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MotorcycleMania motorcycle drag race at Eddyville Raceway Park

By General Posts

MotorcycleMania Breaking Out in Eddyville.
MotorcycleMania motorcycle drag pre-race news release
event: MotorcycleMania sponsored by Trick-Tools
when: August 13-15, 2021
where: Eddyville Raceway Park, Eddyville, Iowa, USA

Eddyville Raceway Park will experience a severe outbreak of MotorcycleMania when the Trick-Tools sponsored event spreads through the Eddyville pits on August 13-15. Two full days of intense motorcycle drag racing is the prognosis, and the only known cure is to attend as either a racer or fan.

What makes this event extra manic is that all classes will qualify and eliminate on each day—that’s two full races in one weekend! “Makes it worth the drive for people,” said Trick-Tools’ boss Bruce Van Sant. “It’s something we racers don’t get to do very often, but it’s pretty common at Eddyville.”

A major highlight is Iowa’s first staging of the hottest motorcycle drag racing class in the country—Grothus Dragbikes Pro Ultra 4.60. The best 4.60 racers in the nation will be hustling nitrous-huffing or turbocharged two wheel beasts to the eighth mile stripe in the world’s quickest motorcycle index class. $2000 to win, $800 runner-up, $200 semis, $200 entry, all run, laddered by qualifying—EACH DAY!

Schnitz Racing Top Gas 5.10 index, BB Racing Super Comp 5.60 index, Certified Auto Sales Super Gas 6.00 index, The Cycle Shop Outlaw No Bar will all pay $1000 to win, $400 runner-up, $100 semis for $100 entry. All run fields, laddered by qualifying—EACH DAY!

The Cycle Shop Outlaw No Bar is heads-up, no wheelie bar, anything goes.

Rally at the Valley Hi-Roller Box/No-Box Bracket class will pay $2000 to win, $800 runner-up, $200 semis. $100 entry with $40 buybacks after first round. Box/No-Box paired separately until one class runs down to one.

Low Roller No-Box bracket class (AKA Street ET) pays back 80% of entry fees ($50 entry with $20 buy backs). No wheelie bars and no delay boxes

C&S Speed Shop V-Twin Ultra Bagger pays $1200 to win.

Cornbelt Dragbike Association V-Twin Pro Bagger pays $1000 to win.

Cornbelt Dragbike Association V-Twin Street Bagger pays $750 to win.

And again…it can’t be emphasized enough…all of these classes qualify and race each day!

Eddyville owner Gerald Kramer is not just fond of two complete days of racing on one weekend, he’s also partial to two wheeled racing. “Gerald is an ex-motorcycle guy and loves motorcycle racing,” noted Van Sant. “He went down to Valdosta with us last fall when we won the 4.60 race down there, and he was so excited about 4.60 racing. He said ‘We’ve got to have a 4.60 race at Eddyville!’

“So here we are, and it looks like we’re gonna have a pretty good turnout. I’m excited to see the guys coming up from the South to the Midwest and it should be a fun time.”

Hell yes it will! Expect to see drag racing studs Chase Van Sant, Chad Otts, Matt Smith, Broderick “Hollywood” Jackson, Mantez Thompson, Jeff “Fast Times” Jones, Chase Morris, Brunson Grothus, Dan McCarten, Turtle Cole, Brevin Bond, Kenny Schwartz, Greg Mallett, Don Chavous, Tom Ewig, Bobby Brown, Patrick Kerr, Louis Brown, Curtis Winston, Terence Washington, Joe and Tom Klemme, Mika and Courtney Wheeler, and many more.

The track is definitely fast. A recent Nitro Chaos event saw Scotty Palmer run a 3.21 at 265 mph on the eighth mile track in his Top Fuel dragster.

So trailer-up and make the easy drive to Iowa for two full days of MotorcycleMania!

Contact Kelly Hefner (kbhefner@gmail.com) for V-twin class details or Eddyville track manager Gerald Kramer (eddyvilleraceway@hotmail.com)

Friday test n tune 6:30-9:30, gates open at 5:00pm.

Saturday gates open at 10:00am, qualifying/time trials at 1:00pm.

Sunday gates open at 8:00am, qualifying/time trials at 9:00am.

Eddyville Raceway Park is thrilled to host the biggest motorcycle-only drag race in this part of the country in a long time, and you gotta be there!

MotorcycleMania thanks Trick-Tools, Grothus Dragbikes, Schnitz Racing, BB Racing, Certified Auto Sales, The Cycle Shop, C&S Speed Shop, Cornbelt Dragbike Association, and Eddyville Raceway Park.

News From https://www.eatmyink.com

Harley-Davidson Rolls Out Serial 1 E-Bikes In Europe And North America

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by Dustin Wheelen from https://www.rideapart.com

Available at H-D dealerships soon.

2021 is a watershed year for Harley-Davidson. The Motor Company introduced its first adventure bike, the Pan America, and updated the decrepit Sportster range with its lively Revolution Max engine. On the coattails of those two successful launches, Harley will now turn its attention to the urban/electric mobility sector for the first time with its Serial 1 electric bike lineup.

Originally announced in October, 2020, Harley’s new e-bike spin-off introduced a concept based on the company’s first-ever motorcycle in 1903. However, the production models do away with the nostalgia in favor of a stripped-down, utilitarian aesthetic. All four Serial 1 variants feature a lithium-ion battery integrated into a hydroformed aluminum frame.

While all models utilize a Gates carbon drive belt mated to a mid-mounted Brose electric motor, some trims boast more power than others. Full LED lighting comes standard on all Serial 1s and riders will benefit from the four ride modes (Eco, Tour, Sport and Boost) and walk-assist function.

The MOSH/CTY represents Serial 1’s base offering. Without the Enviolo Automatiq auto-shifting hub found on the premium RUSH models, the single-speed reaches a top speed of 20 mph with a 250W motor. The MOSH/CTY’s 529Wh li-ion battery nets between 35-105 miles and requires four hours and 45 minutes to recharge. The MOSH/CTY retails for €3,499 and $3,799 in the U.S.

In contrast, the RUSH/CTY includes premium features such as an odometer display, storage compartment, and 4-piston brake calipers. The model also earns a 706Wh li-ion battery which achieves a maximum range of 115 miles but calls for 6.6 hours on the charger. Serial 1’s RUSH/CTY STEP-THRU model shares the same features as the standard RUSH/CTY but opts for a 529Wh battery unit good for 90 miles and 4.75 hours to recharge. The RUSH/CTY costs €4,699 in the E.U. and $4,999 in the States while the RUSH/CTY STEP-THRU drops by €100 in Europe but remains $4,999 in America.

Exclusive to the U.S., the RUSH/CTY SPEED adopts a Brose TF Mag motor for a 28-mph top speed. The 706Wh li-ion battery returns 25-115 miles and fully recharges in 6.6 hours. The high-performance model comes at a premium, however, with an MSRP of $5,599. Serial 1 will start delivering the RUSH/CTY, RUSH/CTY STEP_THRU, and MOSH/CTY European Harley-Davidson dealers and showcase the full lineup at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally on August 6-11, 2021.

“The dynamic, fast-growing e-bicycle market is at the forefront of a global mobility revolution,” proclaimed Serial 1 Brand Director Aaron Frank. “Offering the Serial 1 e-bicycles in dealerships across Europe allows Harley-Davidson to play a key role in this mobility revolution while allowing Serial 1 to deliver an unmatched riding experience rooted in fun, freedom, and adventure on two wheels.”

Brainerd MotoAmerica BUILD TRAIN RACE

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ROYAL ENFIELD BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. ROAD RACING FEATURED AT BRAINERD MOTOAMERICA

CJ Lukacs shines as BTR Road Race women take on the Brainerd, Minnesota opening round

Milwaukee, WI (Monday, August 2, 2021) – Royal Enfield’s The Brainerd MotoAmerica round was host to the opening round of the Royal Enfield BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. (BTR) Road Race Program where seven women, who have spent months designing, building and training aboard their Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 motorcycles, finally got to chase the checkered flag. The historic exhibition, showcasing the Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 and an all-women field of builders/racers, was featured alongside the pro ranks of MotoAmerica, the premiere motorcycle road racing series in North America.

Starting with Thursday’s Dunlop tire test, all the way through to Sunday’s exhibition race, the BTR Road Racing women took part in all of the practice and qualifying sessions. With only two official training dates on their Continental GT 650 race bikes, the ladies were thrilled to gain the added track time on Thursday. Dunlop stepped up with a fresh set of tires for the BTR participants—a welcome surprise that was above and beyond Dunlop’s original commitment to the program. Ohlins was on hand for the BTR women with suspension support, helping the racers make adjustments throughout the practice sessions.

A standout star rose to the top throughout the weekend—BTR Road Race’s CJ Lukacs stormed to a dominant victory on Sunday ahead of Becky Goebel and Trisha Dahl. Lukacs led every lap and was able to take the victory, despite a hard get-off in Saturday’s practice session that sent her tumbling. The former pro motocross racer was a bit sore, but able to get her Royal Enfield sorted out in time for qualifying, and ultimately the final race on Sunday.

“I am overcome with emotion,” said Lukacs. “This first event, being in the pits of MotoAmerica, seeing the fans, the excitement, going through testing and practice, track walks with Melissa Paris and Josh Hayes, has been unreal. Seeing ourselves on tv and our journey and program being talked about his the coolest thing ever. To have this race win means so many amazing and different things to me. I’m super excited for our next round and I couldn’t be more grateful to Royal Enfield for making this a reality.”

“I had a blast today out on the Brainerd track with my newfound family,” said runner-up Becky Goebel. “I’m just so happy to be feeling comfortable on a racetrack and getting into the idea of racing and learning a new motorcycle discipline. For me, this whole program is about having fun and finishing. Today, that was exactly what we did and that’s what’s cool and gratifying about the Build Train Race Program.”

Third-place finisher Trisha Dahl, who edged out Alyssa Bridges for the final podium position, echoed the sentiment. “What a dream come true. This winter when I started this program with Royal Enfield, I would daydream about what race day would look like and this far exceeded my vision. I’m very fortunate to be one of the seven ladies chosen to race this beautiful GT 650. I can’t thank Bree Poland and Melissa Paris enough. They have put so much time and effort into making this program successful. These ladies aren’t just my teammates; they’re family now.”

Together with MotoAmerica, the Royal Enfield BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. program is breaking ground with an all-women series featuring machines that the women built themselves, creating a unique and unforgettable platform for the Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 motorcycle. Royal Enfield is ecstatic to see the hard work of the participants, the sponsors, and the MotoAmerica crew come together on the track for the opening round of this historic program.

“Having an all-female road race team has been a dream of mine for a long time, and I’m thankful for Royal Enfield and our team in the UK for supporting this effort,” said Breeann Poland, Marketing and Communications Lead – Royal Enfield Americas. “I’m so proud of all our participants, and blown away by the support of all our BTR sponsors. The fans loved the experience and the entire MotoAmerica paddock welcomed in the women as part of the family. We are looking forward to the next two BTR Road Race races with MotoAmerica in Pittsburgh and Barber.”

Royal Enfield BUILD. TRAIN. RACE.

Round 1 Results – Brainerd MotoAmerica

1. CJ Lukacs

2. Becky Goebel

3. Trisha Dahl

4. Alyssa Bridges

5. Michaela Trumbull

6. Kayla Theisler

7. Scarlett Grosselanghorst

Visit https://motoamerica.com/standings/ for detailed results.

The women of Royal Enfield BTR Road Racing will be back in action August 13-15 at Pittsburgh International Race Complex in Wampum, Pennsylvania for the second of three rounds. Find more information on the Royal Enfield BUILD. TRAIN. RACE. Road Race Program at https://buildtrainrace.com/.

About Royal Enfield
The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901. A division of Eicher Motors Limited, Royal Enfield has created the midsize motorcycle segment in India with its unique and distinctive modern classic motorcycles. With its manufacturing base in Chennai, India, Royal Enfield has been able to grow its production rapidly against a surge in demand for its motorcycles. Royal Enfield is a leading player in the global middleweight motorcycle market.

Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 125 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Electric dream: Horwin CR6 reviewed

By General Posts

by Fraser Addecott from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Sales of electric two-wheelers are booming and with manufacturers producing bikes like this one, it’s easy to see why.

It seems difficult to keep up with the number of new electric two-wheelers coming on to the market these days.

The trend was already under way and has only been accelerated by the pandemic, with commuters and others looking for alternatives to public transport.

Figures from the Motorcycle Industry Association show sales of electrics for June up 155% compared to the same month last year.

Sales for the year up until last month are also up 210% compared to the same period in 2020.

That is impressive growth, with the majority of bikes sold falling in the 50cc and 125cc equivalent categories.

Artisan Electric is a British company established in 2016 with a “mission to change the face of electric motorcycles and scooters with industry-leading innovation and product quality”.

The company offers a range of seven electric bikes and scooters – and the one I am testing here is the CR6.

This is a 125cc-equivalent machine, with a pretty cool retro-meets-futuristic look.

The air-cooled electric motor is powered by a 3.96kWh Panasonic lithium-ion battery.

Careful riding will produce a range of around 60 miles.

Haring around flat out – top speed is about 55mph – will cut your range to around 30 miles.

That may not sound much, but the CR6 is aimed at commuters and for jaunts into town, so it’s perfectly adequate.

A full charge from zero takes around four hours, but bear in mind you’ll hardly ever be charging from completely flat, so shorter times are more realistic.

Charging is via a standard three-pin socket and a socket in the side of the bike.

The battery comes with a reassuring three-year warranty.

On board, the ride position is relaxed and comfortable with a long and well-padded cafe-racer type seat.

There’s a round retro/modern, backlit, colour clock with a rather unnecessary rev counter across the top and a LCD panel with speed, charge level etc.

As with all electrics, the acceleration is instantaneous and impressive.

At just 134kg, this bike is light and it feels agile, manageable and nippy – perfect for the urban jungle.

With low-down weight, a decent aluminium chassis and an excellent turning circle, the CR6 handles extremely well.

The non-adjustable USD forks and preload-adjustable rear monoshock do a perfectly reasonable job.

And braking via a front 265mm disc and three-piston caliper and rear 220mm is plenty powerful enough.

The headlight is a nice bright LED and the “tank” is actually a lockable storage compartment, ideal for the charge cable, gloves etc.

It also contains a USB port – handy for charging your phone.

At five grand, the CR6 is obviously a bigger initial outlay than a petrol 125, but running costs work out at just a penny a mile.

Overall then, the Horwin is a solid little city commuter, easy to ride, with good looks and decent performance.

Specs:
Horwin CR6
Motor: Air-cooled electric
Max power: 8bhp
Max torque: 30ft lb
Colours: White; blue; green; black
Price: £4,992

Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP Races its Superbike Counterpart

By General Posts

by Sebastian Toma from https://www.autoevolution.com

Honda has pitted the new CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP against its racing version on a track to prove how fast it can be in the right hands. With slick tires, the sport bike is as close to a street-legal MotoGP racer as possible.

The resemblance between the two is normal, as British Superbike rules mandate that the race bike must be developed from the homologated production motorcycle. Therefore, the chassis and the engine are identical, but the race bike has a few tweaks within regulations to allow it to be even faster.

According to the rulebook, the Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP’s racing version must have a spec ECU, which allows it to rev even higher than its street-legal brother. The gearing can also be changed according to various necessities, depending on the track and rider preference, along with a minimum weight of 168 kg (370.37 lbs.).

To prove just how fast the street-legal version of this bike can be, Honda Racing UK British Super Bike racer Glen Irwin took both bikes on the same day at Oulton Park International Circuit. We are talking about a 2.69-mile (4.33 km) track in the UK and identical riding conditions. Honda even fitted both bikes with the Pirelli Diablo Racing slicks (SC0 compound) to allow a direct comparison between the two bikes.

The street bike was still fitted with the stock mirrors, standard toolkit, and everything else one gets when buying a new Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP. The slick tires were the only change from the stock condition, and the team did not alter any settings on the bike.

Glenn Irwin rode each bike for six laps, and he managed to set a time of 1’39.054 on the production CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP, which is just 2.872 seconds more than what he did with his British Superbike Fireblade.

Trap speed was 210.5 km/h (130 mph) on the street-spec bike, which is just 6.8 km/h (4.2 mph) slower than the race model, which goes to show how far have sport bikes gone in past years. The only thing left is for their riders to improve their skills on the track before thinking about changing anything on a stock super sport motorcycle.

Johnny Lewis at Flat Track and Build-Train-Race ladies

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JOHNNY LEWIS TAKES HARD-FOUGHT FOURTH AT PORT ROYAL HALF-MILE

Women of Royal Enfield BUILD TRAIN RACE battle on at second BTR exhibition race

Milwaukee, WI (Monday, July 26, 2021) – On the heels of their historic win at Lima Half-Mile, Johnny Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield Team were looking to start a hot streak aboard the Royal Enfield Twins FT at the inaugural Port Royal Half-Mile, round eight of the Progressive American Flat Track Championship at Port Royal Speedway in Port Royal, Pennsylvania. While the all-new venue held its share of challenges for Lewis, he and the Moto Anatomy X crew fought for every inch throughout the day, ultimately coming in fourth overall in the AFT Production Twins main event.

“Days like today remind me what a great crew we have,” said Johnny Lewis, “Today had its ups and downs but our Moto Anatomy crew never stopped working hard. It was a bit of a battle for us, but we had competitive lap times in the end; it just showed that our work throughout the day paid off. It was great to end tonight on a positive note.”

After a hard-fought battle with Dan Bromely for fourth in the main event, Lewis was able to edge him out by 0.007 seconds at the checkered flag—an incredible sight for the Port Royal fans. “Within the team, it was a success!” Lewis added.

“Johnny puts every ounce of himself into each race weekend and you could see it at Port Royal,” commented Breeann Poland, Marketing and Communications Lead – Royal Enfield Americas. “After battling some issues throughout the test and earlier in the day he was able to push through to a fourth-place finish today. We were proud to see this level of passion and dedication from the whole team.”

Port Royal Speedway was host to the second round of the Royal Enfield BUILD TRAIN RACE (BTR) Flat Track program, and the ladies of AFT thrilled the Pennsylvania crowd with some great battles. In the end, Jaycee Jones beat Jillian Deschenes to the checkers for the overall win. Lanakila MacNaughton was holding third, but made a mistake on the final lap, opening the door for Sarah Dixon to nab the final podium spot.

The Port Royal weekend got out to a great start for the ladies of AFT on Friday when they were invited to participate in the test on Friday, allowing for extra track time and eight rounds of practice. “Extremely happy we got practice Friday,” said Jaycee Jones. “If we didn’t have that day to figure out the track and make changes to the bike it could have been completely different.”

Jones was able to dial in her new Ohlins rear shocks, that she credits with making “all the difference in the world.” Jones not only captured her first win of the season, but set a scorching lap of 27.939—a time that could have potentially qualified her for the Production Twins class.

Jones and Deschenes are now battling for the BTR championship with one win apiece. Sarah Dixon, with a pair of thirds, is looking to break through for a win, while the talented field of builders and racers is also hungry for podium finishes in the 2021 championship.

“It’s been over a month since the ladies first raced in Chicago and we were eager to see them back at it again,” said Breeann Poland. “The racing between the women is definitely heating up. I am proud of each and everyone of them for pushing themselves both on and off the track. Lana missed the test on Friday and was at a disadvantage all day but when the green flagged dropped she put everything she had into it and battled for a podium spot.”

Johnny Lewis and the Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield team will be back in action at Weedsport, New York for the Short Track doubleheader on August 13-14. They will be once again joined by the women of Royal Enfield BTR as the American Flat Track Championship makes its return to New York.

Tune in for broadcast coverage of the Port Royal Half-Mile on NBCSN on Sunday, August 15 at 10:00 p.m. ET/7:00 p.m. PT.

About Royal Enfield

The oldest motorcycle company in continuous production in the world, Royal Enfield made its first motorcycle in 1901. A division of Eicher Motors Limited, Royal Enfield has created the midsize motorcycle segment in India with its unique and distinctive modern classic motorcycles. With its manufacturing base in Chennai, India, Royal Enfield has been able to grow its production rapidly against a surge in demand for its motorcycles. Royal Enfield is a leading player in the global middleweight motorcycle market.

The Moto Anatomy X Royal Enfield team is supported by Harris Performance, SENA, Motul, Beringer Brakes, Solid Performance, EVS, ODI, Just 1, Tucker, Saddlemen, S&S Cycle, Team Lawant, Quayle Construction and Goon Glass and Rubber.

Royal Enfield North America (RENA) is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and is developing a growing network of more than 125 dealers in North America, including the contiguous U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico. RENA currently offers the all-new Meteor 350, Himalayan and the 650 Twins (INT 650 and Continental GT 650) motorcycles, along with a range of Genuine Motorcycle Accessories and apparel.

For more information on Royal Enfield North America, visit www.RoyalEnfield.com/us/en/, www.Instagram.com/RoyalEnfield_NA, www.Facebook.com/RoyalEnfieldNorthAmerica.

Davinci DC100 Is a Two-Wheeled Robot Disguised as an Electric Motorcycle

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by Elena Gorgan from https://www.autoevolution.com

  • 0 to 60 mph (100 kph) in 3 seconds
  • top speed of 124 mph (200 km)
  • peak power 135 hp and peak torque 627 ft-lb (850 Nm)
  • ride range of 222 miles (357.51 km)
  • fast-charging to full charge in 30 minutes

The motorcycle of tomorrow is, according to makers Davinci Dynamics, the DC100, or its fancier, more expensive version, the limited-edition, hand-crafted masterpiece DC Classic. Introduced this week in Beijing (hat tip to New Atlas), it is said to be the culmination of seven years of hard work, the first step toward the electric two-wheel revolution that the world has been hoping for but is yet to fully witness.

Big words for an equally big moment, but you don’t get the chance to stand out from everyone else if you don’t show cojones, figuratively speaking. Hopefully, Davinci Dynamics can back up the impressive claims with a futuristic cafe racer to match, because, on paper, the DC100 sounds like a dream. It’s more than just an electric motorcycle, the company says: it’s a two-wheeled robot disguised as an elegant, futuristic, electric cafe racer.

The DC100 rides on a monocoque aluminum alloy chassis. It has a single-sided swingarm and a cover for the giant lithium 17.7kWh battery pack that gives it a boxy but still streamlined appearance. It rides on Pirelli Diablo Rosso III tires, and it’s painted in muted gray or bright orange, making it feel as if it belongs in a video game of some sorts.

On paper, the DC100 delivers solid performance, meant to “rival the performance of their 1000cc gas-powered counterparts:” you get 0 to 60 mph (100kph) acceleration time of 3 seconds, peak torque of 627 ft-lb (850 Nm), and a top speed of 124 mph (200 kph). The hub motor delivers a peak power of 135 hp, while the battery is good for an estimated WLTP range of 222 miles (357.51 km). Fast-charging ensures a full charge in just 30 minutes.

The DC100 is also very smart, using technology for smoother and more intuitive, longer, and safer rides. It’s packed with sensors that collect and track information, says Davinci, with the ultimate goal of maximized efficiency and comfort, so you can truly enjoy your ride.

Features include Hill-start Assist Control (HAC), regen braking and improved balancing on descent, reverse assist (which allows you to back out of a spot on torque, even on an incline), traction control, and combined braking for maximized stopping power. In Drive mode, if you release the brake, the motorcycle “creeps forward slowly” at 3 mph (5 kph) to ensure a “smooth” start.

But the most intriguing features are listed as “to come:” self-balancing capabilities, target recognition, and remote control. Davinci promises that the DC100 “will be able to balance itself” and “to automatically follow a target,” hence the promise that it could become your “jogging companion.” The idea, one assumes, is that it won’t ever go any faster than in the creep mode mentioned above, at 3 mph (5 kph). Not that you should ever go out jogging with your bike, as if you’d have your dog tag along.

Remote control will also be offered as an OTA update, through the Davinci App. Though the press materials released so far show the bike with a display, the Davinci website and the press release that went out this week note that, even in this stage, your “phone is the key, and your display.” This means that riders have to use the Davinci App for settings and stats, and their phone to visualize them, including speed. They would also use this method for remote control, when and if it becomes available – maybe even to summon their bike to them in the way drivers do their Teslas today.

As noted above, Davinci is offering two models of this two-wheeled robot that poses as an electric motorcycle: the DC100 and the DC Classic. Spec-wise, the only difference between the two is that the latter will be limited to just 50 units worldwide and will come with a hand-crafted, hand-assembled and custom-tailored body that stands out for the “striking minimalist aesthetics,” each carrying an ID number.

The other, more significant difference is in pricing: the DC100 costs $27,500 / €26,000, while the DC Classic is $90,000/ €78,000. Assuming you picked yourself up from the floor, here’s the good news: the pre-order books are open, and all you need is a $150 / €150 deposit to secure your bike of tomorrow right now. That’s not a figure of speech, because the wait for either is long: the Classic ships in April 2022, and the DC100 in July 2022.

 

Ducati Panigale V2 Bayliss 1st Championship 20th Anniversary Honors a Legend

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by Sebastian Toma from https://www.autoevolution.com

Ducati is celebrating 20 years since Troy Bayliss won his first World Superbike championship. A special edition of the Panigale V2 has been made, and it comes with several goodies on top of the regular model. It had to be painted red, and Bayliss’s race number is also on the special edition Panigale, which also features graphics inspired by the 2001 championship-winning bike.

The special edition of the Panigale V2 ditches the stock Showa and Sachs suspension system in favor of an Öhlins kit. The front is taken care of with the NX30 fork, while the rear is kept under control with the TTX36. Öhlins’ influence on this bike does not end here, as the Swedes also make the steering damper. Right next to that part, on the triple clamps, one can observe the production number of each bike.

For maximum weight reduction, the special-edition Ducati Panigale V2 1st Championship 20th Anniversary comes with a lithium-ion battery, as well as a single-seater configuration. The saddle is sewn with contrasting red stitching, and the craftspeople at Ducati also embroidered Bayliss’ race number, 21, along with the Italian flag.

Thanks to the lightweight components, the bike lost about three kilos (6,6 lbs.), adding up to 174.5 kilograms (385 lbs.) Seat height is 835 mm (32,9 inches), which may be tall for some, but being tall enough is just one of the things one must consider before buying a motorcycle in this segment.

Ducati fans will also remark a set of sport grips, a titanium and carbon fiber exhaust system, and Troy Bayliss’ autograph on the fuel tank. The latter also reminds us of each of the three years when Bayliss won the championship title.

The extras with the special edition of the Panigale V2 end here, but future owners will still have a great bike to ride. Ducati’s Panigale V2 comes with slide control, wheelie control, ABS, traction control, and various other systems to help keep the rider with both wheels on the road.

The red Italian super sport bike comes with a 995 cubic-centimeter V-twin engine called the Superquadro, with four valves per cylinder and the famous Desmodromic valves. The unit can provide 155 HP at 10.750 rpm and a maximum torque of 104 Nm (76.7 lb-ft) at 9.000 rpm. The famous Ducati V2 sound is standard.

For those of you who do not know who Troy Bayliss is, you should know that he is one of the most loved motorcycle racers of our time. He managed to get the World SuperBike Championship title three times in his career, in 2001, 2006, and 2008. To this day, Troy Bayliss is the first rider to have won a Moto GP and WSBK race in the same season.

Zero FXE launched: Review and Details

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by Andrew Cherney from https://www.cycleworld.com

The brand’s sleekest and most fun ebike yet. The lightweight, agile FXE is a new addition to Zero’s 2022 lineup.

  • In a segment full of either high-priced, tech-heavy options or cheap flimsy junk, the FXE is a step in the right direction, especially for commuters not too concerned with range. It’s also a ton of fun.
  • The design adds a minimal, supermoto style onto the existing FX platform for a more modern, updated feel.
  • Steel frame holds the tried-and-true ZF 75-5 air-cooled motor in the FXE, rated at 46 hp. The 7.2kWh battery is not removable.
  • Certain design elements like the front headlight design (an LED) and “beak” got carried over directly from the Huge Design concept bike.
  • The bike’s light weight and short wheelbase make it easy to work turns, with good lean angle and sticky Pirelli tires aiding in your attack. You can drag the kickstand if you’re super aggressive though.
  • The relaxed, commuter-friendly riding position is even more upright than the SR/F’s but it makes for a comfy perch (except at higher speeds).
  • You’ll find the Cypher II operating system on the FXE displayed on a new 5-inch TFT screen, giving various ride modes and bike data. Pair your phone with the app to tailor them and get more detailed info.
  • Stylish cast wheels hold grippy Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, which upped our confidence in deeper high-speed turns.
  • The rear Showa monoshock delivers nearly 8 inches of travel for an impressively stable ride.
  • Inverted Showa fork is adjustable. J.Juan brakes offer excellent feel and good stopping power, and ABS can be turned off.

2022 Zero FXE Specifications
MSRP: $11,795
Motor: ZF 75-5 air-cooled IPM motor
Battery: 7.2kWh (max capacity) lithium-ion integrated battery
Charger type: 650W integrated
Charge time: 9.7 hours to 100% w/ standard 110V or 220V input
Claimed Range: 60 miles highway, 100 miles city, 75 miles combined
Claimed Peak power: 46 hp @ 3,500 rpm
Claimed Peak torque: 78 lb.-ft.
Top speed: 85 mph
Transmission: Clutchless direct drive
Final Drive: Carbon belt
Frame: Steel trellis
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa fork, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 7.0 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa 40mm piston monoshock, spring preload, compression and rebound damping adjustable; 8.9 in. travel
Front Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 320mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Rear Brake: 1-piston J.Juan floating caliper, 240mm disc w/ Bosch Gen 9 ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast alloy; 17 x 3 in. / 17 x 3.5 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Pirelli Diablo Rosso II; 110/70-17 / 140/70-17
Rake/Trail: 24.4°/2.8 in.
Wheelbase: 56.0 in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Claimed Curb Weight: 299 lb.
Standard warranty: 2 years
Contact: zeromotorcycles.com

Conventional wisdom says there will be more EVs on the street within the next five to 10 years, and our urban roadscape will look a lot different than it does now. But conventional wisdom usually skips over the equally important notion that attracting riders means you have to innovate while also being sensitive to price, particularly in the electric space. Zero seems to be tackling those talking points, at least partially, with the reveal of the new 2022 FXE, a compact and affordable supermoto-styled commuter machine it’s billing as “the motorcycle of tomorrow, available today.”

Building the bike of tomorrow is a tall order, even for an electric motorcycle manufacturer, but when Zero took the wraps off its new machine last month near the firm’s HQ in Santa Cruz, California, our group of assorted moto scribes nodded. Here indeed was a very different looking electric bike—especially for the sometimes dowdy two-wheel electric space. And yet a mind-blowing revelation it was not, especially if you’re looking at the spec sheet alone. From a design standpoint, the slim, starkly modern supermoto-styled machine felt instantly appealing—even if it looked an awful lot like a deconstructed riff on the WR450, or more accurately, a close cousin of the brand’s already supermoto-y FXS model. But how would it hold up on the street?

n the FXE’s case, form did not have to follow function—or not as rigorously as previous models, which adopted more familiar shapes to make them appealing to the general public, according to Zero. But now, says VP of Product Development Brian Wismann, the consumer is ready for updated designs, which explains why the FXE, a model based on a concept collaboration with Huge Design back in 2019, is here. Although it’s built on the brand’s existing FX platform, the partnership with Huge introduced a completely new design language, informed mainly by stripped-down panels of bodywork. (The concept bike was in fact built on an FXS model, and you can see the similarities.) On the FXE, the so-called essential surfaces—seats, body panels, touch points—are intended to look like they’re floating over the chassis. The distinctive styling radiates modern industrial design aesthetics, while “celebrating the electric drivetrain” says Wismann.

When we sidled up to the FXE at a secret staging location outside of town—Zero shrewdly had us ride older SR/Fs and SR/Ss to where the new bikes were stashed—we were struck by just how approachable the profile was. A sane seat height welcomed even the shorties in the bunch, with the 32.9-inch perch making for easy access and a riding position similar to that of a dirt bike, not super aggressive but sitting atop the slightly dished, mostly flat seat, with a fairly short reach to the tallish bars. Mid-mounted pegs were ideally located, not too far forward or rearward, providing an upright stance in the saddle—even more than the SR/F I had just gotten off of. The compact body panels make for a clean look, though they did splay outward from below the faux fuel tank, pushing my knees out into the wind. They basically made it impossible to grip the tank as you normally might, but it was more minor inconvenience than any real annoyance.

With the ergonomics checking out, I put the FXE into Sport mode and let ‘er rip. Even though I sort of knew what to expect, the instant torque pop of an electric motor never fails to put a big grin on your face. Yes, 46 horses might not sound like much, but the eerily silent power pulse from the air-cooled ZF 75-5 motor is more than enough to turn your head, especially in its immediacy; the throttle felt far more responsive than the SR/F we had just ridden, possibly because the FXE’s substantially smaller mass and less unsprung weight made for quicker power transfer. With its narrow waist and short wheelbase, I found I could easily push the FXE into and through even the harshest decreasing-radius turns we tackled among the Santa Cruz redwoods. The bike did not fight me on quick transitions as much as expected, with the sticky Pirellis giving me all kinds of confidence throughout a half-day stint in mountain twisties. And with no need to worry about shifting, you’re free to focus on the next apex. Or to just blast to the 85-mph top speed, which I did whenever we hit a straight stretch of road. Why not, right?

Zero also outfitted the FXE with its now-familiar J.Juan brakes and bolstered by a Bosch ABS system, so stops were also a stress-free affair, with easy lever pull giving a strong bite and solid stopping power and almost no fade. (ABS can be turned off as well.) With 7 inches of travel, the inverted, adjustable Showa fork soaked up almost every road deformity we came across (except for one unexpected curb hop) staying composed even in truly harsh divots. Holding the line out back is an equally resilient—and adjustable—Showa monoshock that tracked solidly throughout our short ride.

As with the FX, the FXE also leverages Zero’s Cypher II operating system, which here is married to a new 5-inch optically bonded TFT display that proved bright and easy to read. You can access ride modes—it comes preprogrammed with Eco and Sport—and tailor torque, speed, and brake regeneration from the free Zero app, which also gives you insight to battery status. We can’t speak to range, given our short ride day—Zero claims 100 miles of city riding from the 7.2kWh (peak) battery, with 60 miles of range claimed on the highway, at 55 mph. The display screen showed less than 20 percent of charge remaining after our 50-mile stint, which was a mix of high- and low-speed scenarios, and that feels fairly close to the claim. According to Zero, the onboard 650W charger will top off the battery in 9.7 hours off a standard household socket; a rapid charger available for additional cost will do the job in a little more than 3 hours.

In sum, we’re not entirely buying the “bike of tomorrow” tagline, but the FXE does manage to serve up a grin-inducing blend of instant acceleration, flickability, and easy steering. Perhaps even more tantalizing is the sub-$10K price tag; yes, you’re getting a somewhat short range bike, but at least that obstacle is being somewhat addressed. Of course that sub-10K number rings true only once you tally in the federal and California EV tax credits, but hey, $10K is $10K.

Considering H-D’s lowest priced electric offering, the just-released LiveWire One, runs upward of $20K, and any bike called Lightning, Energica, Tarform, or Damon is well north of there, you’ve gotta hand it to Zero for compiling a portfolio of four models priced under $12K, all coming with a warranty and dealer support.

The dual sport FX sits at $11,595, the entry-level FXS is at $11,295, the naked S is priced at $10,995, and now the FXE at $11,795. All four either are or can be configured with the ZF 7.2 powertrain, which, granted, is not the fastest or most top-of-the-line offering, but it does help make the FXE one of the most affordable models in the Zero line.

You can check it out yourself at some of the upcoming stops of the IMS tour (starting with Sonoma Raceway on July 16) and bikes should be in dealers later this month as well.

Tucker Powersports Launches New Product Collection

By General Posts

Tucker Powersports Launches New Product Collection for Snowmobile Owners and Winter Sports Fans

New Collection Includes Broad Range of Products to Support Snowmobile and UTV Owners Through Local Dealers

https://www.tucker.com/

Fort Worth TX – July 12, 2021 – Tucker Powersports today announced the launch of the Tucker Snow product line, which offers apparel, accessories, vehicle parts, tools and snow sports equipment to Tucker dealers. This product collection marks Tucker’s return to the distribution of winter sports products and the parts and accessories needed to repair and maintain snowmobiles.

Over 1200 of Tucker’s current dealer customers sell snowmobiles, UTV’s and other winter powersports products. The new program from Tucker help dealers expand their offerings to include winter apparel, snow helmets, replacement parts, lubricants, trailering needs and thousands of suspension, engine and drivetrain components for both competition and casual winter sports. In addition, the product line includes snowshoes, toboggans, sleds and other items for non-powered winter fun.

A significant portion of the Tucker Snow catalog is dedicated to a large selection of parts and service items for hundreds of models of snowmobiles from Artic Cat, Polaris, Ski-Doo and Yamaha. The offering includes both OEM replacement parts and performance upgrades.

Notable brands that are included in the catalog and are new to Tucker are Motorfist, Woody’s, CA Pro Skis, Zox Snow Helmets, Sportstuff and Yukon Charlie’s. The other brands in the Tucker Snow collection are familiar to Tucker dealers, including 100%, Quantum, Motion Pro, NGK, Cruz Tools and Yuasa Battery.

The 2021 Tucker Snow catalog was shared digitally with Tucker dealers today.

About Tucker Powersports: https://www.tucker.com/
Featuring the most powerful portfolio of parts, accessories and apparel brands in the powersports industry, Tucker distributes top brands and offers its own brands, including Answer, Biker’s Choice, BikeMaster, Bully Locks, CoverMax, DragonFire Racing, FirstGear, ProTaper/ProTaper Sport, QuadBoss, Speed and Strength, and TwinPower.