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Bulldog Is the Alpha Male of Big Dog’s Motorcycle Lineup

By | General Posts

by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

Over the past week, as part of our Two-Wheeler Month coverage, we talked at length about the custom motorcycles made by Wichita, Kansas-based Big Dog Motorcycles. As the week draws to a close, so do our stories about the group, as we’ve reached the end of the list of Big Dog machines available. And of course we saved the best for last.

Big Dog is among the few shops out there to have turned custom motorcycles into series production bikes. That’s a good way to provide people with the riding thrills they like without sending them into bankruptcy. With this approach, Big Dog managed to keep prices low, as low as $28,995 for the Coyote model.

The Coyote is part of a lineup of bikes that also includes the Boxer and K9, but also the alpha male of the lot, the Bulldog. This is the most expensive Big Dog machine currently available, and there’s a good reason for that.

Technically, the build does not differ all that much from its siblings (with the exception of the Boxer, which is significantly shorter). It also rides on a custom frame, the frame houses the same S&S Super Sidewinder V-Twin engine as in all the other bikes, and the engine is tied to the same 6-speed transmission. Only this time it comes with a reverse gear.

Why a reverse gear? Because what sets the Bulldog apart from the rest of the Big Dog motorcycles is that well, it is not a bike. It’s a trike, one meant to “break the leash” as its makers say.

That’s right, a trike powered by an engine so big (the Sidewinder has a displacement of 124ci/2.0-liters) it comes with “more displacement per cylinder than the sum of all cylinders on today’s biggest inline-four Superbikes.“

Just like the bikes in the portfolio, this one too comes with a wealth of customization options for the body, wheels, and engine. The starting price for the trike is $42,995.

The Harley-Davidson Anaconda Limo Is One of the Longest Motorcycles in the World

By | General Posts

by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

The Anaconda is named just that because it was – or aimed to be – the world’s longest motorcycle on the road. Unveiled on February 13, 2004 at the Annual CARQUEST Auto Parts World of Wheels, it is the brainchild of one Steve McGill from Kansas City. Smokey, as he likes to go by.

We’ve discussed in a previous story another strange, Harley-Davidson-based limousine hybrid, the LimoBike, which is part Harley, part limousine and a complete, steaming pile of “no.” The Anaconda is different, in that it resembles more a motorcycle and remains essentially a Harley, because it uses a Harley engine. It is still a trike, though, just to clear any possible confusion from the get-go.

In a 2005 Cycle Connections interview, McGill offered a surprisingly simple explanation for creating this monster of a bike. No, he didn’t do it because he wanted to become famous, though that would happen later. He did it because he’d realized no one else had made a Harley limo.

Whether that’s entirely accurate is debatable, but the bottom line is that he did it. After spotting a Harley Trike displayed at a local Wright Brothers Bikes store, he called to inquire about purchasing one. He started thinking that Harleys are the Cadillacs of the bike world, so it only made sense to turn one of them into a limousine.

Using one Harley and one DFT trike kit, he created the Anaconda, which gunned for the title of the world’s longest motorcycle on the road that same year it was unveiled. In a December 2004 interview retrieved by Cyle Connections, McGill claimed he had been in contact with the Guinness Book of World Records and had obtained confirmation that the Anaconda was a right fit for the record.

He also said he was yet to file all proper documentation, but strongly indicated that he would do so soon. It could very well be that he never did: there is no record of him ever holding a Guinness record. This leaves the Anaconda with the unofficial title of one of the longest bikes in the world.

Measuring 19 feet in length and weighing 1,420 pounds, the Anaconda can carry up to nine passengers, with the one in the back riding most comfortably. McGill needed 6 months and about 640 hours of work to put it together, and said that he was actually surprised how well the project came along.

“Some things went surprisingly well,” he said. “The shift rod is almost 12 feet long, and it had to have proper clearance as it routed through frame components and still align properly at both ends. With amazing luck, it lined up perfectly. I was lucky on a lot of stuff.”

The Anaconda looks like it’s powered by two engines, but the front one is a dummy. McGill says this was done on purpose, since he couldn’t even wrap his head around the idea of not having a motor under the tank. He would get a major rise out of people looking at the Anaconda and not figuring out how it worked.

“The back one is a stock Harley Evo motor and provides the power. The front one is a dummy, for looks only. I found out about a company in Leavenworth that produces over 300 different fiberglass engine replicas,” McGill explained.

“They’re normally used by custom builders to align motor mounts and such. Everything is in the right place, but it’s much lighter. I got a fiberglass Harley block from them and added real heads, primary cover, and other chrome stuff. It’s fun to watch people stare at that front engine and try to figure out how it works. It sometimes takes them a while to figure out that it doesn’t,” he added.

After the Anaconda was completed and made its grand debut, it continued traveling the country throughout 2004, attending various shows and winning countless awards. With an increase in the level of fame came another idea to McGill: that of using all this new-found popularity for a good cause.

It was never his plan to use the Anaconda for an actual limo service. So he started attending events to raise money and awareness for various causes, in between bike shows. And, of course, shooting cheesy videos with nine pink-clad ladies riding in the back to show it off.

Canton veteran who lost leg rides again thanks to customized motorcycle

By | General Posts

by Kelly Byer from https://www.cantonrep.com

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer get back on the road.

Challenge America: Makers For Veterans helped Charles Zollicoffer ride a motorcycle for the first time in eight years.

More importantly, he said, the fall program renewed his faith in humanity.

“I was left for dead on the side of the road,” he said. “So, during my time in this last seven or eight years, I have lost a lot of faith in people. A lot.”

In 2011, a drunken driver pulled in front of Zollicoffer’s 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle on state Route 800. The now retired U.S. Marine Corps and Army National Guard veteran had completed three tours in Iraq and was scheduled for deployment to Afghanistan.

Another person came across the early morning wreck and stopped to help. Zollicoffer, a 53-year-old Canton resident, spent months in a coma and had his left leg amputated at the hip.

This past Veteran’s Day, he received a modified trike at the Makers For Veterans closing ceremony. His family’s safety concerns had kept Zollicoffer from pursuing a costly trike, but they talked and accepted what it meant to him beforehand.

He’s taken a few rides.

“I can’t even describe the feeling, when you get that wind blowing through your hair,” joked Zollicoffer, who has a shaved head.

Makers for Veterans

The Colorado-based nonprofit Challenge America began the Makers for Veterans program (CAMVETS) in 2019. It brought together volunteers with various expertise to solve challenges posed by veterans.

Dallas Blaney, executive director of Challenge America, said the inspiration came from a similar initiative in Israel. Challenge America members participated in the international program and wanted to recreate the experience in the United States.

Blaney described it as “human-centered design applied to the veterans space.” The process begins by asking participants, selected from across the nation, what they want to do that they haven’t been able to.

“That forces the veterans to frame their challenges in a positive way,” Blaney said.

A team — built “from scratch” — with skills relevant to the individual’s challenge then meet at a kickoff event. That is followed by about eight weeks of planning and work culminating in a three-day workshop.

CAMETS then works with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other partners to identify prototypes to patent and undergo additional product development.

“So that we can get those promising solutions out to market where other veterans and civilians, too, can benefit from these things,” Blaney said.

CAMVETS coordinated a spring and fall program. From 17 total projects, Blaney said, the partners produced 15 working prototypes and, so far, filed for five provisional patents.

Blaney said a digital service dog application designed to help a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is expected to be the first product ready for market.

Both programs were held in the Cleveland area, not far from where Blaney grew up. He said the region has a great blend of medical, manufacturing, entrepreneurial, academic and innovative institutions.

The Cleveland Clinic, Bio Enterprise and St. Edward High School are some of CAMVETS’ partners.

“It just seemed like such an amazing fit, and it’s a very friendly place to do business,” Blaney said.

The nonprofit likely will host another program in Northeast Ohio this year, but only one. He said CAMVETS plans to expand to a new city.

Zollicoffer’s custom trike

De Ann Williams, executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission, heard about a CAMVETS opening during a conference and nominated Zollicoffer. It was the first she’d heard about the organization, but she thought the program might produce a longer-lasting prosthetic leg.

Zollicoffer used to play basketball and entered the program thinking he’d leave with a prosthetic for athletic activities.

“With the level of my amputation, that was close to impossible,” he said. “So they started asking questions.”

Zollicoffer, who grew up riding motorcycles, then told his team he’d like to ride again.

“As a motorcycle enthusiast myself, I understood and respected that,” Williams said.

Zollicoffer worked ’hand-in-hand” with his team as the plan evolved — from modifying his prosthetic leg to modifying a three-wheeled motorcycle. However, he said he wasn’t privy to the end product until the Veteran’s Day reveal.

When he was asked to visit a Harley Davidson store as the project wound down, Zollicoffer began to wonder if he’d get a new trike. He later learned that sitting on a $35,000 motorcycle was more for measurement.

The engineers, students and other makers on Team Z turned a two-wheel 1972 Harley Davidson into a trike by replacing the rear portion with wheels from a 1978 Mustang. They also moved the typical, left-side motorcycle gears to the right.

“So, it was a totally customized job,” Zollicoffer said.

Community comes together

After he saw the trike, Zollicoffer saw the executive director of the Stark County Veterans Service Commission.

“I turned around and there’s De Ann standing there,” he said. “That’s when it became clear to me that the whole outreach team got together and they did this thing.”

CAMVETS has paid the “lion share” of most projects, Blaney said. The local commission, though, was tasked with raising $5,000 to buy the bike, which was complemented by donated parts.

Williams said she believes the plan to have the bike donated didn’t work out, so the commission reached out to area service organizations. They had the money within a few days.

“I was just beside myself,” she said. “I couldn’t believe the community came together like that.”

The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Chapter 38 was the major donor. Others were American Legion Post 548, American Veterans Post 124, and Coyote Motorsports.

DAV Commander David May said the project aligned with the group’s mission to assist disabled veterans.

“We’re happy to do it,” he said.

Those involved with CAMVETS said they were glad to learn of the program and plan to volunteer or recommend it to other veterans in the future. Zollicoffer said he made “lifelong friends.”

“We’ll definitely stay in touch with CAMVETS,” Williams said. “I think that that’s definitely going to be a partnership that I hope lasts for a long time.”

Ask the MSF : Three Wheels Versus Two

By | General Posts

Q:What are the main differences between riding a trike and riding a two-wheel motorcycle? Are trike training classes available?

A: The common types of trikes are those with two wheels in the back (such as Harley-Davidson’s Tri Glide and Freewheeler), and those with two wheels in the front (such as Can-Am’s Spyder and Ryker).

Trikes have traditional motorcycle controls, engines and seating positions, but they do not handle like traditional motorcycles.

Unlike two-wheelers, three-wheelers do not lean into turns and counter-steering is not used.

Instead, like an ATV, you steer a trike in the direction you want to go. Initiating a turn may require more effort and different body positioning compared to a two-wheeled motorcycle.

Always set a good entry speed, look through the entire turn, and keep your eyes moving.

Evaluate the turn for its geometry, surface conditions, and traffic. It helps to turn your head in the direction you want to go.

Just like riding a two-wheeled motorcycle, you need to be aware of traffic and environmental conditions, compensate for inattentive car drivers, and minimize risk by using the MSF SEE system—Search, Evaluate, Execute.

Since a three-wheeler is wider than a two-wheeler, stay fairly centered in the lane.

When riding in a group, do not use a staggered riding position. Instead, set a minimum gap of two seconds both in front of and behind the trike.

If the rest of the group wants to use a staggered formation, the three-wheeler should be the first or last in the group, so the full two seconds can easily be maintained.

Trike training classes are available. The MSF has two distinct training courses for novice and experienced riders of three-wheeled motorcycles.

In addition to formal training, like any vehicle new to you, it helps to practice routine and emergency maneuvers periodically, away from traffic.

Bonneville Bikernet Weekly News for August 22, 2019

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It’s a Game Changing Wild News

By Bandit, Bob T., Bill Bish, Rogue, Laura, Barry Green, Sam Burns, the Redhead, and the rest of the crew

This is going to be a wild day. This would have been the day we rolled out for the 2019 Bonneville Speed Trials, but it’s not happening. We still have work to do, but we did make our first pass around the block successfully.

We accomplished a great deal in the last eight months and we are proud to say it runs and handles like a champ. Amazing. Don’t miss the 22nd Chapter of the Salt Torpedo build story.

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Weekend Round-up for June 25, 2019

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Jim on the right with me, Micah and Marilyn Stemp.

It’s a Mix of Madness and Metal

By Bandit with shots from Wrench and Michael Lichter, the good ones. Oh and girls from Barry Green

I rode to Camarillo to Jim’s Retirement party after having lunch with Rebecca, my 5th wife. In a world gone mad and bikers from hell roaming the city nights, it’s cool to see a solid family like Jim’s unit blossom around motorcycle parts and everything is made in America at JIMS. Mike and his son were returning to the Headquarters after the Born Free Weekend.

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In the Cantina – Salt Torpedo Chapter 17

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Salt Torpedo Chapter 17: Cable Mania
Wild Action Every Day: Where’s Our Fiberglass Guy?
By Bandit with photos by Wrench

I always wanted to be able to adjust the height or ground clearance, but that’s becoming more of an issue. So initially I would like to know if I can buy larger diameter front wheels, which I will research today.

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Salt Torpedo Action Update Chapter 16

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Making Move on Everything!

The last few weeks have been interesting and challenging. We are actually getting close to watching the Salt Torpedo sit on its own three wheels with the help of Yelvington Shocks.

This week we could finish the steering system. We could link the steering with the wheels. We could have a gas tank mounted. We are getting damn close to making a battery mount, and then hooking up the drive line for a run around the block.

READ the True Story of the First Streamlined trike to be registered for Bonneville Salt Flats racing. CLICK HERE.

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Ride Forever!!!