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Toy Runs for Kids : Merry Christmas

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Rogue rides to the Toy Run in Brevard County, Florida

It is the time of year that Bikers from around the country hold Toy Runs to help out those in their community who need toys for their kids.

Things have been tough for a lot of people, but you can always count on the Bikers to help where they can.

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Chopper Chronicles : The Sundance Meeting

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K.Randall Ball kicks off the first chapter of Stolen Motorcycle Files – Exclusively on Bikernet.com

READ Episode One now !!!

The Sundance Meeting
by K.Randall Ball

Three brothers rode into Sundance, Wyoming on their way to Sturgis in late July, hell bent to make their 20th run to the Badlands.

The small town, population just over a grand, was a mere 52 flying miles from the Rally. They rode long and hard for almost 400 miles, and this could be the final watering hole stop before the last blast on interstate 90 into Sturgis, South Dakota.

Sundance located in the bare open plains of Wyoming was named after the Sun Dance ceremony practiced by several American Indian tribes.

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Motorcycle Cannonball Run finishes at South Padre Island

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by Gaige Davila from https://www.sbnewspaper.com

The 10th annual Motorcycle Cannonball Run ended on South Padre Island this past weekend, with nearly a hundred riders cruising their 100-year-old machines through the Queen Isabella Causeway to victory.

Starting in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan, on the Canadian border, 88 riders, some dressed in early 1900s garb, departed to Texas in a 17-day, 3,389-mile journey, all on motorcycles made in 1929 or earlier.

The group made two stops in the Rio Grande Valley before cruising to SPI: San Benito, at Mad Boar Harley-Davidson, and McAllen, at Desperado Harley-Davison, in their last 99-mile leg of the run.

When the riders got to South Padre Island, specifically to the South Padre Island Convention Centre, they were welcomed by their teams and motorcycle enthusiasts.

Dave Currier, #64, from Fargo, North Dakota, was the first to arrive, on his 1911 Harley-Davidson 7A. His first place finish is impressive: the Harley-Davidson 7A is a single-belt drive, four horsepower machine, closer to a bicycle than a motorcycle.

“I think this has been the toughest ride of my life,” Currier said on Motorcycle Cannonball’s live stream of the finish line. “We’ve been through torrential rains, all kinds of wind, difficulties, (but) the bike ran superb.”

Check Out the Details and Final Scores at https://motorcyclecannonball.com/

Cool Choppers by South Side MC member Patrick

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Chopper builder Patrick, a Member of South Side MC.

A follow-up to our article on Long Fork Run. Southside MC Est 88 Sweden member Patrick’s cool choppers are featured here.

Patrick: “When I built Suicide Machine, I was introduced to stainless which has become a material that I prefer to build my parts as much as possible. So on the white chopper I have made oil tank, flatfender, tripple Trees, barney legs, sissybar, controls, exhaust and lots of smaller details in stainless steel.”

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Long Fork Run at Sweden

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Second summer with Corona, Southside MC Est 88 Sweden had to be flexible once more with their gathering of long forks. Instead of a hotspot for the show, they made it mobile.

Saturday 21st of Aug, 100+ bikes, choppers and pre 84 were welcomed for the ride. However anyone was invited at the clubhouse noon to 3PM, for burgers and a beer.

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Wild Bikernet Weekly News for September 2, 2021

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Keep the faith, the bullshit and bullies are losing their grip. Let’s ride free forever!

–Bandit

The Bikernet Weekly News is sponsored in part by companies who also dig Freedom including: Cycle Source Magazine, the MRF, Las Vegas Bikefest, Iron Trader News, ChopperTown, BorntoRide.com and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum.

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Seventh Annual Riding for Warriors event supporting Veterans

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by Daniel Hamburg from https://www.abc27.com

Motorcycle riders raising money for wounded veterans make stop in Gettysburg. It’s the seventh annual Riding for Warriors event.

The group surpassed its initial goal, raising more than $73,000 to help veterans and their families.

SEE EVENT AT https://support.hopeforthewarriors.org/event/7th-annual-riding-for-warriors/e319457

The 20th anniversary of 9/11 is three weeks away.

To honor those who’ve served, a group of motorcycle riders are making their way from New York City to Washington, D.C. and back.

The first stop Saturday night was at Battlefield Harley Davidson in Gettysburg.

The first 200 miles of their trip is complete, all to benefit Hope for the Warriors, specifically the Warrior’s Wish program, funding requests from wounded veterans.

“It could be as simple as specialty workout gear, bicycle. It could be something like woodworking equipment,” Michael Nehlsen, organizer of Riding for Warriors said.

It’s Nehlsen’s seventh year helping fund those wishes.

“This year, unlike other years, I’ve actually invited some of my friends, colleagues and other veterans to ride with me,” Nehlsen said.

While planning this year’s first stop, he met Sandy Sipe, whose son Lance Corporal Jamie Sipe of Camp Hill died in 2017.

“He was a Marine Corps veteran of the Gulf War era who honorably served five years from 18 until he turned 23 years old,” Nehlsen said.

His family was recognized by the organization, including seven-year-old son Austin, who was gifted a motorized bike and money for a trust account.

“We will never forget this and moving forward we will pay it forward to others and I think it’s something great for our family to feel that someone else is honoring our, my son,” Sipe said.

Honoring those who served and pledging to help veterans in need, Nehlsen says it’s everyone’s duty to give back.

“We’ve made promises to our veterans that we have a nation haven’t kept and there are companies and charities like Hope for the Warriors that fulfill those promises,” Nehlsen said.

And whether they served before or after 9/11, “It’s all about remembering what everybody has given,” Nehlsen said.

The next stop for the riders is the Flight 93 memorial in Somerset County, then they’ll head to the Pentagon memorial and back to New York City for a ceremony at ground zero next week.

Bootleggers Run Brings Riders, TV Celebrities To Mills County

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by Joe Foreman from https://www.opinion-tribune.com

Motorcycles & Moonshiners: Motorcycle riders and fans of the popular “Moonshiners” television series were in hog heaven Saturday during the inaugural Bootleggers Run motorcycle rally that began and ended at Loess Hills Harley-Davidson near Pacific Junction.

The rally, a fundraiser for the Northeast Elementary School playground project, included appearances by Tim Smith and Josh Owens – cast members from the “Moonshiners” docudrama that’s been airing on the Discovery Channel since 2011. The show features a cast of characters, many who reside in wooded regions of the Appalachian Mountains, that make their own moonshine. Smith is also well known for his legally-produced Climax Moonshine that’s made from a century-old family recipe.

Saturday’s motorcycle rally attracted more than 200 riders and included scheduled stops at establishments in Shenandoah and Macedonia and Glenwood’s Keg Creek Brewing Co.

Smith and Owens, donned in their trademarked bib overalls, signed autographs and posed for photos at each stop along the rally route.

Visually Impaired Patriots Experiencing the Road to hold its fifth annual motorcycle ride

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VIPER ride founders John Carter (former Marine) and T J Oman (retired Navy Lieutenant Commander) at a previous event

by Erik S. Hanley from https://www.jsonline.com

A motorcycle ride supporting veterans with disabilities is rumbling through Oak Creek later this month

When T.J. Oman, a retired Navy lieutenant commander in Wisconsin, reached out to a fellow veteran in Minnesota about the fifth VIPER ride, he learned the man had been diagnosed with cancer and had months to live.

VIPER, or Visually Impaired Patriots Experiencing the Road, will hold its fifth annual motorcycle ride on Aug. 22 in Oak Creek at the Oelschlaeger-Dallmann American Legion Post 434, 9327 S. Shepard Ave. The Minnesota man has traveled to the Milwaukee area for every past VIPER event, but his sister was keeping this year’s announcement from him because of his diagnosis, Oman, one of the VIPER ride founders, said.

“I messed up her plans because when I didn’t see his application this year, I put together an email and sent it to a batch of people curious about their absence,” Oman said.

Now that he knows the ride is happening, despite his diagnosis, that veteran is coming to ride.

Motorcycle owners, known as “pilots,” are partnered with a veteran called a “tailgunner.” The duos stay together throughout the day’s events. Volunteers are known as the “groundcrew” and they work to give directions, welcome participants, set up food and drinks, clean up and more.

“We’re looking forward to it this year because we missed it last year,” said John Carter, a former Marine and co-founder of the VIPER ride. The 2020 ride was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Initially only for blind veterans, the ride recently became “the VIPER ride plus+” expanding to allow veterans with any physical disability that prevents them from operating a motorcycle. There is no cost to participants.

“We don’t charge anybody a dime, this is not a fundraiser,” Carter said.

2021 VIPER ride schedule of events
Early in the morning, breakfast will be offered, Carter said. The 50-mile, 90-minute ride through Milwaukee County will kick off around 11 a.m. with two-wheel motorcycles, trikes and motorcycles with sidecars. This will be the first year incorporating a lot of freeway driving with the entire return trip on the interstate, Oman said. After the ride, a big luncheon with live music will be held.

Overall, Carter estimated the event will last from about 8 a.m. to 3:30 or 4 p.m.

All motorcycles large enough to carry a passenger safely are allowed on the ride. Organizers validate every driver’s license for a motorcycle endorsement, get a copy of everyone’s insurance and perform a full safety inspection on every motorcycle.

“It takes a little bit of time but everything we do is all about the VIPER ride and participants,” Oman said. “The reason we do this is the social side of it, just to hang out and talk with these guys. Some of these guys are true heroes.”

The ride will be escorted by police on motorcycles. Oman said the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office has been a supporter “from the very beginning.” Additionally, officers from the Milwaukee Police Department and the Wisconsin State Patrol have ridden with the group.

“We couldn’t do it without them,” Carter said.

In the past, the ride lasted substantially longer, Oman said. The first two years the ride went out to Kettle Moraine and East Troy, totaling 111 miles round trip. The second year was a little shorter but still hit triple digits on the odometer. After two years, some veterans said it was a little long, Oman said.

Pilots and Tailgunners enjoying the open road

VIPER rides have nationwide participation
Oman, who served on a nuclear submarine during his tenure in the Navy, said this year was the smallest group of participants since they started with 30 tailgunners and between 50-55 motorcycle pilots. In the past, the event had about 50 tailgunners and as many as 120 motorcycles.

Oman attributed the smaller sign-up numbers to the cancellation of the ride in 2020.

“The out of sight, out of mind mentality affected us,” he said. Oman said many were likely still hesitant to come out and do anything in a group as well given the surging number of delta variant cases.

Registration for the ride itself ended in June, but Carter said everyone is welcome to attend the other festivities.

“We match up pilot and tailgunner and put time and effort into making sure we match the tailgunner and the pilot for size,” Carter said. “We try to get it all finalized in June so we know what we’re doing.”

In the event’s inaugural year, participants from across the country, encompassing 15 different states, attended the ride. Carter said one regular rider travels from Mesa, Arizona every year.

“He takes a train here, travels three to four days, rides that morning, then takes a bus back,” he said.

While many friendships were gained from the event, some early-year participants have been lost.

“I never really foresaw the impact and the long-term effect but a lot of these guys, the pilots and the tailgunners, have become lifelong friends,” Oman said. “They communicate year-round, they maintain contact, it has become a family and as a result of that we’ve lost a few.”

One veteran and big supporter of the event died a few months ago, Oman said. The group is “breaking the rules” and letting his wife and daughter ride with them this year in his honor.

“They’re part of the VIPER family,” Oman said.

The VIPER ride website has a memorial page for participants that have passed to “keep their memory alive as part of the ride,” Oman said.

“Unfortunately, the list keeps growing, but I guess part of living is dying,” he said.

Supporting veterans with disabilities

Oman said he’d been trying to convince Carter to do a motorcycle ride for the blind in the past. Carter, who became the president of the Blinded Veterans Association of Wisconsin, was looking to enhance recruitment for the organization. Out to lunch one day, the two came up with the VIPER ride.

“We mutually agreed it would be a good tool for recruitment,” Oman said, adding he’d been involved with motorcycle rides for the blind in the past.

Carter said one goal for the event was to get blind veterans back out into the fresh air “experiencing something they wouldn’t experience again.”

“Once you lose your sight you don’t want to participate in much, many don’t,” he said.

Carter wasn’t thrilled about the motorcycles, but Oman convinced him to get on a trike with a friend every year for the VIPER ride. For Oman, he doesn’t need convincing.

“I don’t need much of a reason to ride a motorcycle,” he laughed. He still invites Carter out for other rides but with no success.

“Motorcycles scare the liver out of me,” Carter said.

Charity motorcycle ride raises more than $95,000

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by Vincent Ball from https://www.brantfordexpositor.ca

Organizers of the charity motorcycle run for Lansdowne Children’s Centre are sending a virtual “wheelie” to their supporters.

“We raised $95,663 and we can’t thank people enough for all of their support,” said Angie Turnbull, director of philanthropy, at the Lansdowne Children’s Centre Foundation, the centre’s fundraising arm. “We had so many people, so many businesses step up this year to help out.

“It’s really quite heartwarming.”

Organizers of the virtual ride held during July had hoped to raise $70,000, up from the $33,000 generated by last year’s virtual ride. The last time the event was held in-person was in 2019 when $62,000 was raised.

This year’s event was boosted by the sale of raffle tickets to win a motorcycle provided by Harley-Davidson Cambridge, Turnbull said.

“We were really worried about how we were going to sell raffle tickets but when people heard about our concerns they responded,” shel said. “A lot of businesses called and offered us space to sell the tickets and that was a really big help.”

Turnbull said 42 riders participated in the virtual event. Past rides have attracted from 280 to 400 riders.

“We’re thrilled with the results but the big winners are the 3,000 children we support.”

Lansdowne provides a range of services to children with physical, communication or developmental challenges in Brantford and Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk counties. It receives government funding for programs such as occupational, speech and language therapy and physiotherapy.

Money raised by the foundation through events, such as the motorcycle ride, goes to support recreational programs such as cooking, gardening and camping. In addition to building the self-confidence of the children, the programs enable them to safely socialize with other children and provides some respite for parents.