally important notion that attracting riders means you have to innovate while also being sensitive to price, particularly in the electric space. Zero seems to be tackling those talking points, at least partially, with the reveal of the new 2022 FXE, a compact and affordable supermoto-styled commuter machine it’s billing as “the motorcycle of tomorrow, available today.”

Building the bike of tomorrow is a tall order, even for an electric motorcycle manufacturer, but when Zero took the wraps off its new machine last month near the firm’s HQ in Santa Cruz, California, our group of assorted moto scribes nodded. Here indeed was a very different looking electric bike—especially for the sometimes dowdy two-wheel electric space. And yet a mind-blowing revelation it was not, especially if you’re looking at the spec sheet alone. From a design standpoint, the slim, starkly modern supermoto-styled machine felt instantly appealing—even if it looked an awful lot like a deconstructed riff on the WR450, or more accurately, a close cousin of the brand’s already supermoto-y FXS model. But how would it hold up on the street?

n the FXE’s case, form did not have to follow function—or not as rigorously as previous models, which adopted more familiar shapes to make them appealing to the general public, according to Zero. But now, says VP of Product Development Brian Wismann, the consumer is ready for updated designs, which explains why the FXE, a model based on a concept collaboration with Huge Design back in 2019, is here. Although it’s built on the brand’s existing FX platform, the partnership with Huge introduced a completely new design language, informed mainly by stripped-down panels of bodywork. (The concept bike was in fact built on an FXS model, and you can see the similarities.) On the FXE, the so-called essential surfaces—seats, body panels, touch points—are intended to look like they’re floating over the chassis. The distinctive styling radiates modern industrial design aesthetics, while “celebrating the electric drivetrain” says Wismann.

When we sidled up to the FXE at a secret staging location outside of town—Zero shrewdly had us ride older SR/Fs and SR/Ss to where the new bikes were stashed—we were struck by just how approachable the profile was. A sane seat height welcomed even the shorties in the bunch, with the 32.9-inch perch making for easy access and a riding position similar to that of a dirt bike, not super aggressive but sitting atop the slightly dished, mostly flat seat, with a fairly short reach to the tallish bars. Mid-mounted pegs were ideally located, not too far forward or rearward, providing an upright stance in the saddle—even more than the SR/F I had just gotten off of. The compact body panels make for a clean look, though they did splay outward from below the faux fuel tank, pushing my knees out into the wind. They basically made it impossible to grip the tank as you normally might, but it was more minor inconvenience than any real annoyance.

With the ergonomics checking out, I put the FXE into Sport mode and let ‘er rip. Even though I sort of knew what to expect, the instant torque pop of an electric motor never fails to put a big grin on your face. Yes, 46 horses might not sound like much, but the eerily silent power pulse from the air-cooled ZF 75-5 motor is more than enough to turn your head, especially in its immediacy; the throttle felt far more responsive than the SR/F we had just ridden, possibly because the FXE’s substantially smaller mass and less unsprung weight made for quicker power transfer. With its narrow waist and short wheelbase, I found I could easily push the FXE into and through even the harshest decreasing-radius turns we tackled among the Santa Cruz redwoods. The bike did not fight me on quick transitions as much as expected, with the sticky Pirellis giving me all kinds of confidence throughout a half-day stint in mountain twisties. And with no need to worry about shifting, you’re free to focus on the next apex. Or to just blast to the 85-mph top speed, which I did whenever we hit a straight stretch of road. Why not, right?

Zero also outfitted the FXE with its now-familiar J.Juan brakes and bolstered by a Bosch ABS system, so stops were also a stress-free affair, with easy lever pull giving a strong bite and solid stopping power and almost no fade. (ABS can be turned off as well.) With 7 inches of travel, the inverted, adjustable Showa fork soaked up almost every road deformity we came across (except for one unexpected curb hop) staying composed even in truly harsh divots. Holding the line out back is an equally resilient—and adjustable—Showa monoshock that tracked solidly throughout our short ride.

As with the FX, the FXE also leverages Zero’s Cypher II operating system, which here is married to a new 5-inch optically bonded TFT display that proved bright and easy to read. You can access ride modes—it comes preprogrammed with Eco and Sport—and tailor torque, speed, and brake regeneration from the free Zero app, which also gives you insight to battery status. We can’t speak to range, given our short ride day—Zero claims 100 miles of city riding from the 7.2kWh (peak) battery, with 60 miles of range claimed on the highway, at 55 mph. The display screen showed less than 20 percent of charge remaining after our 50-mile stint, which was a mix of high- and low-speed scenarios, and that feels fairly close to the claim. According to Zero, the onboard 650W charger will top off the battery in 9.7 hours off a standard household socket; a rapid charger available for additional cost will do the job in a little more than 3 hours.

In sum, we’re not entirely buying the “bike of tomorrow” tagline, but the FXE does manage to serve up a grin-inducing blend of instant acceleration, flickability, and easy steering. Perhaps even more tantalizing is the sub-$10K price tag; yes, you’re getting a somewhat short range bike, but at least that obstacle is being somewhat addressed. Of course that sub-10K number rings true only once you tally in the federal and California EV tax credits, but hey, $10K is $10K.

Considering H-D’s lowest priced electric offering, the just-released LiveWire One, runs upward of $20K, and any bike called Lightning, Energica, Tarform, or Damon is well north of there, you’ve gotta hand it to Zero for compiling a portfolio of four models priced under $12K, all coming with a warranty and dealer support.

The dual sport FX sits at $11,595, the entry-level FXS is at $11,295, the naked S is priced at $10,995, and now the FXE at $11,795. All four either are or can be configured with the ZF 7.2 powertrain, which, granted, is not the fastest or most top-of-the-line offering, but it does help make the FXE one of the most affordable models in the Zero line.

You can check it out yourself at some of the upcoming stops of the IMS tour (starting with Sonoma Raceway on July 16) and bikes should be in dealers later this month as well.