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Arcimoto Partners With Lightning Motorcycles To Develop Electric Tilting Motorcycle

By General Posts

Arcimoto and Lightning Motorcycles Begin Development of World’s Fastest Electric Three-Wheel Tilting Motorcycle
Built on the platform of the Lightning LS 218 and outfitted with Arcimoto’s patented tilting trike technology, the new electric bike will look to set the record for fastest three-wheel motorcycle at Bonneville.

from https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210630005368/en/

from https://www.nrtoday.com

Arcimoto, Inc.® makers of fun, affordable, and ultra-efficient electric vehicles for everyday drivers and fleets, today announced a collaboration with Lightning Motorcycles with the goal to develop the fastest tilting three-wheel motorcycle in the world—gas or electric—using its patented Tilting Motor Works TRiO tilting trike technology.

“From the moment I met Richard Hatfield and saw the Lightning for myself at Bonneville, I knew there was the potential to create an electric trike unlike anything in the history of motorcycles, ” said Bob Mighell, Arcimoto’s Chief Tilting Officer, who himself broke the land-speed record for 3-wheeled motorcycles at the 2013 Motorcycle Speed Trials held at Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah. “This will be the first time we outfit an electric bike with the TRiO kit, and it certainly won’t be the last, as we drive toward a sustainable future faster than ever before.”

The Lightning SuperBike set a record as the world’s fastest production motorcycle, electric or otherwise, with the SCTA official World Record of 215.960 mph and a best timed run of 218.637 mph at Bonneville during Speedweek in 2011. The record-setting run was powered entirely by solar energy at an estimated cost of only 8 cents.

“As the world’s leading manufacturer of high performance electric motorcycles, we are excited to bring our technology and know-how to the collaboration with Arcimoto for the three-wheel market. The convergence of our proprietary technology, the market adoption of EVs, and the widely recognized environmental benefits of clean energy propulsion make this an excellent and exciting time to bring these vehicles to the mass market,” said Richard Hatfield, Founder and CEO of Lightning Motorcycles. “Our vision is to see Lightning’s electric motorcycles provide performance-oriented and environmentally conscious transportation, as well as adrenaline inducing fun, for both new and experienced riders all over the world. This collaboration amplifies our vision. It’s an honor to build the first electric bike outfitted with the TRiO alongside ‘Bonneville Bob Mighell,’ who has proven throughout his career that trikes can, and should, fly.”

Arcimoto’s Tilting Motor Works TRiO is the leading tilting three-wheel conversion kit for touring motorcycles. TRiO allows the rider to lean naturally, maintaining performance and the thrill of the ride while increasing safety, stability, and confidence. TRiO kits can be augmented with the TiltLock leveling system, allowing the bike to stand up by itself while stopped at lights or in traffic.

“This collaboration is something that could only happen between two legendary speed demons of Bonneville,” said Mark Frohnmayer, Arcimoto Founder and CEO. “While Plaid-level performance has never been a part of the Arcimoto narrative, proving our tilting trike technology beyond ludicrous speed will give us, and our customers, added comfort that our future micromobility solutions are stable under the most demanding conditions. Further this first adaptation of the TRiO for an electric motorcycle is in full alignment with Arcimoto’s mission to catalyze sustainable, emissions-free mobility.”

The prototype collaboration trike is anticipated to be unveiled at the “FUV and Friends Summer Showcase” to take place at the Portland International Raceway on July 26. To request a ticket, send an email to summershowcase@arcimoto.com. Pricing and availability of the TRiO Kit for the Lightning LS 218 will be announced at a later date.

by Shivani Kumaresan from https://www.benzinga.com

Arcimoto Inc announced a partnership with Lightning Motorcycles to develop the fastest tilting three-wheel motorcycle in the world. Arcimoto will use its patented Tilting Motor Works TRiO tilting trike technology.

TRiO allows the rider to lean naturally, maintaining performance and the thrill of the ride while increasing safety, stability, and confidence.

The prototype collaboration trike is expected to be unveiled at the ‘FUV and Friends Summer Showcase’ to take place at the Portland International Raceway on July 26.

“From the moment I met Richard Hatfield and saw the Lightning for myself at Bonneville, I knew there was the potential to create an electric trike unlike anything in the history of motorcycles,” said Bob Mighell, Arcimoto’s Chief Tilting Officer.

Arcimoto known for its light electric vehicles acquired Tilting Motor Works in January 2021. Tilting Motor Works is the creator of the TriO three-wheel conversion kit for touring motorcycles.

Bob Mighell, founder and CEO of Tilting Motor Works broke the land-speed record for 3-wheeled motorcycles at the 2013 Motorcycle Speed Trials held at Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.

Arcimoto already has a range of light electric vehicles that serve as emergency vehicles, delivery vehicles and just plain fun vehicles. These make the most of smaller, lighter vehicles to cut through traffic to get to an emergency site on time or make sure a pizza stays hot.

Arcimoto’s Deliverator and Rapid Responder vehicles support two occupants, sitting one behind the other. The Deliverator three-wheeler has a top speed of 75 mph (roughly 120 km/h) and sports a 102 mile (about 164 km) city range. Built on the modular Arcimoto Platform, the Deliverator offers 20+ cubic feet of cargo space (0.56 m2), and size that allows three vehicles to be parked in a single space.

These are not the only light electric vehicles the company is manufacturing. The company showed off its latest prototype in late 2020, which is a three-wheeler called the Roadster. It is a roofless three-wheeler with a chopped-down windshield, more like the kind of trikes riders currently use for personal mobility.

Daymak says it’s making the world’s fastest three-wheeled EV

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by Kris Holt from https://ca.news.yahoo.com

If you’re in the market to buy a three-wheeled car that can go from zero to 60mph in 1.8 seconds, then, goodness, does Daymak have the electric vehicle for you. The company is crowdfunding the Spiritus, a two-seater EV that apparently “rides like a go-kart.” It’s hoping to reach 50,000 pre-orders for the vehicle, which has solar panels for trickle charging and a regeneration system, as well as Daymak’s own wireless charger.

Plunking down a $100 deposit will lock in a pre-order and guarantee you a lower price when the EV actually goes on sale. You might need that if you opt for the Ultimate model, which offers the aforementioned zippy acceleration. It starts at $149,000 and has a range of 480km. According to Daymak, it’ll be the fastest three-wheeled car in the world. The Deluxe version has a more modest 300km range, and it starts at $19,995.

As for the design, it looks like Bruce Wayne frankensteined a Batmobile and a Batcycle together. The crowdfunding campaign is scheduled to end on July 23rd. Production should start in 2023.

The Spiritus is one of six vehicles in Daymak’s Avvenire Series. The others include Terra, an ebike designed for on- and off-road use, and Skyrider, which the company describes as “a high-performance EV capable of flying.”

Harley-Davidson Unveils 2021-2025 Strategic Plan; Targets Increased Profitability

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from https://www.rttnews.com

Harley-Davidson, Inc. (HOG) on Tuesday unveiled ‘The Hardwire’, its 2021-2025 strategic plan that targets long-term profitable growth and shareholder value, and also aims to enhance its position in the strongest motorcycle segments.

The motorcycle maker targets increased profitability and low double-digit earnings per share growth through 2025. It also projects single-digit revenue growth in the Motorcycles segment, with solid growth expectations across all businesses.

Harley-Davidson said it will invest in the core segments of Touring, large Cruiser and Trike to strengthen and grow its position. The company will expand into Adventure Touring and increase profitability within the Cruiser segment to unlock untapped volume and margin.

The company noted that Pan America, its first Adventure Touring motorcycle, is an example of the company’s selective expansion into a high-potential segment that has untapped potential in the U.S.

As part of expanding its Financial Services offerings, the company will launch Harley-Davidson Certified, a pre-owned motorcycle program supporting growth expected across all complementary businesses.

The company said it will strengthen its commitment to electric motorcycles with the creation of a dedicated division focused exclusively on leading the future of electric motorcycles, following the success of its LiveWire motorcycle.

Harley-Davidson also said it will extend employee ownership to all employees by offering an equity grant to about 4,500 employees, aligning with its new approach to Inclusive Stakeholder Management.

from https://www.bennetts.co.uk

Harley-Davidson outlines vision for the future

Back in July 2018 Harley-Davidson unveiled an incredibly ambitious and detailed plan for its future – confirming 16 new water-cooled models from 500cc to 1250cc in an array of styles, a new small-capacity machine, huge electric bike expansion plans and a reinvented shopping experience. It was a multi-year, multi-pronged onslaught that was intended to expand the firm’s reach away from its cruiser comfort zone and bring huge new opportunities.

Now virtually all those ideas have been dropped with the unveiling of Harley-Davidson’s new ‘Hardwire’ strategy, which replaces the previous ideas of bold expansion into uncharted territories with a renewed focus on the firm’s core touring, cruiser and trike segments and established, wealthy markets.

The change isn’t unexpected. Harley CEO Jochen Zeitz has been taking the firm in this direction with his interim ‘Rewire’ strategy since last year when he replaced Matt Levatich at the firm’s helm. The ambitious 2018 strategy, which had been dubbed ‘More Roads to Harley-Davidson’ and intended to see the firm through to at least 2022, was Levatich’s brainchild and Zeitz immediately reversed course on taking over.

Harley’s new plan isn’t as attention-grabbing as the ‘More Roads’ strategy but it’s a play-it-safe route that’s intended to bring the firm back to growth and sustained profitability after a few tough years culminating in the coronavirus pandemic that saw sales volumes and incomes slashed in 2020.

On the surface it’s easy to see the Hardwire as a step backwards. After all, in an ideal world the ‘More Roads’ plan, which would have brought Harley into completely new fields including adventure bikes, naked roadsters, even sports bikes, could have transformed the company’s image. However, that might be a rose-tinted view to take.

Sure, expansion is a good thing, but the risks were at least as big as the potential gains. After all, every one of the new markets that ‘More Roads’ proposed to enter was already populated by other manufacturers, all with years of experience and product development focussed on those fields. Just as firms like Honda or BMW have always struggled to get a foothold in Harley’s cruiser territory, the chances are that H-D would have hit rocks in its efforts to muscle in on markets dominated by others. Worse, the focus on new goals brought the risk of Harley taking its eye off the ball in the US cruiser market that it dominates, opening the door to rivals who’d be only too happy to take a slice of that pie.

So what are the ‘Hardwire’ ideas? According to the firm, the first priority is profit. Not something that customers might want to hear – after all, it’s their money that goes into those profits – but shareholders will no doubt be happy.

The route to more profit is, according to the plan, strengthening Harley’s position in the touring, large cruiser and trike segments. In other words, focussing on the bikes that the company already sells rather than putting all its hope into potential future products.

Next up comes ‘selective expansion’, with the focus on the headline model from 2018’s plan that has survived the cull – the Pan America adventure bike. Virtually every bike firm on the planet has looked on with envy as BMW romps from sales record to sales record with successive generations of the R1250GS, and it’s a market that Harley believes it can take a bite from. The bike’s full reveal will come later this month along with more news of another survivor of the ‘More Roads’ plan, the as-yet-nameless cruiser that bears the same water-cooled Revolution Max engine that debuts in the Pan America.

Electric bikes – a field that Harley has become an unlikely leader in after the development efforts that went into the LiveWire – will also play a part in the firm’s future. Harley is creating a separate division to focus on electric products, separating them from its main R&D efforts. During a conference call when the plans were announced, Zeitz suggested that the near-term future for electric motorcycles remained urban transport, perhaps a hint that the planned Harley electric scooter that’s been in development for a couple of years will be the next move in that direction.

Elsewhere, Harley wants to grow its non-motorcycle business, the parts and accessories, merchandise and financial services arms of the company that have long provided a reliable back-up income stream. As part of this, the firm plans to create a used bike resale scheme – Harley-Davidson Certified – for customers who want a factory-approved second-hand Harley.

During the announcement of the Hardwire plan, Zeitz mentioned more than once that the firm is going to be staying quiet about upcoming models until their launches – a significant reversal from the ‘More Roads’ plan which set out a detailed roadmap of several years’ of planned model introductions and one that means in future the firm isn’t going to be in the uncomfortable position of cancelling bikes that it had previously announced. That’s exactly what happened with the Bronx streetfighter, which was pulled from the firm’s plans just months before it was due to go on sale, having again been part of the ‘More Roads’ expansion strategy.

It’s worth noting, however, that despite a renewed focus on the US market and established product areas, Harley’s extensive footnotes to its plan reveal it still intends to ‘develop and maintain’ a relationship with Chinese firm Qianjiang, which is developing the proposed Harley 338R small-capacity parallel twin, and a relationship with Hero MotoCorp in India, which will be distributing Harleys there and also using the brand’s name on Indian-developed products in the future.

The rest of Harley’s announcements today related to the firm’s financial performance in 2020, which was understandably deeply impacted by the COVID pandemic.

For the full year, the firm’s overall revenue was down 24%. In 2020 the firm shipped 145,246 bikes, down 32% on 2019’s total, with ‘touring’ and ‘cruiser’ models making up more than 76% of those machines, while the smaller ‘Street’ and ‘Sportster’ ranges combined added up to less than 24%.

2011 Harley-Davidson Tri Glide Honors Servi-Car Forefather

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

The current Harley-Davidson portfolio still includes a number of exciting motorcycles, but even if this is not very obvious today, the bike maker is also playing in the trike segment. There are three models offered for this market, the Freewheeler, the Tri Glide Ultra, and the CVO Tri Glide. All can somewhat trace their roots all the way back to the early 1930s.

Fueled by the desire not to succumb to the financial disaster that was to cost countless American businesses as the result of The Great Depression, Harley came up with the Servi-Car. It was supposed to be a tool for the automotive segment, to be used in the related service industry.

Being tiny and looking not unlike a three-wheeled pickup truck, the Servi-Car was quickly adopted by small businesses, public vendors, and even police departments. Its success would soon skyrocket, and it helped keep Harley afloat through the troubled Depression years.

The Servi-Car was in production well into the 1970s, which means a great deal of them were made. Sadly, few are still in a condition recommending them for collections or investment, and this is why, at times, people have to come up with innovative ways to quench their Servi-Car thirst.

Sitting in front of you is one of the descendants of the workhorse, a Tri Glide from 2011. It was built in such a way as to be a nod to its forefather, and thoroughly maintained as to be accepted into the Springville, Utah-based Legends Motorcycles Museum.

Sporting Guide Dogs of America logos and whitewall wheels that spin under the power stock engine and the 6-speed transmission, the trike is up for grabs together with 35 other siblings from the same collection. It will go under the hammer in April, during the postponed Mecum auction in Las Vegas. There is no estimate as to how much it is going to get.

Here’s What It’s Like Driving The Largest Motorcycle In The World

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by Janaki Jitchotvisut from https://www.rideapart.com

Meet the diesel-powered Tower Trike.

What is a motorcycle? It sounds like a question that’s disingenuous at best, but after watching this video, you may find yourself asking it anyway. It turns out that legal definitions and official standards and classifications vary by state—and outside the U.S., also by country.

According to the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA), “Motorcycle is defined as a motor vehicle with motive power having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground.” That’s why the Tower Trike you’re seeing in this video does, in fact, qualify as a motorcycle.

At one point, the Tower Trike’s builder mentions an 11,000-pound vehicle weight limit for motorcycles that he found somewhere, and it’s unclear where this figure originated. However, that’s not a huge surprise, as vehicle classification standards vary so much from state to state—and who knows, maybe the guy just wanted a handy story to tell.

In any case, when SRK Cycles describes this bike as what happens when a semi-tractor-trailer and a motorcycle have a baby, he’s not wrong. The resulting behemoth weighs just under 11,000 pounds and is powered by an enormous two-stroke Detroit diesel engine. It’s road-legal, with mirrors, headlights, indicators—and also seat belts, because you sit in the kind of seat you’d find in a big rig. Gas and brake are pedal-operated on the right side of the floorboard, and if you have a big enough foot, you can even heel-toe shift to your heart’s content.

There’s also a 200-plus pound metal cross on the back, which the Tower’s builder says isn’t only a design choice; it also functions as a roll bar of sorts for the trike’s rider and passenger. Since rolling this thing would have to be absolutely terrifying, let’s hope no one tests that functionality any time soon.

Bulldog Is the Alpha Male of Big Dog’s Motorcycle Lineup

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Over the past week, as part of our Two-Wheeler Month coverage, we talked at length about the custom motorcycles made by Wichita, Kansas-based Big Dog Motorcycles. As the week draws to a close, so do our stories about the group, as we’ve reached the end of the list of Big Dog machines available. And of course we saved the best for last.

Big Dog is among the few shops out there to have turned custom motorcycles into series production bikes. That’s a good way to provide people with the riding thrills they like without sending them into bankruptcy. With this approach, Big Dog managed to keep prices low, as low as $28,995 for the Coyote model.

The Coyote is part of a lineup of bikes that also includes the Boxer and K9, but also the alpha male of the lot, the Bulldog. This is the most expensive Big Dog machine currently available, and there’s a good reason for that.

Technically, the build does not differ all that much from its siblings (with the exception of the Boxer, which is significantly shorter). It also rides on a custom frame, the frame houses the same S&S Super Sidewinder V-Twin engine as in all the other bikes, and the engine is tied to the same 6-speed transmission. Only this time it comes with a reverse gear.

Why a reverse gear? Because what sets the Bulldog apart from the rest of the Big Dog motorcycles is that well, it is not a bike. It’s a trike, one meant to “break the leash” as its makers say.

That’s right, a trike powered by an engine so big (the Sidewinder has a displacement of 124ci/2.0-liters) it comes with “more displacement per cylinder than the sum of all cylinders on today’s biggest inline-four Superbikes.“

Just like the bikes in the portfolio, this one too comes with a wealth of customization options for the body, wheels, and engine. The starting price for the trike is $42,995.

The Harley-Davidson Anaconda Limo Is One of the Longest Motorcycles in the World

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

The Anaconda is named just that because it was – or aimed to be – the world’s longest motorcycle on the road. Unveiled on February 13, 2004 at the Annual CARQUEST Auto Parts World of Wheels, it is the brainchild of one Steve McGill from Kansas City. Smokey, as he likes to go by.

We’ve discussed in a previous story another strange, Harley-Davidson-based limousine hybrid, the LimoBike, which is part Harley, part limousine and a complete, steaming pile of “no.” The Anaconda is different, in that it resembles more a motorcycle and remains essentially a Harley, because it uses a Harley engine. It is still a trike, though, just to clear any possible confusion from the get-go.

In a 2005 Cycle Connections interview, McGill offered a surprisingly simple explanation for creating this monster of a bike. No, he didn’t do it because he wanted to become famous, though that would happen later. He did it because he’d realized no one else had made a Harley limo.

Whether that’s entirely accurate is debatable, but the bottom line is that he did it. After spotting a Harley Trike displayed at a local Wright Brothers Bikes store, he called to inquire about purchasing one. He started thinking that Harleys are the Cadillacs of the bike world, so it only made sense to turn one of them into a limousine.

Using one Harley and one DFT trike kit, he created the Anaconda, which gunned for the title of the world’s longest motorcycle on the road that same year it was unveiled. In a December 2004 interview retrieved by Cyle Connections, McGill claimed he had been in contact with the Guinness Book of World Records and had obtained confirmation that the Anaconda was a right fit for the record.

He also said he was yet to file all proper documentation, but strongly indicated that he would do so soon. It could very well be that he never did: there is no record of him ever holding a Guinness record. This leaves the Anaconda with the unofficial title of one of the longest bikes in the world.

Measuring 19 feet in length and weighing 1,420 pounds, the Anaconda can carry up to nine passengers, with the one in the back riding most comfortably. McGill needed 6 months and about 640 hours of work to put it together, and said that he was actually surprised how well the project came along.

“Some things went surprisingly well,” he said. “The shift rod is almost 12 feet long, and it had to have proper clearance as it routed through frame components and still align properly at both ends. With amazing luck, it lined up perfectly. I was lucky on a lot of stuff.”

The Anaconda looks like it’s powered by two engines, but the front one is a dummy. McGill says this was done on purpose, since he couldn’t even wrap his head around the idea of not having a motor under the tank. He would get a major rise out of people looking at the Anaconda and not figuring out how it worked.

“The back one is a stock Harley Evo motor and provides the power. The front one is a dummy, for looks only. I found out about a company in Leavenworth that produces over 300 different fiberglass engine replicas,” McGill explained.

“They’re normally used by custom builders to align motor mounts and such. Everything is in the right place, but it’s much lighter. I got a fiberglass Harley block from them and added real heads, primary cover, and other chrome stuff. It’s fun to watch people stare at that front engine and try to figure out how it works. It sometimes takes them a while to figure out that it doesn’t,” he added.

After the Anaconda was completed and made its grand debut, it continued traveling the country throughout 2004, attending various shows and winning countless awards. With an increase in the level of fame came another idea to McGill: that of using all this new-found popularity for a good cause.

It was never his plan to use the Anaconda for an actual limo service. So he started attending events to raise money and awareness for various causes, in between bike shows. And, of course, shooting cheesy videos with nine pink-clad ladies riding in the back to show it off.

Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

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by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”

Ask the MSF : Three Wheels Versus Two

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Q:What are the main differences between riding a trike and riding a two-wheel motorcycle? Are trike training classes available?

A: The common types of trikes are those with two wheels in the back (such as Harley-Davidson’s Tri Glide and Freewheeler), and those with two wheels in the front (such as Can-Am’s Spyder and Ryker).

Trikes have traditional motorcycle controls, engines and seating positions, but they do not handle like traditional motorcycles.

Unlike two-wheelers, three-wheelers do not lean into turns and counter-steering is not used.

Instead, like an ATV, you steer a trike in the direction you want to go. Initiating a turn may require more effort and different body positioning compared to a two-wheeled motorcycle.

Always set a good entry speed, look through the entire turn, and keep your eyes moving.

Evaluate the turn for its geometry, surface conditions, and traffic. It helps to turn your head in the direction you want to go.

Just like riding a two-wheeled motorcycle, you need to be aware of traffic and environmental conditions, compensate for inattentive car drivers, and minimize risk by using the MSF SEE system—Search, Evaluate, Execute.

Since a three-wheeler is wider than a two-wheeler, stay fairly centered in the lane.

When riding in a group, do not use a staggered riding position. Instead, set a minimum gap of two seconds both in front of and behind the trike.

If the rest of the group wants to use a staggered formation, the three-wheeler should be the first or last in the group, so the full two seconds can easily be maintained.

Trike training classes are available. The MSF has two distinct training courses for novice and experienced riders of three-wheeled motorcycles.

In addition to formal training, like any vehicle new to you, it helps to practice routine and emergency maneuvers periodically, away from traffic.