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Healthcare Worker Darwin Longfellow Wins Dunlop’s Humble Heroes 2020 Harley-Davidson XL1200 Sportster Roadster

By General Posts

from https://motorcycles.einnews.com

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA, USA, December 17, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ — To thank healthcare workers and first responders for their heroic actions during the pandemic, Dunlop asked people to nominate their own Humble Hero for the chance to win a 2020 XL1200 Sportster Roadster. The uplifting stories reminded us of the power of the human spirit, of what selfless dedication and compassion really look like.

Choosing a winner among all the submissions was not easy, but the story of new Physician Assistant Darwin Longfellow stood out. She was nominated by several different people. She even worked with the city of Taos, New Mexico to make a cool video staring her and her horse encouraging folks in her community to mask-up when asked. She spends what little time off she has riding motorcycles.

“We started this campaign to honor all essential workers across America, including our many workers in Buffalo, NY who masked- up and came in to keep bikes rolling,” said Mike Buckley, Senior VP, Sales and Marketing, Dunlop Motorcycle Tires. “We quickly realized the impact the pandemic had on first responders, so we focused on giving something back to them to honor their efforts. We chose Darwin, but we wish we could choose all of them because they are all heroes. Her story just hit all of us the hardest.”

Here’s what a few of Longfellow’s admirers had to say about her.

“I couldn’t think of a better person to nominate for this than the one and only Darwin Longfellow,” said colleague Brooke Samples. “She is incredible for so many reasons but especially when she was truly put to the test of being a new graduate as a Physician Assistant in the time of Covid. She was the only clinician at her location working full time through the entire pandemic and continues to do so.

“When her colleagues were afraid of becoming sick and insisting on only doing phone visits, Darwin was standing in a hot blacktop parking lot in the middle of the summer, overheating in mask, gown, faceshield and gloves explaining CDC guidelines to her community members in easy to understand terms. She also did Covid testing clinics during summer monsoons and insane wind bursts in Taos.” —Brooke Samples

“When I first met Darwin Longfellow, it was all about motorcycles. We shared a love of the open road, and the wonders of the desert on two wheels. I learned that Darwin had recently graduated from a Physicians Assistant program and was working in a health clinic in rural Northern New Mexico. I was immediately impressed by her passionate dedication to her work, and we became fast friends.

“In addition to daily COVID-19 test screenings, Darwin provides safety net care for patients with needs regarding pregnancy, Diabetes, Hepatitis C, and drug addiction. The clinic operates in one of the most impoverished areas of the United States, and provides care regardless of ability of a patient to pay, which protects the uninsured, underinsured, and undocumented.

“Darwin loves the open road, and once told me that, “Being motorcycle people, we love to move on.” When the work is done and Darwin can resume her pre-pandemic routine, I can’t think of a better way for her to “move on” than to hit the roads of Northern New Mexico on a new Harley-Davidson.” — Scott Toepfer

“As a fellow healthcare provider, I have been humbled by Darwin’s selfless service to her patients. She has met her community where they are, and cared for them with limited resources and support, working diligently to practice preventive medicine and protect her community both within and outside of the clinic. In a group that prides itself on service to others, she, without a doubt, stands among the highest tier.” — Kelley Rutter

“During the start of Covid, she was the first-person doing testing in our community open to any and all who wanted to be tested. She put herself in danger to help people. Darwin has put her life aside in order to assure others are being taken care of during these hard times. I wish I could just insert her in this essay so y’all could meet her in person. Knowing her is loving her. She is such a bas ass young woman with so much to give in this world.”—Ashley Rolshoven

About Dunlop Motorcycle Tires
Dunlop is the largest supplier of original equipment and replacement motorcycle tires in the U.S.A. For more information, visit: www.DunlopMotorcycleTires.com

Hot New BMW Roadster Motorcycles Coming

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

There are presently four roadster motorcycles in BMW Motorrad’s lineup for the U.S. market: the R 1250 R, the S 1000 R, the F 900 R, and the G 310 R. As of later this week, that number will grow, as the Bavarians are getting ready to present two new models in the range.

The announcement was made with just a couple of days left before the unveiling is set to take place. The Germans will be showing the two new bikes on their Youtube and Facebook channels on Thursday, November 19, starting at 4.00 pm CEST.

We are also promised “exciting guests,” but more importantly the launch of the configurator for the two new models as soon as the presentation concludes. Naturally, we’ll be covering the story as soon as the info and photos for the bikes are released, so check back here for more later in the week.

Despite all the things going on in the world, BMW has been very active in 2020 on the motorcycle front, a sign that in the coming years it will focus more on this industry.

The biggest reveal of the year for the Germans was the R 18, the first entry in the cruiser segment since the R1200 RC (and a direct jab at Harley-Davidson), but also a bike powered by the “most powerful 2-cylinder boxer engine ever used in motorcycle series production.”

More recently, we’ve been given a preview at the bike maker’s plans for the electrified scooter segment, with the presentation of the near-production version of the Concept Link. Called Definition CE 04, the electric two-wheeler is supposed to revolutionize the segment through a series of technological advancements, including the use of the largest display in the scooter world, a 10.25-inch unit.

Given how extreme these two premieres of 2020 have been, we expect BMW to up the stakes in the roadster segment as well as soon as the new models are unveiled.

BMW Electric Bike Based on the DC Roadster Could Be in the Cards for Production

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by Daniel Patrascu from https://www.autoevolution.com

It’s a time of complete transformation over at BMW Motorrad. The Bavarian bike maker, a steady and powerful presence in markets around the world, just expanded its lineup with the introduction of its brand new cruiser, the R 18 Big Boxer that should give Harley a bit of a hard time. And electrifications efforts are being made as well, as the motorcycle industry is beginning to slowly shift to this type of propulsion.

Back in the summer of 2019, during the #NEXTGen event in Munich, BMW unwrapped the crazy-looking Vision DC Roadster. The two-wheeler was shown as a preview of a possible future when BMW would drop the use of the nearly century-old boxer engine in favor of a battery and electric motor, all wrapped in the (almost) classic body of BMW bikes.

At the time, BMW did not say anything about the future of the DC Roadster, but recent filings with the German Patent and Trademark Office uncovered by Electrek could suggest a production version is being considered. This assumption is based on the fact that in the list of desired trademarks, nine of them include DC as relating to motorcycles.

Securing the trademark for certain ideas is not something unheard of in the industry, and it doesn’t necessarily mean something is going to get made. In this case, however, chances are the Germans are indeed working on an electric bike.

Unlike electric cars, electric motorcycles are still taking their first shy steps. Lost in a flood of failing startups that promised to revolutionize the industry, Harley-Davidson is the only major bike maker to have released a bike powered by electricity.

And even if the LiveWire is not exactly the sales hit Milwaukee was hoping for, its capabilities are undoubtedly incredible. And we will all get to experience them that on September 18, when Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman’s Long Way Up hits Apple TV+.

So yes, maybe it’s not the right time for electric bikes to be made, but soon enough it will be. And it doesn’t hurt to be prepared.

The BMW trademark filings do not reveal too much about the electric bike. In concept form, it used a vertically mounted battery, complete with cooling ribs and integrated ventilator, and a motor underneath the battery. A tubular structure that includes the seat is in the place usually occupied by the fuel tank.

No actual performance figures for the electric powertrain were released at the time of the concept’s presentation.

BMW F900 R review: Nothing like a naked roadster on a freezing day

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by Geoff Hill from https://www.mirror.co.uk

Starring in his own remake of Freezy Rider, our man Hill tackles the elements to see if the Beemer has what it takes in the tough middleweight sector and finds it’s close, but not quite a cigar

It was freezing, raining and blowing a gale – and I was on a bike with zero miles and new tyres.

Perfect conditions, then, for pushing the limits of the Bavarian firm’s naked roadster whose mission, should it choose to accept it, was to give a good spanking to Triumph’s new Tiger 900 and the established and very popular Yamaha MT-09.

“Mmmm. I’d start in Rain mode if I was you,” said Ian at the dealership, slapping me cheerily on the back and going back to his nice warm office, the swine.

Oh well, I was obviously being punished after getting home from back to back launches in southern Spain and Morocco, and at least first impressions of the Beemer were good – compact but comfortable riding position, tilting you forward in a mildly sporty fashion on to the bars to give you a view of decent mirrors and a fairly simple but informative TFT screen.

A quick toggle of the Mode button through Road, Dynamic and Dynamic Pro into Rain, another toggle of the Electronic Suspension Adjustment to solo rider with luggage to take account of the fact that I’m heavier than the average ride, three presses of the heated grips button to get them up to the maximum setting – and I was off.

The fuelling at low revs was slightly snatchy and acceleration in Rain mode was a stately affair, and was never going to set my pants on fire, particularly since they were now soggy anyway.

Why BMW designs very expensive suits with the waterproof lining on the inside is a mystery to me. I wore one for a round-the-world trip and, in heavy rain, everything in the outside pockets got soaked.

Anyway, where was I? Ah yes, on the F900 R in the rain.

Good points so far – the quickshifter on the SE model I was riding was perfect, snicking seamlessly through the six-speed box both up and down, and handling was light and neutral, although I was still taking it relatively gently on those shiny new tyres, even though with traction control, I was unlikely to come a serious cropper.

With Brembos and big twin discs up front, stopping was linear and progressive, with cornering ABS on the SE model to give me a nice warm feeling of safety.

Oh, wait, that nice warm feeling wasn’t the ABS – it was the heated grips, which were so good that even in the sub-zero temperatures, my pinkies were in danger of bursting into flames and I had to wind them back to the 2 setting.

Right, that was it – I was bored with Rain mode, and the roads were drying out a bit anyway, so it was toggle time again, to Road mode, and while I was at, changing the suspension mode from Road to Dynamic.

That was more like it – progress became satisfyingly swift, accompanied by a meaty rasp from the exhaust and, with the bike hunkered down and firmed up, it flung itself into corners with a nice combination of enthusiasm and precision.

Things got even better in Dynamic mode and I think once the tyres were scrubbed in, I’d leave it in that all the time and use Road if it was raining.

On the base model, you only get Rain and Road riding modes, sadly, and no Electronic Suspension Adjustment.

The verdict? The Yamaha MT-09 is more powerful and aggressive, but the BMW makes peak power and torque at lower revs. It’s also cheaper and has more tech, including the electronically adjustable suspension, which makes it more user-friendly and a slightly plusher ride, and with BMW luggage attached, more suitable for touring.

More than 100 photos from GNRS

By General Posts

from Rodder’s Journal

Over the weekend, the Pomona Fairplex was hot rod heaven. From the buildings to the midways, everywhere you looked were cars, cars and more cars. There were big dollar show rods and homebuilt creations, record-setting drag cars and one-off customs. Topless, pre-1937 machines without roll-up windows competed for the coveted America’s Most Beautiful Roadster title, while a host of traditional rods overran the Suede Palace. This year’s show didn’t hold back—and we were right there in the middle of it all.

Throughout the weekend, we walked more than 12 miles in our effort to capture the sights and sounds of the 71st Grand National Roadster Show. We heard flatheads gargle, big blocks rumble, and hot rodders young and old obsess over details. Chrome glistened, Metalflake glimmered and spectators from far and wide floated around the Fairplex in an automotive-induced euphoria. We caught up with old friends, met new ones and shot photos—a whole lot of photos. Hundreds of them, to be exact.

Since we don’t have to worry about cramming too many photos into a small space, we decided to run an expanded gallery of GNRS coverage on our website. There you’ll find images of our favorite rods, customs and competition machines that we came across during our Southern California trip.

Before you jump into the pictorial, we would like to say a quick word about our next issue. TRJ #83 will be heading your way shortly, and now is the perfect time to give you a glimpse at the covers. On one, we have Lucky Burton’s Model A that he built for Bonneville. It’s been chopped, channeled and streamlined in every way possible, yet it’s as traditional as they come with flathead power.

The other cover features a vintage photo of Steve Scott’s “The Uncertain-T.” We dig into its strange saga, share rare and unseen snapshots of the original, and showcase the tribute built by Martin Bennett of New Zealand (which was on display at this year’s GNRS).

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who followed along for our Instagram and Facebook coverage over the weekend. For those who missed it, you can check it out here and here.

That’s all for now. We’re already counting down the days until next year’s Roadster Show.

CLICK HERE FOR 100+ MORE GNRS PHOTOS

Cheers!
Your Friends at The Rodder’s Journal

BMW E-Power Roadster Electric Bike Shows Its Face

By General Posts

by Sabrina Giacomini from https://www.rideapart.com/

BMW is one of the mainstream manufacturers that’s most involved in the electrification of transportation. It didn’t come as a big surprise when the manufacturer showed the Vision DC Roadster back in June. In fact, we were surprised it hadn’t come earlier. BMW has since been pretty quiet about what could become its first electric motorcycle. Until now.

number of European media headed to France to check out the E-Power Roadster which we guess is BMW’s working name for its electric motorcycle prototype. The bike the European journalists got to test is actually an assembly of bits and pieces of existing BMW models, including the front end of an S 1000 R and the back-end of the R 1200 RS. Obviously, at this stage of development, the priority is to put the electric powertrain through its paces rather than gives the model a finished look.

Though even just a Frankenbike, the E-Power showcases a number of really interesting features. First, contrarily to most electric motorcycles that use a belt or a chain final drive, this one sends power to the back wheel via a shaft.

While the bike itself is an amalgam of BMW bikes, the electric powertrain combines bits borrowed from hybrid cars. The 13 kW battery at the core of the bike was grafted from a hybrid 2 Series while the electric motor comes from a long-wheelbase 7 Series (a Chinese exclusivity). This allows the E-Power to produce a respectable 136 horsepower and an exciting 147 lb-ft of torque (that’s 7 lb-ft more than the Zero SR/F and trust me, that’s a lot of pull).

According to Motorcycle News, the E-Power is able to go from 0 to 60 in a minuscule 2.9 seconds, barely 0.2 seconds more than the S 1000 RR. And that’s despite the bike weighing a massive 639 lb.

The prototype is fast charger-compatible and can recharge three miles of range a minute which means that within 30 minutes, it could regain 90-percent of its total range.

According to the Head of BMW Motorrad Christoph Lischka, the company will further the development of the motorcycle and send it to production only if the team can figure out how to increase the range to reach between 125 to 185 miles. So an electric BMW bike isn’t a sure thing just yet. The bets are open.

Vintage Electric introduces powerful New Roadster Throttle Bike for Fall 2019

By General Posts

Classic Roadster Aesthetic Blends Innovative Design with Comfortable Ride Position, and Best-in-Class EV Technology

SANTA CLARA, CA – Vintage Electric crafts powerful electric bikes that artfully blend the vintage-inspired design of classic board track racers with the best in EV technology. Vintage Electric is proud to present the all-new 2020 Roadster model for riders looking for a high-performance EV ride paired with a unique cafe racer aesthetic. Designed in the grand tradition of open-air sportscars, the brand new Vintage Electric Roadster presents riders with an impressively fast 36-mph throttle bike that offers top-shelf performance with styling sure to turn heads.

“The new Vintage Electric Roadster is our take on applying the thrill of a canyon-carving convertible sports car to our respective EV bike segment,” says Vintage Electric Founder/Lead Designer Andrew Davidge. “We set out to combine best-in-industry performance with a grand aesthetic inspired by the simple, yet powerful, European and American sports cars from the 1950s and 1960s eras.”

Optimized for performance and comfort, the new Vintage Electric Roadster design starts with a hydroformed aluminum frame for the optimal blend of lightweight strength. Front suspension is standard: an MRP inverted-fork system supplies 60mm of front wheel travel to absorb road irregularities. The Roadster’s attached polished alloy seat-post features a saddle constructed with sable leather that matches the leather-wrapped handlebars to give riders a classic automotive feel. To compliment the high-quality leather accents throughout, the Roadster also features a classic two-tone color wave where black and silver further accent the aerodynamic design. Also, the Roadster’s LED headlamp not only lights the road, it captures an elegant moto spirit of yesteryear and transports it to today.

The new Vintage Electric Roadster bike is outfitted with the best in modern EV technology. The electronic interface on the handlebar is clear and intuitive; on-demand acceleration comes directly to the rider. Alternately, the thumb-throttle provides easy, convenient access to five incredibly smooth power modes. Speed ranges from a nice steady ramp to a powerful launch for riders. Another helpful feature on the Vintage Electric bike is the rear regenerative disc brake, which provides incredible stopping power while recharging battery power.

At the center of the Vintage Electric Roadster design is a powerful 1,123-watt battery in a stunning cast-aluminum housing that charges in a very fast 4½ hours. After a full charge, the Vintage Electric Roadster has up to a 75-mile range. In another nod to classic open-air sportscars, the Roadster is capable of speeds up to 36 mph in the optional private-property/closed-course “race” mode.

For more information on the $6,995 Roadster or other Vintage Electric models, please visit vintageelectricbikes.com or call (408) 969-0836.